35 Burst results for "Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnson"

Takeaways: Trump tightens grip on GOP, narrow Squad victory

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 d ago

Takeaways: Trump tightens grip on GOP, narrow Squad victory

"Donald Trump's election year tour of revenge continues as he oust more Republican members of Congress and helped strengthen his grip on the party in Wisconsin Michael's a wealthy Trump backed businessman won the Republican primary for governor defeating former lieutenant governor Rebecca clayfish and establishment candidate and Ron Johnson who has been embroiled in January 6 investigations easily won his primary but is considered the most vulnerable GOP senator up for reelection in liberal leaning Connecticut Lee or a levy had a surprising win over a more moderate rival a day before the primary when the FBI raided Mar-a-Lago Trump held a tele town hall rally for her and in Washington state 6 term congresswoman Jamie Herrera butler who voted to impeach Trump conceded defeat I'm Julie Walker

Rebecca Clayfish Donald Trump Ron Johnson Connecticut Lee Wisconsin Congress Michael Lago Trump Tele Town Hall GOP FBI Jamie Herrera Butler Washington Julie Walker
Olivia Newton-John, who played Sandy in 'Grease,' dies at 73

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 d ago

Olivia Newton-John, who played Sandy in 'Grease,' dies at 73

"Singer and actor Olivia Newton-John has died after a 30 year battle with breast cancer at her ranch in Southern California according to her husband She was 73 a marchesa a letter with a look at her life Olivia Newton-John once said that when she showed up in leather for the final scene of the movie grease the crew had no idea who she was Newton John also starred in xanadu and two of a kind Newton John sold more than 100 million records including magic have you never been mellow and please mister please Newton Johnson in a 2019 AP interview when she realized what the song physical was about she tried to stop its release but her manager said it was too late So I was like oh my God We better do a video Okay we'll do a video and we'll make the video about exercise

Olivia Newton Newton John John Southern California Breast Cancer Newton Johnson
GOP gubernatorial candidate to appear before House Jan. 6 committee

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 d ago

GOP gubernatorial candidate to appear before House Jan. 6 committee

"Wisconsin and three other states are holding primaries I'm Lisa dwyer on what to watch The Republican matchup in the Wisconsin gubernatorial primary elections features competing candidates endorsed by former president Donald Trump and his estranged vice president Mike Pence Wisconsin Democrats are picking a U.S. Senate candidate to face two term Republican senator Ron Johnson for control of the closely divided U.S. Senate in Minnesota U.S. representative Ilhan Omar is facing a primary challenger who helped defeat a voter referendum to replace the Minneapolis police department with a new Department of Public Safety Meanwhile voters in Vermont are picking a replacement for the U.S. Senate's current longest

Lisa Dwyer Wisconsin U.S. Senate Senator Ron Johnson Mike Pence Donald Trump Ilhan Omar Minneapolis Police Department Minnesota Department Of Public Safety Me U.S. Vermont
Why the Left Can't Have a 'Liberal CPAC'

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:16 min | 3 d ago

Why the Left Can't Have a 'Liberal CPAC'

"Also think this goes to polling and elections is the executive director of net roots was quoted as saying progressives tend not to fund infrastructure. Hello. Yeah. If I could tell liberal college students, we're going to send a bus to the school to pay for you to come out there, got a dorm set up. Here's a food card. I can get my numbers up to 5000 tomorrow, but I can't raise that kind of money on the left. We always get accused of getting funded by George Soros. I'd kill to be funded by George Soros. We've been told that none of us we've asked George himself George and he said no. But yeah, media matters says there's no way to recreate the conservative convention circuit without a more muscular progressive media to support it. I mean, it's just they say, even if the media environment were completely different liberals still might not flock to a cpac counterpart. And here's the quote, the Democratic Party is a coalition party of 57 different single issue voters. It's so much easier for the Republican Party to stay on message because there's so monolithic. On the left, it's like herding cats. Right. And he was talking about our conventions. We don't have Joe Biden's face on our shirts. We don't have tattoos of Barack Obama on our arms, the hats, the putting on your cars, have you ever seen a build back better on a T-shirt? He thinks few on the left would go to a progressive version of cpac certainly he wouldn't absolutely not. And they was talking about at our events like net roots. The protesters are our protesters on our side. Protesting people. Liberal enough. So what do we do about that before the mentor? Because certainly we've proven we could get this done. We heard it enough cats to get this amazing Bill through the inflation, right? How do we keep our coalition together? Because I think we just have to, I mean, you know what's funny because we always hear from Republicans personal responsibility. But that's really what it's about. It's about personal responsibility. You have to do what you can. If you can go register voters, go register voters if you can phone bank, do that. If all you can do is vote for whatever reason, go do that. Talk to friends. But I mean, yeah, we have what she said is right. And we don't get behind hate and they do.

Net Roots George Soros George Democratic Party Joe Biden Republican Party Barack Obama
Kimberley Johnson on How Trump Ruined Bipartisan Mainstream Media

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:08 min | 3 d ago

Kimberley Johnson on How Trump Ruined Bipartisan Mainstream Media

"We you pointed this out, but it's just this mainstream media stuff just drives me insane. You were saying, I don't even hear them cover. They've covered Democrats doomed so many times. I know you're missing the Democrats and pulled ahead in generic polling. There's new polling showing Biden and Harris beating Trump beating desantis showing Harris beating desantis. And they just don't, they're so hard. They never report on that. Yeah. They're just so we D to this storyline, right? And meanwhile, like you said, I think roe is a huge thing, but I think it's not even the only thing. Like, look at the most legislatively successful president since LBJ with a 50 50 Senate. I mean, it is truly every barometer 50 year low in jobless. I mean, the jobless numbers just came out Friday. I mean, I don't know how you can spin it anymore that Biden is an incredibly successful. What do you make of the approval numbers for him because to me it's just this relentless mainstream media coverage that I don't know how we overcome it? