18 Burst results for "Johnson Library"

Robert Caro on How He Does It

The Book Review

09:47 min | 9 months ago

Robert Caro on How He Does It

"Robert Carroll joins us now he is the Pulitzer Prize. Winning author of many books. New Book is called working researching interviewing and writing. He's also the author of the years of Lyndon Johnson four volumes of them thus far and the powerbroker Robert Moses and the fall of New York Bob. Thanks so much for being here. Pleasure to be here all right so everyone has been greatly anticipating a volume five of the years of Johnson. But instead you have written this other book working researching interviewing writing. Why did you decide to do this? Ever since the powerbroker I kept myself out of the book. I don't think the word I appears in there many times. If soon as the book came out people started asking me. What was it like ten of you Robert Moses and I realized that I should have put in something to tell people what that was like so for like forty five years. I've been hearing that question and people ask me what it's like to work in presidential libraries were. Can you find out from interviews? This isn't the adviced anybody but it's sort of. I said we'll I WANNA give people some glimpses into how I work so. I took time out to do this book now. I'm back doing the volume. I mean it's an interesting question about interviewing Robert Moses because you had read five sessions which women seven sessions with him. Which was very different from the Johnson. Biography where he was dead already for several years. Before you could get started and I'm curious you write about it a bit in working what the difference was like for you. Writing the book writing a biography of a person who was still alive versus writing a biography of someone who was already gone in one sense. It's great to write about someone who's still alive because you get to meet Moses. Didn't talk to me for the first couple of years of the book. Then we had seven interviews. Soon as I started asking questions. Pamela the interviews were over but they will long sessions and I really got to look at him with Johnson. You felt okay. I came along just too late. He had died just three years before was great about him was that he died so young he would have been only sixty seven when I started. He darted sixty four that everyone was still alive. He had I think twelve people in Johnson City High School. When he was there they were all there to be viewed. But you can't make up for not meeting and talking to the person writing about you just can't do feel that absence and working on the Johnson. Yes you do everything you can to overcome that you know you interview the people closest to him over and over and over again constantly asking them what was he like. If I was standing next to you what would I see him doing? So you try to get a feeling of him now. We have these telephone transcripts where you hear him talking hundreds and hundreds of hours you can listen to him talking and see how he deals with people and how he gets what he wants from people. That's always amazing to me. Has that changed the way that you've been doing your research having access to those types a change the writing of history in general like on the Gulf of Tonkin incident which has been sort of mystery. What really happened there. How many attacks were there? On our destroyers. You know that led Johnson to launch these launch bombing attacks on North Vietnam. Now you actually hear the communications between Robert McNamara. The Secretary of Defense Cincpac the admiral at Honolulu and the commander of the fleet. That's an in Viet Nam. You hear this and what was really going on in real time the other aspect of your interviewing that. I thought was so interesting that you write about in this new book working is the delicacy of interviews and especially when you get to touchy subjects. And they'll you didn't interview Johnson for the book did Interview Lady Bird and tell the story about how you and when you approached the subject of Johnson's longtime affair with Alice Marsh. Well when Johnson is in the Pacific during World War. Two year allowed easing Australia. You're allowed one telephone. Call the senator from Texas. Just Johnson has to decide whether to run again for the House of Representatives or to run for senator. I'm going through all the correspondents and suddenly in the middle of it. There is a telegram from someone sewing. Alice I've never heard of Alice. She appears in no book and it says Lyndon everyone else that happened to me in the White House. Everyone else thinks you should run for the Senate. I think you should run for the house. Please try to cool love Alice. I said WHO is Alice. Who was the person that he makes the only one telephone call? And who's giving political advice which he follows shortly after that? So that's you know. An example of going through the papers by luck her sister and best friend show up at the Johnson Library and ask to see me and I go down to see them and they say you know we wanna tell you about a woman named Alice Marsh. We don't want to portray to some Bimbo. She was really very important in Johnson's life. And they told me the whole story of this Lauren and significant relationship and his life. So how do you then? Ask Lady Bird. You know panel. That's the only interview I ever had in my life where I couldn't bring myself to look at the person I was interviewing. Alice was a small town girl. She turned herself into the brilliant Washington. Hostess Brilliant Brilliant Salons and she came from a little town called Morlin. Now no one would go to the mall. And unless they were looking for inflammation analysis a little town in the middle of nowhere and I never know I went up there and we learned about her. And how remarkable she was but all of a sudden we have a mutual friend. Who lived in Morlin? Who calls me in a panic and says the bird in Texas? Everybody Calls Lady Bird Bird. Bird and always. You've been in Marlin. So she knows you know about Al. Assad said well that had to be if it doesn't concern me but her secretary then shows up at my desk in the reading room says Mrs Johnson would like to see you out at the ranch this weekend. We had been meeting in her office so we sit down at the dining table. She's at the head of the table. I might her right. Hand my stenographer's notebook like like the one you use is is down on my right hand taking notes and without preamble. She starts to talk about Alice Quiz. How elegance she was how sophisticated she was how she taught. Linden things and everything that she taught him. He followed the rest of his life. You don't hear these lawn when she met him. He was this new congressman very awkward with Lorne Gang Leo Arms. She said turn them into an asset. Always wear shirts with French. Cuffs and very nice cufflinks. So when people's attention is cool to them it's called in in a in a good way. She told him. We're kind of Necktie to favor. Countess Myers Tie. But most of all at crucial elements in life. It was her advice that he followed an in a number of cases one in particular. It's not exaggerating. Very much to say she saved. His career is takes a moment to tell. But it's it's interesting his early careers financed by a very fierce huge Texas contractor. Herman Brown Brown and Root and Herman was prepared to keep financing his Roy and in return Johnson was getting huge contracts for Brown and root when all of a sudden they had a falling out Lyndon Johnson was getting them authorization to build a dam which they wanted but Linden wandered low. Rent Housing Project built in Boston in what was a very poor Mexican American neighborhood. The houses in that neighborhood were owned by Herman Brown. The tenants were paying rent to him. They were very profitable and he was enraged at Linden wanted to condemn them for his housing project and his chief lobbyist and his chief lawyer talked. Instead you know Herman was about to turn on Linden and when Herman turned on you he never turned back when Alice here is about this and invites them both down to Greatest Stadium Virginia. She sits down at her table. And says why don't you just compromise give Herman the damaging winds and the land and all of a sudden everything was okay. So Lady Bird starts talking not only about her elegance. She says the quotes are in the book. She was so sophisticated so beautiful. I remember her neck succession of wonderful beautiful dresses and me in well not so wonderful. And and then she said you know Lyndon Basically Linden always followed Alice's vice during that whole interview I have to say my head. Just stay down and I took notes. I couldn't look at her so that was done. The next week we went back to ordinary interview she just launched into it without you. Even though I you know I sometimes think I know something about politics. I'm really glad I don't have to write about. Women never understood why she did

Lyndon Johnson Alice Marsh Lady Bird Robert Moses Texas Johnson City High School Herman Brown Brown Johnson Library Pulitzer Prize Robert Carroll Robert Mcnamara Secretary Brilliant Brilliant Salons Gulf Of Tonkin Australia Linden New York Viet Nam
"johnson library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"johnson library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"About the possibility of winning a war for which at that moment he was sending these idealistic young kids are many of them to die now he retired from the presidency didn't choose to run for reelection the time I was younger and he seem old to me but right was today's. he was for sixty years old when he when he retired in nineteen sixty eight he was actually fifty nine fifty nine and he died at the age of sixty four right so but he died of a heart attack where today with a stand he probably would have been able to stay alive right you're going to kill me for mentioning the spot I actually learned not from David's new book which is coming out next month called the American story Robert Caro told not to show me ask you you've told a story before I think people might be interested hearing hearing it then the Johnson was worried that the people were not coming to his presidential library so he wanted increase attendance what was the clever way that he came up with to do that stronger I got from his great friend Terry Middleton director of the library died not long ago Johnson anyone been to the Johnson library you you can clap played like world. you may have noticed that across the street from that library is a fairly large football stadium. that's a maybe a hundred thousand people so Johnson was worried about getting people to attend his library which in the spring of nineteen seventy and seventy one around that time he was very unpopular and so he curls over to the stadium and says to the guy that makes announcements at halftime.

David Robert Caro Johnson director Johnson library Terry Middleton football sixty years
"johnson library" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

16:41 min | 1 year ago

"johnson library" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"To get on this laws passed it won't matter. If you're an average person or four coming through Hong Kong, there will be a real possibility you'll be taken and sent off to the mainland back in the United States and major ruling for women's reproductive rights. The supreme court of Kansas ruled Friday that women have a right to safe and legal abortion under the state constitution in a six to one decision. The court ruled Kansas constitution affords protection, the right of personal autonomy. Which includes the ability to control one's own body to assert bodily integrity and to exercise self determination, unquote. The ruling overturns a two thousand fifteen Kansas law banning the most. Common abortion procedure after about fifteen weeks of pregnancy. This comes abortion rights are under threat across the United States with twenty eight states currently considering legislation to ban or restrict abortion in various ways. Three prominent women's rights. Activists are launching a new political action group today called super majority aimed at training new generation of women activists to take on grassroots campaign and electoral politics, at least you Garza co founder of black lives matter. Former Planned Parenthood precedent, Cecile Richards agent. Pu executive director of the national domestic workers alliance say they'll focus on mobilizing voters for the twenty twenty primary and general elections speaking to the website refinery twenty nine Cecile Richards said quote, women are the majority of voters in the majority of activists, and yet they continue to be treated as a side issue in special interest group. It's time that women get the credit and the encouragement and we begin to amplify. The extrordinary work that women are doing Richard set top Pentagon officials or backing department of homeland security requests to allow members of the US military to come in contact with migrants along the US Mexico border. If approved the plan would provide waivers for about three hundred troops to work as cooks and drivers for immigration agencies. The plan would also bring in military lawyers to work on immigration cases in civilian courts in Massachusetts. Federal prosecutors have charged a state judge a former court officer with obstruction of Justice for legendary helping an undocumented immigrant evade ice agents said a district courthouse in the city of Newton. Judge Shelley Richmond. Joseph and officer Wesley McGregor helped undocumented manned sneak out of the courthouse through the basement back door knowing ice agents were looking for him in the front lobby. Both Joseph and McGregor pleaded not guilty. A lawyer from Gregor, quote, the charges factually wrong and legally. Questionable and quote, federal immigration enforcement, Runamuck, unquote, and Los Angeles health officials have ordered a crime teen for over one thousand students and staff at two colleges emits the largest measles. Outbreak to hit the United States in decades. The order came after a student UCLA and another at Cal State, Los Angeles came down with measles, potentially exposing hundreds of others on each campus. This is LA county public health director, Barbara Ferrer. The department of public health has asked people who've been issued a quarantine order to adhere to the following to remain at home or an investigative setting and not to attend school or work outside of that designated setting if they have medical appointments, or some other urgent matter that needs that requires that, they leave the home they need to notify the public. Health department before they do that. And they have a number to call. So that they can get assistance in making sure as they travel. They don't inadvertently of risk exposing others to me cels. They're not allowed to use public or commercial transportation that includes buses subways trains. Taxis are airplanes. Measles is highly contagious infection. That kills one hundred thousand people worldwide each year, most of them children public health officials say the disease is resurgent in the United States due to declining vaccination rates spun by discredited theory that the MR vaccine causes autism, and those are some of the headlines, this is democracy. Now democracy now dot or the warrant piece report, I'm good, man. We turn now to one of the nation's most celebrated writers the two time Pulitzer prize winner, Robert Carro, he's out with a new book, titled working that gives an inside look at his remarkable research and writing process, and it does appear that Robert Caro is always working forty five years ago. He published his first book the power broker, Robert Moses and the fall of New York over a seven-year period, he conducted over five hundred interviews for what turned out to be a twelve hundred page book looking at how Robert Moses re. Shape, the nation's largest City New York, the modern library would later name. The power brokers one of the top one hundred non fiction books of the twentieth century along with such works as Rachel Carson's silent spring, and w e do boys is the souls of black folk and Carol hasn't stopped working since for the past forty five years Robert Carro with much help from his wife. I now has been researching the life and times of president Lyndon Baines Johnson from his childhood and hill country, Texas to his time in the White House for volumes have been published so far the path to power means of a cent master of the Senate and the passage of power, they total more than three thousand pages rubber Carro is now writing the fifth volume looking at Vietnam, the great society and president Johnson's decision not to seek reelection in nineteen sixty eight Robert Carro has been described as the greatest political biographer of our. Times and America's biographer in chief, but to reduce Caros work as simply biographies of great men misses the point Carro uses both Moses and Johnson to show how political power works karaoke writes that by focusing on Robert Moses he was able to explore quote realities of urban political power power in cities, not just in New York. But in all the cities of America in the middle of the twentieth century with LBJ Carro helped expose how national power works in the Senate and the presidency. Robert Carro once told Kurt Vonnegut, quote, what I'm trying to do is to show not only how power works, but the effect of power on those without power, how political power effects all our lives every single day in ways, we never think about he says well with democracy now co host one Gonzales today is joining us from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. We're spending the hour with Robert Carro, welcome to democracy. Now. It's great to have you with us. I wanna go back to fifty five years ago. In fact, it would be fifty five years ago in July that president Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four and go back a few months before that when Lyndon Baines Johnson standing next to a blood spattered. Jackie Kennedy would be sworn in as president. He could've taken on any issue at that point becoming president Warren by many in his inner circle don't do the Civil Rights Act. Don't lose the south. He moved forward. Describe for us set the stage in the place talk about LBJ's decision to go this route four weeks for four days after the assassination to give dress to the joint session of congress. He's not even in the Oval Office yesterday, still working. Out of his private home in Washington three or four of his speechwriters sitting around the kitchen table, trying to drift the speech and at some point Johnson comes down wearing a bathrobe and some how they're doing this with the only thing we're all sure of this don't make civil rights priority. If you anger the southerners who control congress, they're going to stop your whole legislative programme like they did Kennedy. It's a noble cause. But it's a Louis course, don't fight for it and Lyndon Johnson says to them or what the hell's the presidency four then. And of course, in his speech. He says we'll the southern senators sitting in a row in front of him. Our first priority has to be the passage of the civil rights Bill. And talk about battle that ensued. You particularly focus on Richard Russell. And you pit these two. Well, they pitted themselves against each other. Russell Johnson convinced the sub senators for twenty years before nineteen sixty four every vote that he made was on this. I've sort of the south you he not only supported every southern Bill and opposed every civil rights Bill, but he was a southern strategist. And Russell took him under his wing, Richard. Russell was the most powerful figure in the Senate. He was the head of the mighty southern caucus. You have to stay in that year. I forget the may have the numbers rule here. But proximity right of the sixteen great standing committees in the Senate eleven which aired by southerners Rattlers. They had all the power in the Senate and Russell raised Ludin Johnson up to the position of majority leader. It was him who really put Johnson. So I would speak to some of the southern senators. And I asked one of them. I remember Herman Talmadge who's actually doing when I got to talk. He was a Senator from Georgia for only talk to me. And I'm asking him about this. And I said, well, what how what Lyndon Johnson convince you should be the relationship between white men and black men. What did he believe how master and servant? I said, so how did he make you believe that tell who is short man and proud of his shortness said he talked to me all the time. I thought we were friends. I thought I knew what he really believes. So I said, well, how did you feel when Johnson gave the speech saying first priority must be the civil rights Bill? How did you feel sitting there as he stands same? As Talmadge said was this long pause for Lisa's to me sick? Felt sick. Robert, Carol what then. Changed Johnson and made him such a proponent of the civil rights movement. Well, I'm not sure that anything changed Johnson. To see it may be that. He believed the same thing all along. But he concealed it for twenty years. You know, why do I think Lyndon Johnson truly believed in civil rights that it wasn't a political thing? Because when he was twenty and twenty one years old he went to college college he called the poor school. He didn't have enough money to continue to drop out between his sophomore junior year and teach school and he taught in a school in little town down near the Mexican border in Texas. In what they called the Mexican school. I wrote about that not too had ever cared. If these kids learned or not this teacher cared. He was so insistent that they they learn English. He thought that was the crucial thing if at recess. He heard boys shouting incitement on the baseball diamond he'd in Spanish he'd run out and spank them on the spot girls. He gave a tongue lashing to now. All this all this time later, he has concealed us. Now, he becomes president. He has the power. You know, we all learn Lord actions. Axiom. All power corrupts absolute power corrupts. Absolutely. I'm not sure that as a result of my work. I believe what I really believe. I really believe that power does not always corrupt sometimes power cleanses. But we're power always does is revealed when you get enough power. So you can do what you want. Then people see what you wanted to do. I was interested in in your new book working, obviously, some of the stuff that you have in. Here is a distillation not only of what you learned. It'd be the bigger books that you're also the process by which you learn them you talk about the rise of power of Lyndon. Johnson you center on this moment in October of nineteen forty appeared to be that Johnson really as young as young member of congress begins to gain more much more influence and power. And you were fascinated to try to understand what had happened in October of nineteen forty two suddenly cata pull Johnson into a key figure, and you end up discovery. This whole connection that he developed to the oil barons of Texas and the flooding of the Democratic Party. What if you could talk about that it was quite it was quite UC? He's been in congress only three years. He's thirty two years old. He has an. Oh power. And then all of a sudden after the month of October nineteen forty just before the election. He's the guy you see in the files senior congressman asking for five minutes of time. So I said what happened during that five months? I I was talking to a notable Washington fixer, very Buea and. Wheeler-dealer Washington for decades and Tommy the cork he used to call me kid. So I said what happened in October nineteen forty every move Corcoran said to me money kid money, but you're never gonna be able to to write about that kid. And I said why not he said because Lyndon Johnson never put anything in writing. Well, Corcoran was only partly right Johnson. Hardly ever put anything in writing. But as I'm going through the papers and the Johnson library. There ought to amazing documents one is a telegram from Brown and root the Texas oil contracting them building firm Johnson is getting federal contract saying to Lyndon Johnson at the beginning of October nineteen forty Linden. The checks are on the way. And the the the money that that is being sent to him unprecedented amount of money is for him to distribute to congressman because Lyndon Johnson is genius. He doesn't have any power. But he realizes there is one thing has no of the congressman has he knows to groups of people. He knows the Texas oilman and contractors who need favorites from the federal government. And you need an willing to pay to get it to give campaign contributions, and he knows the northeast and New Orleans liberal congressman who need money for their campaigns. He arranges that all this money be given through him, and that creates power there is a list that I found Johnson library. That was just remarkable. You know, we wonder how do you prove that economic power has such an effect on political power that economic power creates political power sometime? You see it all in this list list is type one of Johnson's secretary to type column in the left column is the name of the congressman who's asking for money in the Senate column is how much money he's asking for small amounts tiny amounts by our standards for the four hundred fifty dollars for poll watches Linden seven hundred.

Lyndon Baines Johnson United States Texas Richard Russell president Robert Carro Johnson library measles Senate Kansas national power president Johnson Cecile Richards congress Herman Talmadge Washington Hong Kong
"johnson library" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"johnson library" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Then we've got. The the qualification over that will I seventy percent of your. If you just cleared out everywhere making age and reading right. Browning portray or constitution. Memorized. And we have to put them in the postal postmaster federal employees that I control they could save locally recommended the converse with the Senator register but new. About it outside Washington at all. Lactate by staying. This true. But that's it. That's my general feeling and I've talked to attorney general and got them working on it ought to start off with that anymore. And I do at fourteen beef getting out. I don't want to publicize it. But. That's what I had mind. But you're stable those perfect votes important, very. I think it's good about that. And just don't see anybody can say that man can fight, but he came and boast. That was by the way that conversation nineteen sixty five was on Dr king's birthday at the time. The Voting Rights Act would be signed August sixth nineteen sixty five that was Johnson. Speaking to Dr Martin Luther King, and I wanted you to comment on their relationship. I once was speaking to Harry, Belafonte and said when you get on in years and can't remember you're almost daily conversations with Dr king, you can just apply under the freedom of information act to the FBI to get the transfer the conversations you had Robert Kennedy Johnson's attorney general had king wiretapped talk about that relationship, and what Lyndon Baines Johnson did and signing both Civil Rights Act in one year later the Voting Rights Act in the tape. You just play the most significant loin was the first to loins Johnson said he says bass. If you make it easier for Negros to register. Seventy percent of your problem is solved. Johnson believed that if they black people would given the right to vote they could take care of a lot themselves. They would start electing their own officials. They they would start the change America. So he's saying to king. The thing that I'm concentrating on is that you can register just as easy as going into a post office. If we give them the power to vote, they'll have the power than a, you know, Martin Luther King for a long time. Didn't trust Lyndon Johnson. You know? All he didn't fully didn't believe fully believe that. When Johnson gives his speaks and says we shall overcome Martin Luther King is down in Selma. He's listen to it on television in the living room of one of his supporters. I wouldn't Johnson says and we shall overcome. They turn around and look at the king. And it's the only time they say they have a sore him cry. Robert Carroll to to go back to your of your approach to writing and researching especially in this age when everyone or most of the young people get their formation and their news from a Twitter and Facebook pulse and relatively short articles that they might read online. You actually moved with your wife to Texas to be able to really get into the the subject matter of LBJ and his role in history. And where he came from could you talk about your approach to spending years often just writing what book. Well. The research research. You know, I write pretty fast though, no one believes that it's the research that takes the time. The particular thing you're talking about moving to the hill country. I thought we wouldn't have to do that they were already as I recall seven biographies published. They all had chapters on his youth that depicted him certain way, but I'm trying to get a little more detail. Just so I could write better couple of chapters myself, and I realize I'm talking the people in the hill country, then it was a land of such loneliness such poverty that's for me coming from New York. I said to the, you know, understanding these people I'm not on the standing the mores. I'm not understanding this country the hill country, and therefore, I'm not understanding Lyndon Johnson. Because this is what he came out of shape. So I said we're going to have to move down there and get to know these people who love Paris. Rice books on French history yourself. So why can't you do a biography of Napoleon, but we moved down there. You know income. What are you talk about? Why it's hard to get these people to talk to you. Mistrusted journalists because we Johnson was a president that journalists who've come down for three or four days, and maybe even a week and go back and write these series of articles. And what the hill country was really like I'll tell you what the hill country was like you'd go to interview some person who was alive. Lyndon Johnson and high school now was old and directions would be something like drive out of Austin for forty seven miles you watch for the category on your left, you turn left. There you go on this rutted unpaved road for like thirty miles at the end of it is a house with a person who the information you need, you say I haven't passed the house for thirty miles. Who does this person talk to does? She have any friends. It's different. They're very wary of strangers. And I wasn't getting people to talk to me at all. So as soon as we move down there as it happens as soon as they realized someone had come to stay in trying to understand them. They would tell me what Lyndon Johnson was really like as young man was very different from anything that have been depicted before. You talked about moving there with your wife. I wanted to talk about her role with you have extolled her what role in your work. I mean, everything from when you move to hill country how she gets to be friend. This taciturn woman who is an important source for you turning up with homemade fig jam she made herself that opens up the people to speak. But it's more than the jam eight is the research, it is your trusted fellow researcher partner in all of this is the only, you know, you look at other biographies. And the knowledge -ment the name three or four or more research is who helped them. By found that there's only one person besides myself that I have been able to trust to do my research. She is a wonderful researcher. She's also historian in her own, right? You know in high school yearbook says haram Bishen is to be historical researcher. So we spent a lot of lot of months and even years of LARs Lyndon Johnson library going through peg. We're going to break for a moment. And then we're gonna come back to continue this discussion. And also talk about Robert Moses who you wrote the book about the powerbroker Robert Caro that twice Pulitzer prize winning author of the power broker. Robert Moses in the New York in the years of Lyndon Johnson. His most recent bestselling book working the system, Christina bow back in a minute..

Lyndon Johnson Robert Kennedy Johnson Dr Martin Luther King Robert Moses attorney New York researcher Browning Senator Washington Robert Caro Texas Pulitzer prize FBI Robert Carroll America Selma Bishen
"johnson library" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"johnson library" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On assignment in the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill here in Washington in the gallery. Overlooking the Senate floor there's a place just for journalists who report on the Senate every day. It's where they go to watch the big history-making moments. The votes that send us to war or enact healthcare law on a desk above where the Senator stand. There's a book that sits like a fixture. It's a permanent reference for understanding what's really going on below. It's a biography. It's the story of Lyndon Johnson. And how he used power to bend. The Senate to his will and become the greatest majority leader in history master of the Senate one poetry prize in two thousand three for its author. Robert Caro in eleven hundred pages Carro uses president Johnson to explore how power Crete's how it's used and the impact of that power on the everyday lives of Americans. It's. One installment in the series the years of Lyndon Johnson. Carol was already a Pulitzer prize winner for his thirteen hundred page nineteen seventy four biography about New York infrastructure mogul, Robert Moses, it's called the powerbroker cowers fans. Now eagerly await the last installment of the Johnson books all about the presidential years, the sixties civil rights and Vietnam. In the meantime, Robert carrot is out with a new much shorter book, it's called working, and it's all about the interviews the discipline, and the method that have helped Robert Caro enthrall his fans for decades Robert Carroll joins me now from NPR in New York mister car. Welcome to one A. Nice to be here. Very nice to have you, sir. I know that people constantly ask you when the final LBJ book is going to be finished. And and I promise you're going to be spared that here, I'm not going to ask you that give you a break from that perennial question. Even though you never give your sources of break from your perennial questions. That's okay. The years of Lyndon Johnson has been a forty year plus project for you in Robert Moses, many years before that when you were a young reporter there. There are lots of people with real power in this society. What drew you to these two powerful men? Well, I was a young journalist that was a political reporter. And I got interested in Robert Moses, I started to realize we live in a democracy. So we think that power comes from being elected from votes at the ballot box. But here was ago. I Robert Moses who had never been elected to anything, and he had more power than anyone who was elected more power than any mayor more than any governor more. More than any mayor and governor put together and he had held his power for forty four years. And with if he shaped New York all the highways, the modern bridges, the poets. And I said, I don't understand I'm supposed to be writing about political power. But I have no idea where he got this power. And I realized knowing that that anybody else, and I realized that have to write a book to try to find out what it was. I didn't understand what it was. And to explain a similar impulse for Lyndon Johnson. Well, by way, similar. So the Powell broker you could say is about urban power power and cities. Then I wanted to do national power. And I learned I hope with the powerbroker that if you pick the right man, you could show a lot about political power through his life. And I knew I wanted to do national power next thing. I knew I wanted to do it through Lyndon Johnson because I felt his life. He understood national power. I felt I could do a lot through his life of you mentioned those early days as a young reporter a young political reporter when you looked up from your daily deadlines in your daily stories and realized way power is important. And and why does this unelected man have so much of it? You got your start as a beat reporter at Newsday on Long Island to take me. Take me back. If you can't how do you remember those days in the clattering teletype in the grumpy editors in the newsroom? You know, I love being reporter, then as you say the newsroom was full of shouting back and forth. I work nights for awhile. I think by ours was seven thirty at night to three thirty in the morning. And if you look around the room about three o'clock, you saw everybody with a headset so on and you knew they were making dates for when they got off at three thirty. You could tell who is dating who by who is torturing on a headset, and who who is listening, but I had an editor who is like an old out of the front page days in Chicago, tough old guy named Alan halfway. I had never done any kind of investigative work in through a real accident. The meaning everyone else who's on the Newsday picnic on fire island. No one could get them on the telephone. Because this was does about nineteen sixty six sixty seven no one had cell phones. And a tip came in on a very important story. We're working on they couldn't get any of the regular investigative reporters. So finally, the editor said to you'll have to go down and do it. It was looking through files secret files that was suddenly being made available to us at the Federal Aviation agency at buydell wild airport late at Kennedy airport, and I went down. I just loved the. But I didn't know that. I knew what I was doing. I wrote a long memo for so that the real reporters who came in later could write the story and the next day the this whole Goi secretary he was managing it calls and says Alan wants to season they was Allen halfway she says Alan wants to see you right away. I said to my wife, I I'm glad we didn't move back to be fired. And I went in there, and he was reading my memo, and he looks up in may. And he says, I didn't know someone from Princeton could do digging like this from now on you do investigative work. With Todd with my usual southwe fair times. Like, I said, but I don't know anything about investigative work. And I remember he looked up but made for a very long term. And he said just remember one thing turn every page. Never assume anything turn every gun them page. And I think I've carried that advice in my head of a since you get a byline on that story on the FAA. You ask the right question. No, I didn't. You remember who did? No. Well, I. The two reporters who were covering most of this will Bob green in on Brophy. But I don't know who's via line was on. They probably oh, you a bigger debt than maybe even they would acknowledge in their later years. I wonder since they were at the company picnic, and you for the first time turned every page that was advice, and you write about this in the book that that was advice that his stuck with you throughout your entire career. Turn every page assume nothing always get the next interview read, the next document. That's a moment. It's pretty clear that is that has never left you. No, I I wish I could recount all times that that advice has proven just right? I mean, I could tell you one incident diner, the Johnson library. Of course, you can't turn every page there. They say they have forty five million pieces of paper there. And I believe I believe. If they go on endlessly. But I decided to look in the boxes of papers that related to his first three years in congress because I wanted to paint the picture of what are what the life of a young new congressman was Johnson came to congress at the age of twenty nine without any power. So I'm I said, okay. That's what ever it was. I think seven or twelve boxes I can handle that it's going to take time. And I'm looking I and you look through these papers, these letters, and memos and all and you see oh, something happened. And it happened in October nineteen forty before October nineteen forty this young congressman is writing letters to committee chairman and senior congressman basically saying can I have five minutes of Utah after election day, nineteen forty November fifth nineteen forty all of a sudden a lot of the letters from these more powerful congressman to this young congressman saying can I have five min. Minutes of your time. And I said what changed things around at that time. I was talking a lot interviewing the lot to an old Washington fixer sort of a legend in his time named Thomas Corcoran. They called them. Tommy, the cork the greatest fundraiser in history. They call them. And I said to him what happened in October nineteen forty and I remember he called me kid, and he said money kid money. But he said you never gonna be able to write about that kid. I said why not he said because Lyndon Johnson of put anything in writing? And I really believe that at the time. But I said I'm gonna look through, you know, turn every page in this ten or eleven boxes. And I'm sitting there turning one letter innocuous letter after another thinking, you know, I'm just wasting another three or four weeks of my life. And all of a sudden he did put something in writing there. It is it's a Western Union. Telegraph form from October thirteenth nineteen forty. It's from George Brown, Brown and root this huge Texas contracting firm that was really financing his early rise. And it said Linden. The checks are on the way and Linden had written in hand on the bottom. I'm not acknowledging their letters were said telling anyone about this. So thank them yourselves. But the names of the six people were in there. It will Brown root subcontractors, and I was able to cross reference into their files and find out that they were all sending this money to Johnson. And what was he doing with the money? I kept turning pages. And there was a list type by one of his secretaries fascinating list. There were two type columns in the left, which one of the most amazing documents taught I've ever seen in the left hand type column was the name of the congressman who were asking Lyndon Johnson for money in the center column was what they were at how much they were asking what they were asking it for him ounce. They were asking with sociable today's terms Linden need four hundred and fifty dollars for last minute advertising Linden. They're going to steal at the polls. I need seven hundred dollars for poll watch and Linden deciding who gets largely and who does not. Yes. In the way. He did it, Tom, Mr. Carol. Let's let's take a brief breath. And we'll come right back to this story. More with Robert Caro right after this on Robert Caro's career of doing work.

Lyndon Johnson Robert Caro Robert Moses reporter national power congressman Senate Linden New York Washington Federal Aviation agency Alan halfway Pulitzer prize Mr. Carol Johnson library Senator Robert carrot Vietnam
"johnson library" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:17 min | 1 year ago

"johnson library" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This is one eight I'm Todd's willington Washington just rejection is on assignment in the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill here in Washington in the gallery. Overlooking the Senate floor there's a place just for journalists who report on the Senate every day. It's where they go to watch the big history-making moments. The votes send us to war or enact a healthcare law on a desk above where the Senator stand. There's a book that sits like a fixture. It's a permanent reference for understanding what's really going on below. It's a biography. It's the story of Lyndon Johnson in how he used power to bend. The Senate to his will and become the greatest majority leader in history master of the Senate one poetry prize in two thousand three for its author. Robert Caro in eleven hundred pages Carro uses president Johnson to explore how power Crete's how it's used and the impact of that power on the. Everyday lives of Americans. It's one installment in the series. The years of Lyndon Johnson Carro was already a Pulitzer prize winner for his thirteen hundred page nineteen seventy four biography about New York infrastructure mogul, Robert Moses, it's called the powerbroker cowers fans. Now eagerly await the last installment of the Johnson books all about the presidential years, the sixties civil rights and Vietnam. In the meantime, Robert carrot is out with the new much shorter book, it's called working, and it's all about the interviews the discipline, and the method that have helped Robert Caro enthrall his fans for decades Robert Carroll joins me now from NPR in New York. Mr. Carol, welcome to one A nice to be here. Very nice to have you, sir. I know that people constantly ask you when the final LBJ book is going to be finished. And and I promise you're going to be spared that here, I'm not going to ask you that give you a break from that perennial question. Even though you never give your sources of break from your perennial questions. That's okay. The years of Lyndon Johnson has been a forty year plus project for you in Robert Moses, many years before that when you were a young reporter. There are lots of people with real power in this society. What drew you to these two powerful men? Well, I was a young journalist that was a political reporter. But I got interested in Robert Moses, I started to realize we live in a democracy. So we think that power comes from being elected from votes at the ballot box. But here was ago. I Robert Moses who had never been elected to anything, and he had more power than anyone who was elected more power than any mayor more than the governor more. For more than any mayor in governor put together and he had held his power for forty four years. And with if he shaped New York all the highways, the modern bridges, the porks. And I said, I don't understand I'm supposed to be writing about political power. But I have no idea where he got this power. And I realized that that anybody else, and I realized I'd have to write a book to try to find out. What it was? I didn't understand what it was. And through explain a similar impulse for Lyndon. Johnson. Well, by way, similar. So the power broker you could say is about urban power power and cities, then I wanted to do national power. And I learned I hoped with the power broker that if you pick the right man, you could show a lot about political power through his life. And I knew I wanted to do national power next that I knew I wanted to do it through Lyndon Johnson because I felt his life. He understood national power. I felt I could do a lot through his life of you mentioned those early days as a young reporter a young political reporter when you looked up from your daily deadlines in your daily stories and realized wait power is important. And and why does this unelected man have so much of it? You got your start as a beat reporter at Newsday on Long Island to take me. Take me back. If you can how do you remember those days in the clattering Tele types in the grumpy editors in the newsroom. You know, I love being reporter. Then as you say the newsroom was full of, you know, shouting back and forth. I work nights for awhile. I think by hours with seven thirty at night to three thirty in the morning. And if you look around the room about three o'clock, you sort everybody with a headset so on and you knew they were making dates for when they got off three thirty. You could tell who is dating who by who is torturing on a headset and who in Koumas listening, but I had an editor who is like an old out of the front page days in Chicago, a tough old guy named Alan halfway. I had never done any kind of investigative work in through a real accident. The meaning everyone else who's on the Newsday picnic on fire island. No one could get them on the telephone. Because this was guess about nineteen sixty six sixty seven no one had cell phones. And a tip came in on a very important story. We are working on they couldn't get any of the regular investigative reporters. So finally, the editor said to you'll have to go down, and do it was looking through files secret files that was suddenly being made available to us at the Federal Aviation agency at Idyllwild airport late at Kennedy airport, and I went down. I just loved the. But I didn't know that. I knew what I was doing. I wrote a long memo. So that the real reporters who came in later could write the story and the next day, the this whole Goi secretary he was managing calls and says Alan wants this. His name was Allen Hathaway, she says and wants to see you right away. I said to my wife, I I'm glad we didn't move about to be fired. And I went in there, and he was reading my memo, and he looks up at me. And he says, I didn't know someone from Princeton could do digging like this from now on you do investigative or. With Todd with my usual sophomore fair times. Like, I said, but I don't know anything about investigative work. And I remember he looked up at me for a very long term. And he said just remember one thing turn every page. Never assume anything turn regard them page. And I think I've carried that advice in my head of a sense since you get a byline on that story on the FAA. You ask the right question. No, I didn't. Do you? Remember who did? No. Well, I. The two reporters who were covering most of this will Bob green in on Brophy. But I don't know who's line was on. They probably oh, you a bigger debt than maybe even they would acknowledge in their later years. I wonder since they were at the company picnic, and and you for the first time turned every page that was advice, and you write about this in the book that that was advice that has stuck with you throughout your entire career. Turn every page assume nothing always get the next interview read in the next document. That's a moment. It's pretty clear that is that has never left you. No, I I wish I could recount all times that that advice has proven just right? I mean, there could tell you one incident diner, the Johnson library. Your course, you can't turn every page. They're they're there. They say they have forty five million pieces of paper there. And I believe that I believe that go on endlessly. But I decided to look in the boxes of papers that related to his first three years in congress 'cause I wanted to paint the picture of what are what the life of a young new congressman was Johnson came to congress at the age of twenty nine without any power. So I'm I said, okay. That's what ever was I think eleven or twelve boxes I can handle that. It's going to take time. I'm looking I you look through these papers, these letters, and memos and all and you see oh. Something happened and it happened in October nineteen forty before October nineteen forty this young congressman is writing letters to committee chairman and senior congressman basically saying can I have five minutes of your time after election day, nineteen forty November fifth nineteen forty all of a sudden a lot of the letters from these more powerful congressman to this young congressman saying can I have five minutes of your time. And I said what changed things around at that time. I was talking a lot interviewing a lot to an old Washington fixer sort of a legend in his time named Thomas Corcoran. They call them. Tommy, the cork the greatest fundraiser in history, they call them, and I said to him what happened in October nineteen forty and I room he called me kid, and he said money kid money. But he said you never gonna be able to write about that kid. I said why not he said because Lyndon Johnson of a put anything in writing? And I. Really believed that at the time. But I said I'm going to look through, you know, turn every page in this ten or eleven boxes. I'm sitting there turning one letter innocuous letter after another thinking, you know, I'm just wasting another three or four weeks of my life. And all of a sudden he did put something in writing. There. It is it's a Western Union. Telegraph form from October thirteenth nineteen forty. It's from George Brown Brown roof, this huge Texas contracting firm that was really financing his early rise. And it said Lyndon checks are on the way. I Linden had written in hand on the bottom. I'm not acknowledging their letters were said telling anyone about this. So thank them yourselves. But the names of the six people were in there. It will Brown and roots of contractors, and I was able to cross reference into their files and find out that they were all sending this money to Johnson. And what was he doing with the money? I kept turning cages, and there was a list type by one of his secretaries fascinating list to type columns in the left tank, which wanted the most amazing documents Todd I've ever seen in the left hand type column was the name of the congressman who were asking Lyndon Johnson for money in the center column was what they were at how much they were asking what they were asking it for him ounce. They were asking with sociable today's terms Linden need four hundred fifty dollars for last minute advertising Linden. They're going to steal at the polls. I need seven hundred dollars for poll watch and Linden deciding who gets largest and.

