12 Episode results for "Johnson Publishing Company"

Linda Johnson Rice, CEO of Johnson Publishing Company: "A lot of times, there is somebody that you need to listen to that might have a better idea.

Skimm'd from The Couch

34:57 min | 7 months ago

Linda Johnson Rice, CEO of Johnson Publishing Company: "A lot of times, there is somebody that you need to listen to that might have a better idea.

"This episode is brought to you by goldman sachs. They have a series of programs and initiatives that provide women with economic empowerment and leadership. Opportunities will explain more in a bit but first let's get into the episode. I don't care how smart you are. You're not perfect. You're not perfect and a lot of times. There is somebody that you need to listen to. That might have a better idea. I'm carl sagan. I'm danielle weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it. All out than where. It began on a couch today. Linda johnson rice joins me skimmed from the couch. She is the ceo of johnson publishing company which published ebony and jet magazines johnson publishing helps give a voice to millions and chronicle the african american experience across the country. Linda has also served on numerous corporate and philanthropic boards including the chicago public library. Omni kong group. Grubhub tesla estonians national museum of african american history and culture. Linda thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. Thank you for having me carly. I'm excited to be here and sounds to have you here so i think you know the first question. We start with the same one every show. Skim your resume for us. I most certainly. I'm happy to do that. I am still the ceo of johnson publishing company. So that is great and it. Is that the founding company for ebony jet magazines and fashion fair cosmetics all started by my family and for better or for worse i have never worked anyplace else and so i grew up in the business. Grew up in the in the magazine business in the publishing business and also in the beauty business but always surrounded by incredible people great parents but great staff who were very uplifting and all about aspiration and inspiration for the african american community. So i grew up in the business. I went to Born and raised in chicago got my degree in journalism from. Usc came back and got my masters in management from northwestern. And i got my masters in management. So funny i started out full time in school and then i switched and i went part time so it took me longer but i really wanted to work at the same time and i had the luxury to be able to do that. A lot of people don't have that. But i did because i wasn't looking for a job once i got my degree. I already knew where. I was going to be an actually once. I i got my masters in management. I actually became president a company like the very next day. But i do want to stress. One thing that i think is really important here and that is i have worked in a family business but it was not a given that i was just going to step into this role and if you know if you knew anything about my parents it was nothing was given. You've really had to earn it. And so it does seem like boy. That was a really fast. Reject re but This was decades and decades of work. I mean i spent more time at a copy machine making copies and doing all kinds of stuff that you know people do when you start out in in a company. I don't think that was any different for me. Something that people would be surprised to know about you that if not on your professional bio oh my goodness. Let's see on a personal side. I i love to ride. I have horses. I've owned horses all my life so that is sort of my luxury right now. I don't have one. But it's the way i can relax and i studied opera. We do you think. Please don't ask me to sing. But i did. I studied opera for for many years. Took voice lessons and loved. It absolutely loved it. We're gonna dive into the family business. Tell me about your family. Tell me about your parents so you know my parents. John and eunice. Johnson were part of the great migration of african americans from the south to the north. So my father came from arkansas. My mother came from alabama and very different backgrounds. This is so it's really interesting. My my father came from nothing. And when i say nothing his town great people but only six hundred and sixty eight people there. His mother believed in him so much and she just you know the love that she had for him she poured into just him and so for her. The best thing for him was to get out of arkansas arkansas and get education and the way to do that was you know they. They got on the train and they came to chicago. they had relatives in chicago. So a lot of people. With the migration from arkansas people came to chicago alabama. They came to chicago. My mother came from alabama so my father dirt poor came to chicago. Went to high. School became head of the debating team editor. The school paper graduated attended the university of chicago and my mother on the other hand came from a background. Where you have to think about this. Her father was a surgeon. Her mother was a schoolteacher in psalm alabama so obviously black african american back then prominent family. Her two brothers were surgeons. Her sister was a phd professor in english and my mother came to chicago to get her master's in social services at loyola. So now you've got these two converging people now completely different backgrounds you know and and they met ed dance. My parents met at a dance and my father. I remember him saying you know. Ask your mother. You know at the dance. Could i take her whole and my mother said absolutely not absolutely not it. She said. I'm going home with the person that brought me. And so for my father. Being the maverick entrepreneurs salesman was game on. That was he was ready to go so anyway so they met and they got married and what i would say about. My parents is that they both had a discipline and a drive and a determination to show the world the beauty and the success in the inspiration of the african american community and they started that at a very young age. I mean you know. My father started working life insurance company and then he had an idea for a magazine and he loved journalism and he really patterned ebony off of life magazine which is now defunct. But that's really where it started in my. My mother was stuffing subscription subscription envelopes in the basement. And that's how they started the business. This is nineteen forty two. I love that so much. I'm so curious how to sort of the spirit of entrepreneurship show up in your childhood. How did it's show up at home. You know what i think. It was everything that my parents did everything. They encapsulated whether it was. You know starting ebony or for my mother you know. Starting fashion fair cosmetics. She started and then having what was called the ebony fashion fair fashion show. That's what she started in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight which was a traveling fashion show and it went to a different city every night for charity and raised over. Fifty five million dollars. For african american charities could see them all the time coming up with ideas but all of its centered around the african american community and the betterment for the african american community. So that's what i grew up in. Cheer fos erade that you were taking notes in business meetings with your parents at age seven. I don't know about that. But what i will say. What i will say is is started going to the office. Probably when i was about six or seven so i would be running around. And i'm sure annoying. The heck out of everybody there. 'cause i was popping in the editor's offices and then going into what was at the time the art department which now we call graphic design. I was always present. And interestingly enough as i grew older neither one of my parents ever said to me. We want you to come and work in the family business. They never said that. But i went there every day as as a kid and it was fun and then it became fascinating and then you started to realize the media. Business is a very enticing business. And you're meeting people that you know you would never be able to meet under normal circumstances. Come on i'm young. I'm meeting the jackson five. I mean really really. This is michael jackson sitting next to me. It seems trivial. But it really isn't in my lifetime been able to go to nelson mandela's home and sit next to him in his library and have him talk to me about his book a long walk to freedom so these are things that you know. That helped shape me. You started off today talking about how you were able to get a business school degree while also learning the business. Where do you think you learned the most school or in the office observing while that's a tough question but it's a bit of a trade off because i would say i learned the most really working with my father because i think when you are sort of learning at the foot of the master it's a priceless experience and it's a knowledge that really goes beyond a degree. But what i would say about north western which i loved is northwestern was great because it gave me structure and it gave you a sense of how to think critically and that sort of critical and strategic thinking i think was very important. That was very important in helping me make make decisions in shape decisions and it was interesting because sometimes you know you'd have ideas that were a little bit different than what john johnson thought. But you know my father. And i always agree to disagree on things. Sometimes i've won most the time you won. But that's that's cool. That was cool. But i learned a lot northwestern but you really learn from really working. We've talked about this a lot in the show and we get asked us a lot like. Should i go to business school so when somebody comes to you today infest says. Should i go get my mba. What is your advice. i would have to ask them. What do you really want to do because it depends on what road you're going down. You may be an area that you don't need a business degree because it's a little bit different now. I mean when people are coming out of school now they don't necessarily want to be you know lawyers or work for consulting companies and doing things that are so vastly different. And if you want to work for a nonprofit you don't necessarily have have a business degree for that. So i think it really depends on what the person really wants to do. Is it great to get a business. Great course of course it is because that is just one more notch in your belt and actually one of the reasons that i did. It was was because it validated me. It validated me outside of my company. It validated me outside of somebody looking at me and saying oh well of course you worked there. Of course you're going to be president. You're john and eunice johnson's daughter. Of course no. That wasn't the case. That was not the case. I had to earn that. But i think it's a hard question to answer because i think it depends on what the person wants to do. I really do making this podcast. We get to speak with inspiring women. Not just about what they've accomplished in their careers but also they do to support other women as female founders. We also think a lot about a stat. Adding more women to the workforce would help global. Gdp job twenty six percent. That is huge and it won't happen. In a vacuum the goldman sachs ten thousand women program has provided business and management education mentoring and networking opportunities and access to capital two thousands of women for more than one hundred countries. Now they're creating a free online course to reach. Even more women and in two thousand eighteen goldman sachs started launch with gs a five hundred million dollar investment grounded in the belief that diverse teams. Dr stronger returns. Goldman sachs believes everything. Changes women lead because in today's world gender equality is an economic imperative had to their website to learn more that's g. s. dot com slash w. h. e. n. w. m. e. n. l. a. d. We talk a lot on the show about imposter syndrome. And i'm trying to imagine being you and having the opportunity to enter and grow into such an incredible business. That is also a family business imposter syndrome for you. Look very different than suffer. Somebody coming in who had no ties to to the family and they might experience it in a very different way. But you just used the term kinda validation. Did you experience any of that. The non family members in the organization. For sure i mean i have to be very honest here. I mean i think people really honest with themselves. I think they're very few people that have an experienced imposter syndrome. And sometimes you get into a meeting or you get into a situation you think. Jeez my over my head here but this is where you have to really pull from your gut and believe in yourself and what you're doing but of course we all experience imposter syndrome. Let me tell you. I remember the first corporate board i served on and i was probably twenty five years younger than every single person in the room and every single person in the room was a white man. And if that doesn't give you imposter syndrome for at least the moment. I don't know what what does but i managed to get over that because i started to understand the business and learn the business and was able to contribute. And those moments whether it was in the boardroom. Or even just you know in the office literally in that moment. What do you do. You know something has to click in your mind that says okay. I got this i got. You just have to keep the Got this in. You have to move forward. The worst thing is to sit there and second-guessed yourself. Oh my god you lose your mind. Everyone will see you losing your mind. And that's not good. That's not where you want to be so you really have to almost gathered quickly and just say all right. I got this. I'm just gonna go forward here. I'm gonna go forward here in sometimes. That's risky sometimes. It can mean that you you may not be saying the right thing all the time when you took over. Ceo you obviously are taking over legacy business at that point hadn't you think about reinventing the business or to put it a different way. How did you think about taking your family's legacy and making it you're on. It was not easy because the family legacy is so looms so large. It doesn't a lot of family businesses. But i also think you have to really look around and see where is this business headed and for us and for johnson publishing. It was very very difficult. Carly it was tough because we in the media business we were in the magazine business that the medium is the magazine business which was having a seismic shift and it was a shift that was not in a positive way. What was the first big decision you had to make. Well one of them was was in. This goes so far. Back of people won't even probably be able to relate to it but maybe we used to have a department for subscriptions for the magazine and we had people sitting at terminals inputting subscriptions how after a while inefficient zap become unbelievably inefficient. So you got to outsource that but at that stage those were forty people watched me grow up in the business. They'd seen me. Since i people were long term employees so they had been there some thirty odd years or more and you know. They watched me when i was eight nine ten years old and now i'm their boss now. Nco and i have to tell them that their businesses are gone. Those skill sets are gone and that was extremely difficult. And i remember discussing with my father saying saying we have to outsource this and he finally. He agreed with me but he said to me. I'll never forget this. He said linda. I can't do this. These people helped me build my business. I can't do the so you have to do this. And i did. And i remember that i remember calling everybody together and telling them you know on a certain date. We're exiting this piece of the business and we're going to have to outsource and we were very obviously very supportive. Did i think all of the right things that you should do in this circumstance and make sure that people have a soft landing as possible especially since this family business. So i remember that to this to this very day in how very difficult that was and how. I had to really pull myself together to do that. But you know you make those tough decisions. But i've made many tough decisions like that. I mean my father built the office building that we that we have on michigan avenue. And i sold it. I had to sell it. And i realized that was the building of john johnson built. But it became an albatross around us. I mean as the business started to downsize. Keep building the business. Come on you know so. These are tough decisions as a manager. What did you want to emulate from your dad. And what did you want to change. Well The first thing i wanted to change was the short temper. Because that's not me. That's not me. But what i did want to emulate was hidden uncanny ability to be able to get people to really push themselves to do a great job and to end to think outside the box and say you can do this. You can do this and that. I did take away from him because that i really did admire and respect but the short fuse. No that's not me. But that's just a personality trait. That's a personality thing but also you know. I think he really got people to have a great passion for what they do and to be proud so proud i mean to this day. I run into people who worked at johnson publishing thirty and forty years ago. And there's they still have that there's a sense of pride there and so enter on also realized that what they were doing was making a lasting imprint and impression on the african american community and never forget that johnson publishing company has been one of the most important chroniclers experience in america. How did you think about in defining the wider impact. The company could in. What have i think a lot of it came from the staff and the people that we work with. Because the editors you know their tentacles reach farther and wider than mine. Do and i think they would come back. And they would bring great ideas great stories and stories that i think had significant impact not just on our community but also on america because you know the stories that we told were not just african. American stories were american stories. They were american stories. Air stories about success. Stories about chief moment and so bringing that news to the forefront in a very accurate and here's the key word authentic way authentic way was key for us as the world changed under your tenure. How did you think about how the impact in the mission would grow and how you could grow it you know. I think the impact in the mission grew through the stories that we told and the way we told them and in the honest representation. And also you've got to reflect what's going on in the world solve the subjects that you write about obviously have to have some some resonance and some richness and be contemporaneous and so you know that's what we tried to do. That is what we tried to do. But you know it was. It was tough. You know everyone trying to figure out what does the digital space look like when it came to news when it came to reporting when it came to magazines and so that part i think was was a tough tough slip for us as a leader. How do you first for yourself than second for your team in deputies embrace changes and obviously the sort of extreme example. You can talk about as going from print to digital right. How do you. I wrap your head around it and then how do you bring people along. Well first of all. I have to try to understand what is out there. I mean if i think as as as a leader if you don't understand it i don't know how you could ever explain it to your team and then there sometimes honestly when your team needs to be explaining it to you when they need to be coming to you and they nine times out of ten they usually will when they come to you with with things that need to be changed and i felt that a lot within the company and i embrace that i embrace that but i think the key also is you got to have i think open lines of communication and i think you have to be honest with people. You have to be honest. I mean as this business was was changing and and the magazine was suffering. I had to be honest. And here's the thing. This is no surprise. The people that are working there they feel this. They feel probably before you do. So i think you've got gotta be open and honest and have these great lines of communication with people. I admit that. I have made mistakes before where i thought i can fix this. I can do this. I don't need to talk about this and that was a mistake. That was a mistake. Ebony jet magazines were acquired by clearview group in twenty sixteen. You step down for the board ebony media last year. Walk us through that decision that processor. You ama- sentimental person. So i'm like. I save everything from my parents my grandparents. I can't imagine being one being in business with my parents is all that can be its podcast but to being tasked with preserving that and making really really tough business calls that are probably the right calls but doesn't make it any less emotional. Yeah you know in two thousand sixteen. I made a very gut wrenching decision to sell ebony and jet and let me tell you. This is what our foundation of our company was. Bill talk so this is all. I've i've known but i realized that it was such a drain on our other piece of business which was fashion fair. Cosmetics that That it was a drain on the company and there was no way to get around this. Let me tell you. I was in probably a dark place for quite a long time. Because try it's an agonizing thing and here's the here's the other issue that does happen in family businesses. I think is that you you hang on and hang on and hang on because you just you think you can make it. You think you could make an really all the signs of telling you that the business is not there. The businesses no longer what it was. And so i made the decision to to sell it but at the same time now i am preserving the legacy of johnson publishing so i am the legacy of johnson publishing. And that's just a fact. Because i'm john and eunice johnson's daughter but aside from that. I'm working on two documentaries. That have to do not can give a high level that have to do with with the company and they couldn't be more appropriate for the time that we're in right now so that is my way of preserving this legacy but let me tell you. This was a difficult painful gut wrenching decision that i hope to never have to go through that again. Who do not honor. Who did you lied on as mentors to get you through that one of the people in the company who had been with the business fifty five years she started out. As my father's secretary became our general counsel and she became really an incredible sounding board because she knew so much about the company she knew so much about my parents and she and she knew me. And so i think she was terrific to really. Lean on not only professionally. But personally. because you can't go through this stuff alone you really can't. And i also had i think very smart sharp friends who were personal friends and then i had business friends. Business friends and advisors. How do you separate a business friend and a personal friend. So business friend wouldn't necessarily hang out at my house you know. We wouldn't necessarily be going to an art museum together the theater. You wouldn't spend your personal time with them but you trust their business advice and in certain settings i definitely have had some really really sharp and smart business people who've given me advice but in the end i had to make the final decision. I had to make the final decision and you know so many people had said well. Everybody's got an idea as to how you can fix things in there like you know what the businesses at a point where you really do have to make some really tough decisions and you know. I'm sure they would have made them a lot faster. But it's easy to make them a lot faster when you're not at its way. He's here in terms of executive decision making in general. Are you someone that talks out loud. Are you someone that like once you know going back. The decision has been made. No i talk it out. I like to bounce ideas off of people now more than ever. I try to look around the corners and see what you know. What else could be coming. That is either positive or negative. But i like. I like to talk things out and i like to bounce ideas off of people that works better for me in a leadership position. I think this is something that danielle and i struggled with which is had had a carve out in work the safe space for yourself the leader to be able to talk out loud because inevitably given your position people pay attention to what you say. And that's great and also scary because it also makes you scared to sometimes just think about things out loud. What's your advice for leaders spiring leaders listening of how to carve out that safe space to think out loud be willing first of all to be a little bit vulnerable. You have to be willing to be a little bit vulnerable and have ideas that maybe everybody isn't gonna agree with but at the same time. I think you have to have enough confidence in who. You are not overly confident. That's the zippers train. Overly confident and cocky and being and being confident. We're not being arrogant. But i think you gotta be a little. You got to be willing to be a little bit vulnerable a little bit vulnerable that safe space. You have to allow yourself that. None of us are perfect. None of us are. I don't care who we think we are. I don't care how smart you are. You're not perfect. You're not perfect. And a lotta times. There is somebody that you need to listen to. That might have a better idea and our intro. Today we talked about how many boards. You're on you. And i spent a few hours talking about how to think about boards board structure. And so you've been a great source of advice. I and yellen i. What is your sort of top advice to the management and the organizations whose boards you. Sit on what is always the thing that you see. People make the same mistakes doesn't matter what type of organization. Well i'm a big person. On on diversity and inclusion i think is critical to the health and growth and success of a company is that i think you have to be able to have a very diverse company a diverse board and that starts with the ceo that starts with the leader at the top and they have to have that and then they get that buy in for the rest of for the rest of the company. And i think you have to be sincere about what you're doing an authentic about what you're doing. That's always been my you know my champion. I've always tried to push that on on the boards. That i've been on an you know and sometimes they're successful and sometimes you're not but you can't be afraid. Speak up about that when you think about how. You want people to describe your legacy. What do you hope they say. I would hope they would say that she. She did everything she could to preserve the business and short of that. She made the best decisions that she could. Linda made the best decisions that she good. And at some point you have to move on you have to move on. You've got to move towards the future. You can't keep looking in the past. You have to move on to the future. I love that. That's a perfect transition to are very important. Lightning round segment morning person or night owl morning. Best work from home productivity. Hack a cup of coffee in the morning. Why do you think it's important to have female leaders in your industry. Oh i think we all need role models that we can look to. I've i've you've got to have somebody who is a reflection of you last. Tv show you streamed or binge watched the queen's gambit so good i just finished it it's great. Are you a good cook. Yes what's the last entry made. I just did a broiled salmon with the little bird over little shave fresh garlic. But let me tell you. I wasn't always a cook. The covert is forced me their burr near julia child territory. What is the worst professional mistake. You've made oh my god not listening to people. I mean just thinking you know. Oh i got no. That's a big mistake. You've gotta listen. You gotta listen. It's only where you're gonna learn last time. You negotiated for yourself. Was i uh speaking engagement. Did you get what you want it. I did who somebody should have on the show. Oh my goodness a michelle obama while you know her. Can i talk to if you can mississippi state that ensure that would be great. Okay last question. Best advice your data every gave you a failure is a word. I do not accept if you are trying. You are not failing. I love that linda stugotz. Thank you so much absolutely. I'm delighted i everyone. We're trying something new. During this time of economic uncertainty. We wanna take a moment to spotlight some new female founder companies. we've heard many incredible skimmers. Who are leading small businesses and we will be introducing them to you each week on skin from couch. See the lincoln episode description for how to submit yourself or front. My name is shannon jones. i'm an herbalist and the founder of i b c company a hip hop inspired herbal tea brand. We're currently based in laurel maryland. But thanks to our really good year. We're moving to our very first warehouse space which is atlanta marilyn about kind of despite kobe but also because of kobe on a lot of people had been looking for herbal remedies and herbal teas. So we were like right. Bear where we needed to be in the sweet spot because we weren't really hard to keep herbalism and stuff like that like super easy to understand very trendy very fun so a lot of people were looking for things not only finally you need but you also get a good laugh when you come to our website and then unfortunately with george floyd protests We had a huge surge of waters because a lot of people were looking for black owned businesses to support in because we'd already been building momentum through kobe. I'm a lot of people were like. Oh i not company and it just took off even more will. I started at tea company because of all the companies that are on the market. I didn't find anything that really represented me. I used to spend a lot of money on tv. White girl that had a line item in her budget for tea vodka. I would go in just all the little balls of strawberry green tea that i could get. I was super obsessed But i realized that a lot of the marketing in it just didn't seem like it was for me and i felt like there was a gap in the space. I love hip hop music left hip hop culture. And i felt like it's used for everything. So why would apparent it with something that i really love. Which is herbal tea. You can find us on instagram. Facebook twitter at ivy's tico. You can also find this online at these t. Dot com. thanks for hanging out with us. Join us next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day. Sign about the skin dot com. That's the s k. I m dot com. M's for a little something extra to hey listeners. I've got a very special new podcast to share with you today. Called dear therapists hosted by claims therapists and advice columnist lori. Gottlieb guy which you get to sit in on their intimate raw and transformative therapy sessions listen to their guidance and then here how the advice worked out in real life. It's a behind the scenes. Look into what makes us all human. Find your therapist on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast.

johnson publishing company chicago Goldman sachs arkansas alabama danielle weisberg eunice johnson jet magazines johnson publishi Omni kong group Grubhub tesla estonians nation ed dance Linda Fifty five million dollars african american charities john johnson northwestern Linda johnson twenty six percent chicago public library five hundred million dollar
S8E1: Maurice Cherry

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

30:36 min | 8 months ago

S8E1: Maurice Cherry

"Welcome to design of business the business of design where we introduced you to people from all over the world different industries and disciplines who are here to talk about design business and the values that govern how we work and live together I'm Ellen mcgirt and Jessica Helfand the design of business the business of design is brought to you by mail chimp. So you want to grow your business. Now, what male chimps all in one marketing platform allows you manage more of your marketing activities all in one place so you can market smarter and grow faster. Now what male chip? That's what learn more at MAIL CHIMP DOT COM? On today's episode elevating the voices of black designers. These are safe physical spaces for people to come into and fellowship with other black designers or other designers that you. Know what the struggle is about to be in that sort of safe space that they may not have at another type of leader for a tech conference or a design conference or something. Maurice Cherry is the host of revision path, a weekly interview podcast featuring black designers. He's also the principal and creative director at lunch creative studio in. Atlanta Maurice Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you both so much for having me. This is going to be fun is going to be such fun. I want to start by asking you. Both Ellen I loved this particular detail. So we're GONNA go right to it which is the fact that you have talked a lot about dwayne. Wayne. It character on the Sitcom, a different world, which is a spin off I think of the cosby show. dwayne. You went to a black college in Atlanta and studied math tell the story. There for For four years studied math originally I started out wanting to do computer science and computer engineering again, sort of modeling myself after. With dwayne Wayne on the Sitcom because he was a A computer engineering student I believe we're computer science student. He ended up going back to Hillman an teaching math, but also did a stint at Caen show electron IX created this video game. Of course in the season finale the series finale I should say the video game takes off and moved to Japan, that whole thing but. Definitely a big. Influence in what I could see was possible because this was also coming right at a time when you're seeing not necessarily the advent of the personal computer, but certainly you're seeing the. consumerization of it like now it's something that you can buy. And put in your home and there's of course, AOL and zero, and all of these sorts of services that will connect you to the Internet and so I think it was this really interesting time of. where I could see this vision on television show but then I could also be in real life because I have access to a computer and software and the Internet and I can explore these things. But my adviser at the time in college was like Oh the Internet a fad if that's something that you WanNa, go into you should probably change your major. because. That's not what we do here and the Computer Science Computer Engineering Department. You know it's a great department but to that end, they don't at least not then I mean we're talking ninety, nine, two, thousand they didn't do the web it was all learning see an assembly there was it was very much a different realm of computer science that I was not. At all interested in and so I ended up switching to math and that's what I. got my degree in and just kind of blown away that. That you saw such possibility for you through Dwayne Wayne because we mostly know him as that person who stopped Whitley from your APO, which is little video watch run over. Just when I WANNA, get courage up but who were real world role models than the real opportunities that I got you started. Oh. Wow That's a question I think and there weren't that many and I think that's instructive to. Think certainly in college. One of the role models I had was actually an upperclassman. His name is Kevin Johnson, and at the time he was starting this online magazine called club a UCLA UC being short for Atlanta University Center. Which is a consortium of colleges of which more houses part of So he started this club a, you see website and print magazine, and just to see him sort of start and do this sort of thing as a sophomore and be able to get traction behind it and had people writing for that really inspired me Kevin is someone that I still keep in touch with. To this day, he's been a guest on revision path he's now. Entrepreneur millions and millions of dollars you know in terms of products and things that he's done. So He's definitely been a role model of mind that I saw was doing this. At an age at a level that I really wanted to be a part of like he started his own. Online publishing tool. And this is like prior to maybe like adobe contribute or similar types of things like wordpress or something like he made a content management system where you could create things on the web and I'm like I WANNA do that I wanna be a part of that. So one of my current mentors, Hassani Oakley, who is I think current title is. Chief Technology Officer. At Deutsche we talk every week and we're also like right around the same age, but he's like started his own companies started flavor pill. has done a ton of work in the advertising industry. Just see what he's been able to do with technology at another very high level I mean I don't know if you'll remember when. ESPN did this human twitter campaign where basically someone with tweet something out and then they would show a crowd shot of people holding like flip cards and then the limb cards would like recreate what the tweet was at one, hundred, forty characters like he was behind. So being able to sort of achieve technology and creativity at those highly visible levels is something that I really admire him for and then finally. As my friend honey well, her name is Sarah Hunt a young, but she goes by honey and she is been around on the Internet forever super. Accomplished dope designer photographer DJ musician like. I'm not sure there's anything that she can't do. Just in terms of creativity and I mean the impact that she's had I think certainly on the current slate of black women designing on the web is unparalleled. So the three of them are like my that's like my trinity of people that I look up to. So I wonder what it was you saw in design. That was modeled for you as a profession as an opportunity as a culture. So I'm actually originally from Selma Alabama which a lot of people know about because of. The civil rights movement and such, and you know I was Kinda part of that first generation or so right after bloody Sunday so. There's The schools are now being desegregated and things like that, and even though that's the law you know a lot of those still sane lingering feelings of racism. Unfortunately, it's still very prevalent there at least they were when I. Grew up there I'm sure it's still is that way now really my outlets for design through magazines because we didn't have cable, we didn't really have a mall I mean Selma's like a small town off of highway eighty. It's a bypass around you. You literally could drive pass it. It's not. A. Big. I. Guess draw in terms of people wanting to come on this you know you're interested in civil rights. But outside of that, you're like, okay, what's next? But magazines were a big inspiration for me because that was sort of the outlet that I had to the world. Of Selma, Selma's a very small towns, very religious town and magazines were my way of kind of see what the world was like. Outside of all of this so of course, we had Ebony magazine, we had jet magazine. s be emerge, etc. But like just being able to kind of see what's representations of life particularly a black life look like outside of Alabama was kind of my first real introduction to designed I mean it's funny because recently I've been obsessed with looking at. The visual archives that are google books from Ebony and jets and vibe. I've been drawn to seeing and remembering what life was like back. Then I don't know if this pandemic brain setting in or whatnot, but up, even looking back at that and and realizing what drew me to it was you know the way that adds were laid out in the way that just the representation of. Not, just you know black people although you know I'm talking about these particularly black magazines, but just the representation of what life looked like during that time is so interesting to me that was really I think my first real introduction to it seeing how people were able to kind of do all these amazing things, these layouts and fonts and everything like that is really what drew me to design. That's I'm picturing you looking at these magazines now revisiting them again as you're building your career and taking on projects and being a designer in really carve out a big part of your life to focus on work of other creative people creative flexible. The the two thousand, three black weblog awards was one of many projects and I want to dig into the revision paths you because that is just it may be one was valuable archives at this point of lax creative design talent that exists anywhere in the world but what inspired you to spend so much of your creative outlet celebrating other people. I'm sort of tying this back into ebony in a way because. Like I said I grew up on that magazine grew up on jet magazine I? Think a lot of black Americans grew up with that magazine in their orbit and while I remember reading it as a kid I certainly don't remember like synthesizing I think most of the information that was in it like it's a lot of stuff that I don't. Really get now until I'm an adult that I can look back on it and think, wow, ebony was was it like yes ebony was a magazine from Johnson Publishing Company, but Johnson Publishing Company also put out books that they sold in their magazine Johnson publishing also owns a beauty company that put out hair care for men hair care for women that. Advertise in the magazine. So like not only are they selling you this representation of blackness but now you can also go and buy it like you can be a part of it by you know buying a do care kit or or a relax from ravine or something like that, and there was so interesting how ebony just kind of had their hand in. Every pot about driving forward the sort of positive aspirational model of blackness. You know really during a time when I think of course, we're still fighting for civil rights and just fighting for equal representation. They really were at the forefront of that sometime in in high school I, remember doing a book report on John Johnson's biography succeeding against the odds. I think being able to see how much one person was able to really dry forward this conversation about representation and about even just like the stories of what other black people are doing out there in a way has found its into my work through the black weblog awards is certainly the revision path. So there ten years, ten year interval between those two things two, thousand and three. You start the black weblog awards, ten years. Later you start revision path, which is a story in itself. Important work he's done for I think four hundred episodes. Could you frame it for our listeners who don't know what revision path is? Sure. So revision path is a weekly showcase of the world's best. Black Graphic designers, web designers, and web developers. Really. It's really kind of say digital creatives in general because we certainly had more people that are kind of outside of those three particular roles. and. We just do end up conversations about the work that they're doing. We talk about their story how they got to where they are now. And depending on whom the guest is, there may be other things that we try to dive into. For example we had. An expert from expert that's living in Amsterdam. This was I don't know maybe around two, thousand sixteen or so right as trump got elected and we had like this great conversation around. What's it like being a black ex pats over there and do you. Have a feeling of wanting to come back to the states and like just how are you feeling in general? Even. During pandemic, we've been every person that I've interviewed I sort of touched on in some kind of way like. I just a gut check. Mike how are you feeling like where you at? So it's really more about putting forth these people's individual stories. I really try to take myself out of it as much as possible even though I'm the host i. kind of just feel like I'm more of the. Conduit for like uplift what other people are doing because I feel like you know in design media that's important. I think if you go into most bookstores and are probably looking for design books, design magazines, you just don't see a lot of people of color and you definitely don't see a lot of black people and granted. PODCAST is not a book podcast is not a magazine, but this is certainly where people's attention is that right now in terms of media and so revision path is able to be this kind of weekly. Digest of you kind of getting a sense of who this person is why are they important and how you can really follow them and learn more about them I think it can be very easy to kind of fall into the pattern of saying what you do for your job is just to work. which it is, but also based on what it is that you do where you are in your career who you are as a person and the the trials and tribulations that you've had to go through to get where you are like that's a story. That's a story that you know wants to hear that someone out there can empathize with now it sure is and I I was telling Jessica before. We got on with you that I had spent some time pouring over the archives and then I found myself drawn by memory to your work around black. Panther. And it was so much fun to be a and to listen to you be a fan behind the scenes and you teach us about these creative people who made this world for us and I was wondering if you could help put into perspective. Why Mc Bozeman, and his amazing colleagues in the entire ecosystem mattered so much and what they've done for representation in the creative and design fields. That's a heavy question. I really think you know with with Chadwick you know rest in peace to him and of course, condolences to his friends and family and people that he's worked with. His representation of Black Panther I think was just something bigger than a role in a movie if anyone can think back to that time. I say from twenty, seventeen, two, thousand, eighteen when the movie was announced and. The fervor around that movie and that role. I've never seen anything like that. It was so much more than just oh, he's just as actor in a marvel movie I mean he's playing this iconic superhero. The black. Panther of course has that association with the actual Black Panther Party, the political movement here in the United States and then for Chabba too I think come from an HVAC. You have also played all of these other real life black. Heroes Thurgood. Marshall, Jackie. Robinson. James Brown. It's something that I think in hindsight we're finally seeing just how much he was able to shoulder through representation and be able to kind of take on all those larger than life roles. It's I don't know. It's so hard to kind of wrap my head around just how. Huge that is he. He. Brought Marvel. I mean, well, one to the company he brought marvel just so much. Energy and diversity an interest from people but he really really really united people through that role and was still like moving forward to do more things. I know he has a project coming out soon I think it's Ma Rainey's black bottom, which is one of the players from August Wilson Century Cycle. At. That's that's a whole other kind of representation of blackness I granted. It's fictional, but it's still something that is steeped in this. American black ethos that is just an important part of our story. The design of business the business of design is brought to you by mail chimp. We talked to some people working for a male chimp from their homes about what creative leadership looks like in these uncertain times. My name is Jean Lee Jean. Lee is senior vice president of customer experience design. Gene. Talked about why mail chimp has been able to adjust. So well, during the pandemic, we have a culture and a motto Call Bomb Listen Harb Change Fast, and it made it even more important during the time books Kobe. Or customers going through and so as a company some of the things that we've done is we actually have offered free standard counts or public service organization. For instance, we rally together and we get ten nine dollars worth of services for existing customers who we knew they needed the financial support. We even offer sort of pricing discounts for pricing relief for about a year organizations working on causes like social injustice and racism. We launched free customers for websites for five years, which is. Our ability to say hey. We, know what you're going through to get your business online in the start. Of free cousins domain from us, and we'll provide that three five years. Male, chimps all in one marketing platform allows you to more of your marketing activities all in one place. So you can market smarter and grow faster. Now, what male chip? That's what? LEARN MORE AT MILTON DOT com. You spent so much of your life thinking about representation and I imagine that in the years since you started revision path, which began the same year as black lives matter. Your. Thoughts about representation advocacy and sharing the Mike and Listening in the way that you do I can't imagine a more turbulent year in my lifetime and as someone who's really at the center of all of it as a podcast or as a maker as a thinker What's has long been like for you. This year has been exhausting. Of course, there's what you've mentioned in terms of. Just like the. Civil unrest that's happened in the country a lot of that has been around these. Heinous. Gruesome unwarranted killings of black people by police all over the country on top of that you have this this pandemic which. Is just turn the entire world upside down in terms of industries, and even how we socialize as human beings with each other it's just turned everything around. The combination of those two things has made this a really exhausting year especially when you see organizations and businesses try to sort of latch onto these things solely in the name of capitalism like I think anyone that seen all the black squares that were posted on instagram and all of the black lives, matter. You know sort of statements that went out in June and we're GONNA celebrate GNC's. Great Stop killing us in the street. Maybe, change the system. So black people look the police as a potential death sentence. Ab Work on that a little bit more I. Certainly think that a lot of that Attention has died down people's feeds have certainly went back to normal and guess what people are still being killed in the streets so. What did that do You've become such a destination voice. You become such a clear advocate and you also do your own work. So this is the kind of year where the work advocacy balanced tends to shift people in interesting new directions, and so I was I was curious about what projects you're working on how you're dealing with clients. Now, what what new advocacy and an ally ship work are you planning and has any of this changed your priorities? In a way I mean, the podcast I mean revision path is still going strong. I did lose my job during the pandemics that sucked. But I do have the studio to lean back on. So I have started taking back just like brandon client or something here there, which has been pretty good just to kind of keep juices flowing. I've been thinking a lot about preservation and I started to see this conversation this year around how do we preserve like black media spaces? This is the seventy fifth anniversary of Ebony. And granted, it's been bought up by other institutions I think Getty owns a part of it Google has scanned in a large number of their issues, their archives and such, and so there is at least some to go to see these documentations of what life was like back then which is great. But then you think about websites granted, we have the Internet archive at the. Internet archive doesn't store everything. I mean. You try finding a news article from twenty ten like in two thousand and five I used to write for this website called Black Web. Two point zero that was started by Angela Benton and Marcus Robinson and like I don't even know where that is now like you can't find any of that writing and in might be in the Internet Archive. I've been thinking of like, how do we preserve? These spaces I mean I'm very fortunate very, very fortunate that a selection of revision path episodes are now in the Smithsonian attribute to the national. Museum of African American history and culture but. Everyone's not gonNa have their work preserved online in that way like. Message boards and websites and blogs and things from back in the early offs like where is that being preserved? Is that be preserved or is it just gone? Gone because of time in technology, and we'll never be able to get it back and so. That preservation has been heavy on my mind a also been an offshoot of. Some Not some work that I, it was a conference attended in. Back, in two thousand, fifteen at Harvard, the blackened design conference the very first year that they did that conference The talk was about preservation preserving spaces, and they were starting at the city level and then zooming out to like. The the county region what have you There was also right at the time that I think ground was being broken off the National Museum of African American history and culture, and there was just a lot of talk about how do we preserve space? How do we save space? How do we make sure that the work that we're doing and putting out into this digital world is being protected in some kind of way because I think one thing that we have all seen within the past I dunno year. So is that technology can fake voices it can fake images it can completely. Disarm a confusing electorate. Like. It's very clear that technology can do powerful things in the name of Just seeing what people remember and what it makes. You remember what it makes you forget. And you know I. Don't want those spaces that black people have put that much work into you know documenting our time and work and things like that to just be gone. So that's where the heavy on my mind lately. What's the future of revision path? Are you going to steer the conversations in a different direction? Might you? Is it going to end at some point? Does it have a a likely sequel? I'll say this revision path is almost ended every year. Every year that revisited has been it's almost ended for one reason or another whether it's been lack of funding to keep it going or it's been I. Don't know in Twenty fifteen. We were getting a lot of just like stupid hate mail in racial stuff granted. We don't get that stuff now knock on wood but. Every year it's been like to the point where I'm like man I don't know twenty twenty. We'll see we'll see what happens. I think that I don't know if it's necessarily going to. End. At, some point and I don't even know if this time is really. It's kind of informal conversations. One general question that I've asked every guest this year is how are they using their talents to help build a more equitable future and like I've said before the pandemic really turned so many things. Upside down and it's causing I think a lot of designers to look at the work that they do and its place in the world Certainly, we're starting to see at tech companies this. Almost, like this burgeoning labor movement start where the people that work there, very concerned about the work that they're doing and how it changes the world it's not just Oh, I get to say I work for facebook and get a great check. But like how is the platform that you're doing work on? Eroding Democracy Lake. These are questions that are that are on people's minds as they think about, how is my work and my talent being used for the greater good in some sort of way the future revision path I mean we were GonNa do a live tour this year that didn't happen. Because of the pandemic none of that happened and people are like, Oh, well, are you gonNA move it online and I said no because for me when we've done lie shows in the past, it's not just over, we're going to do a conversation on the stage. These are like safe spaces, safe physical spaces for people to come into and fellowship with other black designers or the designers that just. Know what the struggle is about to be in that sort of safe space that they may not have at another type of meat up or a Tech Conference or design converts or something, and so for me, the physical space is very important to allow people come together because yesterday there for the conversation but they're really there to see like who else can they meet? Who else can they talk to? Who can they collaborate with in their city that they didn't know about but now they met them at this event but the future vision path I mean. I. Definitely. See Morphing more into a design media destination I know granted. As a podcast. Now at times in the past, it has also been a log where we had original articles We have a job board so companies can post jobs to it's We even had an advice column for people that wanted to just get advice on their career at so. It's been several things at different times. I mean we've had the opportunity to talk with students and get their perspectives about what it's like. They're you know different schools we did a whole. Oral history piece on the Organization of black designers that was more like you know in depth investigative journalism type stuff I would love to be able to expand revision path out in that way because I know that there are just so many more stories that we can tell that will not fit within the confines of like a sixty minute podcast interview and so that's where I see revision path going is really becoming. More of a design media destination that people can look up to I guess you could say like an ebony origin. But yeah. Say. Say. that. We'll go with that. Yeah, we'll go with. This has been just such a joy Marie. Such. Thank you both so much for having me I'm glad we can have this conversation. Design of business, the business of design is a podcast from design observer. Our website is DB DOT DESIGN OBSERVER DOT COM. There you can find more information about today's guest Maurice, Cherry, plus conversations with dozens of other people about the transformative role design plays in their business till listen go to DVD DOT design observer, DOT COM. If you like what you heard today, please subscribe to this podcast. You can find the design of business the design in apple podcasts spotify or help ever you listen. and. If you're already subscribe to the podcast, please tell your friends or go to apple podcasts and rate us which is a great way to let other people know about the show between episodes keep up with design observer on facebook twitter and Instagram, and if you're not listening already, check out our other podcasts, the observatory and please consider joining our subscription service the design observer cooperatives at design, observer DOT SUB SACK DOT com. And I hope you'll also consider subscribing to race ahead. Ellen's column on race and leadership at Fortune Dot com slash get race it hit Mike Eric overt our theme music. Julie Su Brin edits the show our intern Edina carp and our executive producer is Blake Eskin of Noun and verb Rodeo. Comeback next time when we'll be speaking with Deanna van Buren about envisioning a world without prison. You can go there poor restorative justice process. If you need daily means retail right as a grocery store, there's a lobby where it can just put my phone and get access to the Internet. So it's an entirely different hind the phrase. That's what the these. The event.

dwayne Wayne Mike Eric Ellen mcgirt Jessica Helfand Google Johnson Publishing Company Internet archive facebook Instagram Atlanta twitter Ebony magazine Black Panther Party Marcus Robinson AOL Kevin Johnson apple
Brandi Davis

Revision Path

1:02:15 hr | 9 months ago

Brandi Davis

"Are you looking for a new job? Are you hiring but struggling to find diverse talented candidates? Then we have something that can help our job board head on over to revision wage jobs to browse listings or to place your own this week on the job board. Underbelly is looking for a product design director in Salt Lake City. Typical Harbors is looking for a user researcher for their search and Discovery team in New York City or Ann Arbor, Michigan. If you're looking for remote work 36 creative out of the Greater Boston area is looking for a senior designer. Brave Achievers is looking for design students forgo create USA an ofi design training program for black American Youth and burn Camp is looking for a mobile applications developer. Company stop making excuses on your efforts and post your job listings with us for just $99. Your listing will be on our job board for 30 days and we'll spread the word for you about your jobs are diverse audience of listeners. Make sure to head over to revision path.com forward slash jobs for more info on these listings apply today and tell them you heard about the job to provision pass get started with us and expand your job search today revision path.com forward slash jobs. You're listening to the revision pan podcast a weekly Showcase of the world's black graphic designers web designers web developers through in-depth interviews. You learn about their work their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host Maurice cherry juice. Hello everybody Welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host Maurice cherry and this week. I'm talking with Brandy Davis a creative director in Chicago, Illinois off. Let's start the show. All right. So tell us who you are and what you do? Hi, my name is Brandy Davis. I am a graphic and web designer by trade. I am recently entering into the apparel industry we're going websites for my Niche is small businesses. I love helping small businesses and entrepreneurs create their branding and get their sites off and running and able to be profitable for their businesses. Nice. Now before we kind of get more into what you do and your background and everything. I've been doing this check in with everyone this year back of the pandemic. So, how are you kind of holding up during this time? I I'm starting to balance out. Thanks for asking. I'm starting to balance out when it first started that first month was very tough wage literally work came to a stop and understandably. So everyone was scrambling trying to figure out how to shift their business models from events and different song. Things I think stuff started to sort of shift a little bit better for me. Probably around May or June right now. We're starting to wear like on an upswing. So we're starting to get more clients that are looking to now they have a better grasp of what they're doing virtually. And so now they want to execute so things are starting to pick up a little bit more but that first month was like whoa, like it was silent. I had to struggle myself to sort of figure out like, how do I shift to support people in a life that that this ideal for us virtually for it to be a graphic and web designer. This is ideal. But how do I shift my model and Mark it to my existing clients and helps them in a virtual world. So I have a shift a little bit as well as a little scary at first, but it's starting to balance out and feel a little bit more like normal. Nice. What are your work dog? Kind of looking like right now just in general. So I try to balance things out between the graphic and apparel side because I do in-house printing for that piece. So I have sort of like a split day where maybe like the first four to five hours. I'm at this desk designing probably the last and then I do like some mean time in between and then late in the evenings. I'm printing for about another 3 to 4 hours. Wow, and you're doing the the printing in-house. Yes, I would say about 93.3% I know that's a weird number, but about 93% of the printing is done in-house. I used to use an online resource, but now just to kind of keep quality and that's basically to keep quality in shape. I was like, you know, what is an investment, but I need to bring this in house to make sure that I'm giving the customer what they expect. Wow. So you must have a dog I mean, well, I don't know tell me like what does that space look like it is so I'm home base. I am fingers crossed looking to move into the studio space of bigger workspace wage, but it's literally basement Workshop setup. I have a printer that he presses everything all the equipment that I need to treat the garments. I have any other like vinyl cutting different things that I do depending on a designs. It has been self-taught to for certain extent. I was not familiar with any of this at first I had other people that I would work with so long. It's yeah, it's it's not a massive work space but it gets the job done. You know, it's enough to kind of get the job done. I utilize about a fourth of the basement. Okay, I'm curious about that because you mentioned you know that you were doing it online and I know that there's a lot of these sort of print to order type of places where you can just like upload like an EPS birth. Something upload the design and then they'll do the printing but I feel you on the quality. We try to do merge at revision path. Oh God, like two years ago. Yeah and the quad he was definitely very sketchy. Like some people would get the shirts and the image is all glitchy and stretched out and I'm like, oh I didn't expect wage is definitely a trial-and-error with different printers. Yeah, because yet you could have a good run with one printer and then all of a sudden you'll get an image a t-shirt back in your life. This is not how we should look so it is it was so hit or miss and what I didn't like was I would have customers or people it was it luckily. It was people that knew me and so they were reach out and say hey just FYI. This is how a shirt look in case other people call and say something and so that's how I would know because lung Three people who were supporting me in the beginning were friends and colleagues. So they would reach out and say hey this is what I receive. And so then it was like, okay. I have to think about other option and I did do some local printers here in Chicago for a bit, but I still needed to they all had different print processes. So one person might get one shirt printed with screen print and then one person may get a vinyl shirt. And so it was so all over the place that I was like you need to streamline this because at this point it's starting to look more like a hobby business. And so I had to make the investment my family was super supportive everyone around me, you know were super supportive and helping me get support page that Financial place because I was literally diving into something that was way out of my budget, but, you know, we managed to, you know, they were able to support and manage the page. Get everything in place. But yes, it is very sketchy with online printing. Yeah, and I mean and that's a big step to to purchase the equipment and decide to do it yourself even after going with local printers. So that's I mean, I would say that's a testament to the fact that it's something that you're very serious about and that your customers are important to know that you are kind of doing this by hand. That's really good. Yes, and I thought this was not my plan. So I have literally been following God's path on this because I had no desires at that particular point to be in the apparel industry so long it was like, you know, what if this is something you're going to take seriously and if this is what God has put on my plate then I need to treat it as something that I'm passionate about and so my goal is always presenting producing a product of service whatever to my customer that I would be proud to say or pay for myself. And so yeah, I have to make the decision to bring it in-house wage. So how did the the idea for the apparel line come about so I I like to joke that I fell into it literally so about two years ago. There was a day off the premier for Black Panther and I think it was like February ish and so in Chicago this day it was warm typically around February it snowed, I see but this day it was beautiful outside. So I put on every little I have my outfit ready to go because I was going straight to the theater after work and home I felt amazing, but I have boots on that probably should not have been born in February, but it looked as if there was no ice outside and I was walking to the train headed to work and she caught one patch of ice a black ice and I slipped and failed and resulted in me breaking my leg and my ankle in three places. And so yeah, and that was a really wage. Recovery, I was unable to walk for about four months. I was in like really intense therapy for about another three to four months and I was dealing with depression. And so one of them go to when I'm sort of down is designing like I I truly enjoy designing and so I couldn't figure out what to do with these x-rays that made me so angry so I decided I you know what, let's switch the narrative and so I took the x-rays from when they were my leg was broken in the x-rays post-surgery and created this really funky graphic and I had the Mantra on there of broken heel stronger better because I wanted to get to strike I was at I was at the Hill Park physically, but I wanted to get mentally and emotionally at a stronger and better level. So I would where to put it on a tank. I went to my online printers and had them placed on tank tops and t-shirts and I'll warrant a physical therapy and then I would post it on Facebook when I would, you know, make em Need a milestone and people kept saying like hey, that's a cool. Graphic. That's a nice shirt. I need that and I was like, well, I'm kind of lonely making them for me and they were like well, but I need it and so it's sort of just happened home where I was sharing my story and posting with the graphic and the t-shirt on that people got interested and then they were like, so what else do you have? Like what other designs do you have? Do you have a store and it was horrible but as a web designer, I only had an Etsy set up cuz I didn't I wasn't taking it seriously. I was like, you know what I'll put a Nancy up and that that way I don't have to commit off all the way and then it just started to grow by and then ideas started to come about and I was like, well, maybe I should give a name to this thing that I'm doing and then maybe I should actually create a site and take this seriously because people are actually interested in the story and what I'm doing and so yeah, so a probably about a year later earlier out last year June know about May of em. 19 is where I officially launched merged by be Davis Designs as an apparel brand so that with more of a focus of what we were doing. So he designed off apparel and accessories in a way that Embraces healing confidence and culture and that sort of my mindset of how I'm designing when things come about so yeah that's dead merch in a in a quick little bubble and it looks like prior to the pandemic you were even starting to kind of expand this merch concept out into doing events, right? Yes. That's all from this recovery phase. I always said I wanted to do art therapy. It has always been something that's been an interest of mine. And so that's when I started to use graphic design to heal from my depression. It started to kick in more and so I was like, how can I do this? I'm not in life. Therapist of course, so I'm like, how can I do this in a way that provides a nice fun social environment but also some healing aspects to it. And so I started doing a merchant ships which are similar to like your paint and sips but we use t-shirts or cigar boxes that are as the canvas for painting and typically we start with a mantra of some sort that gives them like an outline of how they can start with the designs and then partnered with me. I have a Reiki master in the sessions. And so she provides, you know about 20-minute sessions here and there and it was very interesting. I was a little concerned because a lot of people sometimes are not as open and she was very well received and a lot of people didn't even realize like they were painting and feeling good, but then they go over to her and they have a conversation and you see tears and they're like, oh my God. Finally released this and I'm like and they were like, I didn't even know I needed to be here Brandy but I am having so much fun. And I managed to release something that was bothering me from this era thought it was just really good to hear that. We were at least on the right path. We have some tweaking to do and some different things but it was Merchants if it's my way of sort of months starting the art therapy. Peace, but in a social environment, wow, I saw the video that you had on on YouTube that sort of showed the event and it looked like it was a lot of fun. Like they were really enjoying themselves. Yeah. It was really cool. And what I like is that the last event I was able like more guys showed up typically the paint and sips a lot of people assume it's like girl nights and things like that, but it was really nice to see guys show up and it was a good variety of Ages like we had some that were in their twenties. We had people there that were seven dead. And it was everyone just sort of had a good time and we played music from every different era and everyone had like a really great time. So yeah, it's been fun to do those jobs will be glad when pandemic is out of the way so we can get back to some of those events. But yeah, it's been pretty cool to kind of see those takes shape. Yeah, Amen to that. I I was watching it. I was getting I mean, I've never been to that type of event but it's like because we've been in this, you know pandemic for so long and I mean, some people have been getting together and still having parties up and I have it but just watch it. I'm like, oh I missed that I missed that kind of like Fellowship, you know, I do I am with you like I have been to a couple things but I am very standoffish. I am sort of like wage give me space. You know, I haven't been to an actual Event Event. I've done like dinner here and there like maybe twice but it's been very hard like a lot of events have started to kick back. And in terms of like bending and stuff that I used to do with the merch line, but I am not comfortable right now stepping into that space just yet. So yeah, I looked at the life. I've got the time hops because they actually the first one was this week last year. It was on the 14th. And so the memory came back up and I was like, oh I really miss being able to do this. And so I'm with you like and it's like oh, yeah. Now while you've had your own business, you've also worked at a few countries to such as digital Bridge Solutions. You worked at Careerbuilder for a while. What did you learn from those experiences, you know, each job came with its own less than a digital Bridge taught me like a different skill like they were very good at helping you sort of like learn skills because they were a small boutique company. Yep. You wore a lot of hats. So I was able to be project manager. I was able to do QA testing which I turned out. I really love and so it was really cool there to be a need to learn different skills, but add Career Builder. I feel like they taught me how to have a perfect work-life balance and it was interesting that it came from managers, but they were very good at like hey shut down, you know, like we understand the commitment shut down. This is your time work will start tomorrow and that was a very interesting and I really loved how I was able to sort of like grow into my own. They're without apologizing, you know, they're like, hey if things are happening may happen, let us know what you need from us and do what you need to do. And that was really good. It was it was good to have like different jobs where you're able to experience certain things because you don't know. What's the right choice. It for you until you've seen all of these different places. I worked at some places where here at one place in particular mostly to name, but it was so strict. It was very corporate office. Yeah, I could almost say I hated it. It was not the right work balance for me as a creative you like to have some level of creativity some level of expression and freedom and different things. This was not that job. It was not the job at all. So it was very hard to design in a very rigid environment. Let's switch gears here a little bit. Where did you grow up where you originally from Chicago? I am originally from Chicago South Side if that has anything to anyone but yet were you kind of exposed a lot to Art and Design grew up in Chicago? I would say in general. Yes, Chicago is a very artistic creative City. I would say probably from as early as preschool. I was introduced to it, you know, I would draw and do different things. I would go to plays and and different workshops. They were bringing to the schools like back then art programs in schools were like amazing. And so you had exposure to all types of things. Like I was able to do any level any entity of art I was able to experience it within our Chicago public school system was down music dance sewing drawing painting literally. I have been able to participate in all of that within our school program, but then we would do these field trips and not we would go to the Opera and you get I could care less about I like I was unconcerned about the actual performances. I appreciated them, but I got like wrapped into off. Like the details of the colors that they use in the backgrounds the costumes that they use and I was like focused on the details of like the structure of things and the ceilings the paintings that they had in the ceiling but I would get lost in the environment and completely missed the entire performance. So yeah, I would say like any given moment you could drive down you could drive down Stony Island in Chicago, especially around 79th Street where you have the theaters you have everything that are right. There is a Regal theater was on 79th and Stony Island and it was like literally a massive mural and so everyone just loves to be on Stony cuz at any point you see like murals and art all over so yeah, I'd say Chicago is very good at exposing a youth to Art now was your family kind of supportive of you getting into the Arts. Yeah, maybe know so they are really split so long You know, I would draw all day long all day long. So it wasn't a surprise for them that I loved art in high school. We came time to pick and colleges and I really was not excited about this nursing program that I was registered in but my dad was not for me being a starving artist. He had no desires for me to go to art school because what I couldn't do was struggle and fight and he is you know, he's been working since he was fourteen him and my mom, you know, they've worked all of these different nine-to-five jobs. And so for him and artist was someone who just painted in there off and didn't have a job and didn't get paid for it which you know, that's probably his upbringing and he had those misconceptions but he was so against it and so I had to sneak off to an art school interview. I did tell my mom cuz I needed someone to pay these fees, but I've missed some of my mom like look don't tell Dad but we have an interview Thursday. It's cool to see about the program and at the time I was going for a three D animation and my mom went with me and she was supportive and she was like Hey, if you want to go, we'll make it happen and thought there was so irritated but at that point he couldn't say no. He appreciated the fact that I actually went took the steps needed to research and find somewhere that I was off a little but he was so irritated and then when I graduated and started working and my first job that wiped out any doubts that I am in art, he was like, okay cool. So what are you doing next? You know, like he was on board and ever since then he's been super supportive. But that was the one time that he really pushed back in question. If I was making the right decision now before we jump into that that first job out of undergrad you started out at the art institute's in Chicago, is that right? Yes. What was your time like this song? Feel like they really kind of help prepare you as a working designer. Yes, and no, I feel like I had really great instructors who took time beyond what their curriculum was designed to prepare me. I feel like the the curriculum itself. It's you know, it went over and helped with the basics and it gave you some repetitive things that you would get used to in a work environment, but I wish it came with some post-graduate support or some in school trainings in terms of like an intern or something like that where you were able to sort of even if it was just working within their graphic department or their web department and sort of getting that experience because I feel like we sort of it felt very like a boutique type school like we touch everything on a high level and then we if you had an instructor that was very passionate about it off. Then they took that time so kind of plant seeds in you to kind of get you prepared and and give you some expectations of what to expect when you enter the real world. And then they all kind of kept in touch with me after school. And at least for about that first year or sold first year or two out of graduate out of school days. They kept in touch and kind of like helped me navigate the space. And so that was Health. Yeah, like I don't regret going to the school, but I do feel like to a certain extent within our curriculum programs. We should give the same thing same type of approach that we do to anyone in business school or Finance or somewhere that they are now plugged into an internship as part of the curriculum. So yeah, I feel like that piece was missing and just to kind of like put this in a a chronological context. This is around like The early 2000s. Is that right? Yeah. So this is like at a time when the internet and the web are really starting to become a thing, you know web design is now starting to become like an actual possible career profession, right? So I think a lot of those schools at that time and I'm thinking of this mainly because I was in college at that same time at a liberal arts school and I really wanted to go to an art institute's because I had been doing web design sort of as a hobby and wanted to learn more and I figured oh I should go to like the Art Institute that was down here in Atlanta. Like I want to go to the artist to the VIN lands because they would know they would have that information. So it's it's interesting to kind of, you know, put it in that context to see that this is at a time when we didn't have all of these types of boot camp bouncing online courses and things that people have now where they can really be like not necessarily so well self-taught. Yes, but also like it's built on the backbone of really kind of the early birth. Days of design when that information wasn't available. Yeah, and and that's why I don't regret going there because like to your point, they likely didn't even know how to enter into or out how to get us involved in this area. That was so very new. So I feel like they did the best that they could in terms of it being something that was a very new program. If I'm not mistaken. It was the first year when I entered it was the first class that they were ever like sort of experiencing and you know working with so yeah, it it they did the best that they could you know, I think things have shifted a little bit. I don't even know actually if that that department is even still available within that within a school system, but they did the best that they could what we had like you said starting out right? I mean it's it's kind of hard to to underestimate just how much things were changing during that time. I mean if we're talking really mm. Web layouts were still being done with tables. I mean, I remember vividly the switch and a lot of people's anger and having a convert table designs to CSS like using CSS for layout. I remember that time so vividly and how many people fought that yes. That was that was a doozy of a time over. Yes. Yeah now right out of undergrad you got an internship at at the one and only George Johnson publishing company which for those in our audience who might not know they were the Publishers of Ebony and Jet Magazine among many other Publications that they had. Where were you when you first heard the news that you were going to work there. You know, what the good thing. I was saying that one thing about the art institute's is that they put me on this path of getting to Johnson, Georgia. Because all of these groups that they aren't programmed not our programs but art groups that they promoted one of the group's I joined was one that they were promoting off and it happens to be black designers and it was based on the south side and it was so cool to see people who looked like me doing the same thing because that was not represented in my classes month. And so I joined this and one of the ladies in that group worked at Johnson and she had posted in the board the job and originally I thought it was graphic. So I sent it to a friend and she sent it back on like no was for a web. This is for you apply. And so I interviewed and then I can't think of her last name. But ladoris was her first name was over HR and I love her dearly and she was like the sweetest but the most Stern person in life, but she called to let me know and I feel like I may have been home because birth. Cell phones were not that tough in mm right free. So I likely was at home when I found out the one thing that I don't remember about this experience is where I was in the month that I got the call everything else. I remembered in detail, but I would assume that I was likely at home and probably kept it to myself for about a day or two because I was so overwhelmed with the idea of working there and my family and friends were so excited and it was so much pressure. And so I kept a lot of things when I first started there to myself because it was just so much so I likely got the call from the doors Foster. That was her last night. The door is Foster, and she she did she let me off I was like, hey, you know, they want you to call me in on this day. And if I'm not mistaken, I think it was like August 8th. Oh, wow. You remember to the day? Remember? I'm telling you. I remember so many details except for Thursday. But it was August 8th of 2003. Then I was start and I remember because I remember saying eight is a number of new beginnings. And so I kept going through those Biblical numbers of things say, yes. That's the the moment when I found out no, I'm curious, you know being from Chicago how much I guess how much of a reputation did the company have like as you were growing up cuz you mentioned your friends and family being, you know, super excited about it. And of course folks knew about Johnson Publishing Company because of the magazines, but like I don't know if if people can really sort of get a grasp of how much of an influence that company was during that time. Yeah, like there was so many story. Like when I started working there, I have family members Mississippi call and give me stories about how Mister Johnson helped them when they were in school and or paying for this or it was very strange to see wage. That all of these experiences people were having that they had never shared until they knew someone who worked there and soul in Chicago. He was like they were like the first family of Chicago regardless of who was the mayor and all of that. They were the they were the black royalty of the city and everyone got excited riding down Michigan Avenue and you see the building and you gave me like, oh I can see the ebony and Jet signs and things like that, but they they he has such a huge impact on all of the South Side the black communities that he was like literally like Keen to everyone, you know, like everyone got excited they respected him because he was a straight shooter and so it was it was cool to work somewhere. That is silly you say the name and at that point you could have been anyone in any position and the respect instantly shot through the roof because Thursday Of who he was and who the company was to everyone during that time? Cuz I remember like my grandmother having the magazines, you know all out on the table and not subscriptions comedy and and oddly enough. My sister picked my first name by reading an Ebony magazine, like my mom was pregnant with me and she's like I was reading an Ebony magazine and I saw an actress from a soap opera name Brandy. Wow, my mom, you know, cuz originally I was going to be named Camille. And so she was like, no you should be I think she should be Randy and then it was so when I started working and she was like wow, like that's literally you're working at the place where I literally read the magazine to get your first name, So it was really cool to kind of like see it kind of take shape. Yeah. I don't know if the current generation of black designers now know just how much of an influence wage Johnson publishing company has had in the black community. I mean they were around they started in nineteen forty-five. They've been there through pretty much every major political civil social movements from then to now documenting it with articles and pictures and everything and also Johnson publishing company owned a Cosmetics company called back. It was Supreme beauty company. So it mentally run into fashion fair Cosmetics. Yeah Fashion Fair cosmetics, and I actually have a story about that. So John Johnson's wife Eunice is from my home town. She's from Selma, Alabama. Her father is a doctor where father was a doctor they all passed on but her father was a doctor her father used to be my grandmother's doctor off. So so we do we knew the Walkers and every year when ebony would do the Fashion Fair like Fashion Tour, right? They would always have a stop in Selma. No, it wasn't necessarily like printed on the schedule. They would always stop and Selma so we could like see the fashion and the makeup and everything like that. So yeah, yeah, well was like I said if it was not on the schedule and if someone made the mistake and did not put it on the schedule, it was a huge issue because she the children made sure that they always hit them home spot States and they always make sure that they did some type of event where they were fundraising or volunteering or donating something always made sure that when they got to their home City that they did extra it was always, you know, like led me let's do this. Let's have this bring this person out is donate this and so that I loved about them cuz as long as they have been in Chicago and everything that they had been doing they never lost sight of who they were and birth They came from and yes, Selma was if it was not on the schedule you'd have to answer as to why did you assume that? She would not want to go to her home City say you were there for I mean nearly nine years working your way up from being an intern to being like the senior designer slash producer there. Do you have any any stories from the wage? I'm like, what? Are you remember the most about working there? So I like to tell people that working there was like going to your family reunions with your your favorite cousins every day. So it was like literally everyday you and your favorite cousins are hanging out. So it was like ten floors and so each department and pretty much had a floor but like everyone went from Florida floor because you have to interact in some sense of the for the most part A lot of people have come to the floor I was on which is graphic and with so I got to interact with a lot of different jobs. Events, but it was so much fun. And I would I would like soak it up like all the history like I stayed in the library. Like if I was on lunch break, I was in the library getting like dates information about stuff that happened in the seventies or reading books that you know, they would be reckoned. They were recommend kind of give you the history. And so it was it was from just a daily interaction. It was amazing. It was like fun, but then there was celebrities and it was almost require that we had to interact with the celebrities and I was like, okay so to stop work and entertain like and so literally you see your like home they say, oh Halle Berry is here or no. It was Toni Braxton. Toni. Braxton is here and at that time like Tony was like the person you wanted to be like an Choi. So I was like, yes cool. They like we need people you gotta come up to take pictures go out, you know, like every time a celebrity came it was like we have lunch come downstairs introduce yourselves like to know what you do take some photos things like that. It was great, you know, sometimes they would do concerts and we would just sit there for two or three hours just like talking about things they would get information. They needed for the story. Just kind of get them, you know feeling good about what was the setup of the story and and what direction was going in so that's pretty cool. Like those were the really good memories of like just having a celebrity sort of just pop in and they're like hey, how you doing? And you don't elevated like, oh, okay. I just came from lunch Bhai. Sorry about anyone, you know, it was rappers. It was R&B singers. It was blue singers gospel like at any point. It could be a 22 year old rapper or off. 70 year old gospel singer and you knew them because they were Staples in the black community and it was just so cool to kind of see but I would say probably like for me one of the wage best experiences was like when I got there mister Johnson was still alive and he was but he was sort of he you could tell that he was getting starting to get sick, but I was excited because at least got to spend some of those years that I was there where he was still in his prime and walking around and doing things and I got off take a a got on the elevator and and Mister Johnson and Eunice got on the elevator with me and he knew who I was which is is a huge thing because I never had to meet him when I interview and so it was so shocking to me that of all these people who worked here. He knew who I was and he spoke highly home. This person told me about you. I know exactly who you are and that like the kid who is like coming in as the internet and to know that someone has both highly involved with me to the owner and for him to remember me. It was like the best feeling ever and then to see him and his wife interact as if I wasn't in the room or the elevator. It's so hilarious and they realized so funny and laid-back and I'm just sitting back here like I'm watching a movie but this was like my life. And so those were the the memories that I I hold the most the celebrities were cool, but it was like experiencing all of the different people who had key roles in the history of the magazine seeing them in their prime or at some part of their Prime was like amazing know speaking of like the history of the magazine you were working there making sure that you were getting Ebony's web presence up and this was during a time when dead And then you can kind of you know fill me in on this but like I feel like this is during a time when magazine publishing was starting to decline and print and starting to go more online. Do you recall kind of that shift was like for you as you were working there. So when I started they had already shifted to putting some presents on the site, but as it began to wage increase, I would say probably about a year or two into being there. It was definitely a ramp-up of we need more traffic you had started to get more advertising online instead of the magazine. And so it was a it was a huge adjustment and it was met with some pushback because Rightfully, so no one wants one entity to take away from another and so when you're used to the magazine publication what you don't want to see is the web now become the dominant theme when you are used to this physical magazine and so it was a lot of pushback and a lot of growing pains of getting them on board that one supports the other it doesn't replace it. And so we have to wage go through that process of just showing them how we could use the to to complement one another and not replace the printed version because at the time there was a high level of subscribers that of course worst that were an older demographic and they don't understand they didn't understand let's go off. Line to look up the latest article. They wanted a magazine. So it was it was difficult to kind of get those conversations started and and come out with the result that we needed that we felt was needed for the company to grow in the right direction eventually things started to get a little bit easier as they saw ways that okay, we can there were certain things that they couldn't print in the magazine because of space and and whatnot. So we couldn't do extended versions of the interview on the website. And so it was things like that that helped them get them on board with everything but it was some difficult conversations of getting a lot more content on the website. Yeah. What do you think about sort of where I bought a black Publications are now cuz I think I was funny. I was talking to my mom about this the other day cuz I was I called her up and was asking her like what was the importance of Ebony and Jet like when you were growing up? Up as a child like she was born in the early fifties, you know grew up during the Civil Rights Movement et cetera, and I'm asking her just like what did it mean to her? And now I think what one of the only place its magazines were all to the only print magazines for black folks are Essence and black Enterprise and they both have web presences, of course, but like with you having worked in publishing on the web in that sort of way, how do you feel about sort of the current landscape of what like black media is doing from a personal standpoint? It pains me deeply to not see everything in jet on the newsstands off. I understand that thing shift, but it pains me deeply to not see your physical publication. I wish the current generation understood the importance of that history and how it needed to be cultivated and and kept around but things shift and I appreciate the presence that black media has online dead. But I do wish that we would have been able to adjust and keep some of that history because when life and all of these other Publications when they are no longer in print they are remembered and they will continue to be remembered by by many. I feel that black Publications. Can I just get lost on our current generation because there's no importance behind that history of it. And so it's great to see people moving to a online media, but at the same time it feels like we're losing a piece of history and black Publications that we won't be able to get back. Yeah, like I appreciate everything that they're doing in an additional sense. It just pains to not see more Publications printed. Yeah and to that point of you know, now they're being a lot of these black media Publications and such online wage. As you sort of mentioned in terms of like archiving and preservation, like where do the digital copies of these things go because you know, most of the stuff that we do on the web is is largely a federal law gets overwritten. There's new versions things been saved over at cetera. Like, how are the older versions of these things being preserved like I wrote for this website back in like 2005/2006 called black Web 2.0 and it was you know, it was a Blog essentially but it was talking about like what black people were doing in technology and startups and things like that. They you can find vestiges of that online in the internet archive, but everything is not going to be saved in the internet archive. I think first of all, but then secondly, you know who or what organization or entity will be responsible for preserving what black people are doing online in this digital age, you know, I mean, yeah, we can go and find the old versions of Ebony and wage. On Google, you know, it's not the full archives, but it's part of it. But like where are you going to find stuff from? Let's say I don't know Urban online or Africana Com or black voices, like all that stuff has been erased and it's gone to like the annals of time. You may be able to find pieces of it here and there but like not in any sort of capacity where you should really go back and see like what was going on during the time what were people talking about like, you know, it came to me when I was thinking of how Netflix is bringing back. These old T shows now like Moesha and Worcester sister and stuff like that and I was like man that's like you p.m. Monday night and I was I was telling that to someone and they were like, what's your pee in what I would have been that long ago, but like the fact that the history is not even preserved in a way where you could find easily as ridiculous. Yeah. That's the part. That sucks. I always say that the internet off. And web design and all of that is a blessing and a curse. It's awesome for advancement and being Innovative and progressing in terms of Technology. But to your point on a lot of things that we were able to preserve and keep an archive and you know, those history those articles and magazines and different things that are important to our culture that we are unable to do. So in this environment and so it's a blessing in the sense that we are advancing and we're getting more involved and and things are like literally stuff that I probably would have never imagined as a kid how the things that I looked up to and admired as a kid are now being sort of lost and there's no way like you said to sort of wage pull that up you could pull up ebony but if the site is gone if whatever reason that site is off gone, then what is left, you know what their besides ebony. Medical ebony articles and that only going to be there for so long as people are sharing them. But at what point does it just sort of remove itself from our memory and history? Yeah, because I think what will end up happening is that as it's being removed and people don't remember it then other people step in to try to tell that story and they may not be doing it from the best, you know intentions. Yes, they may be honestly lying, you know, like so to have that in our own words and that way I think is that's definitely very very important part. One thing that I saw as I was watching. I saw these videos about your merch line, you know, it's gotta bring it back to that. It reminded me how a lot of designers. I know now have some sort of a hobby or off or side business or side project or something where they're making something physical and I think it's you know to the point you're saying a lot of the work that we do is kind of saved over and forgotten or our dog. Or not even our time but just written over in some way. So they're doing something physical like how you're doing merch other people do other physical tangible kinds of things and I don't know if that's the main purpose of it, but it made sure that you have some kind of physical relic of the work that you've done. Yes, that is definitely like one of the things that is important of being able to just have being something physical which is technically like March in terms of like Chicago slank is like just that something that you can design and put something on physical like a practical item that you can put a design too. You know, like that's how we associate merch of it. And so it was like, yeah, it gives you a way to sort of carve your own little piece in history in this moment to have that physical thing because we know we design things for clients if it's not for huge projects or four things that are going in in Avengers. For our workshops are different places where that history is maintained. It's thrown away, you know, like once you do it it's done it's gone and I have a lot of designs that I'm like, oh, I really I love that design but there's no way to use that again. It's done, you know, and so this is a way to sort of have that passion project where you can design from a true passionate creative not attached to a client with no inhibitions like you could just do whatever you want and then off because of that physical item you are now able to keep that into some sort of a history whether that'd be me archiving it myself or someone who has purchased and keeping in a holding on to it. My mom who has kept everything Lord bless her heart in her wallet if she like has had every first business card I've ever made in her wallet. So just having those physical job And it does bring back, you know, the ability of being able to kind of have a piece of history of piece of look this is what I used to do, you know to be able to show that yeah, absolutely. So as I was, you know doing my research for this interview and I was watching videos about you there was a line that you said in an interview. I think it was on the Chicago like daytime talk show or something. Yeah. You said that design is constant in my healing. Can you talk more about that? Yes, so Typically when I designed for myself and sometimes for others, it comes from a place some form of I designed for in that moment of how I am feeling. And so if I am not in the best of mood then I start designing because I need to shift because as I said, I truly enjoy like designing is my happy spot. I truly enjoy designing and so if at any point my mood has shifted off or I am dealing with any trauma or anything that is happening in my life that has interfered my peace. I start designing because that is the one place that I know I can get lost in it and not be worried about the moment. I can get lost in whatever world I enter in for that design and off. Almost an instant feel-good peel because once I keep designing until I get to a point that whatever I needed nurturing inside of me have been satisfied month. And so it clicks in the moment when I get to a certain point in the design that I'm like I'm done like this feels good. And it's it's one of those things of like I like to see them when I'm talking to my clients. I like to say hey if I can connect with you spiritually we're going to have some really dope designs because that means I'm able to tap into what you need from a different level than the statistical area. And so for me designing the spiritual it feels good. And so anytime that I'm designing it is definitely a healing process for me. So it is always the two go together hand-in-hand always Chicago inspire you said I was like my mini New York. Like I really love New York because of New York because of the artists artistic presence that it has and I feel like Chicago is on that same level like I love the culture. I love our little language inside the city instead of whether your side or South side. We all have our own little slangs that we use. I love having that influence that is around and so Chicago is like Saddam was home. Like I feel good when I when I talked about it, like I love the food. I love everything about it. So I get inspiration everywhere in the city and Thursday. We're not necessarily like in your face about a lot of things from the artistic world, but every time that you are around or in different birth, Is that a city? You can tell by just how like the graffiti ships or different murals start to change and different building structures? It's just Beauty all around. I don't think we get enough credit for the beauty in the artistic world that we have and the influences that we have but we are some really talented people. We just you know who are not necessarily given the platform or on the platform that a lot of these other cities are but I get inspiration in Chicago Daily like there's a conversation that will spark an idea because someone will say some slain from back in the nineties and it's like wait a minute I can turn this into something so it's always something that is happening that from a cultural standpoint. I just love about Chicago question that I'm asking every guess pretty much this year is how you're using your skills and design to have kind of job. Build a more Equitable future. So as you got to look back at your career and what you've you know been able to accomplish. How are you using your skills to do that? I would say from a design standpoint. I am likely shifting into a different industry but keeping graphic as my own Foundation graphic design as my Foundation. I feel that my passion and long-term and Longevity is in marrying graphic design and mental health. And so that is where I am working toward. I don't know if that means I'm back in school and I become an art therapist. I don't know but I am open to that idea because I love the sound of that but I want to use graphic design as a way to impact the mental health industry environment where we are helping the youth in the city. He'll just as I say designing is always part of my healing process. I want to use that same passion and skills and take Weeks to help others do the same thing because we have so many of our youth walking around in depression and anxiety and they're dealing with trauma daily. Like at this point we have become desensitized to it. But there is trauma daily in our city and we're not allowing them to have a creative Outlet of how to express that and so I thought I would like for me in terms of long-term goals of using my skill as a graphic artist to impact the mental health industry for the Youth of Chicago. Where do you see yourself in the next five years? What kind of work would you like to be doing? Hopefully after this pandemic has gone off. Yes after the pandemic so it would be awesome if there was a B Davis designed I call it an art Hub, but I would love song. Have an art hook that that allows anyone to come in and experience as graphic web apparel art therapy Merchants tips where we are having events with our healing people. We are having workshops. We are designing like in my head. I wish you could see inside my head memories in my head is the most colorful Palm Springs it has, you know, the history of graphic design and text and fonts and different things being represented on the walls as murals coming together as an art piece in itself, It is teenagers over here, you know designing graphics for apparel for you know, different things like it is me in my life. I happy space creating a a fun and safe space for my community to experience art and to create wage What I hope would be a future career for them because a lot of us we get in the industry. We may be self-taught and different things but my goal is to teach them not just the graphic the creative side, but the business side of it so that they are able to navigate. So in five years, I don't know what you call me in five years, but I have a creative Hub that is allowing the community of the south side of Chicago to thrive do graphic design. Wow. Well Brandy just you know wrap things up here where can our audience find out more about you and about your work and everything online. Yes. So my website for my graphic and a pair off is I do graphic and web design and then for the merch Peas where it has the art therapy and Merchant ships that is a merch by Bee Gees. Designs.com and then I am on Facebook and Instagram the most so those RV Davis Designs LLC and merch by be Davis Designs both for Facebook and Instagram. All right, sounds good. Well Brandy Davis, I want to thank you so much for coming on the show. I mean, like I mentioned, you know kind of during the interview as I was talking about how I discovered you I found out about you. I think really from hearing you talk about your work and from the passion that you have from it is very clear that like wage as a woman of faith that that's something that really inspires your work. Like I feel like you have this divine inspiration that pushes you to succeed and to create and to really even turn off, you know bad experiences. Like you said breaking your leg taking that and turn it in into a virtual like that's that's inspired. So, I mean, thank you just for the work that you've done for the work that you are continuing to do and I'm really excited. See what you do in the future. So thank you for coming on the show. I appreciate it. Thank you for having me. This has been awesome. I am truly blessed to be in a space that is allowing me to share my thoughts in any capacity. So I thank you for allowing me to do so today. And yes, I am definitely a woman of faith and my passion for design goals will be on anything that I could ever imagine if there's anything that I could have been doing outside of design. I don't think I would want it. So I thank you for allowing me to share that show me big big thanks to Brandy Davis and of course thanks to you for listening. You can find out more about branding at her work through the links in the show notes after office hours. Com. Revision path is brought to you by lunch a multidisciplinary creative studio in Atlanta, Georgia. Are you looking for some creative Consulting for your next project? Then? Let's do lunch service visit us at. Yep. It's lunch., I'll put a link in the show notes. This podcast is created hosted and produced by me Maurice Cherry with engineering and editing by RJ basilio. Our intro voice-over is by musicman Dre with intro and outro music by yellow speaker. So, what did you think of this episode hit us up on Twitter or Instagram or even better by leaving us a rating and review on Apple podcasts. I'll even read your review right here on the show off as always. Thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time.

Chicago Brandy Davis Mister Johnson web designer New York City black Publications Boston art institute USA Publishers of Ebony and Jet Ma Salt Lake City Maurice cherry Art and Design intern Johnson publishing company design director Stony Island Michigan Illinois
Frieze: the show goes on. Plus, Theaster Gates

The Art Newspaper Weekly

59:40 min | 8 months ago

Frieze: the show goes on. Plus, Theaster Gates

"We cannot is sponsored by Christie's visit Christie's dot com to find out more about the world's leading auction house in seventeen sixty, six auction private sales online. Anytime. Hello, and welcome to the Wiki not I'm Ben leak. It's freeze week in London yet there's no Bhagat Fair at its heart can galleries create the usual excitement and is anyone still buying? No freeze London offering masters, but it still officially freeze week in. London. With exhibitions and events being staged across the city and the now customary online viewing rooms and digital sales platforms. We talked to Louisa Buck about the arts around town antimony girls about how the markets faring without the fares. Later, Linda Jablonski talks theistic gates about his shows in London and New York before that the newspapers launched a new three part online live events series which began this week could new models for new times rethinking the art market in a changing world. The second in the series breaking boundaries local is the new global is on the fifteenth of October and you can register for this and other online events at the newspaper. Dot. com slash live now as ever a wealth of shows as opened across London four freeze week and our contemporary art correspondent Louisa Buck has been atn about seeing them. I spoke to her about some of her highlights. Louis before we start talking about individual shows, I just wanted to get a sense of the mood while you're out and about because of this is normally Of Year when there's Manik. Energy and millions of people from all over the world descend on London. But what's the mood among the galleries and museums you'll visiting I think it's very up and down to be quite honest I. Mean What's quite interesting of course you haven't got the international crowds coming in. There are not throngs of people. There is no I mean, the champagne sales are zero. There's there's no socializing. So when you go look at a show, the atmosphere is much more contemporary. Actually looking at the were talking about the work there's a sort of rush to kind of. Embrace people say hello then shrinking back again is one realizes that one has to observe social distancing. In the commercial galleries, it varies a lot from quite a sort of casual attitude to really quite strict one way or temperatures taken as you walk in. So it's mixed, but it is cautious it is sedate. It isn't frenetic you social or indeed social tool, but it is there is a seriousness people she going to art to look at art could to here and give us a sense off the kind of scope of of the shows that you'll see in because this time of year only again, because the collectors are all here because museum director's coming in from all over the world. This is the moment where the galleries choose to show their most high profile artists, their most ambitious shows. You get the sense that that's the case this year as well. I think they certainly re scheduled to coincide with an art week in early October whether freeze is going to happen not when they decided to go ahead with these shows they didn't know at the time I mean the atmosphere who knows about the buying but as I said, the looking is there and I think can people actually falling upon the looking with great seriousness the Great Bruce Nauman show that just opened at tate modern. Now. When is of course the artists artists he is such a genius. It's a great show. It's partly with the stayed licking in. Amsterdam. I'd like it to be in the whole of the floor of galleries, of course, half of its given over to. Warhol. So that's not the case. But actually what's interesting is now kind of haunts tate. They very cleverly recalibrated it partly for social distancing but I think to have now been very much within the body of takes on the ground floor. There's no was wonderful repetitive video of him, washing his hands again, and again, what could be more appropriate before you even enter the gallery he's voices piece an adaptive piece from his turbine project. You hear strange disembodied voices echoing down the stairwell above the actual exhibition. Gallery entry itself is his great neon saying the true artists helps well by revealing mystic truths of course, that sort of deeply ironic and then in you walk into nominees Judea the great time lapse piece of his studio with cameras scrutinizing the space when he is absent from it. So you're immersed in the artist's studio, and of course. So much of now work is about what the Hell Dr is doing the studio what resources to draw their body, the immediate things that come to hand nominees the most inventive artists. And, one phase in his work for example, costing space underneath his chair is a whole career for likes of Rachel Whiteread. So you've got this kind of protein feeling you engine studio, and then you go through this show with really wonderful installations but also works that in our feeble insecure beleaguered moment really do speak for the. Times I mean nowadays work is so much about you know about giresse about cruelty about humor about the body he caused his own hands and early work that takes on new resonance there's amazing. Insulation anthro socio you've got this bald headed man actor not Naaman shouting feed me, help me eat me gun me project to drown the walls on monitors insomnia feeling the spotless beleaguered body is here. So nominee taken on new resonance. It's a great show and it's a great show for our times. He may be a white male, but boy is it important? White Male? I'm very that data sharing him and is their big. Show. For this moment sort of sets the tone away as you know, a high water mark for the rest of the show is around ten. Yes it would normally cost how the Turbine Hall Project at this at this point, and they haven't they still a very wisely got our walkers great fountain. So that has been putting in on the back burner but then another great show just opened is Michael Clarke the Barbican which is. He's been choreographer in residence of the last fifteen years and he's this great figure. I mean yes he's adults when choreographer but he's also brought together so many cultural forces I mean back in the eighties he was bringing the world of ballet into the world of punk clubbing popular culture lgbt or we called then culture working with an amazing array of artists, all of whom are very much given the foreground in this in this insulation at the Barbican I mean you walk in and there's this Amalgamation of several Charles Atlas Films About About Clark, it's a multi screen installation. So you're immersed in the world of Clark of him dancing in talking of socializing the amazing music that's played and that's Thoughts Scott on the ground for the new go up into these various sort of areas of different artists working working with Clark. Of course, you've already seen the great designer. Lee Barry, who gave so much of a look of of his of his work in the films but you see the costumes you see Sarah Lucas and him collaborating. So there's a great kind of crossover and I would say that some what's GonNa Nice there's a moment where Lucas as. Remove devoted to Michael Clark with which Lucas has made a giant sculpture sounds like a plinth upon which sits a cost of Clark's headless body sitting on a toilet, and of course, out, you go to free sculpture on the few bits of freeze that's actually happening and there is another version. This great sandwich is cement sandwich in in the grounds of Regent's Park. So it's a nice cross reference from the commercial freeze still exist in analog form and the institutional. So let's talk about free scope droopy. Is it much the same as the sort of only bit of the fair effectively GonNa hate as it normally would do well yes and out to go to regents park and it's a great way. You'll socially distance value not in a group of larger than six and you can see some great sculptures. The Luca sandwiches I said is one of my favorites because. It's so democratic. You can climb on it. It sits said instantly recognizable icon also a great piece by by Gavin Turk, large door he likes the Pan It's giant bronze open door, which is a great one for people to kind of play with with an often the different kinds of spatial encounters with that also, doors are used in a great piece by. Lubna Humid, which is five conversations were five reclaim doors painted with is great stylish women in vivid colors incorporated into the kind of form of the door. So that kind of interconnecting with each other, there's also a great piece by Rebecca Warren. Statistic Peace Richard Long Stone Circle and a piece by an outside didn't know London based on calliope limos a giant Platt. In steel like a braid of a plot that becomes a huge column like a brand cousy so that you can actually inter relate with works you in the flesh eyeball to eyeball, and that's the part of freeze that sooner absolutely as before. But then freeze is also sort of adapted itself apart from going online of calls where you can go to endless viewing rooms. But it's GonNa caulk streets and corks because back in the day when my day when I was in dinosaurs roamed the earth when I first started the art world, it was the epicenter for the art world's. The contemporary art world, then it went to fallow in a bit quiet. Now, it's massively redeveloped a lot of the galleries of left, but actually now people come back into town including. Freeze live, which is one of one of our modern. Refurbished groundfloor space spaces in in freeze, and he has been setup as institute of Melodic, healing, and there are various various installations by for example, anthea. Hamilton here in Mercer of our Barrington, which will be activated and live action will take place. In Cork Street to very small audience we will all be live streamed. So free sort of popped into Cork street as the galleries as well. sadie Coles has a show that I'm also this gallery and various other. So corporate has become kind of weirdly reanimated freeze with galleries. Putting. Almost like boots Stephen Free, but honorable mention he's just around the corner new Burlington street with a great show of of Holly Hendrie sculpture. But he's also got a pop-up in cork sheets of Denzil foresters, enormous dynamic glorious paintings of his time in school in. Rome. In the eighties we've got sort of he is known for dinner is incredible scenes of reggae clubs, and here you've got it sort of taken to old nastily incarnation from his time in Rome in the eighties. So coq St Combat Life. Thanks to freeze. Its this talk about 'em Sarah Lucas. He's old Macadamia nurse because he's got a at his own gallery. Newport street gallery in Vauxhall. He has he's showing a body of work from that first decade, which is broadly seen as most successful decade. Artistically you've been what do you think? Well, it's called of century. It seemed only a matter of time that Damian made this high end high-spec Gallery that he created. As a receptacle for his own work and it's actually I mean, it might Sandra the hubristic that. But then also extrordinary works though I mean you can see the evil Lucien of his paintings because as early painted plates, painted ponds, and then painted boxes from the from the eighties also his his collages from really when he was before he was a student even when he was really starting out in the early eighties and so you've got the. Evolution is work and then you've got some great extraordinary pieces. I mean there's a slice shark, which is a slightly early one many great spot paintings. Then that is the great great pieces. It's called a hundred years rather than thousands another version I mean but is to my mind the greatest hearst piece, which is that the veterans full of living flies, which is kind of fantastic. Memento Mori where they look they're born that the box for the eggs. Hatch they bonus round they feed on cows head and some sugar, and then they're killed in an inset to cuter. But this vitrine is full of these repulsive buzzing Dotson flies and is this sort of short life cycle. It's a great piece. There's also the enormous sculpture which could have clarion calls the end of the ninety, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, him, the vast anatomical child's toy that he's blown up two colossal heights another very strange piece is vitrine stuffed animals. At the faking an auction with teddy bear auctioneer, and it'll paintings inside saying an arts about life. Not about money but I mean I would argue that actually it's probably interchangeable with him but never seen that piece before. So is kind of early retrospective of his early works into my mind the best works and seeing the evolution of these BOP pieces, the spinning paintings, the trees, all of which there is a really interesting interestingly the poll and it's for free as well. I, wanted to talk about you mentioned hearst's paintings and. His commitment to painting was pretty strong right from the start but we actually began this year on this podcast talking a lot about figurative painting and it just occurred to me that there is actually quite a lot of figurative painting happening right now in London. So you've seen some shows on. What it's really interesting and talking of hearst. One of his absolute old marcus from Goldsmiths. Gary Hume has a really I think wonderful shirts, Bruton August it's called occupy Lago paintings and it poses the problem of what does an artist whose? Formal aesthetic. Painter, due to respond to the current situation and he's taken two strands of work. One is these taken images of schools bombed schools just went when when a scenario, some a trustee that's happened in a war zone whether it be Afghanistan wherever it may be Syria often see this bombed-out schools with terrible scenes of carnage she takes will a horror out and he just reproduces the decimated schools with happy children's paintings happy Dekel in the background and abstract. It and that's one strand the others time the archipelago paintings based on the form of the life jacket, the outline where you've got this sort of the over the over over the shoulders and the void for the neck and the head, and so that abstract to becomes a sort of bio more fic- form, which it becomes like a sort of an abstract element. He hasn't his painting some of them sometimes there tangled together sometimes separately construed these very. Beautiful City pages report. There are these images of horror of loss of life. The life jackets become something else altogether you wouldn't know into know what they are but once you do see he's also made a sculpture out of almost life sized versions of them costing concrete looks like in Morgan is sculpture, but it becomes tangled mass of loss of life and loss of hope, but you also points out the void in the center of the life jacket. Is a bit like the Yo- ne- kind of female symbol signals, the vacuum, a symbol of life. So these are very exquisite but very somber works and the child's paintings on the walls of the devastated schoolrooms, a kind of cheerful but with a terrible vacuous scary feeling of of empty empty promise. So that's a really interesting series of work also says on this works by Donna shoots Thomas, Dane Big lumpen scary figures and creatures, these of humanoids that she paints. Showing how the use of painting can still render electric emotion? I mean. She's she's known for the for the causing scandal, the Whitney onto the Emmett till painting that she produced the open call skits for of of the young boy who was lynched in the sixties put this shows that she's a serious painter. This is not just about sensationalised images. This is about really grappling paint we made to say and do and Christina calls also caress produces strange obstructing bodily paintings. Showing the experience of inhabiting body but rendering it in paint. So figurative painting, it's really interesting I mean maybe it's because there is a very strong straight and painting and contemporary art at the moment as the recent Chappelle show confirmed or maybe it's because dealers are thinking. It's a safe bet painting sell who knows Thank. You very much around the. Louisa. Thanks for joining. US. Thank you. Now without the freeze fast how it galleries and auction houses responding to this moment melanie girls is an editor at large at the art newspaper and the art market columnist at the Financial Times I talked to her about how the market's getting. Melanie, the art will tends to have a certain rhythm through the year. We expect certain things to happen in certain than it's been the same pretty much for a very long time that is not happening right now is it's all over the place. Now, exactly it's It's chaos. At the moment what we'd got used to a certain events at certain times in other was happening with other events being at its. But you know you'll stay will fasten your staple auctions were always around the same time. I think it will settle because humans weeded chaos but I didn't think for a while. Just always seemed to be reasons to do things different me at the moment so. Chris just held its auction at a different time because of the US elections, we've got brexit coming heavens. What happens to the February season in London. And then very significantly, of course, as the virus I saw. This morning he sits me please come to my name on the on the twenty seventh about Tober. In London if we're open to you can't if we're not anoc Dan, you can't even clan for a couple of weeks ahead. So yeah, I. Think I. The calendar is a complete mess but you know experiments coming in left right and center. So it's it's stressful. But it could be an opportunity. So basically, this week because we've got the freeze on fair and everything else the auction houses would have had their sales in London right. But of course, because of the circumstances because of the pandemic that hasn't had a knack for there have been auctions that are sort of been a been global essentially yes. What's happened is the new coach which are meant to be in November, and only for one auction house this isn't even universal. This is what I mean by chaos. It's everyone doing their thing but the New York auctions are normally held in November. Christie's held its auction this week instead because act NEOCON which was hinted new, it was virtual so it's just A brave new world is I keep saying and you revolt in any sort of new sort of experimental format when you can i. think it does this is important because it does speak to the kind of ways because we all now in A. Situation where the event culture that normally surrounds auctions just isn't possible. So you were involved in the kind of experimental means to try and correct to sort of more event like feel around this Christie's auction, right? Absolutely, I was I was kind of beamed to to Rockefeller. Center in new. York, and sat next to someone who is in New York, we were set with someone who was a hundred yards away from him but it looked like we were all in the same room. An annual completely right. I mean events a thumb on, but they also confer value which is really important in this world the added value with earning all. The parties in the private views and people are trying to find ways to to create that. I honestly think it's impossible. The moment to replicate I didn't think anyone has managed to him and I had great fun working with Christie's in an in an alternative reality when I have people asking me all you. Oh Wow. You're in New York it's like, no. But but I didn't think great technologies is yet that the magic bullets An auction auction in fact works quite well as a TV show I mean they had something like two hundred and eight thousand viewers, a lots of platforms, but that's not the same as violence. So I just I just that to reinvent the wheel. Every time auction everyone has to every fair we see online has to have some novelty value To generate the sense of occasion. And this the most exciting thing wasn't me pretending to be in New York domestic citing thing was the auction of one hundred, Sixty, seven, million, year old dinosaur. But I don't know if you can do that all the time. So yeah. The proof I guess he's always going to be in the pudding. How did how did the actual auction do? It was okay. Then I think you need to sell. More than three, hundred, million dollars of art wants the premium is added in a week that you know president trump is in and out of hospital and we are in the middle of virus. You know it wasn't bad but I think they probably would have wanted it to have gone a bit better choice. So they sort of reached low estimate essentially. Yeah. Exactly. Okay. Thanks to a dinosaur. So, let's talk about the dealers and the online viewing room so We've heard from Louisa Buck, about what's on in London? There is a dynamic series of exhibitions and everything else but it's interesting because we used to in this week getting sales reports from galleries at the fairs, and these are often with lots of seven-figure, maybe even more sums in them. There are sales reports emerging aren't there. So tell me what they're telling you. Yeah. I've just got a long list of says I mean we're on day two I think of freezes lovie are and I got a long list of sales I mean, what's that? They sold fifteen million dollars worth on day one. Including Bradford. So three point, five, million dollars, which is, which is pretty high. But I mean loads of governors on this list. You. Tanya connector has sold Oliver Lasts and Sarah say analyst Saban Gillian wearing mooring pay at eighteen thousand pounds Goodman Gallery Kentridge six, hundred, thousand dollars. So it's unit sales all coming in as they did in a way it's just a question of really how how the galleries all using these reveals because it's not so different from failure would always get day one sales, but a lot of them have been negotiated beforehand and so on and so forth. So. You'd get now something a little bit different but the galleries a using the overalls a bit like an advert. In a newspaper, I mean unfortunately their biggest competitors. The newspaper. That paying they're paying four thousand, nine hundred pounds to share in having to use it in a wide sway bright. But at least. One of the things I was wondering about Olis' Does it give you greater insight into some of that sort of behind the scenes stuff. That's always the subject to speculation as you know, how much of this is negotiated from to what extent is a is a booth in a fair, just very, very advanced form of advertising or you know all real new sales made in the booze and to an and how many what proportion is actually sales and what proportion is sort of pre negotiated that comes to feel that you're getting any insight through the VR and the fact that the fares themselves on that she. Got Anymore true in sight except you pointed out to match David's WanNa, put out a list of sales this week from three different channels. So from the freezer. From that own website and from that Gallery Show That is interesting. Think that people are a little more honest about from where the sales are happening but that's as much to drive traffic to their and website to be honest. But no I think it's as much of a mystery. You know I'm still told day one overall sales of this in the same way as I was told day one free sales of this. It's a, it's not an acceleration, a continuation. And I've asked Louisa what the mood in the gallery she was visiting was like, what's the mood music from galleries dealers the eappen speaking to just about the health of the market Dealers are always optimistic and I. I'm quite impressed by how about this topic may still an how active people but I. Think. This is this week in London I. Think There's a bit of a fair I saw the they altered by emily singer earlier today and she says a bit of a fair going back to the calendar that we're all kind of busy busy busy until the end of October. And then it gets awfully quiet. There's almost nothing that is happening certainly not in the in Europe or the US. and so people really I think the fear is okay. What would ticking by where we have our hybrid sales galleries but we? We don't know what happens next season. We haven't seen the worst of right now. Curiously, there has been an fair happening this week you've been visiting tell us the one, fifty, four off air. So tell us where is it and what does it look? Yeah, it's. It's always been in Somerset and it is in Somerset House again and I think working with a place that knows how to function as an institution has probably helped it open. Only twenty nine galleries, which is relatively small for not fat, but it's great to go. It's great to see people. It's amazing to see all I mean I found that I'm looking at emceeing textures unnoticed sing layers in a way I never I probably never used to do because I'm so used to saying things on a flat screen recently. I spent more than two hours that which again for twenty nine galleries is is it's the inverse of what you do on a navy seal. See this ticketed entry. Say Small, of course. Quite, convoluted one way system, which is all fine. That's what they have do. The only problem is if you've forgotten to ask someone something, we'll take effect of something you have to go all the way round again, but it's fine. It's across two wings. They opened to be peace at ten o'clock. This morning on it was busy in each is David was there and everyone's quite. Galvanized it to do their best and excited to see each other galleries. Super happy to be there some of them. You know there's a New York gallery who has a local contact in London, who is still doing manning the booze for them because they physically come they could they a lot of people have quarantine for two weeks? but yeah, everyone's pretty pretty upbeat. Just just to be here you talk about sort of galvanization. We've heard about the galleries whatsapp groups during the lockdown where they were all in touch with each other and helping each other and all that kind of stuff. Is there a sense you think that the art market has somehow become more of a community through all this or is that just the sort of headline galleries want us to think I'd anything there's a spirit of collaboration because it's in everyone's interest. We all do well, I didn't think anyone I didn't you know the bigger galleries might not want that immediate competitors to do as well as them, but they don't want people to fail right now and you definitely didn't want people lower down the food chain to fail because that's that's all future Whether or not anything has yet worked from from a galvanizing point of view I'm not sure yet. I think at the moment everyone's sort of doing what they used to do online and a bit being nice tweet each other. But I think watch this space. I think that will be more things happening I. Think now we've realized this is a temporary blip. We are going to see I think galleries in particular. Really finding ways to come together and do something that makes money. Thank you so much for coming on and too. Much for having me Ben. Thank you. you can visit our freeze. We might Christine with the latest analysis and a guy, the key events at the newspaper. Dot Com Lindy you've Lansky talks to fiesta gates about his new transatlantic exhibitions in a moment. But first, here are a few of the top stories on the newspaper's website this week. The rumpus over the postponement of the Philip guston exhibition in three. US museums and the Tate in London continues to create headlines The director of the Tate and the National Gallery of art in Washington of outline their reasons for the postponement as Gareth Harris writes came in Feldman Director of the National Gallery of Art told the hyper allergic podcast that it felt like this was a tough time in America to do this exhibition. Particularly at this moment stressing the show cannot forward with walkie rhetorical teams. Meanwhile, the director of the Tate added in a letter to The Times newspaper in London. The preceding would not have been possible for financial and logistical reasons. France's National Assembly voted on Tuesday to possibl returning twenty seven colonial artifacts from French museums to Benin and Senegal as Anisimov. Rights. If enacted, the bill would compel Frantz to pretend twenty-six works looted from Benin's Royal Palace currently in the collection of Music Apron Jacques Chirac in Paris and assume would return permanently to Senegal. Francis Music. Dilemma. And finally, the latest postponement of an art fair as Anna Brady writes tae fast in Maastricht will be late next year from mid March until the end of May take off said in a statement that move allows the globe luck immunity to boost securely and safely come together in person at Pfaff an at the height of a European control season. You could read these stories and much more at the out newspaper, DOT COM or online at s which can get from the APP store. We'll be back after this. We cannot is sponsored by Christie's these October Chris Percent Classic week, as a hybrid sale series with ten live online auctions of elegant timeless pieces ranging from a strong collection, of Dutch landscape and the enviable collection of decorative arts from Jane Rights, men to Roman. Marbles rare, edition of Shakespeare's first folio and Louis Armstrong's trumpet alongside Classic Wake The prints and multiples department will online only sale dedicated to Francis to is Capriccio. Discover and bid on ray of extraordinary works that define and standards of cross. MANSHIP. Find out more on Christie's. Welcome back before we hear from Fiesta Gate don't forget to catch up with the newspapers focused brush with featuring in-depth artist interviews and subscribe to hear new episodes. In the coming weeks you can do that at Apple podcast, spotify, Amazon or wherever listening. Now Fiesta Gates has two exhibitions opening this week in New York and London the to related shows feature works across a range of materials including brick reliefs. Paintings using tar LASCO works in glazed and five clay and a number of works when his spine series using bound volumes of the African American magazines, Ebony and jet contributing editor in New York Linda Jablonski spoke to Gates about the two shows and he's going community projects with these organization rebuilt foundation based in his native Chicago. Let me just say that. Ti. For those who don't know although I'm sure everyone does the astor has exhibited in cities all this country in Europe in by annuals in galleries and museums over the last ten years but this show. Titled Vessel. Is his first solo show in New York City Simultaneously Somehow through the magic of I don't know what you're opening a show of related work the same day. This. Saturday the tenth of October in London White Cube. Gallery. So this means at least people in New York and London both can see what you've been up to during the months of the pandemic shutdown which seems to have been a lot. Yup. I mean six months of non travel. That's like four years. That's four artist years I mean. I've been to your studio in Chicago I know how big it is and I assume you have lots of assistance but. For this show for this material you were all alone. Is that true? Yeah. Well, the studio doesn't have lots of assistance. Anymore that model no longer works for me during this time, we've had to builders working with me off site and I really mean it that that the six months that was preceded by. Three or four months at the American Academy in Rome in. So that that period of time of focused attention on a set of projects I've not had that in this last decade. Inside admit. If I had all day to read. Say there were days. Can read for the whole day and the next day that I could conceive of whole dot Taurel treaties. During that period. But it was just so nice to be in Rome and have a Roman Day. Feel like three days. You know. Into a day of research. Really, really be a huge gift, and so I was able to come back to Chicago with pretty crystallized ideas that just needed to be executed. And Lots of new kind of ripe convictions about what it means to be making. winemaking felt important to me and stuff. And so the new tar paintings came out of that. Okay. So if for the benefit of our listeners, let's talk about what exactly is in this show there are different. Chapters that unfold as as one goes through the gallery. Beginning with. Our I don't know you can tell me if they're the newest works you've made or or made before the brick reliefs that are hanging on the wall in the front row of the gallery. Yeah. So the the brickworks, our new, the brick release, our new. But. The exploration in ceramics isn't new. Okay. So let's I would like to go through this. The way one sees the show, which is it'd be beginning with one tar painting and will explain that in a second. And these wall reliefs, there are abstract works made of bricks. Is this the first time we worked with brick? Well, no. In a way, the brickwork has gone from you know making small bricked installations that would appear on a pallet strapped up kind of brick as a formalized object, a minor Carl Andre perhaps, and then they started to evolve. From hand making breaks at the studio to being involved in a production environment with a brick manufacturer. In North Carolina, where they were taking a colored bricks that they weren't gonNA use and they were taking all of that that colored clay material, putting it in a hopper adding additional of manganese dioxide and black stay, which would make the bricks black mixing that to extruded kind of minute black brick. And so in some ways, the brig work is is a direct engagement with like an industrial reclamation as much as it is taking on the mind tristen investment in building as a way of reclaiming space and restoring space. So in this case. Goes in didn't need a brick situation but I thought when you enter the space having these brick sculptures function as sculptures, and maybe it's just the material clay. You don't know that it's brick. It doesn't function like a brick on the wall that it felt like the right on introduction to the rest of the exhibition they struck me the there. Each one of these has a different arrangement, some of which they have a texture. As well as a Patina or a glaze but they almost look like you've worked them by hand as you would with clay I don't know how you got those effects but. It also reminded me or made me think of they were like many land art projects. They look like something you'd see from the air. Flying over. A piece of land and the suddenly this structure. Yup I had a lot of fun trying to imagine the highest sculptural use. For the lowest sculptural material and in. So in that way, you know that they're bricks but in fact, it's just clay clay made into a square. Becomes a potentially a modular material but for me, it's really like all how can I take this material? and. Encourage encourage into new things or demonstrate that it's actually as important material to contend with as any other material that would be in a in a conventional art. Situation. The brick can win hanging with these works as one tarp painting. What you call tar paintings and tar is one of the materials who've been working with for a long time you're. Somewhat autobiographical reference to your father who was a Roofer. And so I've seen some of your previous tar paintings which were a different scale and a completely different gesture. It seems to me and these are painted have pigment enamel paint on them as well as while they're tar paper what not tar paper The torch down, you call it it feels necessary to kind of describe the evolution of roofing. Maybe in a in the fifties, sixties and Seventies. People used an asphalt paper. So. They would mop the roof with hot tar hot hot vitamin, and then they would lay out A. An asphalt kind of paper. Then they would tar over that paper overlapping the paper. Then you would tar the entire move after that, and it would be like putting Shellac on top of a hardwood floors. Over time, the building industry started to use a rubber material that was thicker and it was backed by tar. So that people would then take a torch. Towards the back of the roof, the rubber material to activate the tar and then laid that material. So it was a, it was a dig material that was much more consistent in kind of kept the water out better. But over about the last five years, I've been trying to play with this material like how do I use torch down and realize that I could. Painted and the intrigue the material. As. A kind of collage material. And use my torch as kind of adhesion device, and then we started playing again with older roofing material. Torching it it pulling those parts apart putting them back together and then assembling essentially new painting with these old roofing materials the vessel. Selves the ceramic works you started. I would say you started in life singing in the choir at your church but pottery is what you went to school for. So working with clay was the first thing you did as an artist but you also and you also studied in Japan the works initial. Have references to west African sculpture as well, and you also studied urban planning simultaneously with part part making. Yeah Planning Planning with the main thing and clay was like the little side thing. I'm a minored in in studio art, but it feels important voted to at least mention urban planning, and if we were take the disciplinary title away, we will be left with a person who studied the formation of cities in the management of cities. And the management of cities through governance and administration whether that Administration is public administration private administration like. Development Corporation. Councils, of planning. Departments of labor, streets and sanitation in the value of of studying or planning then is that you become a little bit of a kind of. Poet of the construction of cities the city feels like a form that's valuable but it's also you're operating. At a level of. That's hundreds of millions of dollars a year in order to keep the city working. And so what happens when you give a potter good administrative skills to be poetically reflective on the city then the potter was to break rooms the potter wants to build quarries. The Potter wants to create wealth for the poor. You deploy those administrative skills that help you poetically reimagined the city you can. You can deploy those skills in super pragmatic ways. Well, let's talk about the pragmatic ways you've done that with the rebuild foundation where you have taken derelict houses on the south side of Chicago neighborhood that is and beautiful absolutely impeccable filled with joy and kindness and resilience in beauty. I think you've brought that out with the houses that you bought renovated and re- purpose for the community with your other. Activity, which is collecting or collections You bought the contents of a doctor wax record store that had gone out of business a bookstore filled with books relating to architecture and turn them into kind of libraries accessible to the public most spectacularly. There's the Stony Island Arts Bank which I visited once and have never stopped thinking about consists amazing. It is a library, it's a reference center and it's alive and it has an exhibition space and I it's fascinating to look at the material there. Some of this has entered into the show I saw goes in in this tower of books of bound volumes of. You bought the the print run of the magazines from the Johnson. Publishing Company of jet and I also started hunting. For Ebony and jet magazines all over the world I started buying out inventories in Atlanta became obsessive. I became a collector. I. Mean. I wish I could afforded like three or four engine Deca crosby's paintings but you know I just kind of took the things that were around him. I wanted to say on record that rebuild, which I'm extremely excited and proud of has done. A lot of things but I don't want to neglect the fact that my studio we buy buildings we by building so that we could use them so that when their interns in the summer, there's a place to stay so that if we if we were to have a good week and a person needs to like crash, they don't have to grass in my bid, they can crash next door. We buy buildings to to demonstrate. that. Blog wealth is willing to invest in a black neighborhood while black. And, that in that black wealth isn't just a hedge fund investing in white space in that artists are more likely to take more risks than most other people embedding neighbourhood because artists are constantly creating. A crude value. For themselves, not just financial value. Telling about understanding how a building has value beyond the ability to buy and sell it and flip it. But a building has inherent value. Because it means that I can do more of the things that I love. I could store more of the things that I love I could care for more of the people who I love. I wanted to say rebuild and the studio had been actively restoring buildings and in some cases restoring them not just for some kind of grand. Mission Statement. You know did you can put on a logo or in get people that sympathetically give money restoring them because the the spaces are beautiful and I have a fetish I. Have a fetish beautiful space empty space. non-productive Space Holy Holy Space I don't want the word to be perceived as a missionary project. The work is actually space theory. This is this is. This is lethal. It's very obvious when you even not even have to be in these spaces even just reading about them. Or looking at images of them is that you come to this urban planning. Let's say this reclamation project and you're reclaiming not just spaces or archives, but also creating or maintaining. Layers of history of that community and that era that would otherwise be lost in. That are so important just as a human connection that you come to this science of urban planning as an artist as you were saying as a poet and it is really different at different than what you know an administrator or politician or an economist will vendor. This point you're making is actually quite important to me that when we when we talk about the challenges that black communities have around black and brown communities around the world. But particularly in the not the united. States. If you go back and you look at all of the systematic undoing that happened, FBI scandals of them infiltrating black organizations pitting people against each other assassination crack. The influx of military weapons, import black places in there they ll ability very little cost. If you WANNA take all of the phenomena of that I would say what actually happened was kind of deep spiritual erosion. So that the family gets jacked up, you don't have the church anymore the archdiocese is jacked. You know all of the the social infrastructure that would have caught little bobby in spanked him on his but an incentive onto mom and mom hang out his button and bobby wouldn't do it again, all abet social infrastructure is gone and at the same time people are saying this nuclear family shit is a thing of the past. Oh, God is dead. WHO NEEDS IT? Oh, you know this is a land who needs to eat at home anymore. Stupid. You know hang out in it what you end up with. Is a seemingly sophisticated secular environment but an environment where the all of the all of the netted work. Is unedited. So part of the project to me has be lacing back emotional social and spiritual webs even in advance of sometimes new construction. So as I, can we have a place where we just eat together? Or read together or just be together. And that if you can, if you could make those kinds of spaces, actually think that it does more than people give it credit for. You know. If someone asking do you think your projects are making impact? Doesn't matter because if you're only gauging impact by bricks and mortar, it does matter. But do I think that people WANNA be around each other more and longer in black space as a result of the space that I build? Yes. Then a person who would never consider living where I live could then say I could see myself here and what makes them want to say that is something that's invisible. It's not something visible, and so the word eggos IAN is also trying to get at that invisible energy that is present. When we're cool visible things happe- talking about a communal experience and nuclear families you grew up in a family with nine children. You're the youngest and you're the only boy. And I would like to ask you if having eight sisters older sisters in any way contributed to this world view that you have. Well, maybe maybe that that very thing reinforces my point that. We all live together in this, a four unit apartment building that my parents own in my older sisters had their own apartments you know but part of my survival was that building and then, and then another part of my wiring was these these nine or ten personalities that were hard wiring me to to love to be kind to respect women you know to want to be better. So I think this idea that there was a there was not the proximity that the architecture gave us. Then there was the kind of emotional richness. That my sister's gave yeah. That makes you may be preoccupied with things that other people aren't preoccupied. I would like to ask the this tower of books. They're bound volumes of the magazines which are in a wooden structure with the spines on the inside, and you can enter Itch So the outside the shelves are open and I couldn't help it. I. Took one down look through it. Which? I'm not sure visitors to the gallery can do it was a little like being back in this stony island art spank and looking through the books there. You know I'm a white American from the north and I grew up reading lots of magazines and I remember being aware of jet in Abadi but I don't know that I'd ever actually seen one and there was this parallel. History of America in the Mid Century America that was that I didn't know anything about I. Didn't know those people I didn't know those places. I didn't know those activities. It was fascinating and also made me feel small because there was so much I didn't know and yet coexisted with what I did know and a whole culture. I didn't know about even that was beyond music and books is. This. Snapshot of life. Yeah I. Mean it's reasonable to say that blackness parallel universe for song. I would also say that in this case, the kind of cultural specificity that the the piece called New Egypt that new Egypt offers it's intended to function like. A kind of Holy Grail of the Black American experience. You know the floor of the floor of new Egypt is. The Altar Center from Saint Lawrence. Church. And maybe in my mind the warfare that. Europeans have been lauded for. As as Rome conquered other parts of the world. So, much of that warfare included the dismantling the burning, the pillaging of people's libraries in the assassination of their scholars and the kind of dismantling of Millennia generations of of intelligence so that people wouldn't even know the tremendous legacy that they. Are Inherent. And so I think that in some ways, these two works, one new Egypt, and then the other kind of the spine works walking prayer they're trying to talk to each other about in this case Carnegie's. Desire to see the everyday person had access to reading and literature and knowledge by by setting up these libraries all over the country, and in fact, other parts of the world kind of monopolists commitment to pedagogy in education. In the oven truth that. So much of the world's knowledge has been pillaged. Through warfare and the spoils of war. So that. The people who have had extreme knowledge might forget it in a generation. So. I think this commitment to building libraries, if feels like it also feels like kind of intellectual impulse. Not. Emotional spiritual impulse of a person with a path analogy the like I'd like to imagine. That I had the ability to rebuild a black nation that would be a small a small part of that, but but the task should know lesbian ambitious task. What, what is in the shower in? London. London is is is more specifically about how I respond to the Johnson Publishing Company with new works so. This this carpet remnant that is from the original Johnson Publishing Company building. Becomes the launching pad for a body of new spine works. There's a tribute to Josef Albers with a series of words called homage to the square which Albert's was deeply invested in in a way it was a way of playing out his color theories through squares is so I take on Johnson Publishing Kinda, black modernist color strategies with the Joseph whose. Square in mind and so text heavy exhibition but it's one that I'm really proud of the fact that these things are both manifesting at the same time. I almost wish they were both in a museum that people could get to wish the galleries could even maybe talk more so that people recognize the two shows as a kind of continuing. Thank your theanswer. Thank you so much. Casey's exhibition black vessels custodian at five five, five West Twenty Fourth Street New York from the tenth. Of October the nineteenth of December, his exhibition sweet square of dark abyss is at white online and freeze online until the sixteenth of October and you see the works in Sweet Square of Dhaka base in real life at White Cube Berman's is viewing room note you need to book an appointment. And that's it for this week subscribed to the. NEWSPAPER OF COM COMA subscribing the top left of page, and you'll find a range of subscriptions. So at the top of the page funding to subscribe to our various newsletters. Subscribe to this podcast and a brush with if you haven't already see gives a rating review if you've enjoyed. You can also find us on twitter at Tanno and facebook and instagram cokes. The we cannot is produced by Judy hops get do. Track baby. Be Editing and sound. design. Thanks to Louisa Melanie. Lindor. Fiesta. and. We'll see you next week. The, we cannot is sponsored by Christie's visit Christie's dot com to find out more about the world's leading auction house seventeen, sixty, six, auction, private sales online. Anytime. Soon.

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Beauty: More Than Skin Deep

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

29:26 min | 7 months ago

Beauty: More Than Skin Deep

"Elizabeth arden is not a woman who backed down from a challenge. It's the spring of nineteen fifty. An arm is undeniably new. York city's clean of beauty when women walk into luxurious salon at fifth avenue and forty second street. They enter the brave new world of beauty. Care the service is first class. They received massages manicures and skin care treatment using this ardent own special recipe which he creates a laboratory attached to her salon customers. Fine new beauty products designed and package with hand-printed gold lettering and the now famous red door logo on is an entrepreneur in an era when american women don't even have the right to vote so naturally for so long is also a place where women come to discuss the issues of the time like universal suffrage and labor rights but a challenger. His recently arrived on the scene. On forty ninth street in midtown manhattan. A new salon opened to great fanfare. It's only is petite on gary and woman named helena rumen stein who calls herself a beauty scientist and she's known nervous has made her own fortune. Inventing skin creams and treating women and opulent salons in europe and australia. And now she's set her sights on new york. It's shot across the bow to elizabeth arden. And the starting a rivalry that would come to give birth to the beauty and cosmetics industry that we know. today. I'm walter isaacson and you're listening to trail blazers and original podcast from dell technologies. Goes back to a room for some finishing touches. Her makeup artist beauty headquarters. You all know that a good appearance is a mind. And here's something else for your to shave. That goes with your own collaring and tipped off your clothes to advance. They're much better in fact perfect and make the most of what nature has given you. Elizabeth arden might have been the reigning queen of beauty in new york city at the turn of the twentieth century. But you could argue that. The original queen of beauty was egypt's cleopatra for signature look was famous throughout the ancient world. She employed some of history's first makeup artist to producer cosmetics such as eyeliner face powders in route from ancient times up until the nineteenth century has networks were primarily one by nobility and the fluent upper-class after the industrial revolution they became more affordable and accessible but during the victorian era wearing makeup was considered immoral but many women still adorn themselves in their homes with lip color eye shadow face powders and perfumes. There was a demand for cosmetics but the market at yet to be built the tipping point for the modern beauty industry took place in the early twentieth century. When the american women's suffrage movement began to make headway in the fight for female liberation and the women's right to vote taking place outside. Lindy woodhead is the author of warpaint. Adam elena rubenstein and miss elizabeth awed their lives at a time so rivalry. They weren't just confined to the home so much that will entertainment saved going out but the didn't necessarily have to be chaperoned all the time women would taking place in public life. They were more visible than ever before. This increased visibility resulted in heightened awareness about their physical appearance and created demand for women's spaces such as salons growing up on a farm in canada. Elizabeth arden dream of becoming a nurse but when she arrived in new york in her mid twenties the only job she could find was as a cashier in a small solon showing the wealthy women of the city. After a few years she took the knowledge gained from that block and started her own business. She had healing hands. She had the ability to really get to grips with a problem. If you had a skin problem and that's think about how horrible scan problems can be for people whether you're blushing whether you've got extra also things. And she had a cream or lotion or a patient for all of them or was already a wealthy woman selling products wholesale to some of the biggest department stores in new york. She was on top. And that's where she wanted to stay. She was very rarely challenged. She was controlling woman. She felt that she was on her way. And here was elena. Rubinstein arriving in town and this is not a challenge that miss arden took happily to she was very jealous. She was very angry and she knew who rubinstein was. Arden had traveled to europe in one thousand nine hundred and visited women's time salon in london and paris unfamiliar with a product and recognized but entrepreneurial prowess that was a businessman who made a remark to an early forbes magazine and he said you know madame rubinstein. She would have been good at anything whether she was selling widgets machine tools. Whatever she was doing she was amazing. Saleswoman but arden never thought. Rubinstein would come to new york and when she did. The rivalry grew fierce almost immediately. They marketed their competing. Skin creams aggressively playing on the fears. Women had the blemishes and wrinkles. They also competed when it came to adopting new cosmetics technologies in the early twentieth century. Rapid advances in science and technology. We're having a positive effect on american society from cars and airplanes. To frozen food and penicillin consumers have technology gave them more freedom and a better quality of life. Rubinstein recognize this growing faith in new technology and used it to her advantage. It was no accident that rubinstein called herself a beauty scientist in advertising pages. She was sometimes depicted wearing a white lab coat conveying a mastery of her own cosmetics creations soon caught onto and so when either woman came out with a new line of eyebrow pencil mascara applicators or lipsticks retractable tubes. The other was shorter. Answer with the release of her own line of new products as well and while this competition define their careers. It turns out that it's the things they have in common. That truly define them as entrepreneurs they desperately had to support themselves and their extended families they were both daughters of failed fathers. They became the provider of everything over the course of a fifty year business where i've already rubens nine ardent built enormously successful cosmetic empires today. The industry is a global marketplace worth more than five hundred billion dollars. And that's partially thanks to elizabeth arden and elena rubinstein. They were incredibly ambitious. They were totally professional in the in the sense of dedication and these two women were truly truly pioneers and they started something which is now a global force but it wasn't only ardent rubinstein. Who helped assemble the beauty industry. The nineteen twenties were turning point in the history of cosmetics. It was a decade when a rowing culture of liberation that the march of technological progress. It's hard to imagine anything as tiny as a tube of lipstick changing the world. But that's what happened. When in nineteen fifteen maurice levy invented the small swiveling applicator. Previously lip color was expensive was tedious. To put on. That had to be applied at home. Now it was portable for as little as five cents. A woman could conceal a tube in her pocket. Or handbag and stride confidently into the modern age when you had Women kind of go. More into the workforce and be more independent and especially in the nineteen twenties when of women got the right to vote that the the wearing of the lipstick became sign of an independent woman. This is gabriella hernandez she is the co founder of besse cosmetics and the author of classic beauty the history of makeup. It meant that she didn't have to be married. She could be self sufficient and have a job in take care of herself. Which was a very novel concept. Even the word make up did not exist until nineteen twenty. That's the year are humble. Hollywood wigmakers named max factor coined the term factor was a pioneer a foundation inventing various recipes for actresses whom he would make up to look stunning on black and white film. The allure of hollywood actresses on film played a major role in the demand for plasmatics among women across america. Indeed the entire modern history of america runs parallel to the shifting concepts and expressions of beauty in popular culture. It's interesting when you look at every decade. Did you can see how the makeup and how women were wearing this kind of mirror. What's going on either. Social your economically of the period like the fifties for example because it was after the war and obviously the idea was to marry and have kids and have families so there was a huge Idea of women as ultra feminine. Sex appeal had to be really up there so you had overdrawn lips in very defined browse but up until this point. African american women found themselves largely ignored by the beauty industry. That is until one significant. Pioneer broke the color barrier. Her name was eunice. W johnson with her husband john johnson. She founded ebony magazine. America's first periodical aimed at an african american readership and in nineteen fifty eight. They launched ebony fashion fair to raise money for charity. My mother really wanted to showcase the best a fashion across the world for african american audience. Linda johnson rice Ceo of johnson publishing company and eunice johnson's daughter. And what she wanted to show was that you could be inspired by. This looks at inspired to express yourself and that you deserved to look and to be the very best. The annual ebony. Fashion fair was the first fashion show to feature african american models and as groundbreaking as it was to see black women on the runway in couture. The real innovation was happening back stage in the makeup room. Fashion fair cosmetics came from the ebony. Fashion fair show. It really came because my mother started saying the models that we had hired mixing and matching different cosmetic products. You know backstage. You know trying to find the right hugh that would match their complexion and so when you're trying to mix and match these sheds at my mother just kept saying this. There's got to be something that we can do at that time. None of the prominent cosmetics companies made products for african american women. Beauty brands figured that all women regardless of collar the same makeup eunice w johnson was the first two wheel. How wrong they were after failing to convince the big brands to adapt to a changing marketplace. Eunice assembled a team of chemists and began to make her own makeup. And in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy three. She launched fashion fair. As matic's fashion fail was the first makeup company for african american women and it remains the largest black owned beauty brand in america. Every time you see a black model on the runway every time you see black model in an ad black brand in the beauty space and then the cosmetic space you have to thank you and us johnson over the next thirty years. The world of cosmetics continued to appeal various trends from disco culture. The punk rock and in between but something happened in the early two thousands that transform the up world a powerful but simple piece of technology was introduced that disrupted the beauty industry more than any other innovation in the last century. That technology was a little online video. Showing platform called youtube on july. Twenty second two thousand and seven. A young woman in england helped create the new multibillion dollar arm of the cosmetics industry lauren loop was a regular twenty. Something falls in love with makeup as a young girl while watching her grandmother before her beauty rituals she enrolled in beauty college and discovered. She had a real talent for cosmetics. Then one day. She decided to make a video of herself. Applying eye shadow and she uploaded to youtube. It was just me me bedroom. The vigil was very really. I think he could share the computer found in the background. Though i didn't speak so so nervous. But i did this corporal collide lock and could not believe the amount of comments that got asking. Could i do more. And i'll just. That's how it all started. The original video eventually received almost a hundred thousand views so look began to post videos trying out new looks and practicing which he had learned in college audience grew by leaps and bounds. And just a short time how people request and things like celebrity locks things. That scene on the tally 'cause all the music channels with the vibrant makeup blocks and also can you do this method. Well i'll give it a turn. But i'm not professional and i'm not really sure what i'm doing but i had fun anyway. She may not have been a professional makeup artist. But luke was at the forefront of the greatest transformation in the beauty industry since the birth of the salon. The rise of the influential at the core of luke's extraordinary success was something very basic. Authenticity viewers flocked to her youtube channel. Because he was open and honest about beauty products techniques and about herself. It was the kind of intimate connection that big cosmetics companies could only dream of achieving. The youtube beauty revolution had begun then. He had automatic of bronze thinking. Oh what's this. I'm going to have to get in on this. And the might we're gonna send you a lot of product would love it if you did a vigil and shore. Wh- show everyone the products and give your honest opinion one day. A major beauty brand offered luca contract to promote her own line of their products. She eventually accepted because she believed that her presence was important to millions of other ordinary women. Who felt that. The beauty industry wasn't speaking to them. I was on the front cover of new york times magazine and it was the everyday woman and it was amazing. It was that point. When i realized what i had done. And that was created. A stir and allow austin. And when i say us i mean the everyday girl not just your models and not just airbrushed it was about allowing vilnis and it was about uncovering and latin ost sign through. That was such an amazing time in the industry. Although she was excited by new fame luke began to experience some tension between promoting the products of a global beauty brand while still remaining her genuine self and being real with her fans. The toll eventually became too much for luke to bear and after her contract finished she stopped posting videos for a few years but fans never forgot about her. She touched countless people with a grainy. Do it yourself videos about eye-shadow and the importance of staying true to yourself. And eventually they helped her regain the same inspiration. She'd felt when she posted that very first video. I do believe had a positive impact people who have emailed and of sad because i inspired them when they were teenagers. The now in the twenties thirties. And they've gone on cosmetology school the now on the on sal on the makeup artist so it's not just about what's going on on youtube it's about people in everyday life of took advantage of the the inspiration have given them about just going out and doing what the want. Today beauty youtubers some of the most followed creators on this site with the most popular having more than twenty million subscribers each and it's an industry that now spans across gender lines as well with some of the most popular influencers marketing products directly to men. Even laurin liu has begun posting videos again in which she continues to share her makeup tutorials beauty tips and the wisdom of her life. The youtube bear fundamentally changed the relationship between beauty brands and consumers it gave consumers more power to demand accountability quality as well as personalized service and in one sector of the industry that demand for personalized care is leading some innovators to look inward for new ideas. All the way into our dna around the time that lorne loot realized the pitfalls of being youtube influence or a swedish dermatologist named and wetter noticed something else whether it's been the past twenty years diagnosing skin diseases and advising patients when using creams to treat everything from exit premature aging but in her otherwise cheerful stockholm office. This always been one constant source of never ending frustration and used to having patient stacking up all new products on my table on my desk. They county quite frustrated. Nothing really works since the time of elizabeth arden and helena. Rubinstein skin kooning's have had an almost mystical appeal. It's no coincidence. That the two great pioneers of modern beauty care. Doctor start making and marketing skin creams. Their clients constantly worried about dryness blemishes wrinkles in the effects of exposure to ultraviolet sunlight realizing that the same old approach to personalize skincare. Just wasn't working letter. Wondered if there was somewhere else she could look and that's when she hit upon the idea of looking inside our genes in med school. I was actually taught that only twenty percent mattered. You know your genetic setup it was all external factors how you live if you smoke if you some base pollution but these last years. We learned that it's as much as sixty percent determined by genetics. Four years ago wetter and hope partner launched a company called l. They began to investigate genetic factors skin problems and then create bespoke solutions for each individual patient. It all starts with a dna test just for your skin allows researchers have identified sixteen markets inside human. Dna that all relate to how skin aged things like pigmentation collagen quality elasticity and water retention are all determined by our genes taken together. These markers tell a story about the natural fitness of our skin and how it response to environmental factors such as pollution radiation allergens and stress. Once you've learned the story of your skin the chemis yet to work. Each skin-care profile is matched with specific products and ingredients. So the cream. You put on your face. As tailor-made for your specific skin analysts estimate that the market for dna base skin-care will top eleven point seven billion dollars by twenty twenty-five it feels like the dawn of a new era of beauty science and although modern beauty care embraces scientific innovation like never before wetter and her partner still face the familiar challenges of disrupting an industry from the outside. I do believe familiar perspective as a doctrine medical doctrine scientists that we have good products. It's just hard to show the market. How good they are so even if your best in class you know how to get out there. That's a really big challenge wearing a white lab coat and a reassuring smile on her face. When it cuts a figure. Not unlike madame rubin style in some of our advertising a century ago. They're still no such thing as a miracle cream but you can experience. The magic of a product made just for you. One hundred years ago as consumers. Peru's elena rubinstein's cosmetics a fifth avenue department store or sat for makeover at one of elizabeth arden's on julius salons they began to experience personal beauty in a whole new way and they started to see it too. And that's because a simple piece of technology suddenly became a staple figure in most american homes and businesses. The mirror for the first time we began to look at our own reflection as part of our daily routine ever since the mirror has been a product that until recently nobody really expected to change much paramore abby and i'm the founder and ceo of modern face. If you've ever used your smartphone camera as a mirror to touch up your makeup or check your hair. Eve likely thought. What if this mirror could show me a different for cosmetics. That's what a raby thought to. When he invented modifies the underlying idea of our technologies that we we humans always mirrors made looking. They're looking at our faces near is something we do on a routine basis and all we do we take that same mirror experience that we have every day but at the virtual component the you could get a sense of what different products bidet skin changes or hair changes or changes on your face could look like giving a shopper. A sense of what product might be best for them back in two thousand and seven. A raby was an engineer. At the university of toronto he was developing artificial intelligence to improve speech recognition which required precise wheel time projections of facial features on a computer screen. The technology had the power to make speech recognition hyper accurate. But it also had another. Didn't potential and my co-founder had the idea that we should also added facelift. Option six filter that would apply to face that would get blemishes and would perfect the skin and remove pours and things like that something. That's very common today but back then it was quite and that's how modifies was started as as that facelift was the key to getting us into this precision face filter effects that we started to make modifies isn't augmented reality. Technology that simulates changes to your face potentially limitless ways. Do you want to try new hair. Color a shade of lipstick or see how your skin might look. After using a particular cream modifies can take almost any cosmetic product in the world. And let you try it on. Virtually its technology has been adopted by over a hundred brands and in two thousand eighteen. Laurie al acquired a rabbit startup which team of scientists and engineers continues to explore. The possibility of a are beauty. Care as we've deployed this technology in more places. The realization is that none only is useful but it actually does help. Consumers make it better decision. The more coffin about the product or color. They're choosing and be more likely to actually end up buying a product as the technology of smartphones. In cameras gets better. Modify augmented reality. Come closer and closer to mirroring well mirrors and by using technology to merge product designed with personalized care to enhancer transform. Your appearance modern face is picking up where the early pioneers left off. In many ways that remains the legacy of elizabeth arden elena rubenstein and early cosmetic moguls. Even as the years have passed and many people have forgotten their story. True innovation in the beauty industry doesn't just come from clever sales pitch or trendy new product nor even a massive upheaval. Such as you to it takes looking into the mirror and seeing something that no one else can see. I'm walter isaacson and you've been listening to trailblazers and original podcasts. From dell technologies for more information about any of the guests on today's show please visit dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening.

elizabeth arden Rubinstein rubinstein forty second dell technologies helena rumen stein youtube new york elena rubinstein Lindy woodhead Adam elena rubenstein miss arden madame rubinstein fifty year five hundred billion dollars maurice levy gabriella hernandez besse cosmetics america walter isaacson
133 - Theaster Gates  Keeping the South Side

The Kitchen Sisters Present

16:46 min | 1 year ago

133 - Theaster Gates Keeping the South Side

"Radio welcome to the kitchen sisters present where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva before we start. Start the show. We want to thank you for supporting the kitchen. Sisters Present and Radio Topi in twenty nineteen. We're looking forward to big things into twenty and we're glad to have you along along for the ride a special. Thank you to everyone who donated to the radio. TOPI forever campaign. Your support means so much to the kitchen. Sisters present an all of the radio topiary shows be on the lookout for more information about your rewards in your email box in the next few weeks. Thanks again and happy New Year from all here at the kitchen itching sisters now you can get enhanced security for your home wifi network with Xfinity Xfi if it's connected it's protected. Now that's simple easy. Awesome go to xfinity DOT COM. Call one eight hundred xfinity or visit store today to learn more restrictions. Apply this episode. Kosovo the kitchen sisters present is brought to you by Sun soil since soil mix full spectrum whole plant. CBD that's organically grown naturally extracted and accessibly priced. They are ganic farm all their own hemp in Vermont. They naturally extract. CBD from him using organic coconut oil and they test their products next at three I s credited laps to ensure potency and puree today listeners of the kitchen sisters can try son soil. CBD At twenty twenty percent off head to send Soil Dot Com and save twenty percents off your order by entering code kitchen sisters at checkout that Sun Soil Dot Com Promo Code Kitchen Sisters for twenty percents off your order her today. The kitchen sisters present the Astra Gates keeping keeping the south side when we want to revisit the past and immerse ourselves in a time long gone you can bed or probably at the museum on discount Wednesday Wednesday waiting through each and every exhibit aimlessly but those curator moments are chosen intend not to reflect the person who admires it let alone alone the place. It resides but Potter Visual Artists Archivists and neighborhood visionary the Astor Gates believes that there are different different ways culture keep it. Why can't the neighborhood that raised me be kept and preserved by me using abandoned buildings and found objects the asser gates and his team of artists? Show US what it takes to keep Chicago history in Dorchester projects. Oh who am I my name. Name is Leah Renee Gates in collaboration with the kitchen sisters and I will be your reporter for today so sit back. Relax and enjoy the smooth move. Sounds of the south side. I'm a potter. which seems like a fairly humble vocation I spent about fifteen years making them one of the things that really excites me artistic practice? Is that as you are very quickly. Learn how to make great things out of nothing. I was been kind of turned on to lots of different kinds of materials and buy studio grew a lot because I thought yeah. Well it's not really about the material. It's about our capacity to shape the neighborhood that I live in Grand Crossing neighborhood that has seen better days. There's lots of abandonment. And so I thought. Is there a way that I can start to think about these buildings as an extension when expansion of bioterroristic practice that if I was thinking along with other creatives architects engineers real estate finance people that US together might be able. It's kind of think in more complicated ways about the reshaping of cities and so I bought a building them off and band and we are on the south side of Chicago in the Grand Crossing neighborhood on the corner of sixty nine night then Dorchester Avenue Fan back back back back. I'm actually originally from Detroit Michigan once I left Detroit to go to empower university and then I ended up getting a job in marketing and then after about seven or eight years of doing that but at the same time I was kind of if you will as an artist and and I decided I didn't want to have that five to nine anymore. Quit my job. Bedlam owned visited different art schools around the country and it brought him back to Chicago now. The acid gates was a professor of mine when I was in Grad school and we hit it off right away and I've always been around thinking about the program the program thinking about the kind of connections that could happen between one house and another between one neighbor in another and we always tried suggest that not only is creating a beautiful vessel important but the contents of what happens in those buildings also very important. This building became what we call the listening house now. The Listening House looks very much like a corner store that kind of sits in the middle of a residential block where we are now as currently acting as an extension of the studio used to be a space where we all kinds of gathering. Listen to music and you can see plenty of records here to our right to my right. Your left and these records have been source of many different places so one of the spaces being Dr Wax which was a very well known vinyl record store. He's in high park. No thank you kind of step in and said Hey wall if you're stores closing. I think there's a lot of good things that are happening here. Could I purchase some of these records or the remaining stock. As you can't that you cannot sell it. Move lift so the as kind kind of ended up acquiring the kind of remaining records that were there was also record here from his own personal collection purchase over time and then be. I thought it was important that just kind of choir just some of the tax the object of the sounds of what was kind of filling those spaces also being kind of an important part to gooding library kind of understanding space. I was actually just wanting to activate these buildings as much as I could with whatever and whoever would join me. Think the answers ideas not to just be the only person that owns uh-huh and is operating and has division. His his hope is that maybe people see that I can own and I can't operate and I can't imagine that you can do the same as well you know. I think the project visual fail if he's the only one that's doing the visionary uh we've also started to collect memorabilia from American history from people who who live or have lived in that neighborhood where better than a neighborhood with young people who are constantly asking themselves about their identity to talk about some of the complexities of race and class. That one of the archives that will have their Johnson Publishing Corporation. The other side of the wall of records of the wall of Vinyl is kind of collection of books. A lot of them are overstock of parts of the Johnson Publishing Companies Library that were given to the astor as well so a lot of the red red leather bound books in the blue. The bound books are bound copies of jet life. Negro Digress Hugh Magazine Tan magazine Ebony Ebony Ebony I would like to thank you personally for your article. Mother's daughter over the years Ebony magazine has. JPC did an amazing job of kind of creating a space for black people to understand themselves. You know they they kind of create a sense of normalcy around what it might be like. It is opened up a book or look at a movie on the radio and kind of see hear and understand images or sounds that we all breath. When you're with for a long time I think the very much interested in Johnson publishing company kind of visit as another demonstration world building all one eight hundred five ninety five hundred today and give your family advantage? I am really looking forward to try that brown sugar pound cake. Thanks fun rich and our lives in in so many ways you want to open up one of these. We should definitely open so right now. The says Ebony Tame five November nineteen forty nine to October one thousand nine hundred fifty. It's a pitcher Joe. Louis says why I quit jump. Marvin's marvelous was the wife. And Joe. Lewis Dan you end up like everybody else devoted and affectionate the Marvin Lewis kisses passive husband chills. One is return to Chicago from fight. Victory three trips to divorce court march fourteen in years a bit. Topsy Turvy Romance for the heavyweight champ and ex stenographer. Domestic trouble stemmed from Joe's long absences from the house and lack like a private life for me and my head. Everybody has always been there and I thought it. We'll be and so that then the idea that it might not be there didn't really cross my mind but then I remember my pops tried to do his part by buying lying. Everybody subscription SOGETI magazine. He bought the entire family. Like you've been inside the same house so he made sure everybody has magazines. ooh Now during the asser trying to do my part you know as well and maybe didn't have the same relationship to gender Ebony POPs theater theater that my grandparents did but maybe this is my part in hoping to continue that tradition of caretaking that. I think that I was introduced to remember my parents when people see this. They always ask you know why doesn't another larger institution kind of have their hands on these things. How an artist properly? I don't care for them and I think the beauty of an artist is that we don't have the same sort of like rules and obligations to the objects and so we understand objects differently because important that so you kind of come inside the listening housing these books and sit with the books kind of smell the age or the history of the Wilderness on these pages. We were slowly starting to reshape. How people imagined the south side of the city? One House turned into a few houses and we found that building on my block. We now referred to the block Dorchester projects that in a way. That building became a kind of gathering site for lots of different kinds of activity. We turn the building into what we call now. The Archive Archive House is actually a single family home. That has been kind of converted into this workspace or this will sack overstock library. I'm also kind of imagine the importance of this are kind living existing in this neighborhood. A certain kind of library institutional library like this exists. I have to go to the library of Congress kind of see these things but then you're assuming again we're talking about this idea of worlds in the world of Lebron Congress's not my world. This is my world in this banks that we call the bank. It was in pretty bad shape. It was a difficult project to finance because banks weren't interested in the neighborhood because people weren't interested in the neighborhood because nothing nothing had happened. Bare dirt was nothing. It was nowhere. The Arts thing was built as a bank in one thousand nine hundred twenty two and at that a time. This neighborhood was primarily Irish Jewish was a thriving fairly affluent neighborhood in the bank. Was the cornerstone of Commercial Block of hotels tells in restaurants in twenty twelve. The terra cotta on the outside of the building started falling down and the city decided at that time they would demolish and you can see. This building building has marble three stories. High its neoclassical revival designed. It's a big imposing structure and it would cost a lot of money to demolish so that's white stood vacant for so long. The astor lives around the corner at Sixty Eighth Dorchester. He went to the city and asked if he could buy the bank and they said sure you can buy right for a dollar however you have to saving on week my name is Julie Joost. I'm the director of public programming. Rebuild Foundation in we are at our cultural cultural institution called the Stony Island Arts Bank here on the south side of Chicago at sixty eighth in Stony Island. Now that the rumor of my block has spread and lots of people are starting to visit. We've found that the bank can now be a center for Exhibition Archives Music Performance. And it's all about about providing free arts and cultural programming to the community and the fact that space is in this neighborhood the fact that is so beautiful it can be the source of pride in the fact that everything we do. It's free. There's no entry fee. There's no there's no barriers for people coming in here and participating in what we have to offer something that's very unique and important one thing the astor says a lot is that beauty is a service. Why can't neighborhood like this beautiful things? there's probably two big ideas governing me. One is like my Momma's Christianity which words like Salvation and redemption. They were very important. Words very important metaphors for what happens. Happens when a person dies. Can they be redeemed. Could they be resurrected. And if resurrected what does that do for people around right and I think that when you take spaces that have been abandoned for a long time. You don't tear the building down. You Redeem the building you demonstrate in plain view. That thing could be something better than it had. And that when people witnessed that redemption people feel like a small miracle may have just happened. I realized that somebody had to kind of protect in order for me to kind of guess have access to it if somebody wasn't in the business of being a keeper deeper than all might have been lost and I may not have had the opportunity to say. Well now. It's my turn. Now be the keeper. But I think it's important that that kind of work continues so that hopefully hopefully once my time is then as a keeper that there's somebody else maybe it's maybe it's my neighbor. Maybe it's the the ten year old boy that Remembers Devon. You know from being in the arts banker walking into the the arts banker listening to the dollar store that he then understands that I wanna be keeper to and so now it becomes his job their job to to protect and be thoughtful of the things that protect. Aw The astor gates. Keeping the south side was produced by Leeann Renee. Yates in collaboration with the kitchen. Sisters David Nelson and Nikki Silva with Nathan Dalton and Brandy Hill special. Thanks to the extra gates Devon May Julie Joost and the Rebuild Foundation and a shoutout to Ted talk for providing archival tape of the kitchen. Sisters present is part of Radio Tovia from P. R. X. A curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcast casts created by independent producers. Find out about all of our radio. Tokyo shows at Radio Tokyo Dot. FM and find out more about the kitchen. Sisters are stories workshops internship possibilities and are fantastic t-shirt visit kitchen sisters dot org. Thanks for listening you too ex.

Chicago Joe astor Marvin Lewis Julie Joost Dorchester Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva Radio Topi Rebuild Foundation Ebony magazine Detroit Astor Gates Leah Renee Gates Astra Gates Kosovo Johnson publishing CBD JPC Potter Visual Artists Archivis
50 Years of the Ebony Fashion Fair, an interview with Joy Bivins

Dressed: The History of Fashion

55:53 min | 2 years ago

50 Years of the Ebony Fashion Fair, an interview with Joy Bivins

"I'm dana schwartz and i'm the host new blood new history podcast from i heart radio and aaron main focuses on the stories of some of history's most fascinating royal from the infamous to be almost forgotten world is full of illfated love affairs bad decisions and family drama when you wing crown mistakes and be done listening subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts just the history of fashion is they production and i heart radio in in in in in mm seven billion people in the world we all have one thing in common everyday we all get dressed welcome to dressed the history of fashion a podcast where we explore the who what when of why we where we are fashion historians enter host april callaghan an cassidy zachary april i have to say that i had today's guest on my radar since day one of this podcast i am very pleased to announce today's guest is joy that ends one of the curator's behind the landmark exhibition inspiring beauty fifty years of of any fashion fair kosher ended by virginia you're heavens exhibition is the first ever to celebrate the pioneering traveling fashion show in dubuque at the chicago history museum in twenty thirteen before travelling onto several other locations just as a fashion bear did for over fifty years and while the exhibition may have only traveled to a few different locations at its height the fashion fair with two hundred pieces of the most extravagant exciting pieces of high fashion intoe traveled to over one hundred and eighty cities cities and this is just in one season so just what is the fashion fair you might ask why is it arguably one of the most important contributions to fashion in the twentieth century to answer all things fashion fair we are pleased to welcome joined them instead the judge today welcome joy joy welcome to the show today is such a pleasure to have you here with us it's really awesome semi talking with you today so you the chief curator of the international african american museum in charleston south carolina and so before we dive into the of any fashion far i was hoping you could talk a little bit about the muse m asmar work there shore on me international african american museum is an institution that is slated to open in late two thousand twentyone it's been in the works for nearly two decades here in charleston south carolina in art museum is a scheduled to open or the side of art museum will be gaskins war which is right on charleston harbor in captains war if is really critical fight in the history of the transatlantic slave trade and really in the development of this part of the world it is a place where many african took their first steps here on the north american continent so it's estimated that more than forty percent of a africans who arrived here in the americas took their first steps on gas in more so art museum is located there and it really is insight that dedicated to telling stories about 'em africans african americans that builds a charleston south carolina but also about those connections to the larger african diaspora to the nation into the larger african diaspora so we have a lot of history and culture to cover at this institution and were working to get that done and in a short time here in charleston so i've been in the city of charleston for nearly a year now in my work is really to develop what that museum experience will be from me exhibitions and then also working without a archie genealogy is who's heading the center for family history which is are place where are visitors will be able to learn about their own personal pass plus a millennial pass as they come to this place where they can learn about african american history an offer the history of the larger african diaspora really credibly important means an end something it sounds like you're building helping to build from the ground floor up which is incredible and actually i i didn't realize at the museum wasn't open yet but there isn't actually a really great archive of a digital archive of photographs online that dress listeners should definitely check fuck out until you get to the music in a in a couple of years will be looking forward to that and we're here today to talk about ebony fashion fair which was the subject of an exhibition you cook traded west virginia heavens if you years ago at the chicago history museum exhibition was entitled inspiring beauty fifty years of be up in any fashion fair and i believe it traveled to north carolina museum of art am i correct yeah so stuck in traffic how did i miss that i really wish i yeah i did not i i found out about it after it closed so i'm a little embarrassed to say but on the garments on display were just incredible i do a copy of the catalog and before we get to the of any fashion fair specifically i won't talk about ebony magazine which was founded over seven years ago in nineteen forty five by john johnson so can you tell us about the magazines creator but also why the magazine what's hot unimportant publication for african american sure so ebony magazine was actually the second publication that the founder john h johnson a created in the nineteen forties the first was called negro digest in nineteen forty two in nineteen forty five he introduced ebony magazine to the world now ebony took a real page from life magazine which wasn't pictorial magazine i detected you know american life and had articles about different parts of the usa culture ebony was an accident a response to that kind of publication it sought to fill that gap within the african american community so the magazine really took on the project of creating a visual in age if you will of the best of african american life the best black life so it is the place where you went to see where where you could see black celebrities and black achievement and fashion and travel and so on and so forth and it really spoke to kind of the lack of that kind of publication that kind of media that would being addressed to an african american audience that was a really hungry just see images of itself that want defined by dominant culture so ultimately biz magazine started in nineteen forty five very quickly became a staple within many african american homes you know with the subscription magazine so it flourished in flourish out of chicago starting on the south side of chicago in the nineteen seventies that johnson publishing company move downtown chicago but it was always kind of moving farther north in the in the trajectory three of its history so the magazine became kind of a staple of african american culture is where you found your best draft women or you could find recipes where you could see who was hot who is not within the large african american culture and so over the decades long existent it really created an archive of african american life and culture here in the united states especially like how you discussed in these catalog how racist society in racial society while they were present in the magazine or certainly discussing the magazine it is no way it's focus who's really like you said focused on highlighting these more positive aspects of african american live you know something that if someone wasn't experiencing as of yet you could some things that you could aspire to and one of the things you could inspire to is to be 'em to follow fashion to be a part of fashion in that kind of leads me to my next question which is i'm hoping you could talk a little bit about what it was like to be an african american during the nineteen forties this is of course the world war two era segregated military's segregated everything and i know as a black woman during this period you could not just walk into a department store try something on you would have to purchase it and therefore own at to even give it a try and see if it even fit so incredibly polarizing a period to what wall for black people in the nineteen forties and obviously before a an well into the late nineteen sixties united states was a segregated racially segregated society so there were just avenues of american life that were close to you andy while we could really frame it as there are places where black people were capped out of what it did was it also created opportunities for black people to be entrepreneurial in terms terms of creating businesses that cater specifically to black consumers right so john johnson through ebony magazine is is not only showing these images of black people at the festival and and created and so and so forth he's also showing that there are black consumers who are looking to spend their money they use these products to an in many ways it's an untapped market and what he does is create some visual image of this market that dominant society in all of these companies that from which black people purchase are not they're not targeting them right so what's in the pages of the magazine you get a chance to see how african american actually living what they actually aspire to and aspire to be so which then you're right the nineteen forties the magazine zayn comes out after the war a world war two is completed 'em after the victory is want an you know many african americans were radicalized politicized by the second world war because they understood understood that they were fighting for their freedom of others but did not enjoy that free no at home john johnson understood that there was a market that was a just really waiting to see themselves in ways that a dominant media just did not show them and so there is a kind of like a perfect marriage and you see how civil rights through the history of the magazine becomes more and more important and it's on bigger and bigger stories more stories about it as the magazine which shores so wildlife yeah there were so many avenues in american society that were closed the african americans in the nineteen forties african americans were creating opportunities for themselves so you've had with in black neighborhoods all throughout the nation you know you're military shops milliner shop where you could purchase your hat that you know there was a seamstress and the designer and so and so forth where you purchase closed that she couldn't try on at maybe marshall fields for other stores throughout the nation so there was kind of like the there's this is very interesting tension and i think happening where the greater american society was closed but that engender kind of a greater creation of opportunity among african americans to do for themselves and like you said one of the ways in which they did that was in the closed they created for themselves and their communities and we are here to talk about clothing and specifically fashion fashioned fair which is incredible feature an ebony magazine i mean that became this traveling fashion extravaganza but before it was this a traveling show it was a future in the magazine and i'm hoping tell us about these early fashion features an they're important and not just sharing fashionable clothing with readership by really changing their relationship to change in relationship to the garment but there's also the magazine as a place to again expressed something that was already happening within the culture right so 'em african american which which in the larger culture dressing up being dressed being shaar being put together was part of a larger cultural expression and so while their new fashions that are being shown within the fascist within ebony and within the fascist feature specifically it's also a reflection of something that is happening within the community right so again when you talk about this particular publication the reason that it sticks is because there's a desire and there's already something happening within the larger culture that people can can connect to it within the magazine until those early facetime feature which were you know edited in kind of spearheaded by free tonight who is the home services director so she kinda cover everything from your recipes you travel to the fashion features a really did teach her things like captain swimwear in how the how the dress for certain occasions and so on and so forth and it also was a place where black models got a chance to have sunshine if you will because there just wasn't a space for them in these other publications so one of the reasons we really want us to kind of look at the ebony fascist fair because yes there's this fantastic fashion in as little as lavish and it's luxurious and it is beautiful and all of that but it's connected to this this larger social history that the magazine it's helping to kind of explore innings edited and i also think thought it was a really important how you wrote in the catalog about how the ebony especially instrumental in projecting these images of glamorous and elegant black women that were really yet projected within mainstream cultures have basically saying you know i think he wrote black women could be everybody's glamorous sister white counterparts because in the mainstream culture and the images that were being projected 'em in society that wasn't an image that you austin saw during that time you you didn't see the dapper gentleman he didn't see the glamorous lady so within ebony magazine you not only end not even within the fascist fair column but the covering of some of these w taught ball and there was you know every year for many years there were the feature about the best dressed women in america so the best dress black women so you really gotta see that you know african american women african american men were really out here doing something extravaganza extrordinary that you weren't gonna find that in the pages of bogor harper's bazaar but the beauty beauty of black women the beauty of black men would mean celebrated within the magazine and what the fashion fair the traveling show did was really give people a chance to see that kind of in a dimensional space race so not just look at the picture but see the people inhabit the government right in nineteen fifty eight was the first year that up and he's fashion fair went from being a feature in the magazine to her tour exhibition of fashion fashion can you tell us a little bit about the impetus behind this transition the more i thought about it you know you write something and then you time path is the first installation or the first kind of pilot of the fashion and fair was in nineteen fifty states where john johnson really brought these garments end his models to dealer university as a way to raise money for that university of oregon has a 'em the president's wife the president of that campuses wife and they put on a show they raised my money for the institution but when you purchase a ticket for the show you also get a subscription friction to the magazine so you either got a year subscription to ebony or six months subscription to jet magazine which with another publication of jonathan of the johnson empire media empire so the impetus to take the fashion on the road one it was to get people to see or to allow people see these beautiful garments in person it will wait a fundraiser certain organizations whether that'd be the the links or the alex or what have you in a particular city and then it was also a way to make sure that these subscriptions to the magazines were being you know attached to the fashion show so it's kind of like this whole situation where you have the fashion you had the business of the magazine and then you had the philanthropic arm on the traveling show as well so it it really all work together so so you've got to see what you would see fashion that you would see in the magazine closing in person so fashion editor free tonight oversaw the fashions are traveling show from its beginnings until nineteen sixty three when she passed away and it was after that that the fair came under the direction of the glamorous visionary you niece johnson and johnson's wife and how do you need to transform the fashion fair into this internationally celebrated display of not just fashion but oh coulter fashion and why is this important well on mrs johnson was very instrumental in the founding of the company in the founding of any she gave magazine i mean it's the same she herself was a person who was highly educated but always had an interest in kind of art and culture i think are minor in college was was art she as a child you know she may closed her her her dad so and so forth so she brought with her on an interest in fashion and also kind of keen eye on what what's hot and what we're gonna who wasn't going to be the best and the brightest among these designers 'em ban the thing that unit did or i i never call her units alec color mrs johnson 'cause if i met her i wouldn't call it a first name i does see what what she did an end you know this is part of the history of the show is well is that they did it wasn't like they were going to borrow garments they purchased everything things for the show as she really created a vision of glamour and luxury that took it to the next level and she developed relationships with designers she maintain those relationships to the point where you know by the seventy new mrs johnson was you knew she wasn't coming to just you know look if she always fought things that were just kind of different a little bit of extra becomes her audience expected a bit more they expected flare an end drama so she always purchase things that were kind of the at the far end of of of miners were creating so so she she did a great deal not only you know she carried on the tradition started by frigid tonight but she also just she grew it right she grew the fashioned fair when the fascist they're starting at fifty eight in went to about twenty four cities by the middle of nineteen seventy six they have the divide the show in the kind of two season so the winter in the spring because they had grown to more than a hundred cities in the eighties i think they did a hundred and eighty you know at the height nineteen eighty seven they did like a hundred and eighty three city tour so they she is really kind of this is hard thing she's taken over the editorial vision within the magazine and she's really you know out here making a name for eunice johnson because she wasn't couture buyer as well but also you know really making a statement win this fashioned fair this traveling show so in terms of her power with in that industry a within the fashion industry and really her kind of vision for the fashion fair she really needed it she took it to the next level yeah you mentioned it a little bit earlier but when the fashions fares and mrs johnson most significant legacies can be found in the showcasing and promotion a black models so how significant was fashion fair and changing the way black black women were depicted in the media but maybe also happy sopping south well you know when we were doing research for the show and we went and talked to some of the early fashion sarah models like there were some there is some women who were in that first show so that we spoke to an ebony magazine really was the only game in town for them even though they were 'em you know professionals if they want it to be a plant that wiz where they were gonna be seen ebony jet fan you all of these publications that were put out by the johnson company in terms of the models but they chose they were trying to create a sense of showing the diversity of hughes within the african american community you know they weren't necessarily picking from people who were already connected to the industry so we've also an offer an opportunity for those who were not in the industry to really kind of try their hand at the craft and really practice it you know because they were moving so quickly and also going to so many cities you really had to create create some personality when you were walking's runways and so on and so forth so in terms of what they did for creating space for black models you know they're really at the vanguard because it's not until so the late sixties early seventies and really not you know with any kind of regularity the eighties that you start to see a black models in mainstream publications so publications like ebony in china parts were really the place that blast model got a chance shine and we're gonna hear about one of these models specifically pot cleveland when we get back from eight brief sponsor break hi it's cassidy an april an whenever i'm ready to shift gears from podcast church jim warrior you better bet i'm wearing fab lennox flip on my favorite pair of leopard print leggings and wallah transformation complete that isn't only for the gym they create clothing that's me to inspire physical activity in any type of setting moreover athletics aims to create finance fashionable workout clothing at an exceptional price points thermometer is living your passion everyday right now dress listeners can receive to leggings for only twenty four dollars when you sign up for the vip membership that is normally ninety nine dollars value you should check out my favorite leggings which are the me up pocket leggings which have pockets for your phone get them while they're in stock as designs change monthly all you have to do is go to fab lennox dot com forward slash dressed to take advantage of this deal now that sublet x dot com for slash stress to get to leggings for only twenty four dollars there is no commitment to purchase monthly and free shipping on all orders over forty nine dollars also make sure you enter email address when you take the style quiz as you'll receive exclusive discounts and the inside scoop about new collections that have not yet been released again got a fat let ics dot com forward slash traffic terms and conditions do apply welcome back dress listeners so one cleveland's very first modeling jobs where the traveling fashion fair she was just sixteen years old when she joined the tour and that was in nineteen sixty six and i i'm currently reading her memoir walking with amuses which is wonderful i highly suggest are listeners check it out and she really recalls excitement of the fashion fair experience on this time when she met muhammad ali lots exciting things and experiences happening for this young woman and but she also talks about the fear that was involved when she in the tour and went to be american south and at this time this is the sixties and it's a place deeply entrenched racism at something that's most recently captured in the oscar winning film green book so not only were these models groundbreaking in their display of fashion they and the the credit they traveled with were incredibly brave and quite resilient in the face of much adversity and even dangerous she writes about this running in what the kkk france so can you speak a little bit more into the early road blocks of the show mrs johnson and it's participants initially encountered and were able to overcome so that cleveland of course you know giant was in the fashion industry she's spoken pretty plainly about on some of the encounters that they had in the south as they traveled and she's traveling much later than some of those those earlier you're model sanded when they were traveling this out they traveled in a greyhound bus so accustomed bus everybody on the bus the clothes on the bus they go you know they're traveling through the south end particularly peculiarly in the early sixties you know during the time of the freedom rides it was there could have been some confusion between their mission and the mission of those activists were so brave but some of the models also speak about about not being able to answer the front door to order food 'em they also traveled with a models who were fair enough the past as sometimes we go into these stablishment and do what they need to do for the rest of the crew so again while were talking about the fascist there in in bringing fashion and really equalizing ability in see andy ability to experience tour were also moda and so on and so forth a front end in person often they were going to places that had not yet been desegregated and in the shows if there were folks who were not who were black and white you know they had to be separated so and it's so far so it's existing with in the context of what's happening in the the rest of the united states so wasn't always easy to make you make your way down south to show these fashion but in many instances that's where the you know they have the grandest audiences or the the biggest outpouring of support because it was really an opportunity to see something in places that were outright style to african american right and you're right also about mr and mrs johnson's initial struggles with even gaining access to oh couture fashion in europe during this period i mean oko cheer at this time is you know is really exclusive and exclusionary to african american clients and mrs johnson shows up there and really just breaks down all these barriers and becomes really incredibly important crutcher client can you talk about how she was able to do that a little bit we know that the in mr john says autobiography there definitely is a section where he discusses a trying to get access to some of these fashion houses and they're not just off they're not all in europe some in the united states as well an end being denied and a really threatening having to threatening legal action against some of these companies if they are not granted access so while there are within the dominant culture there are prejudices and biases against african americans there those exist within the fashion industry where people were not necessarily sara lee taking them seriously as buyers right core they to come in right these checks in at macy's you know ultimately grand financial statement when that's not necessarily how people were encountering african american and so a lot of what they did in terms of breaking down those barriers was with their checkbooks that's what mrs johnson did right she's coming to see her work and she's gonna buy most of europe collection you're gonna take her very seriously and i think that into what happened in developing these relationships is that when you're gonna spend that she was spending so much money that she demanded at a level of respect that a happy build but because it would expect it as as she continued to calm year after year then she could do what she wanted ultimately within these circle right and she herself as you mentioned earlier was really important oh catcher clinton herself she wore a culture fashion as well and she's incredibly fashionable glamorous woman so i don't think it would take much convincing and i know you said by you know as as the fashion show progressive progressive the relationship that she bills with these designers is really really interesting and we'll talk a little bit about that in a minute but i wanna talk about the show itself because you've you've mentioned it a little bit and and and how by the mid seventies show is traveling a hundred eighty venues i mean this has really turned into this extravaganza is incredibly exciting and you know event to look forward to so if i wasn't audience member of the audience member during this period what would you have expected to see from a typical how okay so at the height of the show they had about between a hundred and fifty two hundred eighty access so ultimately that means that you're singing that many garment within the span of the show amish show would be between an hour and a half to two hours there would be a musical interlude an you would see it broken into the category of the of the type of fashion right so day where swimwear the evening where sonus so for later in the show these kind of a interpreted or acted out skits became very popular a men and women in maxine ensemble if you will is also very popular witham thumb audiences of course it ended with the bridal a scene so it kind of took a while to get through the show and you had the hat entertainment value to it there was a moderator or commentator who described the fashion described the scene so it really it was it was in entertainment in bed with fashion if you will right and it's important not to i felt like these comments that were first how they were literally purchase she display in the magazine added a fashion show for this performance but they only absolutely it was a performance many of the models had other talent you know they song and dance roller skate it whatever they brought with them they also brought to the display of the fashion you know there are folks who would talk about a model who could turn as if she were on a you know a rotating pedestal or something like that so there was there there is a lot of weighing in on going on at these shows that had to do with the garment but also has to do with the ways in which the models inhabited and how they performed at you just didn't walk in show what you had oh my you know you had to make it come alive for the audience how wonderful and as mentioned the fashions on display or not just any off the rack fashion but oh coach here i mean we're talking about the crandall a criminal fashion and he talked about she often went for the muller auburn guard more you know expressive pieces at the designers offered so these are not inexpensive by any means and you're coal curator of the museum exhibition virginia heavens called mrs johnson a curator because of the thought and care that went into the selection selection of each and every garment for the show can you tell us a little bit about how she picked the fashions to be displayed on what she was looking for well 'em she wasn't looking thing that popped right so she was looking for things that spoke look on luxury an ex then when you see no you don't have to try to figure it out there with a lot of color there were a lot tougher there is a lot of sequence a lot of leather so things that really boat to kind of the the actual value of the government because these what they're supposed to be aspiration all right that's the thing they choose you hope to be able to a where one day for you might not you you might wonder how who aware of that ad where would i wear that because there was also a again speaking to the fantasy of fashion and not just the utilitarian nature of wearing something that's very smart although there was you know the complete look that we display within the exhibition where you you had the hair was done the makeup was ripe accessories were on point point the garment with great the shoes everything was just so but there was also a lot of fantasy with in the show so many things that were chosen a like a lot of you know high fashion wasn't necessarily you know wearable it was really about dealing with the ideas in the design in the fantasy of of of what the designer was trying to bring polite and she really wanted her audience the enter that world so a lot of what you saw on the fashioned fair stage was it was sharp and it was smart and so on but there was also things that were just kind of crazy in out there as well she was trying to create something for the audience is enjoy but also for them to understand what was going on within fashion at a particular time and he talked a little bit about mrs johnson's relationship to these you know precision crutcher designers are high fashion designers and many of him like a manual on garro for instance she really supportive from the beginning of their careers she's incredibly important client to the industry can you talk a little bit about this relationship there is a wonderful photograph in the catalog of her and he found their own for instance right so you solar on bill blass emmanuel and garro the the thing about putting the show together was that we had access to thousands of government that were purchased over several decades for the emmy fashioned fair if some of these designers she pretty much had a full catalog so garro from the late sixties all the way until the end of the run of ebony fashioned fair so she each seller on same thing there were pieces was in that collection that you can't really find anywhere because she she just took all of it m a n patrick kelly tally in things that were made specifically for the ebony fashion fair because of the relationship she had with the designers 'em i think it was really again that becomes because she wasn't around when we were doing the show to talk to us about that we did have access to her assistant producer who did it by the end of her life with doing most of the vying for the show but it's really in kind of the physical wrecker on the garment where do you see those relationships you know you could see that more now in terms of who is who is representing in that collection in what was representing them that collection and there was something they missing that you would think would be in that collection and so you kind of you know there were questions that that developed over the period of kind of interacting with windows garment but definitely you saw it you know bill blass you sound the ron emanuel in garro just some phenomenal phenomenal garment which in the span of her collecting history so she had her coat she had her own collection to so we had the you have the fashion collection but then that was what she herself purchase which we didn't get into but you know there was a a great recor within her own government archive as well and you mentioned patrick kelly she was of course in a valuable mature clammed patron but she really wasn't important supporter black fashion designers from the very beginning can you tell us about some of these designers that featured an exhibition one in particular that stand well there couple 'em there's no such barkley who you know is you may or may not have heard his name before there is patrick kelly somebody who is iconic being michael who made a very wonderful evening gown era dean designers that she worked without all the time and then there's those history early on which we don't really cover because there's not a lot of documentation where when the fashion fair we're going a certain cities in the early days they would find out who the designer who is the same stress or the taylor in that town who is doing really great work and they would feature it along with all this other fantastic fashion that they were playing as well but black designers actually spent in they're designed to mrs johnson at the johnson publishing building an issue like if she would include it in the show so if you are someone who didn't have that you know high name recognition is mrs johnson was a fan of your work your designs could be in the same show as a eastbound the raw 'em so it really was both the high end and then is kind of graphic design work that or grassroots work that was going on as well too i mean she is just an incredibly important patron it sounds like from this period for over fifty years years of that any fashion fair so it's really incredible hi it's april and cassidy as you might already know we are big fans of athletics kate hudson fashion focused active are brand end athletics let it isn't only for the gym dna cast i went on dancing with my friends and i threw a slushy eighty stress about black sports bra and the platform congress and i felt cute and company all night long yes it whether it's running errands or to yoga fabulous max has a versatile tell options for your day today and right now listeners can receive to leggings for only twenty four dollars when you sign up for the vip membership this is normally ninety nine dollars value and be sure to check out my favorite leggings which are the media pocket it leggings which have pockets breer phone so get them while they're in stock as designs change monthly all you have to do is go to fab lead x dot com forward slash stress to take advantage of this deal now that fab lennox dot com forward slash dress to get to leggings only twenty four dollars there is no commitment to purchase monthly and free shipping on all orders over forty nine dollars also make sure you enter your email address when you take the style quiz as you'll receive exclusive discounts on the inside scoop about new collections that have not been released yet again gotta fab lennox dot com forward slash traffic terms and conditions do apply has ten now choi how did you and virginia go about picking the fashions do we featured in you're exhibition i mean you just referenced this archive that have i think thousands of pieces in it how could you even begin to choose what to include well i think condition was a great separate or of the the women from the girls why right so 'em we we were looking for things that wouldn't require a grand amount of conservation although we did have a couple of pieces that were key that 'em they need it's a work because as i mentioned they were traveling into like a hundred and fifty hundred and sixty city so be saying had been worn many times in often hack the house a modification just so people could get the models could get in and out of them quickly and then get back on stage that magazine itself was very helpful the programs from the ebony fashioned fair were very helpful you know those things what what are the recurring thing color was the probably the most recurrent theme in any fashion fair a title or the the scene for particular season we were looking for those designers designers that you know did have a significant death within that collection of one of my favorite sections of the expedition really had to do with that complete look that put together woman where the the jewelry that accessories all of that was we we want it to make a statement about that as well we want it to make a statement about the international nature of the fashion that was being displayed right and those those key pieces that we knew so there's a lot of garro there's a number of some of the pieces in the show that over tour comes up over and over again within the the fashion fair history there was also a in the early eighties there would be edition of the plus size model so we were trying to do a couple of different things right look at the arc of the show itself historically but then also look at the ways in which these garnett spoke to the things that were important to mrs johnson right so there's one section just about kind of luxury n n b firmer an end sequins as i mentioned 'em but also have some pieces in it that you're not gonna see anywhere else because she she bought it so and i've heard stories i can't i don't know if i could confirmed it that you know some of the house's knew that she had teases and they have their own color you know they have their own kind of archives and they come they came to see if they could a gay back or archive you know what i'm saying yeah and i just think in terms of what she was able to do which is creating a fashion fantasy for people who often who at one point were locked out because of raise an in many ways you know most of us are are just not going to these houses to buy anything you know other were not which is going to look 'em so or or young people who maybe had an interest in design an ain't got a chance to see these things on on stage for the first time in their real democratization happening on the ebony fashion fair stage and i also think the ability to make these very beautiful things you know kind of milk them for everything there were right in terms of providing a place for black models and not just women that have a platform to show their so in terms of all the behind the scenes people who got a chance to you know prepare these garment prepare the the men and women for the stage is both a fashion extravaganza but it's just a really interesting castle for thinking about history virginia at is the fashion expert i had an interest in what this magazine what that company did in terms of really elevating african americans to see themselves in ways that they were not being projected at the time that the magazine start it and then to create this platform for all this you know ultimately black excellent and those garment became an extension of that and i just think if if it's fascinating is phenomenal it still gives me chills till the day to think that you know we did that show it was it was really also i mean incredibly groundbreaking show 'em in in one that celebrates as you just said this and credibly important legacy carried on on by mr and mrs johnson end john johnson died in two thousand five at the age of eighty seven mrs johnson died in two thousand ten at the age of ninety three in that was actually just one year after the very last fashion fair ended its run so after traveling for fifty fifty years so why do you think the fashioned fair ended and can you speak a little bit endurance of mr mss johnson's legacy in its wake sure i think the fascist their end it for a couple reasons one put it on a show of that magnitude is incredibly expensive publishing houses for the last several you know last couple of decades have been struggling in i i'm not sure that that was remained main priority of johnson publishing company i can't say that but that's really for them to speak to but it was a really expensive venture you know the nature of fashion also change whereas mr mrs johnson was able to developed these relationships where certain houses and and you know on the strength of her relationship by these things in many of those how the then became part of larger conglomerate 'em so purchasing in the ways in which they had earlier just wasn't as easy as it had been right and also mr mrs johnson really was the spearheading she end declining health that someone is so forth so i think there are multiple reasons the fair end it some of them have to do cost some of them have to do with the changing nature of the fashion industry and then some of them have to do without the decline of the magazine me quite frankly those are my my hypotheses you will end despite the fashion fair not during taken you speak about mr and mrs johnson's legacy today and today's fashion industry but also today an american culture will see i don't think many people know about you know johnson in terms of her contribution to the fashion industry as should write the fashion fair because it was is put on by ebony magazine in primarily seen in by african american is not as well known now i will say that folks who were in the know and love fashion always knew about the fascist fair and go regardless of what color they were but these were disciplined and a show bad primarily support it you know black organizations and it's only so far so they're still those divisions within our society that keep us i'm being as knowledgeable about people of other cultures and race that we shouldn't be so unfortunately i feel like it's not as well known as i would hope it would be but we're in a culture a the african american culture and the the way in have on the johnson legacy i mean it is kind of hard to overstate it because they created a blueprint ultimately for how to tap into under served audiences so what mr johnson did you know witness the court and in backing of mrs units jonathan i have voice see an opportunity to build something really you know quite spectacular and it was like i said we meet round digesting ebony which jet in tandem q is ebony junior it would have any africa for short while ebony south africa ebony man you know they really kind of created a ten play a platform for celebrating the best and black culture sir and did so in in really through these kind of visual a mess but you know the picture this black celebrities so and so forth so they what they gave to american culture and really what they reflective of african american life is really 'em without parallel and so i think despite a lot of the changes that are happening even without the company eight right now you you can't really overstate the importance of ebony magazine northey importance of the ebony fashioned fair right because they provide an opportunity for people who had been maligned and so it'll treat it represented the see when they knew about themselves and then also seeing him so beyond what they thought they could accomplish so that is fantastic yeah charlie as and try this is a real pleasure thank you so much for being here today and sharing the joy that is mrs johnson's attorney fashion fair with us today well thanks for listening it talk about it again thank you for being here the importance of johnson's life and work come truly not be overstated enough mister johnson was awarded the presidential medal of freedom in nineteen ninety six and when he died at the age of eighty seven in two thousand five two thousand people people attended his funeral costs in the reverend jesse jackson set of johnson that quote he gave us a first mirror to see ourselves as people have dignity people with intelligence and beauty put april as we know it said time and again on the show but every great man license even greater woman i mean of course i'm joking but not really i mean you niece was forced to be reckoned with the woman who not only gates ebony magazine its name like millions of black women around the world glamorous operational vision of and so the affirmed indeed that black was is and always will be beautiful that does it for us today dress blisters may you consider the endurance the legacy of any fashion their next time you get trapped remember to tune in this thursday for the latest edition of fashion history mystery where we address questions from you art listers we love hearing from you so if you would like to email us please do so trust at i heart media dot com you could also direct message us on instagram at dressed underscore podcast where you will find images accompany each week's episode stress underscore podcast is also are twitter handle and you can follow us on facebook at dress podcast without the underscore for additional ratings each week's episodes checkout are show notes at just podcast dot com and don't forget about are much start at t public dot com forward slash stress that he eats public dot com for slash dressed as always special thanks to our producers tcp holly fry and everyone else if i heart radio makes this show possible each and every week catchy soon trust the history of fashion as a production of i heart radio for more podcasts and i heart radio this is the iheart radio app apple podcasts or wherever else you listen to your favorite shows i'm dana schwartz and i'm the host new blood new history podcast from i heart radio and aaron main focuses

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Friday News Roundup For Jan. 31, 2020

Reset with Jenn White

28:19 min | 1 year ago

Friday News Roundup For Jan. 31, 2020

"Hi I'm Jen. White and this is reset. It's Friday that means it's time for our Friday news roundup when we you break down the biggest local and state news stories of the week. The governor of Illinois is boasting a promising future for the state. That's after he delivered his State of the state address but he also so use the occasion to call for ethics reform. It's no longer enough to sit idle while under the table deals extortion or bribery persists former Illinois state. Senator Senator Martin Sandoval says he takes full responsibility for his crimes hours after pleading guilty to taking a quarter of a million dollars in bribe shamed. And I'm sorry I want to Apologize People Illinois to my constituents with me in studio to break down those stories and more. WBZ state politics reporter. Dave mckennie Chicago Tribune seek government reporter Dan for Trela and David gracing president and CEO of the Better Government Association. Welcome everybody happy Friday. June houria Korea doing well. So let's start with Governor Pritzker state of the state address in Springfield. The governor touted some of his big accomplishment so far in laid out his twenty twenty agenda. It's time to end the practice of legislators serving as paid lobbyists in fact it's time to end the for profit influence peddling among all elected acted officials at every level of government in Illinois. Dave mckinney. What stood out to you in this speech? Well I mean I think he was pretty forceful and talking about ethics reform and he really had no choice but to do that given developments of late but he was actually unlike other speeches. I've seen like this from other governors. He was specific about what he wanted to see done on the ethics front. I thought I mean he talked about you. Know ending this this deal where we're legislators would retire from office and then immediately go represent a special interest in these contracts that these guys move into in representing utility companies or whatever five grand a month and if they amass eight or ten or fifteen or twenty clients you can see how they get wealthy really quickly and so he. He's wanting to crack down on that and building a revolving door thing. And that's that's going to be in the offing here. I think David gracing other things that stood out to you while I think it's good that he kind of laid out a laundry list on the ethics reform. He still has not taken as forceful position as governor Pritzker might if he he really is serious he could lay out a list of non-negotiables. I won't sign a bill. That doesn't have some of these reforms that he has talked about. He also didn't go to some of the bigger issues. That are much discussion such as ending gerrymandering which is sad. He won't sign gerrymandered map but he still has not committed needed to say a constitutional amendment. That would end gerrymandering. So he's taken some steps but he really is serious. Could take a few more Dan. What about you but sit out one thing that was interesting to me was his comments on wanting to move forward with clean energy legislation this spring in light of all. That's going on with the corruption investigation federal agents being scrutinizing of comrades lobbying practices in Springfield. There's some questions among people in Springfield about how much appetite lawmakers going to have to deal with anything that has to do with energy legislation the spring. The governor said. He wants to see it and he wants to do it without the utility companies really having a voice or or being at the table writing the legislation themselves which is how things are usually usually done in springfield and it'll be a big test of their clout this spring to see if that gets done and that was said so subtly and in passing the speech and yet if you really were able to accomplish that that would be a huge kind of transformative change because forever debut covered this forever. Utilities really have drawn up legislation that that regulates them. The governor's Statement on this was was subtle because he said he said very strongly I will not sign legislation. That's written by the energy companies subtle at all by that. I meant that you wouldn't have realized. What a huge change? That would be actually happens. I I agree with you. It was a direct statement. Yeah I mean. It's the proof in the pudding. I mean it's it is amazing though Dan like like you point out that we listen to an earnings call a month or two ago with exelon and the full steam ahead on getting legislation through springfield. That helps them bailout. They're money losing a nuclear plants and come hell or high water. They're planning on doing something. And I think pritzker has drawn a line in the sand here that says look you know we know that. Your lobbying practices are under scrutiny. We are not going to do things the way we have in the past with this but but again comment exelon. They have bathed this culture in money. An influence well and that brings up the point. The governor's taking a strong stance but Dan. What is is the appetite for this same sort of position toward two energy companies when we look at the legislature? As a whole. It really depends on who you talk to you. There are some people who who are with this proposal. Clean Energy jobs act which would move to one hundred percent renewable what twenty fifty and they're Gung Ho. This the governor's on board with us now. This is a way to get it done without without worrying about what commented the other utilities have to say but talk to a lot of other lawmakers. And they're like well I don't know if the agendas going to move forward and it all depends on and the leaders in each of the Chambers the House and Senate and whether they WANNA move forward and Politically the house speaker. Michael Madigan is not known to be under federal scrutiny. Yet but people in his inner circle have been touched by this investigation that also involves comments lobbying practices so politically for him. He he may not want to let that move forward and in an election year. Well we talked a bit about ethics reform on but the governor really made a point of trying to strike a bipartisan note. In in this address he highlighted bipartisan legislation. At the same time he also make critical references to former governor. Bruce Rounder in even called president. Donald trump out by name. Let's listen than we stood up for human rights and civil rights when we put Donald Trump on notice that Illinois will not be complicit in his shameful and draconian immigration policies. Please your thoughts crossing. He's kind of going to his base. HIS ANTI-TRUMP BASE. And he's doing so safely so because he's he's in a state that even the Republicans are not necessarily very enamored of president trump. There aren't that many Republicans for example running for reelection to Congress Congress who need president trump in order to get elected Dan Lipinski. Obviously he's in a very competitive race and he has taken a position on abortion that is aligned with the president's agenda but that's really I think a core value of Lipinski. I don't think he's doing that. Purely for political fact and you don't see any assigned he or any others That come come immediately to mind are really playing to trump. So this was a safe thing for governor Pritzker too you know and I think the reference to rounder. You know and it was striking where he brought up this metaphor of the flag in front of the Thompson Center. A tattered flag that had been there for many many months as a result of the budget. Impasse under under Governor Rauner. That that that prevented the company that provided flags to the Thompson Center from being paid and so they just quit providing flags and maintaining them and so that was woven into his speech. And I think the point of that was to kind of demonstrate to people that you know. Hey I've had a whirlwind first year as governor and the culture and the environment has really changed here. We're actually really getting things done. As opposed to just being in our trenches and doing nothing Dan how are lawmakers responding to the speech especially Republican lawmakers. It was interesting because having covered some of the speeches under rounder was always a very partisan event you know the renounced bipartisanship as every speech like this has but Democrats were ready to attack the governor on what he had to say and Republicans were ready to defend him. In Republicans had some criticisms of the speech. We talked about gerrymandering a little bit. That was one of the main criticisms that they had there are many pieces of pritzker gender. That are a little bit more progressive. That they're just never gonNA vote for the Graduated Income Tax Amendment is something that Republicans in the House and Senate it opposed It's up to voters now but they generally have shown that they're willing to work with the governor to try to find common ground on issues things that can help business which is a big part of what they would like to do and they don't really seem to have an appetite for making it kind of grueling. Partisan battle was under the previous administration. You're listening to the Friday. The News Roundup here on reset when we break down the week's top stories are panel today. WBZ's Dave mckinney. David gracing the better government association and Dan Petrella of the Chicago Tribune. Some other stories were watching today. The first person to person corona virus infection in the US has been confirmed. And it's here in the Chicago area. Public Public Health officials say a husband and wife in their sixties or hospitalized in Hoffman estates. She traveled from Wuhan China. The center of the outbreak doctors here say the risk of infection remains remains low for most people but everyone just remember to wash their hands as Chicago. Alderman next month will begin debating a ban on Styrofoam and limits on the use of plastics. The proposed ordinance takes aim at single use plastics. They make up roughly half of all plastic production and more than one hundred forty thousand Illinois residents cut lose their food stamps. Under the trump trump administration's new work rules Illinois. Attorney General Kwami. Raoul is joining a multi state law suit challenging them. The changes would prevent states from excusing adults. Who are able to work from maintaining steady employment in order to get food assistance? Let's turn to another big story this week. On Tuesday former state Senator Martin Sandoval pleaded guilty to bribery and tax evasion. Here's a bit of his apology. That day took full responsibility. I Apologize to the people of Illinois and most importantly the constituents David gracing the charges of off as related to the Red Light Camera Industry. What's the back story here? Well he was very tied into the red light cameras. Say a speed is the company in particular. Although it was not mentioned in the Joe He mentioned that he did it was a very open secret. Everybody knew that was company that was being referred to the fads of alleged that he and he pleaded now that two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in bribes. There were very the interesting details thrown out there that he was basically asking for a five thousand dollar per month graft retainer of sorts which ended up two seven thousand dollars during the time that they had him wired what was quite interesting was to see somebody who until recently had been one of the most powerful figures in the state legislature? The person who governor Pritzker was looking to to kind of shepherd his forty five billion dollar infrastructure plan. Who actually went around the state last last year? Touting the plan and building support for it to see him down and and contrite at in a way that you've never seen Marty's hand of all behave previously it it really does show what happens when you get caught cheating the public. Well Dan. What do we know about how Santhal case fits into other federal investigations? We we know they're happening right now. Well we spoke earlier of Commonwealth Edison and one of the things on the laundry list of information federal agents were looking for when they raided his Springfield Office was information about Commonwealth Edison Commonwealth Edison Executives. We know from an SEC. Filing this summer that the SEC is taking interest in common. Ed's interactions interactions with Senator Sandoval centers. VOL's daughter happens to work for Commonwealth Edison. So that's one avenue there's things relating to the video gaming industry that were mentioned in the search warrant. They're things related to something. My colleague Jomar Jason Miser and I had a story in the about today the recycled asphalt shingle industry which is a very very Insider issue with DOT and a political benefactor of of sand volleyball and this gentleman Michael Vondra. It's been around politics for for a long time. He's another person who is mentioned in these These documents so there are many many tentacles in this investigation. We'll falls plea agreement. Says they'll have to pay upwards of eighty five thousand one dollars back to the Illinois Department of Revenue The irs. He won't be sentenced until July but the sentencing range for these charges. Ten to thirteen years in prison that being said the plea. The agreement indicates he's cooperating with the feds so dave this sweeping investigation. We know that when his offices were raided they were looking king for documents related to everything. Dan is listed there. I mean just just talk about where considering Sandoval S- position in the state in his power as politician. What kind of tone does that sat in Springfield? Well I think you know I think people for months now have been very wary of Mardi Santa especially since the raid. They knew that that he was radioactive And and you know there's there's a whole you know we've seen The Luis Arroyo the state representative former state representative be indicted. We we've seen State Senator Tom Gullikson. Who is still in office? Be Face Similar corruption charges charges. You know th this this. It's sort of like I remember a long time ago. I used to cover covered a string of bank robberies on the suburbs and it was. It was a serial thing where this as husband wife kept robbing banks and I remember at the FBI telling me at that point that you know they they these guys think they're smarter than the last one who got caught and that's the same kind. aww dynamic here in Springfield where they you know there you would think that with Governor Blagojevich for example sitting in prison for as long as he is there would be deterrent value but ah there really is no deterrent value when you get into that closed environment and and people's greed the vanity the power. It gets to people and you know that's what you see with sandoval hair where you know I think David Your characterization of what it was what he was like in that courtroom was was so striking. Because I've covered this sky a long time. He was a bully. He intimidated people and to see him be so contrite and so soft spoken and so- apologetic that that that tone was just completely different than the Mardi. Santa that we've seen publicly. Well this makes me back though to Governor Pritzker state of the state address in his call for ethics reform. I'm after the address. We talked to Republican State Representative Mark Bat Mark Bat neck of the ninety seventh district. And here's what he had to say a four this call for ethics reform. We kind of do things down here. Where where we want to get the headline? The bill really doesn't have any strength behind that we have really strong ethic spills. We really should at this point. Say Hey we want to have the strong ethics bills in the nation and I'm not not hopeful that that's going to happen in the next month you know and he brought up a good point in our conversation he said look there are already laws on the books against bribery. They're already already laws on the books against you know things are being indicted for but what we're talking about is something something a little deeper and he doesn't have a lot of hope that that kind of legislation Chen legislation with teeth is actually going to get through springfield. David Greis free. Think well one of the ironies kind of they're very much in front one of us was First of all all the people that Dan mentioned and all those all the stuff that's going on. I think everybody seems to be aware and believe that. This is all centered on Ken. The the feds find something that Mike Madigan may have done. That's not legal. And of course Madigan has not been charged has not been named as a target of any investigation so far as we now but to have Mike Madigan standing behind Jay Pritzker. When he's saying that it's time to clean up springfield and then to have Mike Madigan issued a statement saying we must send the clearest a sign that the game is over and every steps will be taken to prosecute that is kind of a rich irony because so much of the seems to center on a system that Mike Madigan has helped to create by putting lobbyists former cronies in all kinds of positions at Commonwealth Edison and other places over the history of some of the scandals in Illinois politics over many years that Mike Madigan is run springfield? He's been part of the problem problem whether he what he's done is legal or illegal. It's definitely problematic and That that shows you how hard the lift is going to be. How heavy lift is going to be an try to clean springfield because Mike Madigan is part and parcel of the problematic circumstances down there? I mean there's sort of a pragmatic issue to here with with what Representative Bat. Nick was saying on on the phone there that you know we don't know what it's GonNa look like. I mean they're almost could be an argument. Made that these guys ought to just cool their heels a little bit on ethics reform and let this play out and let's let's understand the true dimensions of this investigation and what went wrong. And what is it exactly. Exactly we need to legislate against because you know what we have right now is only I would venture to say probably just a the skin of the apple basically a Event Venture into the Madigan Madigan land in his famous apple eating habits. But but like you know. That's the problem. These guys. Don't know what the feds have. What kinds of things? Nobody dreamed a week ago. That Martin Sandoval was going to be in a courtroom saying that he took more than two hundred fifty thousand dollars in bribes. So I would just say you know look ahead you. I don't know what's GonNa come around and of course one of the problems with this Reform Commission that's doing. Its work right now and has a march thirty one deadline to kind of come up with its recommendations days point is on target. You can't solve years of problems in Springfield with a commission that basically does its work over about twelve weeks at the beginning of twenty twenty whatever they come up with has to be the beginning and not the end of the reform process. And there's a rich history here to sorry that's a very rich history astray of where you know. We'll have a scandal breakout in federal court. The guys in Springfield and women will will will decide they have to react and then nothing happens and I think back to the Illinois Reform Form Commission in two thousand nine they. They had a whole list of ideas that many of them more excellent ideas. Nothing came to fruition very little did so we'll be watching for four as we as we start the spring legislative session. Well one thing we'll be watching for is what comes out of that Ethics Commission. I've covered a couple of their hearings now and some interesting discussion but lots of very weedy issues. Susan how do you define. WHO's a lobbyist? How do you regulate this from the state all the way down to municipalities with you know five thousand or fewer residents And at one point that keeps coming up to with people on the commission people who are observing the commission. Is that the things that people have gotten caught. Doing been charged with or are alleged to have done are already illegal so the question is how do you make it clear that they're doing those things sooner. Or how do you kind of tamp down the culture that gets people to the point where they're breaking the laws that already exists well. It's quite a bit from Springfield this week. Here were some other local stories of note including this one a major shakeup in the Chicago. Police Department. Charlie Beck is the interim superintendent in his only been here for a couple months the former Los Angeles police chief is completely restructuring the way COPD operates eleven eleven hundred officers moving back under district command in term superintendent. Charlie back says the added resources come with added accountability for commanders. We think it is is a robust model that is state of the art for policing and that will allow. COPD to do even better job than doing so. Let's talk about that story. Interim Chicago Police Superintendent Charlie Beck announced major changes to the structure of the police department. Here's back earlier this week. These are pretty sweeping changes ages. But I've received strong support universal support for this. You know we had a long discussion and like Like any good boss. I took all the questions that I can take but then you know we walk out of that room with unity purpose you know we are. We are as a team going to make this work. So David gracing. This is a big reorganization nations. Talk a little bit about what's going to happen this change well Some people outside are calling this a radical decentralisation this is completely different than policing has been done in Chicago Kaga for many many years It's kind of out of Charlie Bax playbook for when he was in Los Angeles taking cops and putting them back on the streets taking these special. Units were focused focused on narcotics and gang crimes and getting them out policing part side by side with beat cops and the idea is you get that expertise not that they had in those special units and you actually put them out on the streets instead of instead of these kind of silos areas. Charlie Beck said he's trying to break down silos. We'll see how it goes. The problem is that this puts a lot of responsibility in the hands of twenty two district com commanders across the city and whether those people people many of whom most of whom came up through Chicago Police Department with not very good training the lack of training has been identified as a big problem here in the Chicago Police Department. Will they really be able to manage this effectively and will it have the intended effect and so that's one of the big questions the other two things that he's done. That are very important. Are this new office for police. REFORM MM-HMM which is meant to go forward with the police consent decree and the opposite. That's the office of constitutional policing and reform right and then the Counter Terrorism Office offices while which is a very important structural move in today's environment. Dan How do these moves. Connect to the federal consent decree CDs currently operating under. They've created needed this whole new office. What's GonNa be one of the offices within COPD to oversee this? There have been questions already about how well see. PD has been doing meeting some of the requirements armaments of the consent decree in the time that it has been in effect which is not very long so far. So they're really putting a priority there and they have put a woman in charge Who is going to be the highest ranking African American woman in the history of Chicago Police Department so it showing a commitment there to to make some changes that stem from the Lequan McDonald case? Well one thing that's interesting is Beck. Is the interim superintendent so these changes are going to be inherited by whoever. The city hires is the permanent hermit. Superintendent presumably not back says. He doesn't want the permanent job. Dave how's surprised are you that. He's making these big structural changes to the department. When he's acting in an interim capacity I find it kind of strange to be honest? Because I mean these ideas they all seem to have merit but what happens if the next person comes in and doesn't like what happens here doesn't like the way it looks. Are we going to do another reorganization to fix the mistakes that that person thinks here. It's a strange thing to put an interim person in charge of major major initiative. Like this. We'll see how it turns out but I wonder too if there is some strategy at play here on mayor lightfoot spark beckon come in he he's GonNa make these sleeping changes and then he leaves right. He's not the guy who's going to have to deal with the fallout but then there's a structure in place that the new person can just step into. So I mean is that maybe part of the calculation. They think that's absolutely a night. I have a background is business journalist and covering companies that get in really bad shape or even down to bankruptcy this is a strategy that's Houston allot bring in an interim ceo to do the dirty work the heavy lifting and then have the new person. Come in. WHO's Kinda can have? Just everything goes well on his easy not easy easy but but more manageable and that seems to be what's going on in today's point about Willie they hire a new superintendent. Who Won't buy into this back program I I expect Lory lightfoot his thinking playing a long game here and whomever she's will bring in for that position probably in March people are expecting We'll probably really be somebody who sees those reforms Bekker's doing as being productive and and the right trajectory for the department. You're listening to the Friday news round up here on reset our the panel today. David gracing the better government association. WBZ's Dave mckinney. and Dan Petrella of the Chicago Tribune some other stories. We're watching today. FACEBOOK facebook has agreed to a five hundred fifty million dollar settlement on claims at violated Illinois. Privacy law it's facial recognition auto tagging function gathered and saved information formation about users. But they did that without their consent so the lawsuit has been going on for nearly five years and Illinois. Residents eligible for compensation would be notified after the settlement is approved approved by a judge and the art collection owned by Chicago's Johnson Publishing Company is sold at auction for nearly three million dollars. Most works went for thousands. More of an estimated Johnson publishing was forced to sell its collection of works by African American and African artists to help pay off bankruptcy. Well I want to turn now to another other. Corruption case out of Chicago indicted Alderman. Ed Burke of the fourteen ward burks trial has been pushed until at least next year as federal prosecutors turnover undercover. Her cover recordings and documents. David this gracing. This is the first update on this case since last fall. Your thought. Well it's really just puts you in the context of How long we've been at this? The allegations against Burke first arose after the butcher paper went up on his offices in November of two thousand eighteen. And that was is just the first of what has wound up being a statewide corruption investigation. The likes of which is day point out earlier we have never seen before the burke part of it just think of the change in the politics of Chicago since then because of Burke. We haven't the mayor who got elected Larry Life. What has said publicly that that's the moment at which she knew she really? They had a shot at becoming mayor. The city council is completely restructured with Burke completely out of power as was made evident in Lori lightfoot first meeting the city council so so it really does show you how transformational this moment has been in in large measure to the work of the prosecutor's office that the US Attorney John Lauch and the FBI people who've gone after these public corruption cases but again we're dealing with corruption now that we're talking about corruption at the city level alleged corruption at the city level and at the state level title and. I'm just curious when you take a step back. What do you make of the fact that this is the conversation that we're having right now in Illinois and it's not limited to just just one body of government? Is this a place or a time when we can actually see a shift because it's so central to what's happening at so many levels of government government Dan. Well it's not just the city in the state it's the suburbs as well there Village halls in the near southwest suburbs. Lyons McCook that were raided by federal agents had the the village president of oakbrook terrace resign after was brought to light that he was under under federal scrutiny So it really is a time you know. Unlike the the Lukoil rich era where it kind of all seem like a centralized around the governor and the people cost him. This is maybe not new stuff has been going on for a long time but it is really revealing. How how deep seated it is and how it stretches to every level of government and it's it really depend on how seriously lawmakers in Springfield can take this issue enact laws ZIP will tighten up some of these things and whether there can be a cultural change around the way government is done annoy they if your thoughts I mean? It's really stunning Jen. I mean it really is stunning and discouraging. A lot of ways that that you know here we have like you know. We all lived through the the the George Ryan conviction and the Rod Blagojevich conviction and again I go back to the point I made earlier in the show about the whole point of this is to have a deterrent to this kind of behavior. And I think there's a liner that pritzker put in his speech. You know when when people think about doing disgusting things politically. We should react with disgust. But there's just a culture where where this where people get power they they get access to millions of dollars in public funds and then they they treat it as if it's a piggy bank. That is a problem it's pervasive and US Attorney's office and the FBI are the ones that are are are attacking but you do have to question today even have the resources everywhere that's WBZ's Ez's Dave mckennie also with us for this week's round up. Dan Petrella from the Chicago Tribune and David Pricing of the Government Association. And that's a wrap for today's Today's reset. Watch for a Sunday pod to drop into your feet and you can listen to it while you get breakfast ready or while you run errands on Sunday until then I'm Jen White. Thanks for you're listening and let's talk again soon.

Springfield Illinois Dan David Governor Pritzker Chicago Tribune Jay Pritzker Michael Madigan Chicago Senator Senator Martin Sandova WBZ Dave mckinney Better Government Association bribery Dan Petrella Chicago Police Department Commonwealth Edison president COPD Jen White
S8E11: Allissa Richardson

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

35:54 min | 6 months ago

S8E11: Allissa Richardson

"Welcome to the design of business. The business of design where we introduce you to people from all over the world from different industries and disciplines who are here to talk about design business and the values that govern how we work and live together. I'm ellen mcgirt. And i'm jessica helped the design of business. The business of design is brought to you by mail chimp so you want to grow your business. Now what male. Kim's all in one marketing platform allows you to manage more of your marketing activities. All in one place so you can market smarter and grow faster now. What nail chip. That's what learn more at mail. Chimp dot com on today's episode bearing witness with smartphones. So i think of so many of these videos that we've seen and some are jittery. Some turn away at the moment of impact. This people are scared but this girl. The teenage girl did a huge service to our nation that day into his family to make sure that we know what happened to mr roy elissa. The richardson is a journalist and assistant professor of journalism university of southern california's annenberg school. She's also the author of bearing witness while black african americans smartphones and the new protests journalism. A welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me ellen jessica. We're thrilled you're here you know. Let's we opened the season of the podcast by talking with maurice cherry amazing guy. He's all about the internet these days but we ended up talking a lot about the johnson publishing company which published ebony and jet magazines. You had the first ever internship jet. Can you tell us how that came about. And what it was like. Yes i really have to give so much credit to who who's now the dean of northwestern trolls whitaker. Who was my professor at the time. And i was in the magazine writing track and really looking to get into the industry as soon as possible and he knew of their interest to start an internship and he said that. I think you'd be perfect for this. So he picked myself as well as my colleague. Darren simon and the two of us really embarked on an adventure. We combed through all the historic archives. They have thousands of pictures at span. Eighty years of black history and we really appreciated mister johnson's status as a story in a storyteller and a trailblazer so it was really a treat to be in the only black. Owned building on michigan avenue Every single day just going in and out and then little bits of history that weren't as beautiful in terms of like where we had to eat lunch. We were given the option to have a four course meal for lunch every single day. At first i thought this is the life. This is antagonistic. How did this come about. And then you'd asked some of the elders there they get very seriously and say well we weren't allowed at the lunch counters in chicago in the past So we had to eat here and so as a young person coming in twenty one years old not really understanding the gravity of the work that was done in that building at first. It slowly dawned on me how much my ancestors had been through as well as the people who were the elder statesmen and women who are walking through the hallways. They're seventy eight years old still making news in still believing in a product that gave them space in voice when no one else would so you become a journalist. Get this amazing internship but your ba is in biology. Can you take us back a little bit and explain what happened. I started out as a biologist. My goal initially was to be a neonatologist. And i wanted to help. Premature babies. thrive in a lot of that would have been the medications of that helps them fight disease very early in life What happened along. The way is that. I had an internship at a hospital in new orleans where i was in school and my job was a hugger as they let you do. The undergrad phase. And so you put your arms to these little holes that the premiums are in and you keep them warm. And i was assigned a little baby name colin I would go in every week in hug on him and make sure he was okay but one day scrubbed in for my shift and he was gone and so was wondering where he wasn't thinking. Oh great maybe. His mom came back so i thought naively that college mama comeback to get him. Unfortunately the staff told me that he passed away at night and got really upset about that thought. Well we did everything we're supposed to do. He had albright meds We hugged him. We kept him warm. Did someone dot com. In the evening. After i left to keep them warm and they said no this happens. The kind of perfunctory stoicism that they had to perform in order to keep going with something. I knew i couldn't do. I thought no one's even crying. You know what's going on here. And they said you're really going to have to toughen up because happens more often than not. A lot of kids will not leave this nick. You and so. That's really. what transitioned me into thinking. Okay how else. Can i help young people and on long had been on the school paper so i thought well maybe i can write about science. Maybe i could still work with young people by teaching and i began to look at science and still respect it from a distance but know that My composition is a little bit more emotional. And i needed to have a field where i could be compassionate. Take little space To grieve if necessary and then continue on you know unless that is a beautiful story and it's just wonderful to learn that you understood who you were so early on in your in your young career. I have to ask particularly with the work. And the focus that you're doing now and i as a race editor for fortune. I really struggled in this in the last few years. Because i did not expect to be viewing videos of violence and murder On an innocent people you know. I thought i was going to be a much more to use. your word. perfunctory look at diversity. Reports and profiles of outliers in corporate life. How have you managed the trauma of where your work has led you Went to xavier university of louisiana. We graduate the most premed students Remain students every single year. Most of my friends are doctors. I was the one who strayed. And so i listened to them during this time of the pandemic. Talk about how. They don't have time to work through grief because they're so short staffed in one of them said on a group called the other day it's all going to catch up with us. You know this grief in this Having impressed impress on and treat all of these people. Meanwhile i'm thinking of you know time. I spent in a bj this year. The conference the national association of black journalists and it was fantastic even though it was virtual for the first time and we did cry. You have time to go through our feelings and talk about the newsroom. The many problems that are consistently bear and so even though news can be just as fast pace as a hospital. I did find that. I had more space in the journalism. World to really explore the humanistic side of doing this work because it is very heavy work and a lot of journalists. Do understand that when you're sitting there with a family member who is left behind It's it becomes more than just a fatal. Police encounter video that you saw on the internet. This is someone's relative and it's impossible. I think to sit with them. And have that stoicism to be as cold as a doctor would meet to be to get through the treatment And so many times you find yourself holding hands with them and letting them get their feelings out Because they're talking to you and they're entrusting you with a narrative but with that comes the weight That weighty baggage of carrying that story And so. I think that those kind of things really helped me Even go through the process with people and get the job done at the same time. Journalism gave me permission to do that. I want to change gears to slightly. Because i'm the i'm the design person in the partnership i have with with my friend ellen. I wonder if you could take us back to when you got your first camera phone. Was there a moment when you realized that the power of observation might have a role for you professionally in the world that was more meaningful than just holding my phone taking a picture looking at what you had absolutely. I would take it all the way. Back to two thousand ten when the iphone developed. Its first front and rear facing camera and talk about design. That was something that did not exist before that innovation so we didn't have sophie's before then at least not very good ones because you didn't have that front and rear facing camera on there that innovation really set me on a patch experiment with mobile phones in the context of news. And what i mean by that is we were in class one day. I was on the campus of morgan state university which is an h. Vcu that spaced in baltimore maryland. And i had my students all in this kind of circle because we were all kind of experimenting with it. I just unwrapped it. It was just my own personal phone and my students said. Can we see that you know you have to consider. This was an anomaly. Back then for somebody to have the newest latest greatest iphone so as an early adopter i brought it to them and i said what might we you at this And so one of my students was playing around and she said. Can you take a picture of me. And i said well you can take a picture of yourself. Look at this. And she's like what the cameras on the run and she start playing around she says i'm india reporting live from baltimore and i said do you know you're doing a standup all by yourself. And she goes. I can't do a stand up by myself. So she starts kind of experimenting stretching out her arms and then of course even though they're twenty years old. They're kind of like girls like me next. I want to go. And i'm just standing back looking at them. Like what if. I had a better device that they hold on to you because this is going to be very jittery the i'll probably not be great and i'm starting to think of harder accessories i can put on here and so i really opened that laboratory up to them and i said let's name ourselves. We're going to be the mo jo lab mobile journalism lab and then i started seeking out funding because i looked on different websites and i was beginning to see certain selfie sticks and other wonderful designs that would enhance. What the iphone to do. And i thought if i'm going to scale this so that it's a one to one solution and every student has their own iphone. Or at least i might touch on this gonna get pricey pretty fast and so the knight foundation was so generous in our very first iteration of this gave us a wonderful seed grant and with that i watched times of different grips to see which one was the best and rated them online and then we started to get lots of donations in from people who would say kenya. Try by design In so it became really great hub for all things mobile and my students just got better and better with the news that they were creating so. I think that you just answered a question that i was very curious about was your decision to join the academy rather than a newsroom and it seems to me in check. Check my thinking on this. Is that part of your mission is to scale the the power and the meaning and the importance of journalism through as many people as you possibly can and you can do that as a teacher. And you can't do that as an editor. Yes so. I was doing it. I a lot of workshops in newsrooms to stay. This is the hottest new thing that you need to know. Here are the top line ways that you use this phone. So i did a bunch of one woman workshops and about two or three hundred journalists in the room and then afterward they would write and say i love what we did by forgot some of forgot a lot of it once. I got back to the newsroom and so i thought well maybe i should start a little younger in the pipeline and get some younger people involved in this and so i really found a lot of gratification in working with younger journalists. Who are still in a position where they have a lot of time to experiment and so it's been really great as a professor to then see thousands of people that you've taught then go forward into the field and guess what happens. They then train up. They train the people who are managing them to see the value of what they have brought to the newsroom. You've got this wonderfully named mojo lap. Brilliantly named branding of this mobile organism. By which you're going to explore and teach and create a way to actually experienced journalism first hand. But as you're doing it the world is changing. Technology is moving so quickly. How did you manage to stem the tide of this complex series of algorithms and and quick to market devices the and the technology changing every five seconds while you were actually a building your own career within the academy and teaching and creating classes and courses and experiences for your students and raising young kids and raising young kids. There's also that detail. It has definitely been a challenge to stay on top of the technology as it's evolved and i would say the best way that i've been able to adapt is by being out in the world and i say that because we didn't stay in our tiny lab in baltimore. We were invited by global girl media. Which is a great organization. I love At l. a. was just starting at the time and they were going to act on. They said we're going to create a program where girls were learn how to report with traditional cameras. But we would love for them to experiment with the mojo as well and so i went to south africa. I and really experimented with twenty girls there to produce news using only an ipod touch and they were astounded. They were just like this is fantastic at the same time every night. I'm going back to our hotel. And i'm looking at the news and i'm seeing the arab spring wrapped in the northern part of the continent and looking at a lot of that being mediated through cell phones. And and i'm thinking. I'm down here in southern tip and i'm teaching a rather recreational forum of mo-jo but these folks in the northern part in africa are engaging really format and so i had to move beyond the traditional. This is how you make a photo essay. This is how you doing audio podcast to. This is how you stay safe. This is how you set your own sue. People know where you're located so you can gio locate yourself in case you're arrested like it became that kind of of training in terms of conflict reporting in so imagine coming home to that Thinking that you're gonna take a break from that Conflict style reporting and seeing occupy kickoff. And so the occupy wall street movement was in full swing. When i came back home and again. I'm seeing all of this mediated through cell phones. I see mobile. Journalists for the first time Attaching cell phones to drones and launching them into the air to get these aerial shots. That even news helicopters couldn't get in new york city because they couldn't fly between skyscrapers and so as i decided to go back to graduate school on that first week of grad school and twenty fourteen. Mike brown's killed. And i'm sitting there thinking. Wow i thought i was going to come into this program with the intention to study the impact of mojo on young girls self esteem. That was the initial dissertation But then as i began to watch the news again heavily mediated by citizen journalists and then looking at these historic threads success. Feel so familiar. The spirit of this kind of reporting feels a lot like what. I observed jet. They're talking about emmett till in relation to trayvon martin but to see it enacted in this newest design technology its newest iteration of smartphones. Really made me think this is bearing witness while black. This is a totally different style of looking at even observed in north african it's totally different from occupy and it does a lot of heavy lifting Culturally and story graphically And so i saw it out during the three years. I was in grad school. Trying to really prove that that was a a new theory Because all of our current media witnessing theory talked about the farther you are away from the initial viewing the less emotion. You have and so all of the media theories that i read said if you weren't physically there you're not likely to be moved as much and i knew that that was not true. My community i mean. We were galvanized by seeing just as the civil rights movement was galvanized by in till and his mom. Making the raid decision to publish His horrific pictures in johnson publishing jet magazine In so i thought that this is completely opposite of what. I'm reading in these. What's been put out by euro centric scholars. So that's what. I started to talk to my committee. And they say we think you're onto something completely new. Maybe you do need an ethnocentric way of looking. What are you going to call it. and i said. I think i'm gonna call this black. Witnessing it is the specific moment the drumbeat of events the ubiquity of technology and a growing sense that we have stories to tell is. What's making this moment. So rich for this kind of action impact but and i are old enough to be have been young enough when rodney king was attacked to think that was the moment. I definitely consider rodney king. A watershed moment for witnessing and backed i started the book with it and i was a kid. I remember curling up underneath my dad's arm as he made us watch and he's like do you see what's going on and i was really scared by that And i thought i you know who did this. Why would he do this. And as i got older. I began to think who film that really had the bravery to looking at that i made been so scare myself and as i began to do a lot of research into the origins of witness saying we really do have to credit george holiday who stood out on his balcony with his handy cam and recorded that really horrific scene of rodney king fighting for his life And when i think about that era. I think about the handy. Camas is something that was almost an elite tool. At the night everyone had one and they still produce very grainy Images and so you fast forward in time to two thousand nine anything about oster grants and you think about him on that bar platform fruitvale station. That is the next big watershed moment. We have in witnessing. It was done this time by something that was more ubiquitous something that more people had at their fingertips the cell phone But it again if we think about how grainy those images were if we think too now we think to may and we think about what we saw. When george floyd was murdered that was taken by an icicle. Eleven and a seventeen year old girl. Darnell frazier recorded that. And so when i think about as the tool became better and produced a better picture and as the witnesses became savvier to know. I should probably be recording this. We have this confluence of things and so we think about what. Dr nilo must've been going through in terms of her own personal turmoil. It's quite miraculous. And you could probably call her the filmmaker of the century for keeping her phone so steady. Not talking over it not narrating. It didn't need any. Narration was already horrible and horrific in itself but then the bravery she exhibited by keeping the camera trained on him and not looking away. on The the officer. Derek chauvin as he's looking directly at took a completely different level of of just bravery and skill and so i think of of So many of these videos that we've seen and some are jittery. Some turn away at the moment of impact because people were scared but this girl this teenage girl did a huge service to our nation that day into his family to make sure that we know what happened to mr roy and that is something that did not exist before. And that's what. I think riled up everyone because if we think about what i talk about in the book is east three. Overlapping eras of domestic terror against black people beginning with slave And leading to lynching and giving way to what we have. Now police brutality through the former two phases. We could not look so we think about for example during slavery while other slaves are being punished. You don't have these great big groups of black people standing around observing as a matter of fact with anyone seen the film. Twelve years of slave. There's inward shula tell edgy four is hanging and the slaves are sweeping. And they're doing things in the background so so that they don't get in trouble themselves. They're looking away. If we think about lynching photography for example you don't have what people in the fringes looking. They were hull at home. Hoping their loved one would come back or they escaping town completely. So many different news archives of whole groups of black equal just fleeing town when they realized that a racial massacre was about to happen. So if we bring that to today it's totally different because we can say for the first time in history i'm going to look directly act as aggressor. I'm gonna stay with you the victim in this moment. I'm not gonna let you go through this alone. And i'm gonna make sure that people know who you are and know your name and to make sure if possible that people know the aggressors name and that is a huge shift paradigmatic in terms of how we'd look the design of business. The business of design is brought to you by mail chimp. We talked to some people working for mail. Chimp from their homes about what creative leadership looks like in these uncertain times. My name is williams. Natalia williams is vice president of product. Tell you talk to us about what it takes to manage a team during a pandemic. it's about being compassionate and being empathetic not only for our customers but also being empathetic and compassionate to each other knowing that we're also dealing with the same challenges around not only the pandemic but Racial inequities though some folks deal with it through kind of investing further into their work. Some folks do not need that time away and understanding How to deal with that as a leader that there's not a one size fits all model is what i've have really learned through this time. Nail all in one marketing platform allows you to manage more of your marketing activities. All in one place so you can market smarter and grow faster now. What male chip. That's what learn more at nelson dot com. I'm really curious. How how the word sacred came into your vocabulary around the use of these photographs. What do you mean by the fact that as you wrote smartphone video black people being killed to be treated as sacred like lynching photographs. What do you mean by that. Yeah i think about how. Our ancestors used those photographs. I think about photographers being at lynchings and usually there were journalists or someone else of Some kind of authority in the neighborhood. Sometimes they were. Police officers judges these kinds of folks. And so when he had that that upper crust of society if you will who sanctioned the lynching and then took the photographs of it they were made into postcards. Many times in those postcards were sold and i remember seeing some of the more historical postcards saying things like we had a barbecue last weekend And i was horrified by that language as well as the fact that these were sold so openly and they are the reason in fact that the comstock act was passed as i researched and found that you can't sending making lewd through the mail And so the us government tried to get ahead of. It tried to make it so that you couldn't send these things without an envelope at least N even that didn't slow the production of these lynching postcards and so what People like either be wells and w e b voiced it in their leadership of the end only c. p. is they would purchase as many as they could they would send white allies down two point south and those allies would say you know what happened here this weekend and then they would purchase as many as ill of them as they could to get them out of circulation and they would print one or two of the pictures in the crisis which was their main vein their magazine and then they would kind of retire them to what they this shadow archive and you had to really look upon them with respect and solemn reserve and in many cases he had to get permission to get them out of a museum or a library where newsroom somewhere and so when i think about how most of us would not we would not dare put a lynching photograph on our social media feeds without some really deep context an explanation in maybe the men. No i think those kind of things have been elevated to a level of of sacred content And i thought about it as i had to watch mr floyd die over and over again on. Primetime television oftentimes without a trigger warning without his face being blurred out. And i thought this is now going to live not only on television but online forever and his children have to see him entombed online in this way and i really begin to think about it along racial lines and say why are people. The only ones who are seeing themselves die on television. I don't wanna see anyone die on television. It is a sacred part the last sacred part of your life and it should be. If you're if you're fortunate you should be surrounded by people who love you. And if you're not in fits of violent death we definitely should not be looking upon that as casually as we are and i began to think they're looping this with the air of a sports highlight and i got very angry at this and so this year i went around to most of the national news organizations in international ones ended nearly a hundred explaining to journalists why they need to retire. These kinds of things to shadow archive and elevate them to a sacred kind of content. That requires us not to regard that as the story but to talk about the systemic inequality as the story. This is not normal if we think about daniel pearl for example and the horrific way that he died as a young journalist who wanted to be out in the world and traveling internationally. It horrified me to see that someone would do that. To another person let alone a journalist and i was really glad to see that content scrubbed from the internet because i thought his family should not have to see that and i think about nine eleven and i'm old enough to have lived through that and to remember the gory images that used to exist online of people who were forced out of the buildings and i was glad when that was scrub from the internet. I thought how muscles families feel you know seeing that. We don't need to see that to know something bad happened that day so we can do this. We've done it when it's concerned others. I wanted to also ask about the next next next generation. We were very lucky to hear the sounds of your your kids in the background. Always welcome in and you mentioned your father and your father making sure that you watched the rodney king video. What is your advice for parents. Now to make sure their kids are getting the news in the right way and getting the proper context for understanding all of these issues so they can become better consumers of the news. Because that's the issue that we're having here absolutely. It's a great question so much of my frustration this year and why beginner right so many pieces about regarding these differently. Because i couldn't shield my kids a lot of times from things that were going on. We would be watching the news in these images which just pop up and i eventually had to explain to them earlier than i wanted to. What was going on. And so i didn't let my children watch the news without me sitting there. I never just even though i am a news person. I never just have the tv on in the background on mute. I never Let them watch it without any kind of context and so for me. I could explain to them that something horrible happen without letting them see that video So when george ward died. I showed them a picture of his daughter. I showed videos of her saying daddy changed the world and her on speaking about him and then i showed pictures of what he looked like when he was alive so that they could remember. This was. someone's dan. This was someone's brother son and so they will of course would ask mom what happened to him and then i explained That he was killed by police in a had to have that. Talk with my son. Even he's six that people will eventually look at him differently when he's older and so although he didn't grasp everything is only in the first grade He unfortunately does understand. What loss is for example when chadwick boseman died as a huge hero. My son's black panther. Right and i remember telling my son maybe a day or so later. 'cause i couldn't bear to tell him in the moment that he'd passed away and my the first thing he said was well did he have covid and i said no honey didn't have cohen. Yes did the police get him. And i said no. The police didn't get him honey. He had cancer and he said oh and so to think that those would be his two terms of reference that the only way that this really regal black man could have died would have been through one of our two major pandemics right now. Race or this disease Was really devastating to me. Because i thought it was doing a pretty good job of not having this death ticker up for covert or not always having these police videos rolling but kids since things they still know. What's going on so before we let you go and i know we're really up against it here. I'm curious if you had any sense even if it's just a quick set of ideas for the future of journalism. Because i think that's the issue that we're really facing going forward. How do we capture this creativity. Embed new principles that are more inclusive that our justice oriented that refer to are complicated history and actually remedies for that complicated history and so make money out of the piece. Is the business model piece. I know everyone's laughing listeners. Everyone's laughing now. I have shut down the pot again. It's clearly not possible. I think it is possible to make money. I think it's different now in terms of how we're thinking of it. Last century was all about the general interest magazine the life magazine's the times the newsweeks. The net has made everything niche and. I think that we're going to have to give up some of these contexts of a one-size-fits-all press for everyone and as we strengthen our niche publications we see them thrive online. We'll begin to see. There are business models but it will require that you know a specific audience very very well down to the language that they use right and so we see organizations like the shade room for example having fifteen million followers and Joe biden president elect joe biden and a vice president-elect comma harris stopping by to talk to the shade room this year. That's enormous. That never would have happened before because people would have dismissed it as what's called on the internet the black tmz writer like they're gossip site And so to see these kinds of new destinations pop up. In thrive have really made people turn their heads and say is there a new press burgeoning and so i think the legacy media either will have to partner with some of these citizen journalists in an emt model almost where the citizen journalists are the first responders and the legacy media are surgeons who then take it from there after the gurney is wheeled in if they don't relinquish some of that power in partner they will die and it's because people want media that speaks directly to their experience we have seen that you've seen All these marginalized communities be excluded for hundreds of years. And they're tired of it. They don't have to tune into a news site that doesn't take their community seriously or that will misquote them or when it comes to their demands. Elizabeth. thank you so much. This has been so much to think about and absolutely a marvelous conversation. Thank you so much elliot jessica. This has been fantastic. The design of business. The business of design is a podcast from design observer. Our website is db dot design observer dot com there. You can find more information about days. Guests severe richardson plus conversations with dozens of other people about the transformative role design plays and their business to listen. Go to db dot design observer dot com. If you like what you heard today please subscribe to our podcast. You can find us. The design of business. The business of design in apple podcasts. Spotify or every you listen to podcasts. And if you're already subscribe to the podcast. Thank you now. Please tell your friends or go to apple podcasts. And rate us which is a great way. Let other people know about us between episodes. Keep up with us on facebook twitter instagram. And if you're not listening already check out our other podcasts. The observatory please consider subscribing to race ahead. My column on race and leadership at fortune dot com slash. Get ahead mike eric. Our theme music. Julie subaru edits the show. Our interns are edina carp and leaning and our executive producer is blake eskin of noun verb rodeo. Come back next time when we'll be talking with mikhail civil about why design writer wanted to become a state senator. I think i had a various status. You've cities. I was like oh cds or just as ballet of street life. It's extraordinary from morning tonight. And i didn't really think about them as economies or places where people suffered see then.

rodney king ellen mcgirt mr roy elissa journalism university of south annenberg school ellen jessica maurice cherry Darren simon mister johnson baltimore knight foundation xavier university of louisiana national association of black jet magazine johnson whitaker morgan state university george holiday george floyd Darnell frazier
December 22, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:48 min | 6 months ago

December 22, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm paris shuts brandis. Friedman has the evening on the show tonight. God of us like any of this legislation is perfect. More stimulus checks will be coming to most americans after congress passes a nine hundred billion dollar corona virus relief package but critics including president trump within the last hour. Say it's not enough. It can be assured that we will respondents. President elect joe biden vows to punish russia for the massive cyber hack of us agencies. We hear from members of congress on this and passing that covid relief package. The finish line is in sight and we can't afford to stop running. The coronavirus pandemic has been a marathon. The us surgeon general comes to chicago to urge everyone to stay. The course we've got the latest on the coronavirus vaccine. Chicago based foundation wants to change the way adult. Long term care facilities are ranked nationwide. I thought we weren't going to get pictures. Is a kobe picture day. A local couple recreates the school tradition for some students who didn't have one because of remote learning and the chicago symphony orchestra has a musical gift for you. This holiday season a virtual recital with pianist. Jorges federico oreo but for some of today's top stories police superintendent david brown says he will tighten the department's rules for search warrants. This comes during a contentious six. Our joint city council committee hearing about a botched raid. That left chicago woman. Handcuffed naked among changes brown says the department will ban no knock warrants except in situations in which someone's life is at risk and a warrant can no longer rely on information provided by an informant paid by the department for information brown also promises to begin tracking data about search warrants. Cd is resolute. That we must change our culture. It is always the right time to do the right thing. Everyone deserves a measure of respect basic human decency and again we must first. We must be first to admit. I'm mistakes and just before the hearing mayor lori lightfoot announced retired judge and claire williams will lead an outside investigation into the raid and the way. The mayor's office the city's law department and the police department handled it. In the letter to alderman lightfoot wrote quote we must get to the bottom of what transpired around the wrong rate of miss young's home and all that followed chicago. Public schools expects to see eight hundred million dollars in funding from the federal stimulus. Bill passed last night according to the district per federal law. Cps must allocate eighty million of that to go to non public schools in release epsco. Janice jackson says the funds will be used to support the critical resources. Needed to reopen classrooms expanded access to high quality academic programming employee record high numbers of nurses and social workers invest in social emotional supports and provide additional resources to our highest need schools for additional details on the funding. You can visit our website at. Www dot com slash news health officials report more than sixty two hundred new cases of the corona virus. There are also one hundred sixteen additional deaths in the state reported today that brings the total number of cases in illinois to more than nine hundred eleven thousand and the state's death toll to fifteen thousand four hundred fourteen r. and b. singer. R kelly has a new trial date in his sex abuse. Case after months of delays due to concerns about the corona virus a federal. Judge said kelly's trial for september thirteenth. The data's tentative given uncertainty surrounding the pandemic kelly is charged in chicago with child pornography and obstruction of justice. He's also facing charges in minnesota and new york all related to allegations of sexual abuse of children. He is currently being held at the metropolitan correctional facility in chicago. Congress finally passed a nine hundred billion dollar stimulus bill in the house. It was a three hundred and fifty nine to fifty three vote. Here's what house speaker nancy. Pelosi had to say consider this a first step and that again more needs to be done and we're so excited that that will be happening under the biden harris administration here to talk about passing the stimulus and lots more our congressman brad schneider. A democrat representing illinois's tenth district covers a portion of chicago's northern suburbs congresswoman jan schakowsky democrat representing illinois's ninth district that includes parts of chicago's northside in northern suburbs and congressman. Rodney davis republican who represents illinois district which includes springfield and wine south and west towards saint. Louis welcome all of you back to chicago tonight congresswoman schakowsky nine hundred billion dollars six hundred dollar one time payments to most individuals three hundred dollars. Supplemental unemployment relief. Are you pleased with the final product here or is it too little too late. Well it certainly doesn't alleviate all the people are feeling and expressing their members of congress but it certainly is a help the six hundred dollar paint it can go for a family of four would come to a twenty four hundred dollars payment which which certainly helps an i call it rather than a stimulus payment a survivor payment because this is just needed for people to hold on so i think as as Nancy pelosi has said it's beginning but it sterling. We need to do more to help. Small businesses to help state and local government and amd help the unemployed although they got some help this time. But we need to deal. Congressman davis Looking at this bill dissecting it according to the joint committee on taxation. There's one hundred billion dollars in tax breaks for special interests like liquor producers electric motorcycles. Are these more necessary than than higher payments to individuals. Well when it comes to putting a big piece of legislation together they're going to be people who have provisions they want put in place one tax provision that you may not have mentioned is one that i champion is to allow employers to be incentivized to help pay down student debt. Their employees a voluntary private sector approach to dealing with the next fiscal crisis. Once we get through the pandemic and that's he ever burdening student loan debt crisis but in the end. I think history's going to judge us pretty well coming together again. Help her mom and pop shops. Give them access to ppp loans again. Because we're in the midst of governor prisoners executive orders who've told many businesses that they can't operate they needed our help and we did it and to that. Affect governor congressman. Schneider governor pritzker has asked for federal relief The mayor has asked for federal relief. That hundred sixty billion dollar package for state and municipal governments is kind of sitting off to the side. Why has that not gain traction. The our local governments are really struggling. They are struggling providing the central services least firefighters. They're they're covering extra cost p so as a member of the problem solvers caucus that came together and made the initial proposal. Nine hundred billion dollar proposal did the became the framework for this package and part of that was one hundred and sixty billion dollars for state and local governments There just wasn't enough support to get that across the finish line. It became stalling. But as a jan schakowsky said this is a down payment. This is not the final piece. And as rodney davis indicated. I think history will judge us. Not just how did this time. It is good that we came together that we found a bipartisan compromise. But this can't be the end. Hopefully it's a path forward that over the next to the back seat we will provide relief. We need and then ultimately you for a recovery and renewal of the american economy to get people back to work congressman michael safer for chicago. The payment checks the Survivor checks that are going to come are also available to mixed status families. Another word bill. Last time is decent. One person was not documented. That check would not go to that household. We changed that and so that families that have someone who is not documented can also get the payments we should we should also mentioned. There's hundreds of millions of dollars for cps and other education systems in here as well as transit. Systems congressman davis. You heard your colleague saying this as a down payment. Do you think in the next congress. They'll be appetite for another round of stimulus. We'll we'll have to see how this addresses the problems that we see in our communities and in our economy right now you know. It's it's where we fundamentally disagree. Republicans and democrats my colleagues We well together on this but their philosophy is to talk about. What is the next step. How can we spend more. I think we need to take a step back decide. What's what's being utilized. What's still exists from our previous cares act funding and we make the best most fiscally responsible decision. But the good news is we addressed a lot of problems that our constituents have come up to us together. There has to address. And i'm excited for that. All right let's shift gears to major national security issue. President elect joe biden addressed the massive security breach widely attributed to the russians. Today take a look when i learn the extent of the damage in fact who is formerly responsible. They can be assured that we respond responding kind as many options. Which i will not discuss. Now congressman. Schneider this is widely attributed now by trump's own cabinet officials to russian intelligence services. It's penetrated the highest levels of government agencies like the treasury department. What more do you know about it. Well so what we have heard is that it penetrated not just government but american companies as well but we don't know the full extent but we know that it is a we've never seen anything like this and it is is not just a fishing expedition. This put our infrastructure risk or critical infrastructure like electrical grid. Our industry They were trying to get information about vaccines. So we don't know the extent or the direction that this might take but as president-elect biden said whoever's responsible and all arrows are pointing towards russia has to pay a steep price for this. i'm disappointed. The president has refused to condemn russia or putin for putting bounties on the head of american troops. He hasn't said anything about the attempted. Assassination of putin's rival nevada. And once again he is denying the severity or the providence of this of this hack while his cabinet officials secretary of state palm pale attorney. General bar said this clearly looks like it's coming from russia. We need to make sure whoever did this pays a steep about. That congressman davis. Does the country need to hear more from president trump about this in a tweet downplayed that russia had anything to do with it. First off russia bounty story That's been that's the problem we have with today's society that you know. We have unnamed sources to come out and talk about. What's happening and i don't think there's stories congressman with respect. I don't think that story has been debunked but let's talk about. Let's talk about this. Russian bounty story has been a parish and and that's one that i'll continue to Chat about and we can. We can talk about that in future time. But in the end There's been a president since more communicative. Unfortunately it's been through one. Hundred twenty characters are less on twitter. And i certainly hope all government officials will tweet less govern more congresswoman schakowsky colleague in the senate senator durbin called it inactive war. How serious is this. Well you know when the president of the united states as well it it could be. China could be But at the same time we know now everyone seems to agree that it is rush limbaugh and the the the the defense department the state department all of these agencies of government have now been invaded by the By the russians and this has gone on for months and months. The president refuses to acknowledge that. It's just incredible in face of all of the evidence of all of the things as kong. A the other congressmen have mentioned. He has refused to blame russia for anything including going after our troops in afghanistan. Right we're going to have to. We're gonna have to leave our discussion here. But we'll be back in a sec. Our thanks to representatives schneider schakowsky and davis as we said we'll have more with them later in the program. Thank you so much. And now to phil ponce and more on the state of the economy phil thank you perez and as you were just discussing late last night. Congress passed a nine hundred billion dollar. Covid nineteen relief package. It includes direct stimulus checks too. Many americans probably most extended unemployment relief and billions for small businesses. Joining us on whether this latest package is enough. Or if it's too much. Are benjamin jones economics professor at northwestern. University's kellogg school of management jones was a senior economist for the white house. Council of economic advisers during the obama administration and rachel grislier a research fellow economics budget and entitlements at the heritage foundation. That's a conservative leaning. Think tank based in washington. Dc and thank you both so much for joining us into four. We get to the Discussion let's take a quick. A review of what that stimulus package entails a little more detail that we've been hearing it will include six hundred dollars. Stimulus checks for people. Earning less than seventy five thousand three hundred dollars in weekly unemployment insurance payments two hundred eighty four billion and small business loans twenty five billion in rental assistance and and vixen moratorium which is extended until january thirty first. Let's begin with with Benjamin jones benjamin jones. How effective do you see. This package is being very big package. I think it'll be effective. Both as stimulus for the economy as a whole and perhaps more importantly it has an enormous amount of social insurance in it to help those who are out of work and are particularly suffering during this economic crisis ratio wrestler. How effective do you think this package might be. Well i think that the price tag here nine hundred billion dollars and we're talking about adding another seven thousand five hundred dollars in debt per household in america. This is a lot bigger package than we needed. It would be nice to see something that was small learn more targeted and i think that that could do a lot more good focusing on the health side the vaccine deployment at home testing. I think there's a lot in here. That's not actually going to stimulate the economy and be effective because these blanket policies. Now that we're nine months into the crisis are not what we need but kind of more targeted once the people who are still in need and there have been mixed reactions to this bill. Here's how one republican senator described it the next time you see republicans in high moral duggan claiming and complaining about spending of democrats and socialism. Remind them remind them if they supported. This monstrous bill that really the difference between the parties is less adam smith versus marks and more marks versus ingles benjamin jones. We heard Some congressman democratic congressman telling paris. Just a bit ago that this was just step. One is more going to be needed. You think more might become needed in the sense. That much of the programming here in this bill should set in march. And it's quite possible that vaccines have not been widely distributed at that point and we're still in a severe downturn so in that sense with regard to the timing. i think maybe more would be needed in programming. The actual size of this program is vast. I'm in some sense. I would agree that sort of more than is needed over the next few months in in this bill ratio one hope. Is that This We'll be enough to keep the economy going until the economy turned returns to normal With vaccinations taking place and so forth. Is that how you see this as a possible bridge to get the country back to where it can organically. Come back where we come back to is not going to be where we started. There have been some permanent changes in the economy. But we've already seen a really strong recovery. So far it's pretty close to be shaping on the third quarter. The gdp was less than one hundred billion below what it was last year. And so we're really on the pathway to significant improvement. I actually worry a little bit more. About some of the provisions like the structure of the unemployment insurance benefits that are flat benefit. And that don't depend on what people were making before is potentially lead into higher unemployment in the future. That's what the cbo went. Some federal reserve studies another Indicated that when you have those prolonged benefits at a higher level you might lead to higher unemployment lower output in the long run. So i worry a little more about what this might do to pull back on that benjamin jones. How about that. One criticism of the six hundred dollars that people were getting and unemployment benefits was that it actually was an incentive for people not to go back to work Is that a real problem. Do you think that sounds very logical. I think the empirical evidence is much is much more direction suggests that higher wages at the low end. Don't necessarily dissuade entry into employment nor does sort of an income floor dissuade people from wine to work and make their income and lives even better. So i i see this as as more about kind of getting the economy worrying to go as the vaccine. Come into play and so that we come out of the gates with a lot of demand in the economy and so people really go out and spend and get us back to full employment quickly. A rachel bressler. Some people arguing that perhaps it should have been a little more targeted that six hundred dollars for people who are people who are earning over. Seventy five thousand dollars will still get some relief. Should there have been a greater amount for people making under seventy five thousand dollars well. I don't think that we should be targeting. Sending money to people who still have their jobs. And that's the case for ninety three percent of americans and while it might still be helpful. Who doesn't want to receive a check. We saw from the last meal payments when people were more in need that they actually mostly contributed to higher savings. Some people paying off their credit card debts american saved one point two trillion dollars more in twenty twenty just between april and october and they did in two thousand nineteen and the also reduced their household credit card debt by eleven percent. So that's a great thing. And it makes americans better prepared for any future crises. That might come but it's not a reason to we should send more checks out there because that indicates that people probably won't go out and spend the money yet until society is more than and are more avenues for people to spend their money. They're not going to go out and do that. And it's not going to be stimulated it's just at the debt rato. Let me take a second with vaccines. Not being distributed. What are your expectations as to win. The economy might sort of come back to a semblance of normalcy. Well it's still going to be months. Certainly and i've got kids at school. I don't know if they're going to go back to school until the fall of twenty twenty one in. That's a big impact on society when children are going to school so i think it's still going to take a while but there are some underutilized resources out there like there. Are these five dollar rapid at home test. You can have results in fifteen minutes but those haven't been given approval yet for individuals to do them at home they have to send them off to a government lag. You know if that approval was given in we could hal up to half of the population testing themselves. Every four days in a cost of roughly fifteen billion dollars that would go a long way towards people being able to safely go back to resume most of their normal activities. Benjamin jones and five seconds. Wendy think the economy might be back to some semblance of normalcy. Economic solution is the vaccine. Can't get it out there fast enough. I want to see a lot. More effort from the federal government on exactly that dimension could be a few months if we wait till the summer you know. It's it's a. It's a huge challenge for our economy. And of course for our health. And that's what we'll have to leave at benjamin jones rachel bressler. Thank you both for joining us. We appreciate it. And i'll paris back to you. Thanks phil. there's no place like home for the holidays. Like literally in your own home with only the people who normally live in it. A trio of high profile medical officials made that plea to illinois today amid spiking covid cases. And the fast approaching christmas holiday. Amanda finicky joins us now with more amanda perez that tag team of physicians illinois dot for negoti ezekie. Chicago's dr allison. Arwady in somebody. Who's less familiar at least on the state shut stage and that is. Us surgeon general jerome adams. Their morning included a visit to saint anthony's hospital on chicago's west side. We got to see people get vaccinated. Louise nurse in the icu. Which by the way is at capacity Had just gotten his vaccine and one of the things that i want. Everyone to know is that it's important that we take cova seriously especially now dr already says. Chicago did see a bump. In coronavirus cases after thanksgiving today is first day that we are back down in both are cases and are positively below where we were in. Think that thanksgiving and it still not good here in chicago. We're adding an average of one thousand two hundred and seventy six cases per day. That's more than three times. The top level of what we need to be so avoid. The hustle and bustle already says for christmas spread. Joy not cogan. The message comes as there's fear about. A corona virus variant detected in. England believed to be even more contagious. The surgeon general says the federal government is considering working with airlines to encourage people to be tested of four. They fly but he says at this point. There is no need to ban flights from the u k viruses. Mutate all the time. That's what they do. The sars cov two virus that causes covid nineteen has mutated over twenty times so far this year it. that doesn't mean that it won't work For a vaccine won't work. It doesn't mean that it is more dangerous. What it means is that we will continue to look at this and to follow this virus working with the. Who the cd. Even if it does get to the point that it's mutated so much vaccine does need to be adjusted. Adams's science can handle it. He says that's what happens every year with the flu vaccine adams last week bought the code vaccine along vice president. Mike pence says he did it in part to reassure people of color who he says understandably may have reservations about it. The trump appointee also went out of his way to emphasize. Getting the vaccine is free. And it's for everyone. Dr ezekie and dr awadhi confirmed to me that no one will be asked for an identification when they come in to get vaccinated and that no one will be denied a vaccination because their documentation status. They won't even ask you about your documentation status so important for people to not be fearful of in to get vaccinated today in chicago adams. Downplayed the confusion. Over shipments of the pfizer. Vaccine saying that hiccups along the way are understandable. He also says those concerns are burying the lead with the journal vaccine now also approved for emergency use millions more doses will soon be on the way. He's hopeful that half of the us adult population will be vaccinated by the end of february. That's around when chicago is hoping to be through with the first phase of vaccination focused initially here on healthcare workers or what he says. There's no specific hard timeline. She says now we're in the bbb phase. Everybody wants and there's not quite enough. But as more and more and more vaccine becomes available we will start to see some shift there and as soon as we're at a point where we're not using really all of that vaccine to vaccinate healthcare workers. That'll be approximately when we're ready to move into phase one. B b those over seventy five years old in frontline essential workers so thank grocery store clerks will be able to get their shots in chicago for now though. Both the city in the state are looking to next week. Monday for the first vaccines to be given in long term care facilities. Andrew are seeing homes. There's no word yet on which of those long term care facilities will be first in line now. Meanwhile illinois dr zeke as says another virus. The flu is down. We have seen very low levels here in illinois and also. Let's remember that the same measures were using to help prevent the transmission of covid is hopefully going to really keep the flu numbers down for this season again. The flu doesn't typically spike until january or february. So if you're wanting to get the coronavirus vaccine in you can't just yet. Well it is not too late to get your flu shots paris back to you all right. Amanda and up next recreating school picture day so please stick around latinos who make up one third of the population continue to power. The city that works these are the people that are working three jobs knowing that. Kobe is out there to the people that need the help and we should help them. Whether you loved or hated it it was something everybody had to do. Growing up school picture day but that isn't the case for some chicago area students who've had the switch to remote learning since last friend so to help out some friends and their kids one local couple took it upon themselves to recreate the tradition. Here's brands friedman with a look at their covid picture day earlier in his career chicago photographer. Jeff dahlgren says people were surprised. He didn't have kids as darfur in photographing lots of kids. You know people always assumed that. I had kids and people would always ask you know. I don't. I can't believe you don't have any kids. But that changed when he and his wife jen welcomed home their son kinder- we adopted him from haiti. The process took about two and a half years. He had a home and he needed a home. That's kind of the short story. That really changed everything in our world. you know. i can't say enough about that it's it's pretty awesome. The dog runs have taken pictures over the years in cherished kinder's school photos and like many families this year. They've had to adjust their son's education due to the pandemic but being at home didn't mean they were going to skip tradition a classic school picture for calendar and his friends. I had had the thought kind of in the fall and put it aside and then When it started coming around to christmas. Which is when i usually put you know koenders school pictures in the christmas cards family. It kinda hit me again in a more strong solid way. We need to do something so to make up for a lack of picture day at different schools kovic picture day was born at the dog. Rin studio troops studio. We had assigned reading them in case. I wasn't here instructing them what to do so they wouldn't start wandering and looking for me. I did a temperature check of everybody that came in then. They moved in and had their picture taken and then they moved out and they went out the door so nobody crossed paths. We time them out at fifteen minute. Intervals i kind of wiped things down in between just to make a jeff created a online gallery any parenting. Just go with a log in and download and use and share but i. It's lights camera school. Picture and kinder's playlist jannine. Jeff live in the neighborhood. We walked to school together under normal normal circumstances and they were nice enough to include us in this Picture day. I think it's really meaningful to have their photos taken because we do whatever year and every year we do something special for the grandparents in the family and to miss a year would have been really sad that she has a son who's around jealous age that she was thinking about how we could get school photos and i thought it was really interesting Especially since so much about school. Experience is not traditional for kids so if we can kind of create a picture day experience i thought it was cool so when i got the phone call. It was like you're doing it. It's a nice not to tradition of having one every year and the same setup with the same same way you know we have a little gallery of his school pictures every year from preschool But those little traditions are think what's been missed. A lot of this pandemic gen dog rin says a big part of the tradition is the pose. That doesn't feel like a class picture. It doesn't have that kind of forced and four smile. Everybody has those pictures and everybody has some good ones and some bad ones everybody including the parents bed hair yet. Terrible haircuts and missing teeth and maybe my teeth were rushed. You know it's still an event. Somehow it was for me you know x. Number of years ago. When i was having school pictures taken It's the same for kids today. The dog rin say it's special because kids grow up too fast here. They go from just this little kid sitting there next thing you know. You're having a negotiation. About how you know you're supposed to go. Put your jacket on and head out the door. i don't want to miss it. I feel like sometimes you look back in life in your you wonder. Why didn't i do this or do that. And it seems so small but when you look back it kind of not that it was big but it was significant in some way for chicago. Tonight i'm brandon. Friedman and jeff jen and kendra say what they enjoyed. Most of al picture day was seeing friends and family they haven't seen in months psalm as long as since the beginning of the pandemic and we thought we'd share school pictures for some familiar faces here at chicago tonight. Recognize these kids. that's me there in preschool. Or first grade. I think first grade probably and then that's brandis in which she believes. Is preschool win for that bowl haircut style to come back still to come on chicago tonight. Members of congress share their thoughts on the continuing effort by the president and some of his advisors to overturn. the election. chicago based foundation is trying to change. How adult long term care facilities are ranked plus pianists or. Hey federico osorio on what it was like recording recital in an empty orchestra home. But i some more of today's top stories. Employees of cook county's healthcare and sheriff's departments hit the picket line today for a one day. Strike sim local seventy-three. That's the union representing cook. County workers said in a statement on friday that the county has quote refused to set bargaining dates canceled bargaining dates and walked out on negotiations for three months. Among other demands strikers say they are seeking pandemic pay for frontline workers and an additional five dollars an hour for employees taking care of cova patients. Cook county health officials. Say they are disappointed. The union strike during a pandemic and that it has used funds from the cares act to provide pandemic to employees working directly with the corona virus a former. Nba player may be the next owner of ebony media. That's a historic company with deep roots. Here in chicago ulysses junior bridgeman placed a fourteen million dollar bid in us bankruptcy court in houston. According to the chicago tribune and crain's chicago business. Bridgman played for the milwaukee bucks in the seventies and eighties based johnson. Publishing company launched the black monthly lifestyle magazine. Back in one thousand nine hundred forty five right here. You're looking at archival footage of the company right now in july it filed for chapter seven bankruptcy which was converted to a voluntary chapter eleven reorganization in september earlier. In the program we talked about the russian hack on a number of federal agencies and joining us once again our representatives brad schneider jan. Schakowsky and rodney davis. thank you for being back. Let's talk a little bit about The aftermath of the election here Congressman schneider president. Trump is having these reported meetings with some fringe players. Here throwing out ideas like martial law. Seizing voting machines Where do you think all of this has headed. I think it's headed to college. Votes being certified on january six. Joe biden being sworn in as president on january twentieth. But in the meantime we should all be very concerned. These conversations that are supposedly coming out of the white house talks of calling the military and other efforts to refuse to have a peaceful transfer of power is a threat to democracy. The key to democracy is the idea that we we speak as an ancient. The voters cast their balanced and win or lose. We respect the will of the people for two hundred and forty plus years. It has been the way of our country and now we are sitting with a president who is refusing to acknowledge that vice president. Mike pence spoke today. And it's telling the party faithful that they are continuing to fight the election results. Take a look and as our election contests continues. I'll make you a promise. We're gonna keep fighting until every legal. Vote is counted congressman davis as the as your colleague mentioned. The only thing left here is Congress certifying electoral college votes One of your colleagues in the houses said he's going to try and challenge that he'd needs someone in the senate to do that. Would you support an effort in congress to challenge the electoral college vote. Well i think if you look back to two thousand seventeen we these same discussions from some of our colleagues who did come to the fore to try and challenge though it happens But in the end the electoral college is those electors. The ones who choose president based upon the votes cast in every single state in the nation. Joe biden is the president-elect comma harris is the vice president elect. I fully anticipate as one who will be participating in that electoral college process on the house for to have those electoral votes counted. It may take a little longer than some times. We've done this in the past. I fully expect it to go off with as minimal problems as as could be expected congresswoman. Schakowsky what you think happens on january six Like we said The effort would need a senator In the would need a us senator to support having debate and then an ultimate vote on it. How do you think that's gonna play out. Well i certainly think that it would be a real shame. The united states of america. We didn't just see the smooth transition including on the the sixth of january. But i wanna tell you what's really embarrassing to me. And and worrisome to me is that a majority of the members a republican members of the house of representatives. Actually endorse some of these. Crackpot ideas that actually. This election has not been decided and the fact that we see so many individuals. Not just those who believe and we're conspiracy theories endorsing. That idea is something that says we need to safeguard our democracy more than ever right now but at the end of the day. We're going to see the inauguration of Joe biden and camera harris. And i believe that at the end it will be a transition smoother. Not it's going to happen till bipartisan consensus here among this panel of a smooth transition. Let's move back over to covid congressman. Schneider have you been. Have you received your vaccination yet. And what do you know about the discrepancy here between how many doses of the pfizer vaccine illinois is going to get. And how many they say they were promised. I know i'm getting my vaccine. When when we start the one hundred and seventeen congress when i go back to washington but as far as i believe that that scene numbers are starting to pick up but i was disappointed. I'm frustrated that the administration from the beginning of this pandemic has has failed to address challenges and supply chain whether it was ppe in in the spring. Now we're dealing with the supply and distribution of vaccines. We're ten months into this. There should be no surprise as point. this is a major challenge but the first steps of getting the vaccine from manufacturer to the distribution centers and ultimately to the place where they will be put into people's arms and get us on the road to recovery. This is a fairly straightforward problem. That should be addressed immediately. Congressman davis sell pose. That question do you have you received your vaccination and what do you know about the amount of vaccines coming to illinois. Not just with five but with the recently approved madeira. Well i have not gotten a vaccine. I had coded back in august. And that's that's right that's right you did. I have antibodies. So i i'm going to wait until Who have not had the disease or in more. High risk category can get the vaccine. I but i will get it and i certainly hope that no one is hedging and deciding against getting the vaccine because it was well tested well researched and the administration and all those working and needs to be commended for getting it out quickly and i'm concerned that we didn't get as many vaccines as was promised. But unlike governor pritzker general He's stood up and he said. I'm sorry i'm responsible i'd certainly hope. Instead of complaining about the administration pritzker administration can begin to fix the problems. We're seeing the illinois department of employment security. I was recently a victim of somebody applying for unemployment benefits in my name and instead of getting results. We get excuses out of this administration. That's a big problem. We have hundreds of billions. I thank you administer the programs correctly with the money we've given them we. Have we have something in common. Because i was also recently a victim of someone fraudulently try to claim unemployment in my name a congresswoman schakowsky other concern is the This new strain of covid nineteen Seen in the uk should the us think about shutting down travel from the uk. Stand the depth of the problem. There are isolated into a particular area. But you know if we don't resolve the problem and vaccines distributed around the world. None of us will be. None of us will be safe congressman. I'm sorry i'm sorry we have to leave it there. We are at a time once again. Our thanks that representatives. Schneider schakowsky davis. Thanks so much for joining us. Nursing homes have been hit especially hard during the pandemic more than four hundred nine thousand residents have contracted the virus as of early december. That's according to the centers for medicare and medicaid services and slightly trailing behind that a little more than three hundred fifty thousand staff members have also gotten infected during all of this one chicago based foundation is trying to change the way these facilities are ranked they say to put the focus on the care of residents and joining us. Now is dr deborah. We s- mayor president of the chicago-based mayor rothschild foundation. Dr we smear thank you so much for being here. Thank you all right. So you're foundation bills itself as the only one devoted to person centered long term care facilities. Please explain to us what that means. Absolutely so the founding president was my late husband. Dr robert mayor and his focus was on improving quality of life for elders. In addition to safety for elders and the concept judge patient-centered carry is not new. It's been around for thirty years or so bringing it into the nursing homes that are competing for dollars all kinds of bureaucratic regulations. Oftentimes probably more than oftentimes. The residents in the families. Who are served are not the primary people were communicated with. Sarah idea was designed a designation of excellence project so nursing homes wade rise to the level of excellence and focus on the patient themselves or rather than patients actually residents and also the public would become knowledgeable about a standard that could be applied jersey. Sing homes instead of all of the more traditional how many cheese repressed in is regarded that actually the quality of the experience so that's our their ranking systems here to sort of sort of designated how how these nursing homes perform so what's the difference between this and more medical center. Medical focused care that that we see nursing. Homes now medicare is certainly an important part of the whole concept of the designation of excellence project like it's more than that so the medically focused assessments. Don't care but they certainly if it's necessary to run the nursing home in maintain health someone might be awakened at three in the morning to take a shower or it. They don't get to prepare their own meals or they don't get to choose things that they would have done in their own home and can be safely done. But it's just a different way of looking at things so so again more quality of life Focus here Four residents of these facilities in your foundation awarded university and a facility in maine to begin research on this kind of care Explain that for us. Yes so earlier. This year we submitted a request traffic asians and had an enormous response and of the many high quality applications university of maine and the senior cedars nursing home came in as a die ad that was part of the study design to address year one of a four year and each year. A different competition you. In this case. They're designing the instrument. So it's if we save more discovery face so that they're designing what are the components of how would determine excellence in a nursing home and their particular plan incorporates participants not just from healthcare not just from regulatory agencies but that people who were living there themselves and their families and they will define what excellence means and it certainly in this pandemic excellence takes on new meaning agree about health and it's about safety but again as you mentioned quality of life so residents and their families will have a say here in ranking these facilities and we mentioned the the staggeringly high toll of cases and deaths in nursing homes from your research. Is there any connection. Between quality of life nursing homes that do better on that and the nursing homes that have struggled containing covid nominal question. I think that the the study that the two main are doing will likely be able to answer that question because part of the design is that all of the data will be digital. It'll although into their red caps format so it can be mined and questions that are important that are timely hitting the answered so stay tuned. It's a one year when your grant. And i would expect the said this year. That question will be able to be answered and on the issue of covert in nursing homes. You know that long term care facilities will be the next sort of class of folks to get the vaccine. How do you think that's going to work. I think it'd be exceedingly well received. It's obviously i think it's longer overdue. And the hope will be that that will be the end of so many people were so vulnerable succumbing to something. That could have been prevented right. Dr deborah mayor. Thanks for joining us. And best of luck on the foundation research agreements and up next virtual recital brings music lovers some joy during a difficult holiday season. But first we take a look at the weather. This year hasn't brought much joy to live music lovers but the chicago symphony orchestra is offering a last minute gift before twenty twenty s over a concert with renowned pianist jorges federico or soro filmed at orchestra hall that you can enjoy in the comfort of your own home. Let's take a listen And joining us to talk about the concert is chicago pianist for the rico or soria. Welcome back to chicago tonight. Thank you. I'm delighted to be with you all right. Well so wonderful to hear music and here you play in that space once again. Tell us what music you feature in this recital when the invited me to to tape these recital. I thought carefully about the program. So i put together. I think a very very in very contrasting program with several composers and also in the back of mind i was. I was thinking about a very personal experiences. That i've had with that i've had with some of the this repertoire that have performed already in symphony center so for me. It's a very personal thing. I love laying in chicago chicago public so it was in. My mind was just imagining that. It was playing for a full house in this difficult times. So these are pieces. That that you that you have personal experience with the at symphony center. What is it like to play in front of a big empty auditorium. When as you say you love playing for those chicago audiences when i think that because of situational coordinated and everything that we are all going through. It's not that one is not used to play in empty concert hall. Sometimes you make recording sudden empty considerable to the fact that the all these behind all this is in our minds. It took a lot of concentrating. But i mean i love performing indies hole and just means the applause in between pieces sometimes. But this is a very very specific. Musical question are the acoustics different when you don't have the bodies to absorb all the all the sound Yes it all changes all the time and I think it's i as i said i've performed in this whole with a with a full house and i always enjoyed very much. The acoustics The sound gets so focused on the stage. Where number for me then does does. How does way. I always enjoy playing. Do we know that. So many musicians have all styles and performance. Venues are struggling right now. Do you see this model streaming concerts as something that the cfo and you might continue even after the pandemic well. I think we have to thankful to technology that we can communicate so easily. And we'll have this available but whilst playing in just imagining i keep imagining that. The day will come soon when we can embrace going to the regular concert everything is normal and just enjoy the festive model over live concert. I don't say anything can replace it. Certainly not in so many people feel the way you do your featuring some pieces as i understand from your latest album which focuses on the french composers debut see remo For a a why did you want to focus on specifically french composers in your latest work. The latest work well had always since i started recording for city records like they have like a theme on my recitals like the spanish. Punish recital mexican music the subtle on mexicano the russian recital so it just made sense and also i've been. I've been sort of in love always with the french repertoire. So you just came spontaneously this decide. Yeah in the which was just a matter of putting together the repertoire. You mentioned how much you miss being back experiencing in playing live music. What is your life ben. Like in covid over the last ten months because of comfort. I think it has made me think about things. Reflect a what is suddenly what while we're missing and the special thing is to keep your creative. I love my work has given me time to to learn a new repertoire and Just call day by day with new thinks. I think but keeping creative optimistic that the soon we'll be all will forget about this light at the end of the tunnel. All right you can find out how to view jorges. Hey federico story was recital on our website now whore. Hey thank you so much for joining us. My position and that is our show for this tuesday night. Don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and our website. Wtt w dot com slash news. You can also get the show via podcast and the pbs video app and please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven. Should jail staff and detainees be among the first to get the covid vaccine and how the south shore neighborhood is doing six months after widespread civil unrest and now we leave you tonight with more from pianist jorges fit rico sorios virtual performance now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm parachutes thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe. We will see you tomorrow. closed captioning for this program is made possible by robert a clifford and clifford law offices pleased to give back to the community through numerous charitable initiatives.

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2003: Wife Wars

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

1:46:06 hr | 1 year ago

2003: Wife Wars

"I listened to the Black Guy who tips podcast because Rawdon Karen Hugs how much you payin we paying. Good that fifteenth sends the box. That ain't good enough nope we can't pick and for that we while twenty two cents a box. Now now we can't give you that. George started dotted over okay. We'll do over twenty two cents straight through good and the bad now. We can't what we can't pick Dan. We forty miles from town. I know we still not GONNA pick it. y'All pick a low. I don't want to send a truck driver back empty so yeah I'll pick enough so he can take a low to the packing house the announcing word to the boss. It telling what I WANNA do. No we not GONNA pick one. You can send back down back to town and we'll wait. Got Nothing to do. y'All just doing us this way. Because y'all got the upper y'all got their advantage over us this warring lasts forever and by Guy GonNa pay for this. We already pay. George said all these years. We couldn't even ask how much you paying for a box of fruit or we give you gave us what you wanted to give us your promises one thing and give us another you. Put the pay day a off whenever you get ready and sometimes you didn't pay US period so now far as sir. This is reckoning day and I worried about after the war you go. You pay us where we want or else you're gonNA hang out there. And they wanted a New York they wanted all over the world. And you ain't got nobody to pick it. The former needed the fruit trees. He left with the truck driver and before long. He is back on the packing house. Tell them to go to work. He will pay them. Twenty two cents this time. Hey what was it the blackout pockets. Your Hose Rod and hearing and we're live on Tuesday. I only two days to to whatever celebration is Yala columnist on this. Everybody is in this two hundred. Nineteen you know what I'm saying. I want to be presumptuous. No novus office Thanksgiving friends given family function for Thanksgiving. You know it ain't of your holiday. Have you want to celebrate it indigenous businesspeople. We invite people call a bunch of different stuff. Whatever you doing good luck to you and your family come on how hope y'all enjoy each other? I hope you have a good the time hanging out with each other and all the family mayor meant that comes from that The whatever just like low key and chill like we do like if you like me. You don't don't give a Goddamn long as I'm working. I paid for it. Yes so yeah. I'll handy out. y'All have a great one. Of course you can find this show items. stitcher potter messages searched. The black. That guy who tells leave us five star review no matter where you are in the world here in Santa my voice of US items leave us a five star review. We Wanna read it on the show. The official so weapon of the show is take an unofficial sport. Bomb and bullet Bolic's Today's exit from the warmth of other suns Which I've read from I think once or twice by Isabel Wilkerson and that I just got to this chapter And that I like I'll I was in the House Ray. Delight say Fist Palm. You know what I'm saying like. Oh actually I was reading the doctors. I I was like I'm ready. I'm ready to go. I fish for my ancestors hands. Okay Trust but yeah data. There's always this like misnomer. I think it's just a white supremacist function. It is making us make all our ancestors which Komo singing ass. You know slaves that I like about back. Ride never stood up even under like civil so like Jim Crow Segregation Civil Rights era like we just took it and and then of course EMAAR McCain ride act like everybody they were just turned three no. Somebody's mother fuckers. Like you know what bitch. You're going to get details today. Yeah Georgia's interesting person. I mean all of these are real people not just Facing but Georgia's interesting because he went to Detroit and he worked in a car factory and I think an airplane factory right during the week. Long Detroit riot the longest one in history And it would for like a week in a day as though he went. I know I'm going back down south. 'cause that's where his wife was in Florida goes back down south but he was changed from the North because of North Union had to get off the sidewalk for white people. You have the caste system of the south of north so right while. They're still obviously racism. Hey we right. I just told you in the week-long is was because up there for the first time. Really ever black people asphalt back so it went a week because I was like okay. Okay take us. We'll take one of yours you know and you'll neighborhood and everything can burn. Spas we concern right. Oh y'all flipping over our car. I I like it was surreal to read it in a book because it was like you go down one street on the white side of town and white people flipping over. I mean yet on the Black Alexa tile black white people flipping over black people. Shit you go to the white part of town black over white people she. He went to work. And I'll probably read this another exerted another day but he went to work On the train to work we got into the black station. Got Out you know. He got on the train to black bordertown. White people was ducked out hiding almost and and black aboard standing up straight but then they crossed over into the white side of town very black and white and it was mobs outside of depending in which area of one race of people began. Like no nook if you but boy so such a great always you get people to get caught up in the middle like a lot of people fail to realize the average person don't want confrontation. They don't want smoke. The average person does not even if they feel oppressed even if they finished not right even if they finish unjust the average person is not willing to put their lives. The founder members lives their neck. They're not WANNA luth income that like they're just not. They're not willing to lose a job. They're not willing to go homeless. And so it's unrealistic to expect people to be like well let's have this. Revolution is not the plan because years ago. Everybody every black person if you a black box so if everybody's in the same box of course everybody's going to be on the same page but once they got to the point where it was quote unquote levels to us being black. You know you're not going to get everybody on. The same was was interested in that was always levels to it but yes white slavery stop in a South Anyway because keep in mind up north you still you had that classes and stuff but it did bring about a different type of classicism then even before like it's more pronounced because you know you can own on some shit you could buy some things you could Work for yourself and so yeah you did have. It's it's so interesting because our there's another other doing a book and talks about how he married into this family of like black people that actually were upwardly mobile like the father was like a the chancellor of a university. You know stuff like that. And it's funny because one is frowning down other but a centrally you only had your money for one generation more than I did you know you you find it on me for coming from a country asked how working my way up. You're a bellhop and you work joey up in your lifetime and now you got a little something now. You don't want your daughter to be able to marry. You know poor southern country man. You know so. It's just you know it doesn't take much like you said a day by as once it once the blanket a pure Oppression you know past. Ah where everyone got it. The same kinda quote quote unquote. Yeah opened up new levels. Yeah man like you say the The levels have always been their house. Nigger feel like it's always been there but like you say once the equality of that oppression. Kinda went the Jim Crow Segregation. You know that kind of stuff really made it like you know you you unified because it had to be unified correct. Even within what I'm trying to say is even within that struggle. There was still different factions of blackness within there was. I'll give you knows everybody and boycott the bus. Everybody did You know March. Everybody didn't even Come to a lot of people agree with white people. Shit black people that were straight up the segregation is right and black. People are inferior to white people. People in all kinds of this divided as it is now agreed. But but I guess my thing is when a common denomination you can and get more people to unify all own own beck thing that affects us all regardless of if you'd have put skin in the game or not people most people because you always going to have somebody. There's going to be like we're the life I live in is just fine. The White Man. Just let me leave. You know people in the US go ahead group outside of that group. Everybody else's like no. This is wrong this is not right and even those people notice. It Ain't right. Sure I like I say from from my reading. It seems like people I understood. It was wrong. But there's a certain just like everything you doesn't certain level getting used to it and then that's just life correct so not everybody was a revolutionary. You know a lot of people was actually kinda scared. A revolutionary tights. 'CAUSE Y'ALL GONNA get us killed like right like they kill him off August this year and for white people. It's very dangerous. 'cause they don't know the difference between Negros so they just show up and it's like somebody getting home. You know what I mean. We accused in some random person is and so you know people were fleeing leaving town leaving the south and all that stuff but yeah I do like reading about him and how he basically came back to the south and because he had a taste of like what is like to not have to live under someone's heel completely completely where you could kinda like stand up for yourself as a person. He couldn't just go back now because the thing is put unquote freedoms freedoms. Are we have a half freedoms that long and I don't think a lot of people understand that like the things that we consider as quote unquote freedoms. They hadn't been around that long and so the thing is why people been mad ever since we got our freedoms and they're trying to do everything in their power take that shit back and they're slowly chip edit and they're slowly reversing rules nece slowly wanted to quote unquote take America back and all that Shit. This this is the things addicted the in my opinion from from what I see white supremacy always wanted to go back to a white supremacist is always on top. Like why people on top up in everybody else is underneath them. That's the whole goal and that's the whole purpose and that's the tactic. The thing is you have to constantly fight. And that's the part that that is hard to get people to understand is not a apply today. Oh I get tired. No it's like I got to get up every day and somebody has got to be out there fighting and if I'm not fighting I'm going to get resources like like I might not be on the front line but I can help. The people desire the fighting and pushing and being sure laws and fighting against redlining. Because all that stems from this shit right here like is it like it is like the riot it went for riots to Lowe's went for riots to court cases. They went for so called. The battle is still there. You know you might not be hanging people people in the streets you might not be run up and people housing taking him on. It don't mean the date on won't happen it just means that people quote unquote obey the laws. Right now yeah I think it's also that when we talk about fight though is not how people define fighting his varies right. One part ars in spite as low key wide really liked what happened. Like part of my Ra- What do recall it when your reticence part of my reticence towards the capper nick situation was that it turned into like Malcolm Jenkins is a cone home and it turned into you know like it turned into a lot of like my way or the highway shit and that's one of the things that kind of puts me off of people because it's like you know got to be careful with the idea that because Martin had a different plan than Malcolm one of them has to to be wrong right? I mean like that that type of thing bothers me because then assigns a level of purity to one person that is unattainable for any human being. You know so yeah. A lot of this stuff is conflicting because it is what is a fight and in this case he was Oregon. He organized essentially the people that were picking fruit into a union right and the reason that he was able to do that. 'cause scarcity of black healthy men who used to do the pick and they cannot because there was a war and many of them got drafted into service so him being one of the few who was in America still and not drafted into war. He was like you know left behind and he organized group Over people and young kids and a couple of his buddies and Said we're not picking this twenty two cents and they were able to negotiate. That but was again why I didn't read this part but why he was doing that there was other people. Like we're not GONNA get it. Don't do it well. We just lucky to get anyway. Some of those black people had never had a job picking fruit it before they have been People who worked in white people's houses cleaning cooking so you know for pennies so to them they were like. Why isn't this enough? I can make it so that we can get more money in a day you would make in a week right but you gotta have faith in me. It's hard that's the part that's hard. Yea Yup and the thing is you you really make contact with this. The reason why I say you make up my mind with this is for the fact that that is something within us that has never left why it is but I could have gotten scraps and so it's been passed down from from generation to generation. Just be happy that you guys just accept the scraps you know what you need is just in the. Why are you asking for more? Why agitating you know why you going here? Demanding you're worth you know because you start problems and the thing is how many of us don't get promotions don't X. Rays don't change jobs. Don't don't quit big or go to Pan Amendment and start talking about how you're unhappy or how you and people just the same thing. The same tactic like eight. Just beheaded what you got. You ought to just. He grabbed the white man. Got You a job. You know boy you got that good job girl you got that good you know county job and shit like that and it's one of those things for me is somewhat frustrating. ooh particularly if you are a person that as a strong willed person in like him. It's like Nah fuck that yeah but you know it was interesting. I feel like we both had jobs jobs like that. Yes we have We both were complacent being paid less than what we felt. We will work and it's only through the show. Oh and then you just basically threw necessity of getting a new job for you. That were really being fed like some some sort of of Sort of reciprocation from the amount of work that we do and founder products that we create you know that like I think you know being from this out the the end black. A lot of this program is in us and it's hard to. It's hard to believe that you can do better when you don't get better or see you better or feel like is for you and so you know some ties for him. It was moving out of the south. I think for us is probably the show right. Oh agreed we go somewhere and there's people that really want to see us and meet US and people to pay money to cut. Come listen to US talk like I you see that. You can't go back to like I shit in his is one of those things where particularly parliament's that is particularly. We are a type of person if you have had certain types of lifestyle and you taste it certain types of freedom and you you know dealt in certain areas and it's almost like it's unbelievable to you and so when you go back and you tell people that had like you say have not experienced it. They can't vision it. They just don't understand is hard for them to perceive it because yes like you said for me. I am where I am now based off a pass expenses since but yeah if I wouldn't have been boulder if I would have been stronger if I would have spoke up you know it's a lot of things that would be completely different but I am glad I went through what I went it through. Don't get me wrong to get to where I am now is just for the fact that sometimes you would like but why did it take so long to get to to the point to aware. I'm like you know what I'd do deserve better. You know what I am worthy. I am worth more. You know. And and sometimes I'm GonNa say it sometimes for people like that in marginalized communities when you have somebody like that. I feel sometimes that is beaten out of people for safety is beating out of people. Because you don't want to get key on a lot of times beaten out of Trojan because the next generation they haven't experienced a lot of heartache and pain hurt and Shit Those old Oh folks that they haven't experienced that so to them. They're very optimistic in a very hopeful. And it's good to be like there and you want them to continue to be like that the but is like for us we like without ain't how the world works and for their protection will actually get them to a point where Adele become complacent and the next thing you know your towel might have had a million dollar idea but because you got tired of them drawn on your walls you got tired of them just doing things maybe creative children do you kinda turn them away from the thing that would have been you know the the first generational no person to be a doctor or lawyer these things but when you don't know you just don't know I just think that rebelliousness is is one of the reasons we don't think of it as a black being in that time here is because we just weren't taught it in schools not taught that time period you're not taught about black resistance existence of any level they not talk flavor vows not talk about The the if you just go through the American school system and they happen the teachers some of black history. You honestly will not think that black people had any interruption to revolt or stand up to them set for themselves until civil rights. Correct you Iran. Because they don't teach you about anything else they don't teach you by black soldiers in the civil war. They you know they teach you like Harriet. Tubman escaped this gate. You know they teach that stuff they don't teach you. She came back and we were soldiers in command soldiers to fight against in slaveholders like they don't they don't teach you that so. Yeah but I think there's a big part of is simply dad when I like to read stuff like that and I like to share stuff like that. 'cause inspires me to be like Yo this mortar these stories than what we were told. Yeah and the reason why I don't teach because white supremacy and I think this is why even today the school systems are of grade. Then they're not afraid of learning they're not afraid giving knowledge. They're not afraid of knowing the truth. They upgrade of. What would we do with this knowledge? They're afraid of opiates. And we let them know that their ancestors would need pump their ancestors dusters fault their ancestors demanded more their ancestors were rebellious their ancestors. Fuck Shit Up. Their ancestors stood up for their right even if it meant it death if if we let them know that that black people went to the polls knowing the day was going to die for the right to vote if we let them know this more more people would be upset about voter suppression. More people would be upset about them. Passed in all types of fucked up allows more people would be mad about people getting on enrolled from dump on voting. Smart people would be upset if they knew. And the is strategically designed. Because the thing is is white supremacists even white people stupid. Because the more of the populist dumb the more you can do whatever the fuck you want to do and you will get no resistance. Did our. That's Today's Of course reading rainbow segment some peoples least favorite segment. I'm just take the book arena really rang. I got any ways to grow. Ray I take a look reading rain. Oh all right. Here's what happens to your people rather hear about. theod is y'all so I really. I mean every podcast Tia. Let me guess they don't agree. Here's what think I'm sorry. This is definitely never changing review. Only they might actually go back and drop the these motherfuckers get man and I thought I got jokes That's going to be the title. Thank God jokes. one-star heels labs to your body when you over thing audit excessive obsession obsessing and rumination totally takes a toll on you physically mentally if you rehash past conversations. Don't dwell on your choices or get trapped in a tunnel of what if scenarios. There's a pretty good chance you and over thinker. Oh Mommy this wise. Wherever UMA nation Asian over obsessing has become somewhat of an epidemic one study from the University of Michigan found that seventy three percent of adults ages twenty five or thirty five over thing as fifty? Two percents Forty five to fifty five euros. Interestingly researchers found that many over thinkers believe they're actually doing themselves a favor the cycling through their thoughts but the truth of the matter is that over thing is a dangerous game to have a lot of negative consequences on our wellbeing as Davis Beagle the director of the center of Stress S. in health and Stanford healthcare put it. There are times when worrying about the problem is a lot worse in the problem is so. Here's what happened to your body when you over thing by the way I it definitely understand that. 'cause there's been times I got paused on something. I need to be doing and thought about it longer than it took me to do it and then sounds like I would have just did it be dumb. I know Most likely you're less likely to take action over thinking create so many options choices scenarios that you end up unable make a decision is a concept called analysis paralysis. I have experienced this. You stuck in particular consequences. That may not even happen. Just his worrying about certain outcomes paralyze us or freeze us from taking an action You don't try things you don't fail which maybe a potential concern but you also don't CG easy at it. Will you do finally move forward the decision you why you might wind up making a wrong one because you guys don't mixed up out of competing thoughts. Yep Yeah I used to do this with friendships like I have somebody like just like a wack person but two presumptive of them. I don't know this is it. Maybe they maybe it's just a misunderstanding. And everybody else knows them doesn't like them and that's really rough assuming they might be starting. Maybe everybody else's around around and I would talk myself into be friends and then like a month later like Disney is whack as fuck. What am I doing I hang out with this person and I do think but I don't really I'm Melissa for over thinker like way less than you when it particularly when it comes to certain things and to an extent that might be according somewhat a disadvantage and my fucking do it move on like you know what? I'm more quick to be like well. That's my answer. I'm more equipped to be like. It is it is and okay and just a so you know but that's not always healthy either sometimes sometimes and so. If I would have thought about a little bit more I would make a better a more educated decision pondering thing I don't I don't make in certain situations. I might do that but I'm less likely to do that because in my mind I I don't know what the future is. And what ever I imagine is going to be worse than reality of it and once I realized allies that I was like. Oh I'm fucking myself up because you know somebody gives you a call and say they know a come home commits in this emergency your mind which most of your mind little in this kind of A. That's a bad example. But you know that's kind of an example of how your mind kind of goes all over the place and you get home and in Kyoto talking about billy bumped his head on the wall and you look at like okay. You made me go through these all these scenarios for a simple situation and sometimes it is big. Don't get me wrong. But most of the time whatever's in your mind because your imagination is going to be bigger than the situation menas. I really want to talk about stuff like that. I'm talking about stuff like you know doing your taxes and you're like okay. I know taxes. I do this day and you procrastinator. Do you think about this. I and I do that and then now now you got the day lie decide. Oh I didn't do my bags. Oh Lord am I gonNa file extension. What do I do and it's like Oh because yeah I thought about this longer than that it would? It took me fifteen minutes to go in there. Fill out the paperwork that I need to fill out fallaway all the stuff that all the programs programs that Shit. I've already hooked up to make sure that this is a smooth transition. I've thought about it longer than I needed to. I could've just done this already. And that's and stuff. I like that that happens all the time you know okay. And that's not you know we like I say it doesn't it like just on that level Another side another thing. You're less creative. Yes agreed. Yeah they said while some over thing he can lead the fresh new ideas it can also backfire and create mental roadblocks. They make it challenging to think outside the box. Another study from Stanford came to the inclusion while magnetic resonance imaging machines. Mri Tomorrow is participants. Were asked to draw a series of images some easy to illustrate so difficult to more difficult to images to draw the more the participants had thing in the less created raided their drawings. Were on the flip side. The last I involved the more creative the drawings were short. Too much thinking seems to put a cap on creativity. Yeah and what we do for podcast. I don't want to. That's one of the reasons I like. You know I try to be a little bit more. Careful I lean into the fact acted. I'm a thinker and thoughtful. Because I you know I'm never going to lose to give that up but you know search it is just like you know Imam I'm turning like I don't know I just in our talking to Justin about this and is i. You know wanted things marabout you that you're dismissive. And he was like what do you like. Because people say dismissive amy so negative by I was like no I like. It's a quality I need to have. I need to be a bit more. Dismissive of people rather than engaging people in fruitless conversations are things that. What does it matter if this person agrees with me on my facebook page or not? Why did I even need to ask them to explain? Let's be real. They don't give a fuck without thinking on that level and Nope and is more nine times out of ten is not going to work out and and try to balance it. I engage. Listen I used to you know because just because it's like yeah. I like this is something I have to get used to and same thing with You know real life Shit. You know. There's people that I'm just like I know I'm not. There was a dude. I WanNa talk about politics. Every Saturday he was a Do devoted for trump and so it will get everyone will come back mostly black people at this why they come in and be like. Hey man how can you say this way. He did this this week. And what about this week and every week there's something with trump right and he always had an excuse and then one time he wanted to talk to me about it and I just ignored everybody was I. Kinda grew by nine was routed him. I wanted to talk about this every week when he knows that. Nothing's going to change correct. He's wasting my time and so and it just is is making my basketball good ball not fun correct. Your energy levels might drop because you over thanking you spend on mental energy and now your physical energy is lower lower. You get fatigued Yeah I can see that sleep may take a hit. You might have trouble double-faulted asleep thinking on night when you need to be taking Heart rate needs to go now as your blood pressure and breathing so you can sleep Over analyzing is something that is arousing and by rousing I just mean to elevate your hearts and makes you makes you alert to right so you can't really sleep Your appetite might change either. Like not WANNA eat because you're thinking all the time it's the pressure appetite but more likely you're going to you when you have worry eating which is much more common first meeting. Yeah so you eat because you're just waking up thinking And you go tastiest healthiest things. Would you stressed because That that's what I call these. Foods Comfort foods high fat sugary foods. You know so yeah any releases a hormone cortisol. I guess that stress on It increases your appetite when you're with your motivation to eat so stressed out you eating even thinking about it then the last part party how to control your tendency to over thing the first step is a notice over thinking. Okay cool calm. I see the people in the chat going through. Hey we have one we eh one next. You WanNa find a way distract yourself and go onto physical body and free up your systems. Think like going for a jog or try Yoga I do. I walk talk now a little bit of pretty much every day. Unless I'm playing basketball I go for a while Sometimes even if I play basketball able to tell the difference I mean I people have been saying they notice a difference but I I mean I feel a lot more clear about just. I'm a lot less stressed out. I'm a lot less anxious. Exercise is a great phone to relieve stress. Yeah it's not it's not obviously I one hundred percent things I mean me. Life has things that you should be anxious about. Some shit is going to stress you out. So there's not a whole complete like I'm and I don't feel anything but I I'm on a different I I met. I said this shit like a year or two ago and I'll fucking minute I'm leaning into this my own like hippyish in our white woman type Shit like I'm not like I'll say white one but I really just me like the idea of having some level of peace and comfort correct. 'CAUSE 'cause you know being black man is so uncomfortable as it is is so volatile is not that much peace and everything things things become taking from you. This person guy shot the cops did does look. You shouldn't be watching the NFL. You shouldn't be eating as you shouldn't be going here. You shouldn't be listening to Asong like everything like another box on yourself and another and when you add in what we do for a living and you add in the fact that we kinda on a has to be on social media they do what we do for a living you have to. I'm constantly thinking about our image our presenting ourselves. I'm thinking about you know the fact that the people have accessibility to us the other day. You know I talked about Lizardo and and Summer Walker now those people and and it was upsetting to me to see young black women basically put through that to the point where their mental health is at risk and they had to lead Internet right you know or or they had to like you you know. They wanted to quit. They do for a living right and and and I. We also talked about the fact that accessibility means people can actually hit you up to tell you. Hey I don't like your song or this thing you did. I didn't like right literally the next morning when I got on twitter. I want to listen to our podcast added the account and it was like well. This show is angry. I mean WHO's listening doesn't agree with you. Jeez Louise and it's like literally the example. I was talking about like that's so yes. There are people that listen. I don't agree with us on stuff. People talk about all the time they'll say. Hey the things you said maybe just a different way. People don't mind we can agree to disagree on certain things so but it's not not even about. It's just that people do listen to disagree. Yes they do So that was number one but number two that accessibility. That literally was what I was talking about Iraq. I think it does because you're talking to human being and it does make people go down. Why should I be in my father by this? Does this bother me in my offset and so you know our responded back. I can't remember what I said but actually deleted it wasn't mean or rude or nothing but I I just actually deleted a response period because I say that that person has something to say they didn't like that segment or they thought it was to whatever the fuck cold like what like like that. There was a time where I would have been like trying to engage and get an interaction and talk to them about it and we know. Why won't you come dishonor? I feel much more comfortable being me and I feel much more comfortable knowing that I'm doing my best and try my best and Dan. I'm humid so we'll be upset. Sometimes I'M GONNA be sad sometimes. I'm be happy sometimes. All the show is is a promise to to let you you. Listen to what the fuck we think. That's it yeah and also like I said it's just our minds tick because you have the right to say whatever you want to say but I have have the right to engage engage. Yeah so a lot of times when I see she's I go l.. Yeah but my point wasn't about the oil Aweil or not. I think my overthinking side is wanting to be like. Let me talk to this person as we can come to some sort of understanding standing or whatever that's just how that's the way my mind were right and that's what I was Gonna go back to the to the the the difference between you warning owning because you want to understand you want to be understood right. The average person don't give a fuck about that. Abbas prime just WanNa put it out there and they don't give a fuck if they understood they not day. Ain't trying to understand you always talking. You're never listening hostile even not always talking. I'm saying like that's one second of that person's his life like this is what I do for a living. But that's one second shootout tweeting. Though out live your life might not even log on twitter but once a month who knows and I'm sitting over here thinking thinking to myself like Oh meanest person I want to talk to them. I want to figure this out. I WanNa like you know. See if they can understand why I felt this way or that you know okay. Then I'm sitting there like look at all of this amount of mental energy. I'm expanding into some random fucking tweet. This person might nine fucking. They might not like us they you might not know us. They might not fuck with us. They might have listened to the show. One Time I. I'm putting all this effort out there to the world for a person that essentially wasn't necessarily asking for that nope you know and not and when it comes to my time and my mental energy. There are people more deserving of that especially especially myself like. I wasn't spending enough time with myself. I wasn't enough time like you know doing things that commie down. As as opposed to hire me. Oh so you know I will be Out so now I'll go for that. Walk go out on the balcony and read I go Play some simple as video games for hours or whatever she did. I just wasn't I was losing track of you know and I think part of that is over over thinking and I think social social media is a tool for people over thanked to constantly be out there. You know and I know for me because I've kind of had real life experience with this where I would be the person that was always considered because like you say particularly being a woman mcbean down south. You don't WanNa be considered mean rude or you know a not being considering all that she didn't to me. I could be almost over considering written overnight so I understand what you're saying because I used to be the person where we had a confrontation and I'll be like well. How can I fix this? I can make this right. You know. Point is energy for up and now all the time I had to determine is my effort worth it because sometimes it's completely not because you end up pulling in kind of going after a person that don't give a date thought twice about what the fuck they say they ain't out nothing about you like you fucking furthest thing from their mind and they live in their best life and you so fucking stressed out. They have not considered. You forgot about the situation. They've moved on so I had to determine is this worked every sometimes yes most of the time. It is not because the thing is. If I'm that important to that person that person would take the effort to reach out to me because I was always the person reaching out this fucking exalting. Sometimes they need to be reciprocated. If I'm not work you take an effort to reciprocate with the relationship wasn't worth it in my mind. Yeah I mean I understand that for sure I think that's the other that's just the other layer two. The overthinking is that I also used to start to sign motivations of people now the thing is I never felt firm about motivation so it wasn't like Disney economy. Because they hate me me. I didn't do I'm not paranoid. I might be anxious and I might be over thinking so what I would do is be like maybe this happened. Maybe that happened. What if this what if this this is what has nothing whatever and now? I'm just spending spending my wills fruitlessly. You know like these people they don't even know I'm thinking this S. O.. Is something that you know. I think I just had to work on. You know. I'll still gonNA have certain things because my brain works that way. I'm GonNa always always branch conversations off in the fucking seventeen different branches. Because that's just the way it was like a huge on adventure book in my head like if I would have said they would have said that and then obsessing over mistakes obsessing over misunderstandings obsessing over that stuff. I just need to stop and one of the things that I think it's really helped me and I in my opinion Improved show. I don't know you know people may or may not agree agree but I stopped giving a fuck about Kinda get. Everybody heard you know like I try. I try to listen but does idea that I can let people that I I think what they're doing isn't fruitful. I think what they're doing. It's Kinda afflict. I don't have to let them cook in my brain. They can do whatever they want to. You know but if I find that shit funny whatever I'm not I can't make everything about their feelings is I can't make everything about you. Know please in every person because people are impossible to please and I think you know that was one of the things and many and you know what nobody nobody really says Shit. Nobody really noticed. So you know I stopped doing it and it was like fuck it and if people don't like that or whatever I just said that's cool that's okay because at least they don't like me for who I am as opposed to you know. Be In some fake motherfucker. They're trying to please everybody or trying to fit in with some crowd that they would never want to fit in with you know yeah and also I think for me a Lotta time. Once you make that shift people would fall. All people will naturally just kind of fall. What's what's you start making shifts and once you start? He knows chances like a lot of times. There's nothing you have to say and nothing you have to do if you change your behavior. The people there were there for not the right reasons. We'll leave the people there was sucking you dry sucking your soul sucking your money talking your energy sucking your life you know. Did they day. We're fucked name now. You'll be like God. Damn people the day will disappear. That was the most rewarding thing about all of that. 'cause I didn't know that and didn't expect that but like you know I I don't really cut people off like that like it's just kind of naturally I'm okay but I'm okay. Let them people go. I don't try to hold on nobody and you don't want to be around me Nigga. Go ahead like this is not. I don't do obligation friendships and relationships so like it was actually Kinda liked. Were warding because because I saw a huge part of this was about people causing me stress and then when I chose not to lie engage on their level and go back and forth with them and make a big scene. They just found a phone call. You know and it's getting to be. I'm getting better at it now. I just see that's walking out on my okay. I'M GONNA just go ahead and pick the exit right here and you can go ahead and be offset by yourself or leave me alone or continue to like bother me knowing that or harass me knowing that I'm not going to be bothered by but it took. It took a certain level of light understanding that I only gained through conflict athlete. And say I'm GonNa try something different rather than matching their conflict energy matching that push push pool go you know they say something. Listen I must say something worse rather than matching that I said I'm going to do something else. Stay true to myself because my true self would not be engaged in such foolishness. You know right and and also I think from because we are different types of personalities the Boca my life particularly in my used in early twenties. I was the people pleaser. And so oh that's why this conclusion I came to cook it in you because I had like real life confrontations real light. I remember leave within our marriage. We had where People were trying to basically use you for all your worth outside of our relationship and it was like killing. It was killing our marriage point. And like we've you know we've been through shit you know apart like it's not just just because we're not you know facebook live our lives live because we're not gonNA generation doesn't mean we haven't been through shared but I remember that period of time you know in the discussions we had about it. Yeah and the thing is you had to talk to me and kind of helped me see and helped me view things and so I mean that's why I am very thankful that I am why I am now and like I told you there I mean And what's funny about me. Is that when people. We'll see me and they see my demeanor and I've said this before I'm very nice number sweet and I'm very kind blah a Lotta people become a target like like. It's almost like they see a sucker nasty a fool. They an idiot. They see a dummy. Like like like a Lotta people actually see that with me and sewn because they see that they make the assumption assumption that I'm not gonNA pick up. I'm not no I'm not going to be aware or I'm just going to let them cook. And just because I don't call you out just because I don't say anything to you just because I don't acknowledge that I see your action. It does not mean. I'm not aware of it all the time. Even at my job and Shit I'd they I know a lot of Shit I might not be talking everybody about. I might not say everything but I am aware of a lot of shit. I'm aware how people interact with people on social media. I'm I'm aware of their behaviors. I'm aware of what they say. Just because I don't come in but I hate honey track. It does not mean. I'm not aware and once I know I adapt my behavior accordingly. Because I let you talk your truth and then I respond to your truth you know and so a lot of times people are telling Alan you their life. They're telling you how they're going to behave. You can look at people and how they do confrontations shit like that and they're going to tell you this is how is going to happen with you and because I'm aware of that now and I'm alert and I can look around I'm GonNa okay. I see how you respond to and so I'm not I never thank you an exception to the person rules just because it hasn't happened with you to fill out with. You does not mean sooner or later. It won't come down until you in them and is our behave the same thing what you you're a worker and a joiner correct people see that and People use use it. And you're like I'm GonNa work you to death I'm going to You're joining into mark. I'M GONNA take the credit for the things you do all that Kinda Shit Like you do a lot like part of the reason I show works is because you work so hard and you're such a team player right but the difference difference is I'm reciprocating back because it's a partnership correct. There's nothing about what we do too isn't half yours right and so I think the difference is there are people who see oh this person of the worker and a joiner slave now. You might like now rise due to work art from me you get no credit you get no money you get no nothing and that can that helpful team building type of attitude dude you have can easily be weaponized against you And so I think that was a big thing you know with the early in our relationship and obviously so we get better at it you know pitfalls here and there that stuff but you know now it's like okay. I'm seeing the signs. This person is coming in and they're trying to you know exploit your labor. They're trying to exploit her whatever and then at the same time. I'm often not aware of when it is happening with me. Correct we can almost kind of see it it kind of any other Because like I said for me I'm aware and I'm more alert alert and I think I mean when I made that changed and started actually telling people know has thought actually stand up and start a because the thing is people were not respect. You know until you demand they respect you know and if you don't respect my no that means you don't respect me because everything in life is not going the be a yes no sometimes nigger I got it and even a do God. I ain't got it for you and you have to deal with the fact that today Angel Day and so home because of that I've I've come to the realization that I'm at now to say I'm not doing that. I'm more APP now. It'd be like that's not my job like like like I'm more because like you said before you know what I'm doing everything I'm more APP now to draw boundaries upon myself. Felt like I had to be like. Oh no no no no. You're not going to use me and you're not gonNA abuse me and I think because I'm very nice. Condom sweet win. I'm make that switch to. Oh I've had enough. I shopped everybody in the wrong because a lot of times they'd be like Oh you always say we're not today no right and I'm quick to say no. Oh just a front correct but at the same time like Ask you know I just try to be understanding recognized like with like I say with you. I try automate. Well we do the least amount of work possible for you. You know what I mean. Come Anton Camera Talk. That's it you know because I'm trying like I I'm thinking of you as well mostly will. Aren't they not like that. Most people don't seem to think of people that way anyway. This is a standard. Do over thinking We just over thought that also find a way to distract yourself with Yoga jogging and I said that part also You can use a worry law. Twenty minutes forbid. Write down everything you're worrying about or have to do Let's do help the process of writing it down not typing but actually writing has a pro processing affect your brain to help get it out of that spin cycle Talking to a therapist friend or loved one can also give you a fresh perspective and realize that something that seems terrible or really complicated after all. Yes adalina Galina to a lot of my own tighter circle of people that I can bounce things off of. What do you think about this situation and you know hello there my friends so I care about me but I also don't have any yes-men friends like every person I every person that I trust also knows? They have the authority to be like did I. I let me tell you I disagree. Have you thought about it from this perspective. Now normally Obviously I'm the one that started about it from every perspective and then I like Nigga you are over thing initiate. This is this person stole fifty dollars from you. You don't have to keep fucking with them you you know what I mean so I normally the opposite but still it does help to have people around you like that. Yeah I I know for me Particularly if I'm at a place where I'm multitasking. You have a lot going on like a lot crossing your mind. I've come to inclusion. It might sound weird and I know we have all this electrical stuff and I know maybe because I'm old if I sit in Phoenix weekly take a pain or and right on that paper like right like just highlight. I like it. Don't have to be detail but just a list of of certain things. I'm asked to go through that list. I know for me personnel. Okay got that check check get. Don't check check yes. I have reminders. That remind me electrically but okay what what other things. I've got to do today when you do that. It actually eliminates your mind from. I'm going in all types of directions. You almost have a plane before you and you have to be like okay. These are the things that I need to accomplish. Let me go ahead and knock them out. So yeah that was in. The last thing was meditation or mindfulness can also help to reset your brain talking Mousa all right what else to talk about You know get into some other shit. What else will you talk about? You know. We haven't played this game in a while Do Some fucking with black people guys. It does lax with pre fall. That's Ri- Oh my God. It's time for the game. We all hate the place Bugaboo Black people today the game around go find your article's Macclesfield fucking black who will stop points towards two hundred twenty five ah sometimes give it to Kars. Today's consensus everybody and his drug cars. I know I'm from the South and I pronounce it wrong and fast sometimes so somebody outright. NSA cars is drug ours. Like like game of thrones Tamir Rice's mother other and the ACLU team up for a booklet to teach kids how to interact with police the ACLU and mother Mirai Samaria Have created and released a booklet and honor. The boy who was shot dead by Cleveland Police five years ago publication called the Tamir Rice Safety Hamburg and was created to Godchildren to police interactions. The booklets cover is red rice favorite color and features smile image of the boy on the back with a in love. Millimeter of Tamir Rice. Rating according to Cleveland Dot com his name and likeness is featured on six pages. That make up the handbook details inside assist children teenagers on how to utilize that Reitman ten possible scenarios ranging from question on the way home to police visiting your home the ACLU states that Being stopped by police officers a stressful stressful experience in the handbook provides details. The way for the way you've way the handbook provided okay. I think they meant to say provided not provides okay. The handbook provided details. The way for us to be able to control their own actions even when you are doing what you do everything right. This is still around. These tips can help. Protect Yourself. Self help you protect yourself. Black children out to add to be out often have to be adults that. Aclu Campaign Manager Milky they have to navigate those encounters. Have this information on hand in a split. Second where they might. I be scared of what's happening next. We WanNa make sure that we're giving kids the tools they need while acknowledging that is not fair. The young people had to walk around and fear for their safety. Not like they still do in Cleveland. Samaria rice brought the idea to the ACLU to create the God as a part of their know your rights initiative it helps to save future children. I'm from the same failures or son. I told them a use case to be more welcoming and so they read it and make sure that they read it so they read it and make sure that they read it with their parents. The guy is available for download on ACLU website with physical editions available to those were able to visit the headquarters. So there's one hundred I give this a one hundred hundred in the biggest one hundred not for the actions and that book for the Fed to dish it has to be. They feel like this needs to be done in the first place. Like that's one hundred hundred comes from my you know is i. I don't police officers new Honduran interact with us. Why why does the people with amount of power need to know how to behave? Yeah and also like to mirror. Rice didn't have a chance to do any of this. You know he might not have been like like someone need to write a book for the fucking police to know how to interact with our kids like it ain't it ain't the baby's fall. No no this is essentially just talk. Aw this is why I didn't get mad. When people had that fucking clip started getting a Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren talking about? Would you tell Yo- blacks you'll black child if they were being info by the police because no one has the answers to mirror. Samaria rice lost. Summarize lost her child she did and the solution she could come up with with in her grief or just stone sober hardcore facts. I don't have a chance in hell of changing the police so let me teach teach our children the next hour how to Notre writes in the be careful and to be safe because we know the police ain't going and going to be able to respect no blacked each out so yeah is a hydra for me as well and I don't mean that against her ACO you mind. Yeah it's just as the black part in in every single time I think about how fucking fair it is that we get here by police for fucking existing And then we have to tell our children children how to behave so they don't get killed for fucking existing. It's infuriating Yeah even even even Linda's the is I remember a were junior. Angie male hill was talking about plastic bags and how certain positive country now they actually want to ban like the grocery store bags or for recycling reasons. They want you to bring your own bags in there and I remember them talking about it and for me. I'm no no no no no no give me. It ain't no but a pack of gum give me a mother fucking bag. GimMe Yo bag with Joe Wright known and I'm a wrapped around it why because I want to begin to develop the motherfucking store. You know you know like you said from Crete and papers you know because all you have to do. Is Somebody accuse you somebody think you. You did Matter of fact they got cameras on you or whatnot. If somebody thinks that you got something in your hand it does does not belong to you. They'll go through it. You know I I've even to the point where it whenever I go into my pocket books. I closed on my pocket. Because you know what you can have glum or something random in your pocket that you have previously zip it up. Don't don't dig uh-huh and it's like I shouldn't have to be like this but for the fact that I don't want no problems in the thing is you almost have to teach children to which is fucked up your. Yeah No. That's really what makes me think about you know how we have to police behavior. But nobody's telling police have property police. Yeah I mean people are but Dang gotta listen because they don't want with the guns. ANC theater fires employees for alleged racial profiling incident during Harriet screening. Three employees were fired from a Louisiana. AMC movie theater at the being accused of racially profile and African American movie goers during the screening of Harriet Mansard into place AMC clearview powers. That was twelve in Ma- theory Louisiana on November third during the opening weekend screening of the movie around halfway through the film. The projector objector reportedly stopped and the lights were turned up as an employee entered address. A possible ticket mix up with members of the African American Women's nonprofit five. Oh four Queens. He's who were in attendance. According to The Washington Post the group have reportedly been seated. NC state purchase when another group walked in around eight fifteen pm. The second group allegedly saw these these were occupied and left a theater. Employees ended the theater shortly after asked to check on the women's tickets. A sixty five sixty five zero patrons. Sandra Gordon said employees are her. I was in the wrong seat. But she showed her e ticket and then he left a few minutes later manager. Stop the movie and Confronted Gordon. The manager allegedly yelled at Gordon Accuser. Kars nuts employee who I check their ticket. It was happy to have Gordon say on the manages tunnel part ratio part. Didn't know what to do ignorance. But it didn't even have to go to that level however the incident wasn't over at that point shortly after the humiliating scene a third employee came into the theater to check Gordon again after the movie and Gordon and fourteen other women coming from the five or four Queens Organization reportedly demanded to speak with a manager to complain about their treatment the manager then issued refunds to anyone else who complained about the incident. AMC Seek theaters completed an internal investigation which India into three employees of all being terminated based on our initial education operational. Mistakes by the theater team led to this unacceptable necessary just Russia. We're working with the theater to address what occurred. AMC spokesman Ryan Noonan wrote in a statement. We sincerely apologize to I. Guess the theater for this disruption and the frustration they experienced as a result yet. One thing I have noticed tiny detail that says everything to me in this In this article is the sixty five year old patriots. Sandra Gordon did not do not cuss woman or that employees out. She did not denied because she was well within. How right if you're going to try to stop a sixty five year old black woman from senior? Harriet you getting cussed out. But what the Internet's there okay. Sandra on black twitter. She Ain't fucking with these hotels and the Russia propaganda. Feminism that was trying to destroy this movie because I don't like Cynthia revolt scene. Where about John Canceling us? She whereabout shit. What she did is she kind of finally Z.? Hairy on the big screen because she probably read up. Learn to buy here. Tony whole fucking life. Ain't been no movies about this one right one. The first time she's would have been to the movie theater right side right about the let you fucking come in their tax cut on the lights on me. I tell them I showed you I showed what would you might take it. I'm in the right seat. Damn hold on. Stop the movie. We need to talk. Okay now you gotta get cussed out I was I now. I was nice the first time these black women got together and organized to get this fifteen tickets to yellowing dink. Ask Theater come on. You missed the. What is the name of the Group of Game Baby? The five zero Queens. Yeah I was. I heard that name. I said it's not going to be no Pravo Queens. He's not confidence. Bullshit at five. Four Queens was like what and guess what I'll fourteen or fifteen mars they black adds up through the foreign and was like bits. What you know they? It was all wearing civil rights. Shirts like no stash. Rosa parks come on Harriet Zone. Right right we Out Harriet Tubman. Come out no you over there messing with D. Sisters. I'm like guy was caused out. Come on and had issue refund dummy EMME gotta give the money back right Cossio comedy money because you couldn't just leave well enough alone now that you you you ruined it for them and you guess what you ruined for the other people that were in there to my question is the people that came in and said they in our seas water they just standing outside like oh I don't care what they say or man. They showed us to take it. I don't give a fuck like take a over another seat. Dan some happy maybe scout. I don't know I mean scope and take used anyway zero two hundred. Oh you know I'm GonNa get his one hundred opening Kuwait but I give a damn zero today. Fired them people. Yeah I give it a fifty. I'M GONNA play the difference because it's still fucked wit. Because he knows this way today whole fucking like to get this field and the experience ruined rowing foreign L. Phone and and his bail and they're now out of May come out come on now Patrick Patterson of the Los Angeles Clippers referred to black women as bulldogs would ask why. NBA Players May white women on his anniversary post with with his wife photos. A common theme of Twenty Ten has been looking on love. Love where people are forcing people to accept all white forcing people to accept a okay. WHO This J rich of hip hop Bob Dot com stigmas have existed for years? Who people choose to be with prejudice still exists? They are nowhere near as bad as they want us. Work however is things that people still have issues with professional athletes particularly. NBA players marrying dating white women a few months ago. Patrick Patterson Los Angeles Clippers celebrated his wedding. One Fan saw his wife. He questioned him on it now. I don't understand this thing. Where people they out? Let me go your instagram wedding photos. And ask you why you married the person you marry. Because based off of their race right ain't got shit to do the Dow that's a level of entitlement ownership that these fans have that six right. You obviously grow to fuck up you'll have to be a fan of a partisan you don't have to like them and honestly unless they have said or are saying something fucked up about you that I don't know why you would make that your business that being said it. Let's get into whatever his comments were because that's the problem. Yeah Yeah but just I the thing that started this to me as already ridiculous. Correct one fan basically said Patrick Patterson never made it to the NBA. She would've never marry him answering him. Patterson said it doesn't matter and love is love but the Fed kept touting him going as far as saying working at Walmart in Toronto she would have never gone for him okay. Patrick Patterson goes on the fan asking if he should settle for a bulldog at the demand accuses him of giving up loving are women. Patterson says he chills that happiness. Dr King fought for adding. That color doesn't matter telling the fan to wake up now. See that's how you got fucked up defending yourself. You straight should've just muted them in black them in modify gone and he went west out too far allows everybody to if I see so yeah responded to my true if I never made it to the NBA. I would never met her while playing for Toronto. But why does it matter loves loved the end of the day and then Mafia material underscore. BWI Clue he's fine into why. Why are you engaging with I never but it's not though bro you grow up loving are women? Why wait till you get? Get some real money for your perspective even if he wasn't an NBA worked at a Walmart in Toronto. You was a chance bro. You jerked became another statistics. I bet she the only one her family history. The data black stay woke my guy and he was the hotel what is happening when he responded to this he really should not. This person doesn't know you or your wife. Why are you responding to them so I should settle for four dollars and act like I'm happy with my life and preach reach? Keep it in your race to the world. As if Dr King didn't fight slash offer quality. Except it's all coaches love one another and no hate no things that maybe maybe your life. But I don't put around maybe that maybe your life but I don't want that for my own. My family color doesn't matter wake up. Yep and the yield you let it slip when you hit that bulldog homey and now the roasting begin. Now they've been CAA Your wife every man a Pumpkin Spice Mayo becky get thank. I know he's getting dragged. I ain't even. I don't even fuck with his face and then they got to be getting dragged into issued an apology. But I can't picture any apology. What about half of that accepted Basic Raziq? Nobody's you should have ignored him. You know 'cause I don't get you marry becky between you and Becky. I'm not fucking you becky would. That's the thing right. We always say that. Most people don't care most rational people. Don't care correct some people do care and they do harass these couples. Yes they do breath. Just don't say shit like you because honestly does no defense. You're going to have of your personal love. Your people are putting macro motivations ovation's on our micro situation right. There's no fucking way for them to know what what that is even if you just literally slipped up and you were trying to say blue dog has to be ridiculous associate. Don't matter breath fucked up. You don't made an analogy or straight OKA- black women bulldogs in your pinch. It to try to defend yourself. Which means you they gonNA bulldogs now so you fry yes? He did issue an apology. I gotta read this angle. He stepped debt. I can't imagine what the fuck it could be like. The Person Road right away. He Rowley wrote it. Yeah I don't know right I don't I don't understand it's funny because I just don't understand the levels Of It you know and I know love is one of those things that make people want to You got to finally warm in people. Do think that's romantic authorship. The ship but Bra People Project because you have somebody projecting their own views on to you about how they think is. Don't matter and this happened a few weeks ago. I just somehow got brat. Everyone's attention he's I want to address my were bored. I during the conversation with someone who was making disrespectful remarks about my wife and our relationship. I was blinded with the same making a comment on my wife's physical stature. I know that two wrongs don't make a right but I let my emotions get the better me and the heat of the moment that for that apologized to him his wife the rest of his family for the hurtful crew comments made on day. I love my black people. I believe in love and the crowd. Oh Oh okay hear me out. I know without thinking but hear me out I get it. He was calling net. Man's wife ugly. He was saying Y'all Mao your wife will like a bulldog his his wife but see. That's the thing it's like when loving wrote rotate shit about lycene activists blah. He ended up hitting everybody you now everybody has a activist. Lycene is like fuck you right. You were talking about one or two people making in broad strokes but you say you got to general what and now you got fucked up. Well you hate to see it but We're going to give it a seventy five. I guess I mean they're I don back and forth Wiseman don't are you a fool people with his own version No they can't and I did not see that context from Aena beginning Definitely now I do locate understand why he's why was phrased that way. A basically ugly is what he was saying which is what people do whenever somebody comes with them. I mean I came from every time I laugh every time I see you talk about how they wouldn't date some super attractive black woman like Shit sniff around interesting today becomes cows like look at this megaphone head or why his mustache. Well I hit low negawatts potatoes baked potato and it's just like his roaster for the day on. I don't also participate but I do say I'm here for the joke. I'm not participate but good. God It'd be funny like he Kinda Got Papa John Right here he kinda got find a little bit because people extrapolated the context just went he. As black women are bulldogs is when he probably think that black woman that that man is dating a board which is still wrong is still around. Because that won't comedy go on your pages they need to you. A Yukon. Man's hockey got US stray bullet. He's like my wife. I'm going at yours so walked up. It's like it's like when they used to have that they don't even do it anymore. 'cause they rise to well whereas used to be my favorite when they used to share the illsley the will knows so is the jeopardy me and it'd be like For five hundred dollars your girl like this this man and then there will be people be like filling in the light like you girl allies tomorrow jail. Your girl like Charles Barkley you girl seal you know like your girl. Looks like this gentleman man do is you. They never do that. No matter who is five dollars you know what I mean everybody to work for their man. That's crazy man yesterday. Say his White Wife aim defense. Of course night show won't their smoke because listen. I thought this was totally different. Because I didn't know the context and I really thought that. Oh this is what happens. You have an anti black white white woman with these anti black men and black women is ugly and they sit and drink tea over this and commiserating sit. Wine is now like she's like by no doubt. No no Patrick. We don't do that. Lead me to forget it is let me hang on private you you you got yourself in this Shit Shit. Man's wife ugly. You need to be on line defending me. I didn't ask but it did not ask for it but I don't know either way. Hey look bad so people gonNA take this much distrust in black men in black athletes. I see people taking it the the most horrific way way. But I'm trying and I've said it on the shell several times and I'm not taking it back because it's just I believe China best going. The situation is and giving people assign people to worst motivation off tops and being like Yup. That's how it is 'cause I leave a little bit of room. I don't know you know a satellite that man white out but did he thinks you like walkers. She's black Oh no now count on picture over then then. Now I'm problematic if I what are we what are we all look at her picture. She do like like avoiding. What are we going to say there? How y'all go? Forgive him of course now. It's too late. Donate we already decided to juries out. Jerry is already back in and decided what man that Dahl. This law have outlined for any conversations. Because we'll be sitting in and I usually that picture though She went on creatures. Dec- extent was an airport. You know all right. Let Me Stop Zero to Heidari. Seventy five me care. I hang going to say this I'm going to. I'm going to give this one hundred. Yeah just put a simple fact. Bad that Mashburn indicatively is wife and he shouldn't care for his wife and Mike is almost like every everybody get older credit they got caught and wife wars. Yeah like Mike Lights yes. That's what happened like is like you know my wife better than your wife. It's somebody crossed the line and then they're like oh it's almost like when when in You go at somebody and you say something to cross the line and I was wrong but judy heard other cities right bob wrong about this nickel mom everything everything about this conversation. It's so bad because the way I'm just going over the conversation away it started it and so he threw back was going to be extrapolated related to all black women correct. So you really couldn't even been like our Joe. Egli is why people. Oh 'cause he black I take me. It was lose-lose never responded. It was a lose lose situation when it comes to that. He admitted him blow two weeks later so he couldn't even be like how's my his wife. Everybody's like aren't they nigger. He made only response. He coulda had his own wife ugly. You Know Joe you have ugly wife by EMI. He could have just said that I was talking about black women talking about that Black Man's wife who is ugly. He could've been a problem. He was GonNa Oughta cry. Don't don't I'm not saying I'm not saying it's right. I'm saying better but you know what is better suited a straight shot in spray about in the room and he sprayed everybody in their own. Oh yeah he checked me. That's Kinda brilliant. He wasn't checkmate. I think about it down to really cause it's like whatever if you say. Is Your wife ugliest list. 'cause you're black woman also all likewise like damn. Nick should stay there and being rich. I guess They yeah I wanted to watch the celebrities the corner and then be uninformed and Shit I. I'm trying to think of other as he could have done. Everything makes it worse if you get a the meet me somewhere and fight me if you're like oh no so you fight for a white woman. You don't let nothing that man could cause people are Ed Determined that it was a problem. This is just my love. Your wife is funny there. Yeah you know how it is now You know matter what you say. You're not talking about my wife like this. Oh so it was okay to talk about black. I just say nope no you racist dollars Disney fry foot. Now we're going to fix this funny but it is man so sorry. I'm sorry right to dismay because the other day I don't even know I don't have no idea I love but I'm like Talk Alana. I didn't even know. He played with the clippers. Notice man if he delivered Papa Johns. I hope I don't sound ridiculous. I don't know who this man is. They walked down the street. I wouldn't I wouldn't know what saying sorry to this man. All right we do another way regardless I'm still here sweetie jokes. Do I might not participating apart. But it don't mean peeking through the window. I mean it is funny to me by is a bad situation to be in and hey maybe he meant it one hundred percent the most racist possible way possible but I really thought when I saw the headline I was going to go on his rampage. He was GONNA be like black women are bulldogs but then seeing his apology on my only take that woman will talk. I don't know it. I don't want to see the picture. Evidence made them come to conclusion. People had different standards of beauty. And maybe maybe he just everyone's beautiful to me okay if you can do Who Says Shit Anyway? Let's go to the next segment Let's do oh wait shit. I almost Almost forget about everybody's new favor segment on show capitalism K.. Thank you guys. Bring up this toll Yeah it rea- nays nor Mani as savage VINCIS. I yeah. Let's do it. Remember when nor money turned it turned out really honest fashion show extravaganza for savage Fendi. It seems that the two artists had developed a real kingship. That says Dan because the motivation singer just announced a re signed her as lingerie brands. I ever brandon ambassador. Breath take an instagram. Shared a news nor Mani unveiled a series of photos where she smoldering posing bright reg savage offensive guard. The singer has nothing but high praise for really tell him vote that she was very honored that that that the ads K.. For herself how can we see pictures. Happy just I do have pictures. But it's slow load in I guess I could put it on screen So you guys can celebrate this capitalism tiredness that how does back as black people. We won't give free because she could sell some lodge ray breath money that is surely going to some white person somewhere at the end of the day. Yes we're GONNA get the cut but white people owned matters of production on this so Yana Jonah ain't doing nothing but being a black face for white supremacist Sunita that's beautiful. I know that this is her passion project. Ah something she genuinely highly believes in a cares about and unlike black people. She don't care about the people and the fact that she wanted me to be a part of that meant a lot to me she some. I looked up to for a very very long time. Wow that's so sad. Looking into another capitalist so I already know what kind of SIC- you GONNA turn out to be another elaine. Given out making money for the white man keeping all of us oppressed look in now delicious in your lodge ray trying to trick us in the bef four capitalism does not gonna get us for So this is the kind of capitalism is supposed to be okay being on the bottom of verdict underneath sitting on my face juvenile bid. No thank you. Don't appreciate this bullshit. What are you gonNa be mad by yourself? My brother look at this. Do you see how she got gold. billionaire purse. Okay trying to fly her wealth all up in our face. I don't think so. I'm fine with that. The people and the proletariat proletariat are not pleased just you just you reflecting on C.. Can you defend these bourgeoisie. Blacks Ashram it's not doing nothing but setting us back reflected on her time dancing performing savage fancy show. She described the experience powerful particularly for a strong showcase. The diversity yeah it was great to be a so many amazing human beings desire to be celebrated. Our beautiful all stays all sizes. The show represented everybody. I just love DOC lucid. The brand is and how it gives everybody opportunity feel sexy beautiful and empower. which is everything last year for as well except for poor people? How are we supposed to feel how billing power? We can't even afford this shit. Anybody wants to talk about that. The price is a fantasy is is worth for Dell is the best makeup bow. Wow of course it's worth it to the survey honey. Why industrial makeup argued I complex of course is worth it? Because a woman's worth capitalism is only seen as her attractiveness. Can you look here black man and ain't don't give a damn about makeup as somebody who is makeup deficient out meow. No Jack Shit about makeup I can can put this on in one fail swoop. This this is the shit for me. Wow look at my chat room Fulla just got them capitalist supremist ashrams premises up Taco supremacist. Hoping Ashram Might Miss Ryan go buy me some Olympic Glaus. Wow it's really sad to see what what they would they. Triggering you blacks in the band have about no savage yet. I have to peek over there and see what she doing. Let me know when Riyadh to come out with some socialist lingerie and then maybe we can talk okay. Socialist Bass savage. They don't yes they do. Not Real wants THEM FAKE ASS. Probably do but the real ones like me We were going down. You don't buy nothing then. Black women entrepreneurs acquire fashion fair. Yeah cosmetics let's do a fashion Ltd.. Fast been around since nineteen forty two doesn't own as old as line. Black women are displaying the power collaboration around with business. According to Chicago Sun Times former Johnson publishing companies Eggers Shero mayberry mckissick and desert we have joined forces to acquire fashion the fashion fair beauty. Line the BIZ. Women purchased a legendary brand for one point. Eight five million dollars that could have gone to fee. We know homeless or some other charity or Socialist Organization from the Johnson Publishing Company cosmetic brand which was created by unions w Johnson Units Johnson. Okay lots forty six years ago and grew to become one of the most successful black on beauty companies in the world. I wouldn't do. It was was founded in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy three I knew was born. I was yeah I mean that's a good point Fashion Fair one of them first cosmetic glass created for women of color mass six million dollars at the height of his existence off fifty six million dollars they took from the community okay. Black People Coulda used at the start. They own independent Gardens within the same zones we have food deserts but Nah ah we giving it to the makeup ladies so they can just get what mansions and cars. This shit didn't didn't didn't buy tell you that They burnt aren't places down whole cities. Black Wall Street. You know we could have built back with some money that we would have put instead in the makeup independent. Take back up. That's all I'm saying but y'all want to see these just because it's a black one group of black women making all the money. I guess it's okay. Yes yes sir. Oh yes the women will provide a brand through community focused capsule collection. They WANNA introduce the brand to a new generation while staying true to Fashion Fairs Rich Cultural Legacy Z.. Faster Fares just before I community to lose. Are you mean the community. They robbed of all the money that make us look good. Rogers Rogers told CRAIN's Chicago business. The statement We plan to modernize a brand new products but will remain true to the company's rules which was a great prestige product focused on women of color. Prestige is just another word for the bourgeoisie. That is all that is You not fully meets this use. This ain't nothing but donald trump in black face. Okay this hour stars care next thing you know they out out here. Running for President Tinfoil hat need to get on. Now I'm just I'm just trying to stop the capitalism. It is roots your every time I see all these articles goes yes secured. A bag says black girl magic. You're serving black girl capitalism okay. I don't think there's no magic and capitalism earlier this year they purchased the Black Opal really day over there. I'm going for all of the Opel Opel. been around Forever Avenue they China by a park place next at the Black Oval See does our heavens. y'All be okay. And then they raise the rent and now we broke the two. You want to lead. The resurgence of iconic comes historically catered to black women. It really didn't make much take much convincing when she told me we had this opportunity with black OPO for me. Yes it was about up. You didn't cosmetics and skincare it was also about my for my community and women of Color and I love that I felt there were so many opportunities here both in industry and even with this brand eh well. Last time I checked. You can't get US free by buying up the block. Okay Jay Z.. said that everybody said Ed all that was going to do. Raise the rent and black people going gentrify other black out of place. They say that's how he made it 'cause black capitalism. Y'All now you telling me they not about to do this with all these black beauty brands that they bind up See I guess onto y'all you you sure is there. You ought to vote. That was issues. Come at a time. When there still remains a lack of diversity in regard ownership in the beauty industry according to business insider the industry which is worth five hundred thirty two billion dollars is white male dominated right as it should be was white mean? cabalists is exactly who was white patriarchal capitalism. Ask every time a black person get something. I'm going to be on that. Ask Ask 'cause that's why it's only money. But he was getting his money. Are you are you. We all need to be poor and wait to socialism here and then we'll had had a saying Unitel universal income. Do I need to count. My husband would is happening here. I'm just trying to stop the black capitalism chow being seduced by just 'cause Y'all elsie black women were nice makeup looking good shit. I know 'cause I follow most of them on instagram. What we need to stab Bob is what I'm trying to say? That's it for this display breath. Yeah that's that's right now that it's time for some guests the race that's right it's guest over time That's right it's time for gas th race gates going across all the podcast today carrying two guests look right and of course everybody is or is this all right. Let's get to our first one care. A Florida. Stripper is facing criminal charges after allegedly kicking the manager of a Gentlemen's Club in the genitals while wearing high heel exotic dancer shoes. Oh that is a kink. Now Uh then I mean consensually. Yes conceptually yeah yeah Also I wouldn't have now be a gentleman's dance club. Yes yes I did. Investigators alleged at Lakisha Ortiz. Thirty five became unruly early yesterday morning after the manager of sensations spelled S. I N. stations and Adult Club at clear in clearwater asked her to go home for the evening. I have noted that Ortiz was employed. What is an exotic dancer? Was Ashley Club because she was intoxicated. You can't can't clinician can dance that. She allegedly threw beer bottles and glass drinking cups upon being asked by manager Mark Ca China to Qatar Qatar Qatar to the park club later as a club as close security charity anchor sought to deescalate the situation. Ortiz allegedly front kicked him directly in genitals while wearing her work. Shoes he She then allegedly kicked in the stomach at the Colorado Sensations Ortiz allegedly kicked kicked third time directly in front of the Police Department sergeant charged with battle battery and disorderly conduct. Both misdemeanors Ortiz was booked into the county. Jail at three fifteen am shows Sunday evening. Even Al States under fifty dollars bond can't guess the race of the Kisha Ortiz out black all right. Let's say chat room debut about about it black right Wait diamond sale. Lock the door black worst thing. She's so black. The worst thing you can do to Kiesha is mess with her money black lakisha Diamond Ortiz. Play ball black. Puerto Rican Latina Tena Apple Latinas can't be giving sloppy lap dancers at the players club. Black likes to play kickball black black and I blame him for still being you. Would they get after style blaming the victim. Anyway she was black. It and mine stands white and Black Latino or Latin people and a harasser. She wanted to black ones. So you say Blake. I didn't know from the name. Surface survey says I will kick you in the balls she got she got that face. Definitely got a kick you in the face. An ex con on has been jailed on grand theft burrito charge and Arizona Felon is back behind bars Following during his arrest last Saturday night on grand theft burrito charge coordinator Investigators Timothy Bail twenty nine approach the man on Phoenix Street Street and took that person's property by force while making threatening statements. Okay the stolen property of felony complaint states was a Burrito of less invaluable thousand dollars. Now I would hope so. Who the fuck his Jack in people for Burritos and how does a burrito thousand dollars under a thousand thousand? Oh under thousand. Yeah Okay Yeah. That's what I'm Rita Ovo tells us. Shit Oh yeah of course not at the having this burrito stolen the victim call now on one and follow bill police located ex-con and arrested him on downtown Phoenix Street around eight forty PM. He's listed as a transient in court records. He was found in possession possession of a wrapper from the BURRITO. He ate every now he got rid of the evidence. They got the rap scene above he. It was booked in America County jail on felony robbery charges for which nobody's me and said I wonder if he just wanted to go to jail if he was on the streets like maybe he's like good now they can put me back in jail. At least you know warm. And they got food bells rashy the clues to sever state prisoners convicted for weapons. Possession only conduct trespassing. Asthma cotton's possession. He is currently on probation in connection with the twenty fifteen convicted for misdemeanors misconduct of our weapons of felony for which he served the three years in custody May Sounds like it's a wrap for Burrito. Thief they care and guess what what was his name again. His name is timothy bail. Maybe he's related to Taco Bell. And he's like that's my Burrito Timothy. Bail is his name okay. I'M GONNA say Tim Debate was black. Okay someone's spill the beans on them all right. I won't play it for that I let's go. Jeremy Arose. David Lee Timothy Bales is. This is a white all those convictions still was out of jail. Plus Black folks deal chicken when say what was in the Burrito Rado black I ne- more clues fucking white. White boy wasted hot sauce on his burrito black white because if he was Hispanic they would've been deported him Taco Tuesday News Day. Tim White Black White very divided over this very divided chat rooms all over the place. Karen went with a Black Karen and his right. How'd you get that rap sheet and of course many of you you guys went with something other than black wrong And he ate the BURRITO. Nice miss it in the face and nothing nichols longer I I don't know how that subject area but you're I'm maybe it was a chicken burrito. I don't know maybe Oh all right. Let's go to the bonus round Oh Dan that's right double points wwl race care is to for to. She's been on fire this week. I know y'all believe it in just like real racism your logic Malaysia. Ain't gotta make that's true true. All right let's go through three over there the race whisper. I Know Okay Nashville Tennessee. A sixty-six-year-old repeat offenders accused get naked and scaring tourists in a restaurant Friday morning at the Capitol Mall State Park according to an arrest warrant or custodian cop police report man creating a disturbance in a park bathroom. The paperwork paperwork stays. She told officers. The man was naked and speaking gibberish. While also swinging bell in throwing objects guarantors were attempting to use the bathroom. What police arrive to the restroom? It was cleared as trying to convince suspect to get dressed. A tour bus derive forty minutes later. Police say they've forcefully removed from the restroom and took him into custody. The suspect identified. Police is Dale. Trump was booked into the metro. Jay on the charter. Only conduct is by was set at fifteen hundred dollars. Alive court records show. He has been arrested more than twenty times for more than twenty charges in two hundred. Nineteen a Most of those charges have been dropped though so guess the race a Odell crump old Gail crump is not here. CRUMP black all right. Let's say Chat Room Negro. That's that's a black asked name. If he why Dob I will be shocked with the crop. Wyoming White Crump K.. Act Right Black. That name. Thank says Old Man old black man fed. Everybody Shit tickle me Odell got kicked off sesame street black That NIGGA black black. Dale was trying to show his trumpet. That is a nigger. Come on out just a black ads name. Everybody went with black on this. Everyone you guys got it correct he. He's a black man. Yeah Black. That's scary you walk into the bathroom. And they got a belt swinging around no close talking. gibberish rush. Oh yeah that's yeah I'd say that's not my oldest man's name yeah years out in black man sad see whatever happened to them and get them to that point man. Oh man they'll put you tick away. Got Damn Sahi do all the time. I got arrested more than twenty times. Oh daily acne food again at the COPS OPS. Go to the bathroom get the house even get out of there shaking his dick around now scaring off tourists. I just came down here to see widow home. Blues was built Janney. Like you're going to see this dig first pitch right. Why did you see my kind of using? What is because we're going to talk to somebody in your life? What's happening to hit him to do? No I think I want to leave your Allen. Where do you see dake on the go? Yeah the bell. PUT US here a man carrying a sword on Vine Street prompts calls to emergency dispatch rush. Okay This isn't the feudal era so man feel the need to carry a sword. Seems Kinda ridiculous. Denise County emergency spend. It was multiple calls about about a white male wearing camouflage jacket Canada sore walking on Vine Street toward mainstream in Batavia police have been dispatched. That's the whole article. Okay I guess the Batavia Dot Com. He likes to keep it short fat number facts. We're having did you catch him. That's an the next article. We don't embellish article we caught em. There ain't okay all right. That's it back. Hopefully we can come back tomorrow depending on if carrying out work early because we have a basketball game to go to the the Hornets play so I work early enough. We're probably door early. Show so we can recap the walking dead finale and then we'll be done with recaps for a few weeks and If not the hey. y'All get whenever whenever them Saturday Sunday when we come back. Also there's too much. Should it's possible to happen Friday morning but it's tentative guys. Let you on that too. That also is on the fall break got it so you know lots arrested relaxation and actor that early weeks December. I'm definitely taken off. Gut Act just like you guys know so all right until then I love you too.

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2144: TicketLivesMatter

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

1:42:09 hr | 11 months ago

2144: TicketLivesMatter

"I listened to the Black Guy, who tips podcast, because Rod and Karen are hot, dear, Sir I. Let me congratulate you. On the wonderful March and demonstration. You conducted last week I saw it on TV thought it was well organized I'm not sure what it was four by I know it must have been something Real Racist Bravo. A writing you today about a pressing concern of mine that I believe should be yours as well as you may, or may not know not may not know I make my living as a cultural pinedale. That is to say people look to. For insights into the culture in recent editorial I call upon people to change our designation from African American chocolate. I won't bore you with specifics I've attached it as a pdf except to try to convince you to climb aboard, I know you guys are busy with all the race stuff and I know that's important, but I implore you to take the time to consider my argument. Chocolate really is the way to go of already tried it out on people, and it's been an overwhelming success and least four out of five black people like it. An impressive five out of five nine blacks do in order in other words. Everyone loves chocolate. But I need to help the. ACP has to be the. Has Been the premier civil rights group of the last hundred years. Not only have you witnessed untold number of horrible ratio isn't as during that period you were there for the previous name changes as well from colored to Negro to colored again to the so-called Negro to black to African American, to American African descent to black again to people of color to black, once more and finally African American through all of this you have maintained remained unchanged. You are still the National Association for the Advancement. Of Colored People in other words. You're not crazy about the term African American either. So get on the chocolate train. Sorry to be so informal, but I can't mask my enthusiasm as you're reading the attached article, chocolate has so many advantages including the best wine. You don't have to change her initials. You can still be the N.. Double ACP only now stands for the National Association for Vance of chocolate. People just think what this could do for fundraising, even the most dedicated bigger. We wanted to send money to that group. Hey welcome to the black autists podcast, hose, rod, and Aaron. We're live on a Sunday night ready to do some podcast. Find us on Itunes stitcher potter. Matic starts the blackout as leaves. Five Star reviews We're everywhere. spotify Google play. Wherever you listening to PODCASTS, leave us those five star reviews official weapon of the show is. An and unofficial spore what about and bullet ball extreme an art that I was reading. Today is from Larry Will Moore's book. I'd rather we got casinos. And other black thoughts. It's just a funny book. It's a little bit dated 'cause I forget when it came out two years ago, then yeah, but the thing that I like. Rock entail that made the book a lot more readable to me is that? Is actually he says brother, alive brothers, alive brothers, rather brothers, which of course is a gender term. You know two thousand nine, so maybe he was just thinking only black man, but then. It didn't really make sense in the context was used in. Not think well. It happens either is probably share him. Probably probably say a change nigger two brother in the book. Because then, the book makes a lot most. Sloppy. Our Yeah if you just say Nigga right here. Yes, that that makes more sense because some of the Times doesn't fit to like. This only happens to black man like no. This happens the black, people. Like, they did it as all inclusive. Men Or? Guys like his novels. Wyndham terms you place it and the assumption is everybody's included. Yet is two thousand nine before. He called Barack Obama. NIGGA In the press corps meeting, or whatever that they do? And there's like a chat where he says something like you know, brother, fry, brother, fide and another thing. He's like Jesus was a brother, but then I've stereotype is really fit for like Nigga so. Yeah, found ypres. You can't be having all these negative yoga and yield context I read that book. It's a quick read I read it Sh- over the course of the week. The weekend, or whatever probably sound like you got over your Ito's block was talking about Oh my God. Yes, I'm over it. I've finished the wedding party. And then I read all of A. I'd rather. We got casinos in light. Maybe two days maybe three. Quick reader, I take a little longer, you fairly well. I wasn't reading anything for four or five months. So you know, and then I started judy. Dyer's book is another short. Re is only ninety three pages. And I'm about forty percent through this. And I started this one this morning. Is How to co I mean it's. Path a complete guy to developing your gift and finding a sense of so so. It's. A cool book so far. It's kind of weird. I don't know much about Judy. Dire, so maybe she's just weird. ASS, person but. She talks about. Like Enhancing your ability through your impact three and a path to like just different areas that people excelling or or they gravitate to as impasse, and some of the stuff is like really spiritual mediums people that can see spirits people that can since energy from locations and stuff like that I can't do all of that or at least I haven't tried to do all of that. And then some of the stuff you know like I, literally like reading about yourself page. It's just like oh absolutely. Can Do this you know I can disarm people lying without really you know. Even if they don't know, they lie. Like I can just be like. Yeah, they don't. They haven't gotten there yet to where this how they really feel. And I think for me I. I am like that when it comes to. Certain things like when it comes to love. I can actually see love you can I I can actually see love radiate Alpha. Mighty, but okay. Darren love or I can see the love in their eyes towards a certain person like a child or things like that you know as. Things where people can pick up on people's energy so some you know some just pick up on their energy. Yeah, definitely I really do believe in seeing filling a herring energy and. Some stuff. I just didn't understand until later in life or I didn't believe in like I. Know for a fact that I was getting sick from being around people physically ill. And have to win. Those people were no longer in my life, either digitally physically or whatever. I I started feeling so much better and this and gone to this day like I like I I went to the doctor like over it when I was like Hey I'm having this problem like I. Will Get physically ill. Sometimes it. She goes. I yeah, it's nothing wrong with you, so you know I like. Maybe. There's some you know look at this. She did all these tests and she was like nothing physically wrong with you, and so then you have to look at Li-. Like stress related. Mental stuff when people have a tendency to ignore because that's that's because I wanna inside going to affect outside, so if you're stress, you have all the stuff bubbling against. It will affect things because yeah I got to the point where it. It's been years ago. Where the Blair pressure. Who was shooting up my you know cholesterol. All these numbers were just shooting up in through the roof. Hours stressed in weighed down. If felt like heavyweights were upon me. And a lot of those people left. That's when I changed. You know when you said PICK UP PEOPLE'S ENERGIES A lot of times you pick up all the people's excited their anger or sadness. You know I've hooked. People just cry like a baby and couldn't understand why that's because I was picking on their energy, and when you know that you're somebody like that, you have to be very very aware of that, and you have to protect yourself, you know. And the nominee protect someone a bad thing, but you have to know the people that you just can't have around you because they wreck your world and you won't even know why. I mean we're not talking I guess about the light well more thing anymore, but. yeah, getting a book points out stuff like being attracted or glomming onto the people that are hurt a lot of times I used to do that or I would feel like that like the underdog like I need to help this person, which not necessarily a good thing. Because a lot of times, people are putting that stuff out into the universe. Some people using it almost like a fishing lure. Yes, why? I got somebody to feel sympathy for me. Let me time and get your energy and get your money. Let me get your attention as you care. And that's one thing about that. You have to be aware of that caring part of you and you always WanNa. Care, but you have to know when to cut people off so that you don't drain yourself into this person that you don't have the energy or the effort to put your actions into something this fruitful because that's the thing you want to do things to meet want to be helpful, but it needs to. To be something fruitful. If it's not fruitful your your point, your energy into a bottomless pit did actually will not benefit you in the long run. Yeah, I think even worse than that does a lot of times. People have sentenced to motivations with Shit. So Hey, I! Need the get, go fund me for this thing and in next week we'll go for this and our next week going to go, and it's like at some point like what's going on. You know what I mean like. It's deeper than you know this. Go find me gone. Fix or you know. Like I say you find people to have sinister motives with you know in create a lot of harm within communities with this year. So it just you know just being able to discern from that. You know trusting your gut your instinct on things. And because a lot of times I would see through the shit, but then I'll tell myself. Oh, my being a bad person that see that to think that this person is being phony with this bullshit now the right thing to do is stick Bader side Blah. Blah, and then I would talk myself out of right. No, this person's clearly kind of kind of fucked up and I'm going to. I would be contributing to that. I would be enabling them by being around them. You know so, you know it took. A lot of learning. Now is kind of lessons. On my own, but then like I, say reading a book and stuff is one of it is part of it solidifies things I've learned, and they're part of it. Is I learning all okay? Yeah, this is how you know. This is the way I've been filling about things. That I've noticed I just never really talked much about him, so I I'm enjoying that book as well. Yeah, and it's also. I know for me personally. I was very naive in older. You get the just more wisdom that you get with age and in time, and that's just something. Is is very frustrating, but that's just something that just comes with age and time that does wisdom 'cause I was very very naive, so you fail for a lot of tricks out of being kind and nice and giving and caring, and also just being a people, pleaser, and wanting everybody to be pleased with me, but the older you get a notch on fun, and you gotta be fucking Niggers. You really have got to be family friends when you got to say. I refuse the job market self insane. To me to meet your standard versus living the life that I was destined to live in, it might not be go image of what my life should be. Yeah, I absolutely understand that. Yeah, that more book is is funny and. The the part about colored black out of. He's joking, but he doesn't make a good point about chocolate. Light chocolate, so like less of A. Intimidating staying in he has a chat where he goes into the types of chocolate black people, so everybody got like they only thing you know. Even to the extent where like instead of collar, people, Whitaker's which? Offensive term but very accurate. He was like we call people white chocolate you know instead of. Yes. so. Much like funny observation. And a he makes a gag out of right in the end. Like three different times for different times, and of course they never write them back, so it's just like hey. Did you get my last letter so anyway? We back. It's been took a week off. I still was putting up old episodes of the pie cast. I've been doing that. Round the clock. Just anytime. I have some downtime. All time tonight imagining put. Up Two thousand episodes of the show back onto the fee, which is exactly what I've been doing and I'm almost done I'm like. Near eighteen, hundred, seventeen, hundred or something like that, so you know. Eighteen twenty two, so I'm getting there in the background for some. Great Time to be night. They were going for the week where we put out Flynn the issue. If Yo- PODCASTS, catch it. Catch all. You was catching it out the thing I. Really have enjoyed is. Going back through the names and titles of. What the hell are we talking about? Yeah, I remember some of the things we talked about and some of the Times. Like you know especially comparing things that now like you know because I feel like. In my head. There's like a person that's like hating on the show hating on me. You know so. My mind is like you know our Disney. Only care about mental health, Kiei or you now you WANNA. Bring this up very talking about tiger for years. Like, it's been years of me being like I. Don't think dude as well and. You know so. It feels like stuff like that I. Appreciate. Make cannon the talking about his. Hotel. WHAT THE FUCK! Why is he is for years? We were these people that no one to fuck shit. He'd be saying. Yeah, so it's been a cool to like. Go back and look at some of that stuff. And some of the jokes. We had running jokes and things. We dropped out stuff so that's pretty cool. Speaking of which I'll tell you who's always been here for a show. Always if you and is pandemic. Adam and Eve. That's right. y'All in the free stuff. Because Adam and eve is getting some free stuff. INGLES stuff around. You'll love. Free stuff is awesome and free stuff to spice up. The bedroom is even more awesome. So what they're trying to do and I did this recently all. Is Give you fifty percent off any anyone item you just pick it on Adam and Eve dot com. Take the item out if you'd be. Listening we were running low on Luke. Okay I'm be all this. You know it was like the slippery here so I was like. Let me go upgrade my loop and you know it's not like when you go to grocery store you like. That hurried rush. Decision in Blue Al over. There have a reverse of the KYI. Jailing is over there right next to like a something's wrong which over Jonah stuff so wanna stay over that two laws using condoms and register. K Y Jelly. Talk you to death about it, and there's only like two different. Ky. jellies and she got. You can't you. You just throw both of them in the car because you just. Going to see over there. It's not wrong price check just word that show reverence. Come over. It'd be like what is going on in our nine. This no, so you just slap it all in there. That's rushed decision. Dot Com. You can take your time. Okay. You can sit up there and look at the customer reviews. You can compare it to products to each other and be like so what's the difference between this warm one? Not Warming, okay? Why does this one got four point? Three five dollars point four point five. How many customers have tried it? Oh, they didn't like it because they ran out too fast. Okay, cool well. I might get a different one of us mad at y'all. I've actually read them in. You actually get some real. You've been oh I. didn't even think it is then people will be putting stuff. Like at eight. And and a reverend never comes in your house and looks over your shoulder and say hey, what you looking at you can take your time. You can do that our by reading into your mom. This is just a completely guilt Hariri experience when you take your time, and on top of that, they're going to give you at checkout Tanto a free gifts. Sexy item for him special gift for her and three, and a third out of your both enjoy, plus seeks free spicy movies plus free shipping. Okay you can't beat on it. So putting co tgwu Adam and Eve, and I'm not going to say how many times you can use it but I've never been stopped. Okay, they've never said Oh. You try to use this code again. Sorry, that's for one time only. Get half hours so I mean you want about two items. Make to order that I'm just I. Don't know how they make, but I'm here to help you. Save money so adamantly. Dot Com code TVD WTI at checkout a hook yourself up, okay. All, right? Let's talk about the news. What has been happening news? Actually before I, talk about the news random thoughts, have you? OJ Simpson should've say white people was cake. Would have been. Because I mean well. He got away anyway, but I'm just saying I looked on TV, everything, pancake, and starting to fuck with me so I feel like get. Me Out I feel like the juice could've could've used a cake defendants. Maybe if he stab some people that'll be the new defense, so I'm GonNa be all snapped and they're gonNA. Get Away with a crime because they're going to be like. I thought the motherfucker was on I. Don't. Know Everything Take Nettie yes he was talking to me. What have you seen these videos? Okay? People are cutting in half and his cake inside them puppies. Is like should I feel bad? Usually put the system. I'll try to cake making system. So. I noticed a long time ago, but I'll bring it up now. Because it just it was never a good time, but if you think about it, Father's Day. Is An ANAGRAM for F- Haters Day. You're welcome fellas. Since I've been wearing a mask has zero instances of having to smell. Somebody's thank Asmara. I was watching. What was IT I was that go TV show I'll watch. Four guys corre. Yes. I was watching eye, and they have a core at Bergeford in Japan. And they was talking about people wearing masks, and they say one reason why people were masters like a little short was because of second birthday. Was People 'cause of your breasts? Thank you smelling. It would you should be forced to. That should be the penalty you know I don't really believe in putting everybody in prison, but that should be the penalty for having you know some hygiene issues like hey, this. What everybody is smelling? When you put this out into the world? So you know now you know. Get situation straight, so that's. That's a good penalty and then You know I don't care if there a vaccine. I'm I'm wearing the masks for Life I. Think I'm Mashed Up I. Think this lifestyle think some people are some people like they're going to like. I don't care if she'd go back to normal I. Enjoy a mass in two zero. Particularly, if you Kinda like Roger Introvert people, Latins, they won't talk to you because they can't read your lips and shit like that. You know it's been a while. I think the Red Table. Talk ended it I. Haven't seen I don't know if they've done another table talks. This Jada and we'll did. There's if they have. It hadn't been the talk of the town. Yeah, but you know I'm waiting on Janet Hubert to Chime in on the Smith family drama. Because I know she'll always yes. She wanted to smoke she. She came to talk. Some shit about will smells of. Got Rope like we know that she hasn't been talking Shit because I. Feel Like I. Don't know this moment. This is ready for close up. Okay Lights Camera Action and they come Mr Deal. She loves bad about. Wheels Smith. This is the perfect opportunity. Aswan a role playing Game Day. and. Slowly and like over years. roleplaying gangs have been teaching us that it's okay to go into strangest crews and take shit. Taking all types of sheet, and you still get to be the hero. Breaking all the houses like you're not a bag. If you walk into a person's house in Zelda, break out a vases. Yeah, take all the coins. Chests off a little rubies out of there. Nobody says Shit of an out address this. They don't wake up and go. Hey, man, the fuck you doing my house. The only game they did that was. Fable on one of the fable gains that if you own the house, you could do if you didn't own a house, you better sneak around in somebody but I a while you touch my shit and they would actually call the police on you and you still get to be a hero, even if you still somebody's shit and they call the police. We just wrong lessons in video games like you take somebody sheet bagger. Now. Not a hero gained is a game. You still like nobody's GonNa. Let you in crew at you some shit like that and just. Just, stop fighting you people just let you walk in there. They don't be like. Hey, what are you doing? nat-nato, the home, security systems and nothing like that apparently the other thing that happened. While we were off. This only happened the last two or three days. I don't know how. I had three vivid dreams, and they all ended with Megan, killed by the cops. You'd never have earnings address I can remember the to never had, but yeah, that's what I meant that you can remember I'm wondering what the fuck happened I'm scared to go sleep like Freddie is in my house, but he just enjoyed and build Freddie light. Like this? From get out what the kind of! Some boost in. Is what everybody going through these dreams because I won't out? This is wack. They weren't even like recurring dreams of the same shit. It was it was just three different dreams. Police kill me. It was one. Hours in the NBA hours hanging out in a bar and there's a whole bunch of NBA players. I don't know why I don't know if I was in the bubble away. But Kevin Garnett was in and I noticed night in a bubble, so what Kevin Garnett was doing now. Kevin Garnett started some other NBA player and I just happened to be in the bar, and he got in a fight with the do in in the police came in and put out guns kindergarten net of course being gone net was like what the fuck you WanNa, do Blah Blah Blah and then they fucking shot Kevin Gone. As soon as they shot him, joked Iran fuck out of there. And then the police shot me and. was like I was just trying to be away from the situation, and then I had another dream police. Pulled us. You me was in the car and they put us over for some bullshit. Remember what it was, but it was like routine like you know, Sergei. You know light out. Some routine and you may like a joke or something, and it wasn't even like a mean joke or something that whatever, but the police was filling like some kind of way about you being. A friendly sometime soon. You'll be like so friendly that. He somehow took offense to like I was making a whole lot of nothing. Yes, and then he tried to choke not jumped out of the car and I got. I got killed I. don't remember what happened. I thought the car. But. And then I woke up in the middle of night, and I was like what the fuck why I was looking to sell. Like should I even just go back to sleep you the fuck off. That's why that's why you like I'll wake up. You'll be like already up like sometimes I what is happening? Yeah, and then the third thing was, I can't remember the exact part of his dream, but it was some type of CAIRN. Shit like. Some futuristic share like it wasn't even like this year. It was like the fog here twenty twenty year. Like the shit from westworld season three, where like everything's floating cars type Shit, and somehow pissed out around round white woman. She called the police and kills like what the fuck these dreams, so I'm scared to go back to sleep. These terrible terrible dreams. I promise you. I would not do anything to provoke anybody. To you anything, then do anything in the dream. Oh just us being nice us. He was gonNA to fuck you. Say or something like that now that will. That's not about to happen, so then I was like. Lean away throat my dreams. And the thing is I. I love you and I know you will always protect me because I had out. The Guy told us before I had a dream and I. Don't remember what happened, but I remember. We were at home, and somebody ended up breaking into the house. And You ended up. Like was like the fuck you doing in here and you think they were GonNa shoot me or something there and you end up jumping in front of them, attacking them and fighting him and beating them at the House are out on this Jim happened years ago and I remember that beverly. So I was like yeah, that's one thing I can't say about you. Protect me and I know you will protect me with your life, and that's something that I i. can say I love about you with a heart. That's what to me. What you sign up for you get married, you know. Even though it's finding on twitter, if I say that the other way around, it'd be like black women always had to be the mules of the earth. Man expect everything. This is kind of the deal, everybody. Yes, everybody's in in like marriages stealing negotiation. It's still a deal whether it's a business deal or or romantic deal, but you're have to give some shit up, and yes, and the things you do in the marriage are GonNa have to be things that are pro for you and for them. Yes, and this and and that's the same thing. I will give my life for you, and that's something that you know very hard for people to understand that whole. Concept sometimes, but yeah, and that's not everyone's marriage. Know some people to have like a I mean you see it all the time of people talking about what they will and won't do marriage, so it's not. It's not for everybody you know to me. I'm like this deal. It is and the think with me is like. And it's not like I can't take care of myself. You can't take care of yourself, you know we individual people and we know we can take out sales, but it's just something I guess l. to you where I'm like the fuck you thank you doing you know our who will stand up and be like? No, we're not even as simple as no. My City but I am a restaurant rides, but I know it's okay. The hell it is can speak to this. The carry could ask me till I manage right if you ain't going to do this baby. All right we back, so let's go ahead and get into what everybody wants to hear Corona Virus News. The Meantime Things. That, FRIEND FRIENDS Down Norman hand. Off. Turning To the change. In the second? You'll be watching me why. Didn't you? Tell me like a nickel traffic. On my bike. Vice. President. On just like? Leave? When I was in high. Her. Feel like the men when I'm around. I mean he almost like he will count on topic a little bit. Got Corona in. Maybe rapping about corona. They're like if you follow it. Corona virus. How you? When she pulled up in the crib, you can't wait to fuck. I feel like it's not. It's not necessarily Noviny social distancing right? I just need a little more like what is happening in Corona virus. You know what I'm saying like what got you? Filling this way so before we go deeper into coronavirus news. I just got one random thought. one thing I do really enjoy about being at home. Is Dead particularly for women. When you're left. Teddy itches. You can scratch it like and not actually have to worry about somebody looking at you like adjusting your bra trying to get to your each. If You utd while you at works because you know I don't really wear bras in pretty sure. A lot of women have actually retired their bras and I. Don't think bras are going to be back back in style anytime anytime soon I. Agree, yeah, I I love it. I do too off Mutatis. Have Not Mike Brosseau years all right. Let's get into the coronavirus virus news A new survey finds hundreds of McDonald's workers have been assaulted by anti mass customers as mandatory mass the norm. I believe that in. I notice my crazy but McDonald's. Everything, that'd be bulletproof. Just keep keep keep the employees separate from the customers. Pull Up, put up a began glass and be like y'all not going to be reaching. It'd be crossing over here. Beaten up are in play. They might just have to close it dining area. Driving safer the. 'cause like? I listen to Keith a girl low keeping a girl care was all keith girl. had. A bundle, hopefully guests at a year. I'll be. I'll be seconded that nomination. Yes so. The the our listening to like one of their premium episodes. And it was like Bianca was say how you know. She's getting emotional our keeping them. They're kind of like. Well. Keith Fuss Fuss about the people that don't masking distance and stuff totally understand the frustration. A lot of people feel, but it doesn't necessarily make people feel good to have people being yelled at and Shit like that. Totally understand that as well. But, I keep thinking and coming back to lie. What do you do when people are literally assaulting people right? They can't write that like it would be different if people were lie. I'm just doing my best, and you know damn it. I just don't understand the mass staying above I, just can't. I can't get I can't. I can't afford or I. CAn't get. I can't get him as. Is Different for that. You know what I'm saying like, or I'm listening to work to leave my house. No one's wasn't that essential workers at the leader House. Like, if anything you feel simply because like you wouldn't be on the bus on the train if you didn't have to fucking be at this point on, you know I countries fucked up people out here. You know trying to cut the unemployment benefits down or cut them off for people, so absolutely understand. People have to do it again. Do, but there is A. Part A and is not an insignificant amount of people. Who are physically like who are light. Mentally and physically. Combative about this isn't like. It's not just a matter of I. Don't understand. It's a matter of like dogma. This is their belief system of and unfortunately the corona virus doesn't care to only infect those type of people, so they literally are putting people at endanger when they're walking around without these mass when they're putting their hands on employees at restaurants is. Hey. We have a government mandate. We have a custom and. Corporation wide mandate you. If you'RE GONNA be here to protect, US. The essential workers everyone applause for seven. PM is trying to do to service. To protect us. We need you to not do this to protect other people in our community who are vulnerable we need to do this and people are literally physically assaulting and that you know me go to fucking jail. Don't do that got jail. Don't put your hands on me. Forty four percent of McDonald's workers say they have been verbally physically assaulted at the confronting customers. who weren't wearing masks. Because the thing is with these companies make these policies who's going to enforce them? The employees that you paid below minimum wage. That's the person you expect to enforce this I shouldn't be accountable and responsible for this. If you're going to cost, you need some kind of outside entity to implement this rules, so they won't sided with somebody about getting paid to get me. Like you need little security and it doesn't help it that it's become a political position on mass stuff. Because once she felt politics shit. People don't give a fuck about logic. Reason it's all emotion, and so they feel like you're infringing on their rights. Somehow to say hey, you can't come in here and risk everyone's life. During this this pandemic say pandemic around the globe, millions of people say hundreds of thousand people dead and some. How is it just? Like I, we're supposed just kinda like. Sit Back and hope that these people come around when you're physically assaulted someone who's making seven dollars twenty five cents an hour because they asked you to put on a mask to protect their life in the customers lives in there i. don't have a lot of sympathy for you. you know? Yes I mean there's all these viral videos and stuff. Of course the people see him, but yet the they did a small proportion of while the S. e., you only serve a small proportion of the chains, more than eight hundred thousand workers in the US to forty four percent of respondents alone represent more than eighteen hundred employees who say they have been assaulted on the job. Right and the thing about it is these companies deeply held accountable for these employees? They ask this warped. You know they actually sitting there supposed to allow. Allow suits because I'm on the clock and get my by customer. I can't sue the customers I'm going to sue you because you're actually paying me. As an employee and part of the contract was not for me to get my ass, but what I was on the clock didn't sign up for that bullshit, and you need the money. If you're working at McDonald's did not. This is not a bunch of people who you like. If they get laid off, they're probably not going to get unemployment probably not getting thirty plus hours of mugs. We are weak what you need to qualify a lot of times for employment unemployment. So. Yeah, a lot of these people are like if no one stands for them. Who's going to say if no one speaks for them? Who's going to do it? And unfortunately we live in a country where the government doesn't want to do the job snow. Right if we had a different administration, maybe we wouldn't even be fighting in this way. They just they'd be like. No, don't stay in the National Guard in the fight protesters and Portland sending the National Guard and protect you know essential workers and stuff like that from these people that are adamantly unmasked and trying to like start shooting physically assaulting people to ask them stuff right, and because you know, studies have shown that that's not what outbreak is that protests? Is These motherfuckers walking around here? Going on? That got masks, my freedom and it's my right, and it's and it's very very. Frustrating and s why for a lot of places day just like we draft lonely Michael I it. They just need opened up their inside again. Because it's just not worth it, because a lot of these incidents be people coming into inside, and not the people don't attacked him, but the drive. Don't get me wrong, but you know when you come into inside. It's a little bit different in the draft room. Yeah what I? What wonder is What then the other thing is. If you're an employee and you physically assault these people back or something you're losing. Your job might go to jail so. That's the customer she, too. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely, I just don't understand what. I just I just don't see it. As a problem of cooler heads are going to prevail. I think this is. Unfortunately being route up until a political fight, a D. being able to acknowledge that is not enough. You know what I mean like Oh. It's a political thing right, but it's still going to assault me whether you whatever you know, what I'm saying so, and and the thing is companies have a mandate as they should to protect their employees and the way we protect people social, distancing anywhere masks so. Not The company for today. Hey tell people to do this. In a just world. They would just do it right on me right right and you shouldn't be. Honestly the other part is frustrating the vast majority people that are like being violent and refusing to do this and throw these tantrums are white people and the at least anecdotally on these videos and shit and one of the things that really bothers me is that they always get the benefit of fucking doubt. It doesn't matter how terrible they are. We always have to feel sorry for these white people as well. They're just doing the best they can. They're just trying to figure out. What do you do when someone's like they're figuring it out can literally kill you and some of them are not trying to figure it out back. You know they don't do it. They walk in there with the intention of I'm going to show my as I'm. GonNa make myself a vile film to prove my fucking points. I'm actually do that. Yeah, so it's just I. Don't know man. Stuff is weird I'm not like it. Let's let him give another article opposite perspective because I'm not even saying that. Corruption fucked up now. I'm just saying like. Like something has to happen. These people because it's an obviously isn't as long as it's a political fight. They're not GONNA get anyway. A WOMAN! A woman may stay couple who were picking picnicking a California dog part because they weren't wearing face masks while eating lunch. She makes them now. You can't do that. Eat Right. I don't have her back either. This is Karen off Shit I feel like it's like that video. We play whatever cares. It's like buffy rockaway. WanNa wear masks and you like you don't really give like you just want to have our moment on social media both. And my thing is if they were picnicking off by themselves them to sit there chilly and nobody was around them. That's the part of the social distancing and I'm eating. I'm eating. That's completely different than and if you were picnicking and I just decided to plot my ass beside you, you know and just disturbing. Just what you Donald W to me. They're outside. Right like. Why are you Mason anybody? Anyway? Yeah, apparently, she made oh this video of it. Okay, let me see if I could show you out a video, but yeah family. She seem as the person. mays mays this couple. See if I could make it bigger over here. Senator Tall Tales. About support all, we do any level, no, we. Begin. My boats are on ruining my state eighty. He probably wanted to add a damn gop convention. Five. Why can't we have a conversion wearing trump down? Okay I'll just want to. Understand and I'm also use man. You Ain't chicken meat with the feedback, Buganda's commercial right or black people in the commercial like he must not racist. So this okay, this is the video. Cuts. What are you doing? You cannot be serious you just. You just made. Jazzy make. You just. You just made him and. He's just. Don't worry. I'm not going to. Offer! Not Okay Lady. Bird Dog. We're both of those are dolls because she loves the dog. Dog Down. A dolls fucking in adult. Apart. What was that dog a gallon? Far, but yeah I mean we. All. This shit clearly. No I don't agree with this either no I do not I. Don't think people should be out here like this thing I think if you have a job and your job says hey, we don't want people coming here without mask. Cool I understand why you would be like hey. You can't come in here. If you just on random motherfucker out of the park, I don't know why going up to anybody to stay away from. They've made a point. Stay away from them. I really don't get this shit. At least one man was hospitalized at the twelve people in Delaware got incorrect covid nineteen results. So. They were doing that thing. CVs get tested for covid nineteen fairly at the at the lab of the tooth at Walgreens I believe the two thousand, seven, hundred ninety one samples collected, but twelve of them were. I guess done done wrong and. They gave negative results via the phone. Due to internal Era Delaware, public health era instead of. Yeah One person's house. We look at the now. He added or You know probably was like I tested negative. It must be a code is like no, it's not in the way. Some of the testing is done is very difficult. Because what I've been reading is that I get tested today I'm Nike. Today's, might you? For weeks and I've possibly could get it during that time and might not know it go I'm negative and I actually do have it, so they're trying to do test the kind of speed up the result so that you actually know an quicker period of time, yeah! Trump supporters banned by Walmart for warehousing flag masks while Shopping Walmart response. They should be banned. I mean at least they wear. Ask you know they doing their best. Everyone's doing. I sat on, but now it's is. Saying the should these are doing? Trump award nause flag mass while Shopping Walmart Minnesota I've been banned from all stores at the video hit the Internet and went viral will I went viral. Didn't we must check it out? I see this video. Let's see what they told mouth. With here. where it can only take. When this ends. An ad, okay. We just shut this down for a second. But yes, video that went viral them. I guess where need flags. Since. You're stick. You have an illness. Double Middle Fingers nause flags. Day, purposely do it. They knew they were going to get attention. They did not care. You can't be American where that mask you cannot. We've literally had him more about this. I. You know we thought about this. Do you not know your history I? Do appreciate the call that he confronted with all guy like we you laws. Did you have you? Yes have you played any video games or seen any movies in the last sixty years? Because this is not what happened, this is. Losing lagged. Oh back to commercials. What what is why is it having a commercial every like five seconds of this video rack? was that the whole video i? Don't know what happened. We about to see, that might have been ovidio. WE WE GONNA. Actually tell us, commercial. Every fixing things. You wearing the swastika. She says he's wearing this on behalf of America. You know what this is. So stupid, Saas, do I guarantee you this what it is? They think wearing a mask is fascism is the government overreach and they're saying these your the Nazis making me have to wear a mask. Because why people don't know what depression is, so they let the house like this'll be a statement. Here's a day. If they wanted to make that statement the right thing, where would have been the Jewish star? They are that they put on a uniform. They're Jewish people. During the Holocaust Rav even aren't tattoos or something like that would have made more which obviously still maybe like you probably a racist for even making this. Comparison but they fucked the comparison of like. They went on the wrong side because I just soon. You would do in a bad way as you do so I don I don't mind you David and not a trucking. This is why having a black lives matter shirt that has like a a whip on it. You know what I mean. It was light. Weight Home What are you? All have messages here. Oh! Tak Liar. Have trump shirt on. No. No the commercial I'm all for this if you have to explain. To be fired. Quick them fifteen seconds. Is, all right well. If you have to explain to everybody what jobs Google, project, is it a? You didn't do a good job. You get the F. F for you this. USED A. Science, class mass will make one of those again like things of all the different planets in the Solar System I. Forget what they call an hour, so fucked up there was. This like we'll see that. Mercury if you look at it right real small discipline, the Bronwyn I, what is that is that? Moore's. Orders it. That's basically what they had to do. This is a statement. What does it mean? That the Nazis are trying to make us wear mask so that we see if you think about it. Okay, so all right, let's start a boom boom won't live. So all right, so the nausea flag right because I just bad right, so they gotta wear. Masks mask are bad right, so it's like the Nazis are making us with a mask of the Nazis. You know what I'm saying. Like That's how bad it is. A DOJ contracted Kobe nineteen. She cloud the virus. I'm going to get corona dental going to get corona, she said. She did she told the truth? Yeah, I got called honestly I. Don't know how this happened. But I guess I order something off, oppose maze, and I don't know how I got it, but I got it. You. Didn't get it from pulse baby. She must have been in. Racial chat rooms having meet ups with the feet so I know. Dodge cockatiels by says she's feeling okay. Having a four day freak out, both earlier artists instagram live claiming she was scared of covid nineteen advisors on the the flu. I'm going to get Koran. I've. Like it ain't the flu you know. They don't do the ideas. And I don't say anything, but I'M GONNA. Bitch has the flu killed one hundred and forty thousand people. Well, that's. Such a short period. That's the thing they were doing. Until it beat the numbers for the flu. They were like what is just the flu, but that was the whole point is like well. Even if you just look at the rate of death, right is happening much faster so if the flu killed everybody that many people in like a couple of weeks. Yes, we would be like. We need to figure out everyone stay in house like. Anyway. What mom funny about this is she? She's at almost got it from post as one. That's not even really how you can get it. like you like unless you're in a place where people are basically breathing on. That's the only way people are getting it now. Even the like David, saying you can start wiping your groceries. Shake because nobody getting it that way. I'm not saying that people will start. Getting I know black. People have to go extra, but I'm just saying they've even said. Hey, that's not even a thing you need to be doing your. That's fine. It's being around. People communities. Fred in those ways going to mass murderer event parties. Things like this you know, and what I what I've been thinking lately is because we've turned. Getting Corona virus into a moral family and I'll say we've turned it into that, but what I really mean is because of the political thing is kind of like shame on you for siding with the trump people who don't take this seriously. As since it has become that sort of thing for people, I think they're lying. I think they day. Engage in risky behavior and you know they're like 'cause I get it if people like I I, want to go to the club I wanna go to a movie I. Want to do something fun and it's like Aww. Shit is how you get it correct and so people. I think people are doing those things, and then they're gonNA. Turn around Labor like I. Don't know how I got this corona. Vars, immersive almost put it on an envelope similar to me I. Don't know what. Oh. I must have just walked out. The housing just jumped on me like ads really think people are scared to to say like I wasn't doing all the things I was supposed to do. You know what I mean like because there's a shame kind of attached with getting almost like issue fault. You have people that are like literally just doing all the wrong things, and then you have people that are like doing all the right things. And somehow still getting it, that's the thing who are those people that are doing all the right things and getting it. I don't know that that's happening. I'm not saying that no one period I'm just saying these popular cases. Where literally a month ago YOU PUKE! This ain't Shit Auto. And you just happen to be one of the people that I've seen this so many times on social media now I've lost count of how many people celebrities instagram people have been like this shit. Ain't series, and then they post. They're very serious, so we need to take this serious. Act Show Joe ASS until virus. Fuck you in Nevada Oh. Yeah, fuck me! Would influx you get get get some of me in you know, but like you say you do have people that aren't out here blasts, and like they actually just trying to do the best they can. And they and some people catching say who like we have examples of the obviously, we have examples of people that said this ain't shit, and then guys is I got. It is serious. My son got it. This is happening a lot. which meet to me, implies that aren't taking the series are the ones who are most likely to get it? You know what I mean and to spread it to. People like I'm just trying to leave my best life. The fuck is this right so that's why I don't like I'm not saying that it's zero people I'm saying we don't have a lot of prominent examples of people where it's like Oh. This person said I'll take it serious from job and also. I got it almost everybody what was happening is that people are not taking a series I think. On public platforms, then they get it, and then they go. I took it very seriously. And I'm like I don't know that I believe you because you were just clowning. Everybody who was taking it serious not too long ago. This is having multiple times. We had that woman who was a instagram person she went out to the beach was drinking water from other people's bottles? Shit and there was I. You know we need to take around virus very seriously. Okay, this is not a joke, and it's this weird type of thing and what I think is happening. Is that people are? For because we're social media, because so much of our work is that way people are like? Ha, Ha look at me being contrary then when the Shit happens, Oh my God. I mean sympathy I. Did everything right. I can't believe me. I think that's happened in a lot because they're afraid of the public shaming that comes with a you didn't desires you lied you. We know that you were out here during risky behavior. You didn't give a fuck right and guess what you did not have the tell us you. You opt to be public in defiant like that. Yeah so that's what I think I'm not saying. Like maybe she really did. Catch pose as indulge Caspian House Blah. Blah I. Don't think so he. Tells on a lot of people is social media man like people post these instagram stories going out and doing shit that they literally shade they're. They're like our dangerous. And then you see them other places like here to here I. Am with no mask chilling the beach with all my best friends and your like. I hope all your best friends our own up enough social distancing in all that. We don't know the stories behind the pictures. People fail to realize like y'all acting. You may be doing the right things, but the public does not know what I'm not even judging. People like a lot of people are really judging folks. Yes, but I really don't know so. Maybe you gotTa with your family y'all have hopefully been doing everything right and you minimizing risk and all that stuff of different people have different levels of risk aversion. And one thing that keeps developing where it's like. Oh, well, you know what's Dangerous Jim? Dangerous is. Going to the Public Pool Oh you know what's dangerous going out picnic in the park and the dog park. She didn't get maced for that so. I get why people feel like okay. This is a developing situation, but that being said some. I think there's a social pressure at least in our circles to at least act like you're taking it very seriously, even William not. So so there's a social pressure because people don't want to be saying they don't WanNa. Be Yelled at. Like Cardi B. is the reason that our shit. Israel went viral. Cardi's Instagram Cardi's having parties Cardi, gave them nails hair. Did she likes that? I'm I'm not stopping anything. So if in a month from now she's got corona vars. People are gonNA. You know probably come down her. Then you know what I mean and so I wouldn't be shocked if she does want to use. What seems to be the new statement I took it seriously. I don't know how I got it. This is crazy to me, too. Because I know I've been taking taken seriously, so gave me. It ain't going to be because I didn't take it seriously right, right? I hear you I is pointing to me too, and I mean it's strange. It's strange to me, too. But, yeah, like I understand I'm not. Speaking which. Chuck woolery. Used to house. What are these the love connection? Will Watch fortune, love, connection and Lingo Okay Hose, loose shows are man love connection. That was such a weird fucking time, right? But you know I can't really judge because half the show, these mickens watching our some bastiat is version of this love reality Shit those basically. UPDATE INSTEAD OF US calling on a game show like that. We call it reality TV. It's the same concept. Yeah, now we actually follow your ass home and he's fucked up broken ass. Right messed up. We did we just watch it. Watch you about fuck almost book. Versus, if I can't remember to Bikini, what would what would three whereas you say, describe me better go, yeah! You can't even see the first. It was the first. Jazz. Catfish although you were pretty cool, though that it was pretty okay. If you went on the show because they screen the people to make sure they were convenient Reich. Not Conveniently. They were alka formerly a or something. They just made sure that like you. You were within the like, nor like they're not gonNA. They will not conventionally conventionally. Yes, you're never gonNA have fat people out here. You Never GonNa have no one's ever been disabled on the show like they. It was very much like a certain type belie. So when they say wearing a bikini blah blah. Then of course, the dude on the other end is. Sound. I would eat. The Our e- Our the whip cream I'll for you and every place. Like these shows is Kinda Nasty. What? They would like I would take. The would intrepid all over my. Just because you say Hanky Panky, instead of fucking doesn't necessarily mean that's ain't planning being different. Well Yeah love connection was one, and then was also the one. I don't think he did it with. The war brought like couples on, and they were asked questions like one person goes behind, and the like off the stage. Yes, and I I know exactly. What to show, but I know exactly what acts one person to question, and then they bring a lot in the back and. Show their cars steal. A yes, that was it? Yeah, I like that that was. A different time like I don't like yeah. The dating game is another. Can we really judge people for Watching Ninety Day fiance when we started with this bullshit, where was it going to lead anyway chuckling? He recently made public is unfortunate believes that everyone is lying about corona virus. He's now revealed. His son is tested positive for covid nineteen. Why you believe doctors, then even a real, it ain't real. Wrong Wrong. This past Sunday woolery, who's gained show house catalog clues wheel of fortune. Love Connection Lingo more expressed his support for those who continue to peddle reckless conspiracy theories about the virus specifically Lincoln that he believes all these are lives to everyone from the CDC, the Democratic leaders. The most outrageous lives are the ones about covid nineteen. He says Sunday. Per NBC News in a tweet that was later share by trump. Everyone is lying to see the the president shared history our. Sorry everyone is lying. To CDC, Media Democrats are doctors, not all, but most that we are told to trust I think about the election and keeping the economy from coming back, which is about the election I'm sick of it. One day later. woolery announced at one of his sons tested positive for Covid, nineteen and tweet he conceded Covid, nineteen Israel, and it is here. I feel for a sick like spelling I. Guess I feel for all of those suffering, especially for those who have lost loved shortly after Megan announcement. His twitter account was deactivated you. Make sense How dare you tell to you believe the doctors. Yeah. Guess what you have to tell us that your child got it Europe chocolate just had it. You could have just went through it and nobody ever known. So. Deactivated is twitter because he did not want that smoke? Know 'cause people probably was hitting him up like. Yes. That makes sense and you might have a now. Oh, yeah, for so I mean. I'm sure as soon as that. It's on twitter saw this because I'm not rosy him. where he lied and said I wouldn't say this all is is bullshit is made up I'm sure people have lost loved ones. She was like what the fuck are you doing? Chuck woolery Chuck Foolery to me is what I call them. And then when he posted like yeah D- happened like I. Can't really feel bad I know that people will feel bad our they don't they. Don't you know I know you know and I I. Do hate to see people get harassed and Shit, too. I really do, but sometimes it's like Bro. You walk into a room and you coulda kept their shit yourself. You've called every scientists a liar. You called all the fucking Democrat politicians. You got it a conspiracy and I hope you'll sung. Guess it, and now you like hey hey. I took this very seriously. Okay, I got it from post makes no man. Nobody believes you. And this is sad, but it's human nature. People don't give a fuck about some to the the indirect to direct me makes him. People don't give a fuck about breast cancer until somebody got breast cancer. You Know Pe-. People don't but. Worsen is worse than that. This isn't saying breast cancer isn't real. This is different in it, so it's not even just I didn't care about it in an impact on me. Literally being like this thing isn't a thing. You know what I mean. I know some of the ESPN on that. Master. Bay. De I guarantee it. Because like oh Joe town. Send each other direct messages tax girl get onto a get on twitter. He yes, he say Israel now that's. Out that's why he. took. Thousand replies and fuel babies. You know you got to lead the twitter account man. Nobody wants level of smoke. Man. I hope is saying better. Woman who refused to wear masks while half of one hundred thousand dollars donated to starbucks employees. So a woman walked up in starbucks and. took a video or picture, and made a facebook post of an employee at starbucks said. I won't serve you unless you wear mad right right so that's what they told her to do. So people donated one hundred thousand dollars to this employee who she tried to embarrass. Wonderful. And now she wants half of the. Fuck you you ain't in God, Damn thing. she's GonNa. She plans to sue. Her rights violated. Her First Amendment Rights and freedom of speech, and all that but discrimination in. Virginia says she posted this photo of Barista. Lennon Gutierrez after he asked her to wear a mask at starbucks. Caption reads meet Lenin from starbucks refused to serve me because I'm not wearing a mask. Next time we'll wait for cops and bring a medical exemption. That post exploded online then a gofundme for tip money for the Baristas surpassed one hundred thousand dollars Gillis says she has medical problems, but also says masks are not effective one of them I get shortness of breath dizziness, and it messes with the heartbeat. And I do have asthma as well so I do have an mashed me, so there's several things going on. You should beat A. Person Nine Ma'am I. Don't understand you should be leaving. Your House in a has Massu. The literally is trying to save your life you want. Your fucking! No, you're not getting. Ma'am I just don't understand man like why. Like what is wrong with these people and like? I don't get like. You this little. You're putting yourself at risk he's. Saying protect you. Emma Bookstore I can't believe yes, you can. You can breed with a mask on. You can actually agree. The that's a bigger reason to stay. In the point, you literally are not healthy enough to breathe in a mass. This thing kills your long than your blood cells and. It is. It's a monster. The only real thing we have is not to get it and it sucks and. Like. This is insane man, and not only that it doesn't even work. She did share two pieces of paperwork to show what she calls a medical exemption. This twenty fifteen doctors report she shared shows analysis of her uterus, end and ovarian cyst. And what does that got? Do at breathing ma'am. Let's say it does have something to do with being a preexisting condition once again. You don't want covert Cova attacks people with preexisting conditions in harsher way. Is Hand written note with the San Diego chiropractors letter chiropractor. Right Right Tara proctor NACHO regular was edition. I've been to a chiropractor, too, but the chiropractor. Normally he writes stuff saying. Hey, you know. Get something for the back because it's affecting them and stuff like that. A chiropractor is not gonNA. Write you a note for you not to wear a mask. Man Who ran if they do, says reason. People aren't going to honor it because the fucking car brag do. What are you gonNA get your mechanic right makes like. Sorry chiropractors. I'm not hating y'all know y'all. Know Him right right. I didn't like it did. Hit Riem sit for certain periods of time. 'cause yes, I'm back posture issues. They're working now at Chiropractic for, but that's the area. Hey? This is anything outside of that. You know you study chiropractor. You didn't study the other thing. that. She asked us not to show says she hasn't quote underlying health conditions that prevent her from wearing a mask while she auto show Hulu chiropractors. Oh then. People don't garment debris harassed. Chiropractic don't know that somebody stone fucking. Ma'am I wrote. This for you know for something completely different. Man, you can't just take out of my office. She says her post about the experience is the First Amendment right is discrimination and everybody's okay with it in New Orleans. and. She says she wants a half of the more than one hundred. Sorry, go ahead! This shows you. She doesn't know what discrimination is for the fact that you put this person's picture here. You thought won't be harassed. That was the whole purpose of you doing this. In the first place, the employees I amendment right employees did not ask for you to. It wasn't like he was eight. Let me take a pitch. Pitch or you in private doing his job, you took a picture. Think fucking going to harass this person and what happened, it flipped go. No, no, we're not going to harass him. We're going to turn around and give him money. Because the whole Harper's with the fucking embarrassed him. If he got embarrassed, you said a mother fucking thing, and it would've justified you being an as so no, you get nothing ma'am. And she would arrest. She wanted them to be herash. She s essentially dachshund him. Here has hey. Everyone here is where he works. He said I have to wear a mask y'all. Do you think you know what I'm saying? If somebody would have came up there and physically Asada him a dozen shit like that. You would ever stepped zero accountability. No, you'll get nothing. starbucks fires him. You're not gonNA, pay half. His salary. Like. That people are talking about thousand dollars donated, which was given to the Barista in cash last week I don't care if he gave it to Lennon. He's I'm going to sue him for half of it. She says the lawyer. She's spoken to about taking her case or expensive in. She can't afford one yet, so she started her own fund me to raise money for herself when dated leading to shout out to the shade of this article. I want to ask. We, not even gonNA show you all. That crazy shit asked if she has any apology or message to the public. No absolutely not I feel like I need the apology. I've been discriminated against I'm one who said Lee upsetting ABC. I'm was one who's sick but ma'am. You put hint pitcher out. He didn't put your pitcher out. Listen I. Don't apologize I'm associated pan so I don't know why that Shit of course not and the thing is. You threaten. Think something going happen. Are. You probably not going to money to sue him. If you do is not going to be worth. Yes Oh my God. All right. Let's move on. Yeah Jacobs the hundred. Terrible. I think it was another white employees I don't care you. Still get one hundred fucking people. I think he was like Asian didn't. Think. He was like letting of some. Like I. Know was like Berlin Brown. Yeah, he was Brown all right. Let's see what else happening. Omega stallion I think. Maybe we oops, I did not mean. Do they? Give me my second. Power Corden. Hit the wrong button. Yes, Omega! And out remember we cover on the show of it happened after we are already taking a break, but she got shot in the foot. People are so in that. It was Tori lanes. We didn't really have the details at the time so I was just like. Let's just wait and see because. You never know what Internet multi I think it's like a race to be the first one to break down what happened and is not always a several as seems. I don't know if there were dating was a what happened, but Supposedly like I said there's all kinds of. Speculation that in Megan doesn't seem to be talking about it. Social Media's is stuff. Pretty much at all. She put out a statement I. Think we may or read that on the show has been. Yeah but she didn't. She didn't say Tori Lanes, did it? She does stuff we know. He was arrested and yeah good a like a gun possession thing, but even original postals of misinformation pros because they didn't took a picture of Megan, which he was arrested in two thousand fifteen. It was like it was arrested together. You know so, who knows what the information is now? That won't stop people from speculating and apparently on the podcast Glock topics Dreyer Dreyer's Michelle. Know. Reality, Star instagram. I model former girlfriend of Orlando scandic. She gave her opinion about it. I think nope already talking about. Protecting I predict. I predict that they had some sort of. Lobbying. Whitney love that drove them down this snapped S. Type of road. I'm here for it I. Like that I want to like me so much. You shoot me and a two, but as what wall? Now was interesting. Is it seemed like in this kind of conversation? You would expect the man the man Blah Blah Blah to be the ones like. They do above light. What what are you talking to and I man? We're in twenty twenty. No, no, no. No, we will not agree to that. We are not trying to get canceled. No, we might say problematic because everybody does, but we're not going down that road I don't even know these news I mean the shows topics that could be about anything, but just the fact that they both immediately was like a that is not the right thing to say. That is very very light her name. What do you want what I want you to like me so much that if I'm trying to get out the car, and you're like no Sicher fucking. And I'm like no Nigga I'm fucking in the car. No, you're not. You're. Not Going. Are you going a just went viral? is like she don't care. Okay? Okay. And theme as Weird about that is apparently her spent time together and all this shit. So I. Guess they supposed to be I? Don't know maybe they're not I. Don't know, but. Those things we're not funny, some people call that love. Me On the outside looking in and I'm like that's that's relationship should not functioning like that he you shouldn't shoot be. You know because I'm trying to leave this. Let me leave. It is not that important, and and in my opinion, that's not a way to show me love. Yeah, and so Megan stallion responded back on twitter without without tag, it or just said. DUMB BITCH! That's it ain't fucking funny. Jokes about getting shot by bigger. And then of course Jerry, Michelle responded back. Don't glorify domestic violence I was trying to say just love me deeply, but while trying to be funny, offended many including meg and I'm sorry. And Megan was finding fuck auto ask. Nick is making jokes about it, too. I'll talk about shit when I get ready. So I don't know. What was happening in the details, situation or share more stuff will be revealed whenever he's comfortable. It feels like it but man. It'd be on people. That's crazy. And I think also know that's one of the things we realized over the years during the show like you get carried away. It's like forget. People are people. I think it's even weirder when you've met. The person hung out with them to didn't do that. GIPP. It's already weird. Yeah, but but when you've had actually personal interaction with them prior to all the coronavirus I like Nagai sat down. I sat down and broke bread. Which you, my Nigga? We know each other's houses. That's on the different yet. Honestly. Some people just think trauma is love. They think trump. Is Love they think violence equals love they you know those people that think a happy relationship is boring and shit like that was just like. Like some of that shit is unhealthy to attach yourself to a real man would hit me a break something, because I we have in a fight. You know stuff like that. And that's the part of I WANNA talk about them regular. Days and be the best part of the deal, but that's the shit. Nobody won't talk like. Don't want your drama. She just be a born plain Jane Dean 'cause. That's too much for me. You don't if you don't love them on, Tuesdays. It's coming out on our own REGGAE I. Get up go to work. Come home. Look at you. Nigga we watch Netflix leap days. You know you don't need me. I'm GonNa get days either. Yeah just. Shoot in the foot. You'RE GONNA. Be waiting forever. I! Don't know he just won't be together. Kind of. If I get to the point lab like Nick I'll shoot you. Oh, it's time to go, but yeah I guess. She thought she was funny. Where everyone! That's the other, maybe she. She was going to impress them dues. Because you know that is the kind of. Man A lot of times. We'll be like yeah, girl you. She wanted she is. Talking about she, you know as as a feminist column. Pick me, but you know Black Man Colin Queens but The point of Eli. Oh you're impressing me because your own you so firmly the side of the men regardless of right or wrong. There is that type of atmosphere a lot of times when people shows environments. Maybe she thought that's what they want it, but it clearly didn't seem to want that, and and like you say I've never seen this show, but it might be one of things, but they're like. Hey, we don't do this like literally like I don't know what you thought this was. This is not the shit we do, yeah. Anyway. They did get to go viral off of it. Yeah. They knew it like Oh so you? Guess you mean it is what it is now? Nick Cannon's plan daytime talk show is pushed back anti-semitism. Controversy. I forgot about. His brand AMY ALMOST BE DIV initially apologize and he. Think? He's doing the mask singer yes, so he did officially apologize. I heard an entire community and they pay me to my core. I thought it couldn't get any worse then I watch my own community tired on me. Communist sell out for apologize and good night. Enjoy Earth. Yok and had this planet I'm out, so of course. Maybe we'll feel like. IS HE BEING SUICIDAL? It was like these two and two thirty in the morning. now the thing I will say. People were like you mean wash your own community tunnel you. What you have to remember? There were a lot of people that supported his anti-semitism. Who are that consider that to be a good black position and Look Louis Farrakhan like there are black people who think anti-semitism. is equal rights to and add to your pro black perspective, so there were people who were defending him all week long when he said that Shit and there were a lot of people to go. This shit is problematic, right? It just depends on what circles you correct ice cube in Spanish here for twenty thirty years now like it really just depends on what circles you're and of blackness on WHO's GonNa allow this and who's going to be turned off by? And so when he was saying Shit there was a contingent of black people defending them, and when he apologized to them, he sold out he right. He made them look bad. You know right that they have been defended him right so they. Started, tweeting this shit and I think the core, a person like nick cannon. Don't know from Adam but just the way he comes off on social on twitter twitter own TV to me. He seemed like a do want to be light. And a lot of times, these fugger's take these statuses, and they can't really deal with the fallout of people like they flirt with idea. You Ain't got me, but then when it happens. Kevin like this to when people really do say well, fuck you then I. Don't like you. They changes some. Changes, so. Yeah so! that. Know I believe he's still okay now. Whatever healthy? He's getting some type of mental Hell Hell. Because obviously you don't. It's just a moment. You know what I mean. Like he may have to live with some people never fucking him again, but. You can kinda high behind the inherent anti blackness and lower expectations that we have of black dudes, right and black people in general a lot of people, Jewish people to will still fuck with him after this no. That's is the truth of it like and his mostly because people go Nigga. Thinking about. Knicks don't know anything, so you know. It's like we get to be homophobe. We get to be transphobic with all this shit, and and it doesn't you know it's like they pay can make transphobia his fucking lynch pin up comedy for the last three or four years. And he's GonNa. Steal be every place that they allow people of his of his caliber to be it. The won't get quote. Unquote canceled partially because he is a black. Do a straight black do. As some as if he was a white man comedian, saying that same shit like I'm dying on Transphobia Hill, they will be like. Andrew dice clay this mega. That's enough. Like there's a weird like spectrum of. Light Black. There's like a level of disrespect for black intelligence that allows us to be socially behind and added into part of our blackness. You know what I'm saying, so. White people can't see me screen. I'll ask the. You just told me refresh. Okay, all right. Yeah so. Let's see what else a court has allowed mornings. Discrimination Lawsuit Against Netflix move forward. Yeah She's the Colin Kaepernick of. Gin Black. People pay that Netflix because at. She said dishes like Netflix. And they paid every black person. Like. Everyone can have. yu-gi-oh familiar. We've paying everybody yes, like you know. The thing where like you said like a lot of sucks to be the first. But after you'd have first when everybody reports the benefit of being the first right so. I was just thinking about that. The other day I was like she kinda Colin Kaepernick everybody else D- paid. Like Everson's lawsuit they're. Paying people. All right. Let's go to the second section. All right. Meal Oh eight nine. That's more white. People knew shit. Believe that Every magazine owners have been forced into bankruptcy. Yeah I. Guess asked Ebony does a lot more people than just the black people that wrote for. On Friday a creditor based in Houston announced it had found and vow involuntary bankruptcy petition against Ebony Media Holdings the company behind one of the longest running black populations in America. Yeah, it's so weird because. It seems that they're not able to make a model of this. That is profitable. and. It was hard for them to adjust to changing times. Yeah Yeah. I'm like I what I wonder and this is a conspiratorial okay. I'm speculating I don't know this is just things I'm putting together. So, recently there was an article about how a social media companies were losing advertisers and. So `as certain. What you call them. Publications were losing advertising dollars. Because the more they talked about stuff like George Floyd. Advertising companies would be like coca-cola doesn't want to be involved with. Yet size. Name so take our ad out added this and so essentially. What you're saying is as you write about things based around race and racism. You have less support from the advertisement companies, and let's be fair to advertising company to the companies who won't add. Maybe there's less support for those ads when you see them attached these things so less. Maybe there are people who get turned off by. Hey, don't advertise Pepsi at the same time, travel trayvon Martin Headline. So I don't know that this is completely baseless without any marriage. Reasoning rive in right I know when I read about Brianna Taylor I. Never Think Oh Popeye's. You know so they. If you think about that, and then you think about what Evans writes Abou- avenues experience. The is of them getting the same ad revenue as vice media as whatever might be lower I'm not saying that's I this is like I. said speculation on my part. I wonder if that's what it is is that they said Hey We literally can't make money this way. We can't pay everybody. We can't have a big ASS office staff, and all the shit that you know because kind of like universal fan con. When you look at white people in the way they run share and you go. This is the way to run things, and you take your thing and try to run it the same way. A Lotta Times black. She is not going to pop off the same way because. Much like podcast, and all these other things movies. What you're hoping for is a buying from the same level of audience participation that these other things right and unfortunately when you talk about race. Look at our podcast. Thousands of episode. What like Audis listeners but we don't crack these list. Normally we don't crack the top tier of wheelock cracking the I two charts were not like there's a reason we talk about Black Shit. You know very rarely. Does someone go I? WanNa help you take this very black conversation meant for black people and. Invest in it with ads and stuff that happens, but it's very rare. You. Know so I wonder if at the end of the day. This was always going to happen because it seems like Ebony and. Some of these black publications have been struggling for years now right right as one of these things where they go. Yoshida's Black Black Yoshi. It ain't black. She catered to white people holding their feelings firs being understanding. It's planning. You know this is I experience the end and why people don't respond we'll. Keep Him on New York Times. They read three articles. Give us some money right, Washington. Post give you can read three articles. Give us the money the Atlantic. Do we need to pay our. We have to make a way for you to pay us to pay. Our employees correct and that model can't be that. Pablo is not like people reading long form written content shit I feel like that's happening so much less now. And so mean in with the inundation of news much of it being bad and by bad I, don't mean the tenor of the town. I mean the quality of the writing of the editorial process. was so much news being bad, but they're being so much of it and so much news now being derivative, so i Washington Post. Rising article is behind a paywall. Walking can just wait an hour for whoever works at. The places that don't have all the shit blocked off to read article and regurgitate the important part of me. This is what happens. Meanwhile journalism of a certain quality costs money, so they're not gonNA get the Washington a football team expose about the sexual harassment without paying some people come out like so so anyway I just wonder if Ebony and jet and essence are already behind the eight ball you know. I saw there was controversy where essence a couple weeks back I don't know if it's been resolved or not, but not the main light head of the whatever he resigned over it. And in the black women that work there in the second positions, accused of being basically like bad their jobs and Shit A, if not borderline abusive quote unquote, so you're talking about another. ICON of black journalism as might be right behind this shit. We might be back in a week or two being like an essence can figure out to make money and shit like like it just might not be a profitable thing, so we'll see and. The sad part because their voices are valuable the action to be out there but I. You say in Asia to inundate his very hard to get the advertising dollars. Yeah, so. But. Yeah so. It was three occupation of more than one point three million. It was considered one of the premier influence voices in black media. the Johnson. Publishing Company launched a magazine Nineteen forty-five embarking on publishing empire that will make the Johnson family one of the most severe black businesses in history along the way to publications chronicle, some of the most memorable moments in civil rights movement, the yeah, so Yeah. So this. Kind of sad man fluoride, because when these things start coming out because the thing is, there's going to be events that happened that you know publication. GonNa Cover in La Times such a funding. You going to have wipe people covering it or you're going to have black people covenant for White Publications Somebody. They put out there. You know a lot of rare why editors stabby level? That's not important. It s not important you but I will are people that actually is like you have to have somebody very understanding insensitive to how black people will interpreted, and how is going to be present it matters. Talk. Thing with. Blacks we're just. A fucking black people. That's why I always trying to play the game. We all hate. The play is fucking black people. The game goes all around. The Globe makes us feel fuck with Oregon. I would point scores Zero two hundred twenty five days. Everybody all right. With us. While Martin's Black Friday tradition by closing stores on Thanksgiving good. Good you. Know. This is not what we ask for. Okay, not okay good. We did not ask for this. I'm sick. y'All doing shit. We didn't even ask for. I take I take it out and taxes. The realtors say they're not going to call it the masturbate room anymore. Like what the Holiday Inn Bedroom. That's ghettos hail. No, you can keep some of this shit. Take it from ticketmaster. Ticket lives matter to me like. Some of this shit is okay black. Friday was one of those things that was okay. You call an African American Friday now. You don't WanNa be fine with that Negro chocolate Friday. You don't want to leave a Friday. Yeah, you don't want to be offensive. Put everybody back to work for free, so we can get. ATV's being over the head, and that's what we won't. You tell can't stand home. Care never goes out on black Friday. Don't listen to high. Wasn't giving out no money anyway. He was willing I guess I'm Indian right people. That was willing to kill somebody for curic. For only three inch dot in stock. What are you going to go now now? How family right and that's the fucking problem we gonNa be trapped at Thanksgiving would dis maters. No thank you. This will give out of crazy people in our family. A place to be there wasn't with US I love. This is, I. Oh, you better get to Walmart and now maternity cowboys game on. What are you doing? Playing on this dance, people go now. Just be sitting around I e e either game this. I'm one hundred percent fuck with one thousand foot with your car's cars comed- zero. All right cares as zero. Let's see a man hurls the inward, always say hurls. Is there another way to deliver it anywhere? You're throwing it. Tells us the word. Go direct some man, politely underhand tosses the inward to several blacks. Like. They always herald into and where. Do take anywhere right down and coming up and just softball. Throw it I. Don't understand a man Hail Marys the inward to several. Ed Verizon. Caused a Ruckus TMZ was there with the. Most. Teams. He was there with the footage. Okay, we here for everything. Some races happening. We are on time. Yet so they have locked the door. It appears a managers must be on A. Phone with the police, he spit on the these spit on the glass door. Varazdin, what could be so important ever-rising? Also you don't WanNa wear your mask or some ships. Oh. Okay, okay, so I understand all right. This is what I think is happening. Okay, I'm guessing no some of this. He probably wants to come in and. Doesn't have an appointment and right because a lot of places like we only do appointments, because we don't want everybody fucking story kitchen to of virus. You'll have appointments, so no, Sir, you're not getting in here. I don't see a mask His phone is not working. And, so he's probably like foot protocol fixed phone right now, and they say sorry can't come without appointment or mask or something like that and he says. Fuck you you calling the cops on me because Yo- fall works well. My doesn't work, you nigger. That's the appropriate response. I mean he had me until nigger. I'M NOT GONNA. Representative of I'll tell you what man throwing the phone at the door. Is probably not the best solution if your phone is broken and they're safe, they're like they're. You're not going to harm them sir. Hulk Hogan. Ashley. That broken his phone. Nice slamming his phone up against a recording this because if they taught him simply. He claimed he didn't he dan recorded. He declined to never did this. Be This behavior? Why would I do this? Who to talk to? You have to call who? Who sitting around waiting to hear from this guy. Yeah, and I don't blame like the stores like inside alive. Rosberg, now we do, only she. Had you better pay online Why would I let you in my store now? You fucking beaten no beaten the glass with your phone, right? You're GONNA break your rhinestone case. To? Going down the block now, probably the black duty called a nigger that is enough to make you wanna go see this man in a lot of cases I understand that, but not don't go out dead and something happened the second. y'All have any formal education. You're going to be wrong, actually leaving the property because once you've. got. After property, you absolutely not wrong I. Just know that that's the power that racism has a black people man. You can be completely reasonable working at fucking garage and just do. NIGGA LIKE Maybe I should go outside and and give him what he won't. Company on the phone. He already covered. He owned companies time. Is that his company TRA. And I think that's what he called. He called the police he cut then they got the company from as well. Get ready to call the company and be like a your employees up here. fucking acting a fool on your on your time. I WANNA get a fucking on his lunch. Break still a company vehicle. He wrote up also. He's representing the company. Tried to. Something fire protection is where he worked for. Used to work for probably unless he I don't i. Let's see owning. Economy back. To the door. The door. American flag on the baggage. We already Louise. gave us the first thing. Companies I don't blame him. He is the beginning. Try to truck now. and. I, guess he. He told the my. Eleven DNA, Acacia need it okay God. Here we got some fingerprint samples from when he slapped the door. The phone cases on the ground to. I had a video. That's the most evidence shot need. To got an active food untold his shit up and might try to tack Y'All. Use Arrested Robert Colona. he looks very upset and his mugshot. Apparently they took him downtown. The police station is in this city. The staffer who posted the video explain it this way. He assaulted me before entering the store throwing phones inside the store, then picking them up leaving the store climbing something else force. mmediately locked the door behind him got downright so misdemeanor gun Sir Yeah So. He, was actually into stolen, showed his ass the night when he left, they locked the door cared. Zero to one hundred Oh fucking. Oh! Yeah that's a hundred. Man What. He was actually into store. Assaulted to do. left and then thought he. Thought. He was GONNA come back into store actor. He said he has something for him. 'cause your phone didn't work. I don't know if you're GONNA come with a gun. I don't know if you I wanNA take the chance either my worst wrong when she mentally. Get a job like how are you able to act? Okay enough during an interview that you ended up with a job. Like I'll be wondering that kind of see for real might if I can handle that phone vibrates. What are you like at work when things don't go, right? Are you just immediately jumped to nigger light? Hey Man, the copy copy machines out of ink got damn nigger. Calling Bob Down you own that.

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