Lyndon Johnson reporter congressman Robert Moses national power Lyndon Johnson Carro Todd Senate Robert Caro Lyndon Johnson New York Washington Linden Pulitzer prize Alan halfway editor Johnson library Senator Robert carrot
"johnson library" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"johnson library" Discussed on Amanpour

"Right there? You attending me an anecdote, which seamlessly leads me into an element of something. You did for C span many years ago talking about this part of your research. There's just take a listen. You looking at four floors. I don't know how many feet these boxes go back. But it's a lot each of those boxes kinda hold a lot on. Fortunately, do eight hundred pages. So. The Johnson library today says they have forty four million documents if you'd be forty four million pieces of paper what we're really living here. Thanks to. You is the first moment, I su-. In my heart. Really sunk at what was a head of your heart sunk, what was the head of you talk about Johnson the man in a moment. But again on the process of of your work you faced with all of that. And you seem to act on a piece of advice that an editor gave you a long time ago. Turn every page is my first piece of advice. I had never done investigative work before. And by accident. I was thrown into something and faced with a whole room full of files from the Federal Aviation agency. And I fell in love that night. I really love doing the for us. I wrote this memo I left it for the real reporters. And then the next Monday, the managing editor who's a tough old guy out of the twenties. Call his secretary called said Alan wants to see you right away. I said the I know thank God, we didn't move. I'm going to be fired. NATO wife. I know my wife's.

managing editor Johnson library Federal Aviation agency Johnson NATO secretary Alan
"johnson library" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"johnson library" Discussed on On The Media

"So that it was understood that one of the options could be that the president made a mistake the Johnson library in recent years. It started to open debate about Vietnam. It could go further, but it started a very good process. The Obama president would stop that. And mean that that effort doesn't have to continue and the private museums will be funded by the president's then staffed by the presence. And then their children and grandchildren confer evermore insure that they only talk about the good things. In some ways, this story reflects what we saw during the Obama administration it self where the president had certain questions of overreach on executive authority on surveillance and intelligence and drone strikes and a common refrain was. Well, you know, this is us trust us transparency. Help us everyday all the time. Even if it's about a matter you don't care about because it puts the government on notice that it could get caught. I think that if a president understands that his legacy could be undermined in the future that could be something that restrains them now. It's a maybe a naive hope. But I remember putting together footnotes for the Watergate exhibit. I thought to myself for any future investigation of a presidency that engaged power. This is the playbook. The techniques that presidents abused power. Try to us were used by Richard Nixon, and there's all the evidence of them. So if you wanna be ahead of the curve in this era, all you need to do is look at the materials that we put online about what Nixon tried to do in many cases, he was stopped by good government. Republicans who are really heroes. I think in the story now, isn't it? Great that the federal government put this online. And isn't it great that to some extent that history restrain bad behavior out, obviously it hasn't eliminated bad behavior? Look we're living through now. But the fact that people will figure out your misdeeds. I do believe is very healthy in society. And so it's an argument for not just day-to-day transparency, which is important but historical, transparency, Tim. Thank you. Thank you. Bob, Tim Naphtali as a professor of history and public service at New York University Louise Bernard as the director of the museum at the Obama presidential center. Louise, welcome to- TM. Thank you for having me. We've just heard from a historian with several worries, but I want to begin with the central one the notion that those associated with the subject of history shouldn't be the arbiters of that history. Fair concern, I'm an academic by training. And so I do understand that particular scholarly consen-. I think that only see'ums regardless of whether they are run by so-called private foundations institutions around by the federal government do have Accua toil points of view. There is very particular kind of story that they are trying to. Tell this is particularly central to presidential museums. The goal of which is to probe the legacy of given president and really think Kathleen about the highs and lows of that particular administration, we take public history in our educational responsibilities. Very seriously, we want to think about the Obama presidency in all of its complexity that includes the highs and lows the challenges of this particular story. The Obama foundation is a nonprofit five oh one three see. It's a nonpartisan foundation. We subject to federal law to our greements with the city of Chicago. And as with other museums might think about the nine eleven memorial museum in New York..

president Obama federal government Obama administration Obama foundation Richard Nixon Tim Naphtali Louise Bernard Vietnam Johnson library New York Kathleen New York University executive Bob professor of history Chicago director
"johnson library" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Steve Templeton live at four forty CBS news correspondent Steve Futterman is in Houston this afternoon. He was there for the President George Walker. Bush processional from the funeral parlor Air Force One or what they're calling. It was a former Air Force One. It's a special Air Force One where this purposes leaving from the Houston airport to DC, Steve how're you doing fine. So it's a day of nostalgia. Obviously a sad event. But when you realize George Herbert Walker Bush lived longer than any other former president, you can't say that he didn't have a long life. He lived a long full life, and it had impact to well long full life where he decided to still. Skydiving when he got older which always loved. I mean, I I love the fact, you know, Steve I mentioned this to somewhat earlier I was starting to go to bed on Saturday night. And I looked at Twitter, and I had not heard at that. I think maybe the word had just come down about George Herbert Walker Bush, and I clicked on the link to the Washington Post, and I started reading the Ovid and the ov- it was very very lengthy. But very compelling. I think it took me about fifteen minutes to read the whole thing. I learned a few things about, you know, President Bush I had forgotten perhaps. And then, you know, some of the details in there just sorta came back to my memory, but but obviously his accomplishments. I think we forget how much he accomplished even before he was in the White House. Oh, yes. CIA director, which means he knew basically, everything all the George and more than that. Probably. He was also UN ambassador embassador to China head of the Republican party at a very bad time around the era of Watergate, not the best time to be head of the GOP. But. I think what really is important to remember how he learned to relate to other leaders around the world as ambassador at the UN and also in China and possibly a CIA director and that led him in my belief to his greatest accomplishments putting together a remarkable coalition to fight Saddam Hussein and kick him out of Kuwait that was a remarkable feat. If you look at the countries that joined the US. Wow. And would also really I think touched these countries meet George Herbert Walker Bush a bit of a hero to these countries is that he lived up to the promise the promise he gave to these countries was that all we want to do is kicked Saddam Hussein out of who wait we will not go after him after he's out of Kuwait. Guess what he lived up to the promise? And there were many critics at the time Mark you may remember, of course, finish finish. The task go after him. I think we learned later on his son. Sure learning later on what finishing that task involved. It was a very complicated. So what are the plans for the week? There was a twenty one gun salute. I was watching some of the coverage this morning, the casket and route to Washington, but it's coming back to Houston. Correct. Right. It will go to Washington this evening. It will lie in state in the capitol rotunda, as you know, if you're a former president you're supposed to get that. And that he will lie in state all day tomorrow on Wednesday in Washington, the states general at the National Cathedral, all the former presidents. I believe Jimmy Carter said today he will be there. You'll have Barack Obama, obviously, George W Bush the current President Donald Trump Bill Clinton, we believe there. They will all be there then on Wednesday night. The body will be flown back here to Texas Thursday a service at his local church. Bush family church here in Houston, Saint James school church and then on Thursday around sunset or maybe after sunset he will be laid to rest at college station, Texas, which is around seventy eighty miles from here that's on the campus of Texas A and M that is where the Bush presidential library is located and they will transport the body from the Houston area to college station by train. It will be interesting to see if he will see these moving scenes of people standing along, the railway tracks with signs waving goodbye, is might be very very moving that it's it's not difficult to see a lot of compare. And contrast, your even with some of the comments that have been made by Jim Baker in John sununu and people that worked in the administration. You start thinking about that era in politics compared to this era in politics. Very different, isn't it? Well, yeah. I mean, you know, there was more camaraderie, you could work with the other. Other side. It wasn't viewed as a horrible things for Republican to work with the democrat. And he worked with them. One interesting thing that came up this week, which I was aware of it's been known. But I just wasn't aware of it. When Lyndon Johnson, the last Texas Texan president before George Herbert Walker Bush when he went back to Texas after leaving the presidency room, breach shows not to run in sixty eight and Richard Nixon succeeded him so in nineteen sixty nine as he left Washington, George Herbert Walker Bush who was on adult by then, but a young adult he was the only Republican officeholder to go and say goodbye to Lyndon Johnson. This is all according to the Johnson library, and according to the Johnson library Lyndon Johnson. Never forgot that and always had respect for George. Herbert Walker Bush. He didn't mind working across the aisle. He might he wanted to beat you very badly. He was very competitive if you ever. Heard about his golf games which were like almost like speed golf. He was very competitive. Love to jump from the plane. He jumped by the way, do the jump from a plane in a parachute. When he was already confined to a wheelchair. Yeah. So so he'd like to compete. He wanted to win. He was tough. You. You can't not be tough. It's your CIA director. If you win the presidency there are moments when you don't do necessarily saying that your mother would want you to do, but you want to win, but he eats he overcame that. And was able to work with others and friendship with Bill Clinton. The man who humiliated him when you run for reelection and your defeated as president hasn't happened that often I believe before George Herbert Walker Bush. It was Jimmy Carter up before Jimmy Carter. I believe it was Herbert Hoover doesn't happen. Very often. So when you're humiliated like that, and you can become friends with a man who did that humiliation. Bill Clinton that says something about you CBS news correspondent Steve Futterman. I appreciate you coming on here this afternoon, you're going to stay stationed in Houston this week, right? Yeah. Very difficult to go and come back a could be done. But probably, you know, it's not all about me as much as I'd like it to be about me. Some stain here. And I will I'll be picking up the coverage on Thursday Wednesday night when he returns Thursday, and we will no doubt speak with you later in the week. Steve, I appreciate it. Thank you. Sounds good. By the way. We'll tell you as a person he was one of my favorite presidents. Forget the politics. I might have. Agreed. I might have disagreed, but I liked him. It was just fun to be around. That's awesome. Thanks, steve. Take care. CBS news. Correspondent Steve Futterman with us this afternoon. Much more coverage including in about two minutes. When Carol has the news traffic coming..

George Herbert Walker Bush president Houston Steve Futterman CIA Washington George Walker Steve Texas George Jimmy Carter director Bill Clinton Air Force One Steve I CBS Steve Templeton Lyndon Johnson Herbert Hoover Saddam Hussein
"johnson library" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

09:40 min | 2 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"This? I probably should have plan on this early. Dave remind me we want to start working in the Christmas bumps this week. I had kinda forgotten about that like the sprinkle a minute. And we'll go all Christmas bumps next week. So good afternoon sort of a Sambre day for a variety of reasons, and we're going to start with the passing of George Herbert Walker Bush, and we have the processional easy for me to say from the funeral parlor to Air Force One en route to Washington right now about to land. Steve Futterman is in Houston. That's where he'll be covering that story all week long because I believe that the casket will return to Houston in a couple of days. Steve, how are you? I'm doing fine today of nostalgia. Obviously a sad event. But when you realize George Herbert Walker Bush lived longer than any other former president, you can't say that he didn't live a long life. He lived a long full life, and it had impact to well long full life where he decided to still do some skydiving when he got older which always loved. I mean, I I love the fact, you know, Steve, I mentioned this. Somewhat earlier I was starting to go to bed on Saturday night. And I looked at Twitter, and I had not heard at that point. I think maybe the word had just come down about George Herbert Walker Bush, and I clicked on the link to the Washington Post, and I started reading the Ovid, and it was very very lengthy. But very compelling. I think it took me about fifteen minutes to read the whole thing learned a few things about, you know, President Bush I had forgotten perhaps. And then use some of the details in there just sort of came back to my memory, but but obviously his accomplishments. I think we forget how much he accomplished even before he was in the White House. Oh, yes, CIA director, which means he knew basically, everything all the George and more than that. Probably. He was also UN ambassador ambassador to China head of the Republican party at a very bad time around the era of Watergate, not the best time to be head of the GOP. But I think what really is important is to remember how he learned to relate to other. You leaders around the world as investor at the UN and also in China and possibly as CIA director. And that led him in my belief to his greatest accomplishments putting together a remarkable coalition to fight Saddam Hussein and kick him out of Kuwait that was a remarkable feat. If you look at the countries that joined the US. Wow. And what also really I think touched these countries meet George Herbert Walker Bush a bit of a hero to these countries is that he lived up to the promise the promise he gave to these countries was that all we want to do is kick Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait. We will not go after him after he's out of Kuwait. Guess what he lived up to the promise? And there were many critics at the time Mark you may remember course, finish finish the task go after him. I think we learned later on his son Sherlock way, you're on. What? Finishing that task involved. It was a very complicated. So what are the plans for the week? There was a twenty one gun salute. I was watching some of the coverage this morning, the casket and route to Washington, but it's coming back to Houston. Correct. Right. It will go to Washington this evening. It will lie in state in the capitol rotunda, as you know, if you're a former president you're supposed to get that on and he will lie in state all day tomorrow on Wednesday in Washington, the states general at the National Cathedral, all the former presidents. I believe Jimmy Carter said today he will be there. You'll have Barack Obama, obviously, George W Bush the current President Donald Trump Bill Clinton, we believe there. They will all be there then on Wednesday night. The body will be flown back here to Texas Thursday a service at his local church the Bush family church here in Houston, Saint James episcopal church. And then on. Thursday around sunset, or maybe after sunset he will be laid to rest at college station, Texas, which is around seventy eighty miles from here. That's on the campus of Texas M that is where the Bush presidential library is located and they will transport the body from the Houston area to college station by train. It will be interesting to see if will see these moving scenes of people standing along the railway tracks with signs waving goodbye, is might be a very very moving. Steve, it's it's it's not difficult to see a lot of compare. And contrast, your even with some of the comments that have been made by Jim Baker in John sununu and people that worked in the administration. You start thinking about that era in politics compared to this era in politics. Very different. Isn't it? Well, yeah. I mean, you know, there was more camaraderie, you could work with the other side. It wasn't viewed as a horrible things for a Republican to work with the democrat. And he worked with them. One interesting thing that came up this week, which I was not aware of it. It's been known, but I just wasn't aware of it. When Lyndon Johnson the last Texas Texan president before George Herbert Walker Bush when he went back to Texas after leaving the presidency. Remember, he chose not to run in sixty eight and Richard Nixon succeeded in so in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine he left Washington, George Herbert Walker Bush who was on the dope by then. But a young adult. He was the only Republican officeholder to go and say goodbye to Lyndon Johnson. This is all according to the Johnson library, and according to the Johnson library Lyndon Johnson. Never forgot that an always had respect for George. Herbert Walker Bush. He didn't mind working across the aisle. He might he wanted. To beat you very badly. He was very competitive. If you've ever heard about his golf games, which were like almost like a speed golf. He was very competitive love to jump from the plane. He jumped by the way, he do the jump from a plane and a parachute. When he was already confined to a wheelchair. Amazing. Yeah. So so he'd like to compete. He wanted to win. He was tough. You can't not be tough. If your CIA director, if you win the presidency there are moments when you don't do necessarily thing that your mother would want you to do but you want to win, but he he overcame that. And was able to work with others and friendship with Bill Clinton the man who chew him when you run for reelection and your defeated as president hasn't happened that often I believe before George Herbert Walker Bush. It was Jimmy Carter before Jimmy Carter. I believe it was Herbert Hoover doesn't happen. Very often. So when you're humiliated like that, and you can be. Become friends with a man who did that humiliation. Bill clinton. That says something about you CBS news correspondent Steve Futterman. I appreciate coming on here this afternoon, you're going to stay stationed in Houston this week. Right. Yeah. Dairy developed to go and come back a could be done. But probably, you know, it's not all about me as much as I'd like it to be about me some staying here. And I will I'll be picking up the coverage on Thursday Wednesday night when he returns Thursday, and we will no doubt speak with you later in the week. Steve, I appreciate it. Thank you. Sounds good. By the way. I will tell you as a person he was one of my favorite presidents. Forget the politics. I might have. Agreed. I might have disagreed, but I liked him. It was just fun to be around. That's awesome. Thanks, steve. Take care to thirteen. I'm watching some video as we were chatting with mister Futterman. They are awaiting the arrival of the presidential aircraft at Andrews Air Force base or joint base Andrews in Maryland as they call it. Now, we'll continue to keep you posted on that. We will hear the the funeral on Wednesday morning. The coverage I believe on CBS starts at ten AM during Charlie Br. Renan's show. So a lot of memories this week. And you know, a mention Steve it's hard to not compare and contrast, it's very difficult for me. And whether you're a supporter of President Trump or not a supporter of President Trump is hard to not flash forward to what a presidential funeral will look like when President Trump passes because well, this may be the last one where there's not a lot of controversy. You start thinking about Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, and George W Bush, and I guess maybe while we know that President Obama not that, you know, telegraph anyone's deaths, I just think that the tone of the coverage is can be very different in the future, certainly for President Trump. So it'd be more storytelling this afternoon from an Wagner, the Missouri congresswoman who ran his campaign, George Herbert Walker's campaign in nineteen Ninety-two and a bunch of other stuff. I wanted to get you. So Glenn Reynolds is a guy who's been on the show me just preview something else for the next hour. He's a law professor at the university of Tennessee. He writes a column on a regular. Basis at USA today dot com and in the paper USA today. Hard copies. Well, just not online, and he had a great blog and Twitter handle and he was known as insta- ponding. And quite Kandla. Got a lot of material from Glenn because he would tweet up a bunch of things that I thought were interesting. And again, he's been a guest on this show quite a bit. Well, he deleted his Twitter account, and he explained why in a piece that was in USA today. Now, a lot of people thought that when Glenn's Twitter account went away. He was also suspended by Twitter because he's a conservative been a lot of those stories that have been circulating and questions about who's getting suspended and who's not getting suspended. But apparently he took it down. Now, I think that the reasons that he did that are quite interesting, and we'll talk with him in the next hour at three twenty on.

George Herbert Walker Bush president Steve Houston Washington Twitter Jimmy Carter mister Futterman George W Bush Lyndon Johnson George Herbert Walker Texas Bill Clinton Kuwait Saddam Hussein CIA George USA Herbert Hoover
"johnson library" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"You party in, you know, in congress when you had a a pretty strong Democratic Party control and the administration. He did not seem obviously he liked it more. If you supported his policies, but he could deal with you. If you were against his policies as long as there was some mutual respect. I'll tell you very interesting photograph that we've been seeing today become a bit viral. It's a picture of Lyndon Baines Johnson. The last Texas president before George W Bush George Herbert Walker Bush as he was leaving Washington in nineteen sixty nine. Having gone out of office as Richard Nixon was elected, and there's a picture of a very young George. Herbert Walker Bush dashing you could say reaching out and shaking his hand. And according to the Johnson presidential library, George. Herbert walker? Bush was the only Republican to show up to beat him. Farewell returned to Texas and the Johnson library says Lyndon Johnson, always respected and remembered what George Herbert Walker Bush did on that day. He was a man who could cross aisles. Hey, how about the man who defeated him who knocked him out of office humiliated him? If you want to say, it's quite bluntly Bill Clinton, they became great friends. Day. In fact, that I've seen in in a few reports, and I saw former President George W Bush describing saying that you know, how how were they so successfully friends, and George H W Bush said, well, I'm an old man. And I like to listen, and he likes to talk. I thought that was just a tremendous. But yes, politics, sometimes makes for strange bedfellows. But the two of them called on by George W Bush to address international crises got to work roll their sleeves up, and they found that they worked very very well together. Yeah, they did. And they did some remarkable things for places in the world that needed help desperately for some charitable causes. They really accomplished a lot. There's also very interesting column either in today's New York Times or yesterday's by marine Dowd. One of their columnists who covered George Herbert Walker Bush, and they continued a correspondence over the years, and I'll be Frank with you. I need, you know, for a fact that George Herbert Walker Bush did not like many.

George W Bush George Herbert W President George W Bush Herbert walker Lyndon Baines Johnson George Johnson presidential library Democratic Party Texas congress Richard Nixon Bill Clinton New York Times president Dowd Washington Frank
"johnson library" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:49 min | 2 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on 710 WOR

"That. Well, we send it to you. But there's a back story. Because apparently all know apparently, a Ryan said, I'm not gonna do those bits anymore unless you send me something. So. Tee-shirt Ruth be told truth be told Jim we meant that t shirt for giancarl. But somehow got to you by mistakes. So. Where it proudly Jim where proudly ads right? Hey, jim. So what are the what are the plans for the funeral here? Well, yes, there this morning at about ten thirty our time here. The president's casket will be loaded onto the aircraft's the presidential aircraft chicken to Washington joint base Andrews, it will be in a Waibel show Mony there. Mr Bush will then lie in state beneath the the dome at the capitol, and there will be a state funeral at the National Cathedral. Then the president will be right back here to Texas State. Get stopped it in the nineteen forties. He and his wife, and we'll be transported to college station to the Bush presidential library. And that's where the burial will happen on Thursday. Mike. Now, there's a memorial tonight in Houston that I hear. Yes. Yes. A citywide memorial a celebration, the mayor of Houston invited everybody in the city to come to this event. It's going to be all right in front of city hall, and there will be tributes pays pay to Mr Bush, the Houston symphony will play, and it's a chance for the city itself to say goodbye to a person who contributed a lot to not only in terms of the reputation of the place, but also as a philanthropist, his wife gave to all sorts of causes around this around this community. Hey, Jim, I seem to remember that when he went when Bush was running for presidency the first time, and even when he was vice president, and we we ran again, there was a lot of people who said, you know, he's not really a Texan. He's an east coast preppy guy is not really a Texan. But he and his wife, I think it's fair to say they did become Texans and Texas embrace them in the end. Very much. So yeah, I think that if you're here for that long. You moved here. And I don't know who's an intentional thing to try to shake off his blue blood upbringing in Massachusetts, or or if it was just whereas grew took him, but he ended up in the oilfields down here built a business and then entered politics. So yes, I think he was very much embraced by not only the state of Texas, but by the Houston, and your that was always kind of in the background is sort of pedigree that came from Massachusetts. But here you lived here for a long time, including after he left the White House, Michael. Yeah. Interesting though, we forget that when Bush went down there. And when he first ran I think either Senator or congress, Texas was a democratic state, not a Republican. All right. Yeah. And and in fact, he was initially a democrat east switched over before you begin running for politics became the GOP chairman here in Harris County, but you're right. This was a a strong democratic state. It's it's made a complete flip in the last sixty seventy years, but it was not an easy thing to run as a Republican. In fact, he lost his first race right for congress. And then eventually moved on and became a CIA director than vice president oppressor. Jim Ryan ABC news is based in Texas. And before you take all the credit or the Texas credit for the bushes. I mean Barbara was born in rye here in our area in west gender. They got married and Ryan New York, of course, the president famously played baseball for Yale. And so we'll take some credit now areas well in general. Since you're a Texan. What's what's the general feeling and appreciation or love or whatever you wanna call it for for the for for George Bush and his family? Well, I think it's the. Here in this community in Houston. The city by the way are pretty strongly democratic Dallas Houston, and they'll pass the big cities are are still sort of blew, but they do embrace the Bush family, not only George H W Bush here, but also George W Bush in Dallas. And so I think the family has been embraced by this community. And there is a a warm sense about who these people were. And I think that part of it, isn't it? They just seem decent, you know. Yeah. H w and w seem like folks guys you could Seidel up next to at a bar compensated. Sure. And he's going to be buried by the presidential library, correct? Yes. There was a small burial plot behind Bush presidential library at Texas or Bill alongside texting. And I'm in college station. The Bush's daughter Robin who died in nineteen Fifty-three has been interred there and MRs Bush Barbara Bush was buried there in April. And now Mr Bush will join his wife and his daughter there at the library. Have you ever been to that library? Yes. The I'm fascinated presidential libraries is it a good one? It is it's so much that I think is influenced by nearby tech university. Which is, you know, the the corps of cadets, a very militarized kind of environments, and I think Mr Bush likes that and you appreciated that aspect of the place. The George W Bush library in Dallas is a little more stately, I suppose on the campus you there there are different fields to them the the Johnson library in in Austin is its own plates. You know, so they each has a different kind of feeling always visiting. I think yeah. Does it have that scanner that he couldn't figure out? One. No, well that was. Display of broccoli. That's right. I remember that one. Of the United States. I don't have to eat broccoli anymore. All right. ABC news. Correspondent Jim Ryan, Dan, Houston. Thanks a lot Jackson where that's Easter proudly, Jim. That's right. Jim I will. Thanks, pal. Yes. I forgot the Brian right? But there's a funny bid if maybe you can find the sound scanner thing, you mentioned it to me. Well, remember it was during the his reelection campaign. And he went to a grocery store, and they were showing him this new technology with a scanner. Right. And he looked and they gave him a carton of milk. And he was like, wow, there's a scanner you scan groceries, and of course, the mainstream media portray him as out of touch with the common American during the recession, and that contributed his lost a Bubba you. Sure. It was the mainstream. Yes. It wasn't just the media was New York Times that wrote about it. We'll tell you more about that. When we come back. But I I wanna tell you. Hey, Al Sharpton has got another scam going Len. Okay. And this what you're not going to believe how just money grubbing? This one is on the part of old Al Sharpton so stick around for that. Hey, it's time for podcasters get the recognition they deserve recognition for the role in influencing pop culture and public opinion interests in the iheartradio podcast awards presented..

MRs Bush Barbara Bush Houston Texas Jim vice president Bush Jim Ryan George W Bush library Jim Ryan ABC congress Texas State Dallas Massachusetts Al Sharpton Ruth New York Times city hall Jim I ABC National Cathedral
"johnson library" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"First of all this was a vacancy the Donald Trump created by most accounts on his own. Least hastened by using his relationship with Anthony Kennedy son by what we're hearing who was his banker which is already a relationship that's a little bit closer. I think than comfort would require to talk to Kennedy, and perhaps encourage him to leave the court earlier with a promise. And again, we're relying on reports. And maybe the reports are wrong. But if the reports are right on the promise that, you know, he would appoint a successor that after the Kennedy might be happy with even one of his former clerks. So Brad Kavanagh was appointed. And the way that happened makes me even more worried because at the time that cavenaugh got into his troubles, as you know, he spent a lot of time at the White House lot of time with Trump's political advisors, if not Trump himself who essentially I assume said, this is the way this is done tell us your most potentially damaging secrets so that we can protect you in the hearings. I hope it didn't happen. This way. But the point is that because of what happened in that confirmation? I think he is closer to the president who appointed him then most justices in history that I can think of although there's an example that you've written about with respect to president Johnson Lyndon Johnson more than one and eight fordis-. Absolutely. A negative example Abe Portas was Johnson's crony Johnson put him on the court. I believe as almost a spy for Johnson on the court spent a lot of time with Ford 'as. And I'm sure he asked him what's going on on the court. You know, if I do a Bill such and such a way as it less likely to be declared unconstitutional, he even used Justice Ford is to write his speeches and to help them choose bombing targets and Vietnam. Totally inappropriate. Can we just can we just pause on that sure? Because that's a stonning. I don't even have a comment about it. Because because I've read I've read that and the idea that a sitting supreme court Justice was helping to choose military targets in Vietnam is something that came to light win came to light years later. There is evidence of it in the Johnson library, you see photographs for instance, of LBJ dealing with the Detroit riots in nineteen sixty seven and guess who's in the Oval Office leaning across his desk, advising him Justice fordis- shouldn't have happened. So it doesn't that a little bit suggest to defend Trump again, which is not my usual practice. I'm really enjoying watching this free. This is this is a new experience. And just want to put things in perspective. Look, I'm horrified by everything going on. Of course. Here's the problem as I see it. There were various presidents who made mistakes, whether it's overly close relationship with the supreme court Justice or exaggerating and incident to take us into war or not having a good enough, you of the constitution or putting people in internment camps and Trump defenders can point to each of those things, and I get it and to say, well, what is happening here. This particular thing is not as bad as other thing that happened seventy five years ago. I think the problem is that this president as far as I can see without the benefit of the passage of time is that he's deficient in all of the areas at the same time. And so it may be true. Lincoln was not perfect FDR was not perfect. Truman was not Obama was not no one is. But the pure aggregation of issues, lack of empathy lack of understanding of history lack of character. All those three things that you said are equal. Oil and essential are all lacking dramatically here. And maybe that's the difference. I think that's true. And in terms of the supreme court specifically, and I think also more generally, you know, if you were I we're talking two or three years ago before Donald Trump came to office. And let's say we were talking about a fordis-. I think you were I would have said two or three years ago. Those are terrible negative role models for justices in American history. People realize that now, and we're not likely to see that ever again, or at least in our lifetime. He shattering one democratic standard after another and on the court what I'm terrified by is this there's a very serious chance that Trump cases will come up to this court, and those cases and how they're resolved could determine I think it is not too much to say if.

Donald Trump Johnson Lyndon Johnson supreme court Anthony Kennedy Trump president Vietnam Brad Kavanagh Johnson library Justice fordis Ford Justice Ford Detroit Abe Portas White House Lincoln Oval Office Obama Truman
"johnson library" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Bailouts. He had seats on their board it cetera etc and there are any number of things that he could have done all through his presidency even after the Republicans controlled congress that he refrained from do it he didn't do, didn't even think seriously about doing why didn't. He It's not a question. That I have an answer for except for what the the obvious How would you. Put it that the optics of. It suggests he did these things because. He simply did that's what he wanted to do it's not. That the Republicans made him it's not that it's the way he wanted to do. It he wanted that his health care plan to come out the way did botched complicated System it's impossible. To understand definitely wanted now I. Tend to think that too but I'm. Feeling guilty now Thomas frankly feel like we're not talking enough. About you about so let's do that again rendezvous with a blue vian Jared okay Okay you have another piece in there called the animatronic presidency which I got a kick out of. Because I had something called the. Animatronic president but it was it was, different I use the term, differently I, was basically making the point that Donald Trump is, going to turn every ceremonial event into an animatronic reenactment. Of. Itself Yeah I don't even want to think about Donald Trump's presidential, library but The way I use, it a cubs from one of the libraries I did not. Visit which is the Lyndon Johnson library apparently has an animatronic, Linden It's really and by the way I think Trump's animatronic replica may turn out to be more lifelike, but but but your point about the. Animatronic presidency it was, based on your your visit to to the two or three That you Bush, presidential libraries run a Clinton presidential library these are the three most recent ones the Obama went obviously isn't isn't built yet And The Clinton one really intrigued. Me and so did the George Bush George Bush the, second you, know the sort of, disastrous George Bush his, intrigued maybe just for the How, would you put it, the architecture challenge that The designers of it face how do you deal with such a disastrous, presidency and made the guy looked like. A hero which is? What every presidential library does. You know these are these are not real museums they have Steph, under. A. Vitrine and they have very valuable artifacts etc etc but these are propaganda institutions, designed, to make the. Person, look like a really really really good guy well, how do you. Do that with a disastrous President George W Bush. It's it's actually kind? Of interesting what they. Did what did they do just briefly they would they. Sandwich is Bogaerts, of awful between moments of noncontroversial so like you There's all of this. Feel good stuff huge? Exhibit about nine eleven. Which is like his one moment when the public was. Really behind him There's the Iraq war, which ends in disaster so, after that you know you're fuming right you're looking at works said you're And so then they have all this nice stuff about his hat his. Pet dog and what his his his. Wife who's a really great person and his. Daughters and all, the fun, they had and. Then you go onto Hurricane, Katrina Failure to do anything about this and you're like And then there's. Some other something about a program that he had I think fighting malaria in Africa or, something, like a letter from, Bano and you're like, oh what a nice guy then the financial crisis, and you're like I Who is this? Guy they have a video game by the way at at his library that it's a you sit in a theater and. You you make choices choices that face George W. Bush and when I was, there they were doing the financial. Crisis what the question, was do you the questions you the viewer? Was do you bail out the Wall Street, banks or do you allow them to? Fail. Right so that's the. Choice it's either one hundred cents on the. Dollar I like global disaster? Right there is, no there's nothing else that's the only choice and even though it is it's rigged? Right it's a rig. Choice make you want to do with George w..

George Bush George Bush George Bush Donald Trump Lyndon Johnson library vian Jared Obama president Clinton malaria Thomas Iraq Steph A. Vitrine Hurricane Sandwich Bogaerts Africa Bano Katrina
"johnson library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"This week is gregory watson the man responsible for getting the twenty seventh amendment to the constitution ratified before we go any further i want to just run a little bit of clip of lillian cunningham just because she deserves credit for us asking you to come here even though your story is not new she was the one that introduced us to it so this is from our podcast at the washington post she was our guest here and we talked about you very good in one thousand nine hundred eighty two gregory watson was a college student at the university of texas and austin maldin research for his american government course he came across a category of amendments to the us constitution called unratified amendments that is amendments that congress had proposed for ratification at that not enough states ever approved to become part of the constitution there were only five of these amendments which had been mostly forgotten but which intrigued watson this was a whole you can get it on the washington post a podcast about the constitution how much publicity have you gotten all through the years on this thing that you did well actually a fair amount i would say there was of course a great explosion of it in nineteen ninety two win the amendment crossed the threshold necessary but i got quite a bit in two thousand seventeen as well for two reasons 2017 of course marking the twenty fifth anniversary of its ratification coupled with the professor petitioning the university to elevate my overall grade in her course from a c to an so there was an explosion of publicity last year just a few weeks ago you were on the daily show yes why did that happen what brought out about they had heard about me through the publicity and 2017 contacted me and asked if i would like to be featured on their show and of course my answer is always yes let's watch forty seconds of this so you can tell you write this paper yes i turn it into the ta and get it back a few days later with a c on it with a c c and i appeal the grade up to the professor she said she'd take a look at it and when she came back a few days later she saw me sitting in the aisle and she physically tossed it at me and said no change i decided right then and there i'm going to get that amendment ratified wait a minute and you saying that this guy actually got a constitutional amendment ratified john just stick to the reenactment also you meant to be nineteen years old so can you act like a hot team no i can't where did they do all that were you were you around when they activists up not that part of it and i'm guessing they did that at their studios in new york they were gracious enough to come down to austin and the interview that they filmed with me was at the lyndon baines johnson library on the campus of the university of texas that was back on whatever martin luther king day was in january of this year january fifteenth fifteenth let's go to for those who've never even thought about an amendment how many amendments are there to the constitution at the moment twenty seven and how does an amendment get past well we have the unique the system in article five of the constitution there are two ways to propose and there are two ways to ratify the one way to propose that has been used for all of them is for congress to pass it by a twothirds vote in the us senate two thirds vote in the us house of representatives never have we gotten to the point although we've gotten close to triggering what is known as an article five convention which would be another way of proposing an amendment but that has never come to fruition yet now there are two ways to ratify the most common way would be for the state legislatures to ratify and it requires three fourths of them in one instance in the year nineteen thirty three a different method was used and that's where little small what i would call mini article five conventions were conducted in the various states and use ly approximated a referendum on the amendments candidates would would run and they'd be they'd be on the ballot is in this case dry or wet in terms of appealing repealing prohibition and voters would go into the voting booth.

gregory watson nineteen years forty seconds twenty fifth
"johnson library" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Who gives a short time ago about the mistress but sunday at eight o'clock i'm a special ed your jackson here on two fires on chris rossouw you watching and if so who with who well i'll be watching both with my wonderful wipe lorraine anne my mistress because you know you're specials in your books bring families and even dysfunctional modern families together so i think all three of us will be sitting there watching and maybe we'll beating clams and a half shall as we do as a chris wild a round of applause for guy geigy do you do he really like secrets i ha i had you live in austin i had you live in oklahoma but the people orlando have really embraced united states on i think i did better with the crowd here than i did with a crowd lost and i started insulting lot lyndon johnson before the crowd at the at the johnson library that didn't go over it it was an interesting tact 100strong yes i i've claim my act up no shot of that i have a couple of things to say about disneyworld's the let's start their third fight i hope it's good chris thanks much will going to be watching sunday i can't wait i see what you wear pie guys we're going to be right back here brian kilmeade show the stanley steamer performance studios and beautiful wdbo where national but today or about orlando back in a moment this is the brian kilmeade cia one of the most popular talk show host in the country people like i do i go on the brian kilmeade compared to rachel maddow your to roughly your with brian kilmeade news 955 and am 750 wsb the we're in the middle of a cultural phenomenon women are feeling more empowered than ever to share their stories of sexual assault they are standing together in aren't willing to be quite anymore you can take the first step to helping prevent these incidents from occurring in the first place by feeling more empowered and confident by carrying a tiger lady the revolutionary defence tool based on one of nature's best defences a catch retractable clause it requires no training his safety carry any illegal in all fifty states and recommended by self defence instructors and police officers including i'm rocco vertically author or ten year the reason why i.

jackson austin oklahoma united states lyndon johnson johnson library brian kilmeade assault chris rossouw orlando rachel maddow ten year
"johnson library" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm anymore as with bloomberg national security leader bill ferries now president trump is faced a lot of democratic criticism over the amount of former goldman sachs bankers in his administration earlier this year congressman brad sure and then a democrat from california spoke out out against trump's cabinet choices on the issues of wall street and the big banks trump sounded like he was bernie sanders he's now creating an administration that looks like goldman sachs over the goes beyond that goldman sachs bankers former bankers anyway entering the political arena as democrats republicans lashing out at the bank two hotlycontested new jersey gubernatorial race republican cam gore criticizing democratic contender phil murphy over his time at the bank after twenty years making tens of millions of dollars at goldman sachs by betting against the american worker phil murphy spent twenty new cillian dollars to by the democrat nomination guy bloomberg news money and power reporter max abelson joining us now on the bloomberg world headquarters in new york max goldman sachs showing up all sorts of ways in politics villas in showing have all across the american political landscape agassi my mind goes back to the beginning of the twenty cent she said goldman sachs was founded in the nineteenth century its old but in the beginning of the twentieth century at the son of one of the founders of goldman sachs i got off to just about the worst start excuse me is the middle of the twentieth century with with political relations he did he sided with the germans dirt during the the the big war but by the time world were to came around goldman sachs was being run in this case i believe bye bye sydney weinberg and gus levy both of them were were middle the 20century and and boost sydney why breaking gus levy will really close to powerful people in the us government you can you can hear city weinberg on the phone with lyndon johnson it thanks for the johnson library and i think because of them and then because of john whitehead he came later it was really kind of baked into the into the modern day goldman sachs.

gus levy new york max abelson reporter congressman president bloomberg john whitehead johnson library lyndon johnson trump sydney sydney weinberg phil murphy cam gore republicans goldman sachs bernie sanders california brad twenty years 20century
"johnson library" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"johnson library" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Games in person by so many other i i agree with you that at all with more physical back on not even close now not even call it what i watched the game on acquatic and i you know i'm i'm thirty or i would grow up in a big john's and you our break every year but what i watch what i watch eight cheap what game and then i want your current game i am baffled by how much fanfare and how much more imposing the athletes start today than they were dining i you know it's always the king so thick northern sugary there were the game is so source now it's ridiculous she no you can't touch it you know you can caught fire in the day you think you're out back people down and grind it out that's totally nuts jubal watched the lakers play in the eighties i i i don't think the lakers would keep up with the warrior all showtime all you sold before can we read you ever watch magic johnson evil tragic johnson play these guys are of sure also you say so okay so basically those guys were really slow you they real do they was paying that compared it today the and allen iverson receiving crippled up after falling in your watch owner here they couldn't they know they had no fares guys then absolutely the un tape thera carper over it careering kirk gave me derek harper heaven allen iverson is slow you in may two thousand i i i'm telling you i when i watched the game i well you know what if you don't think they will great athletes on those games you think like magic johnson library i couldn't play now i i think you it yet stop stop stop stop stop those aiming stupid if about those guys could play anywhere anytime magic johnson will 6foot9 plan point god biking cleans up my you might uh sample though it intriguing matchup particularly because i think we have one of the best in which would probably if this generation i mean the last in the warriors have been an unbelievable yes i'm again wanted the best fighters all eu passed play at this generation yes.

lakers kirk allen iverson johnson jubal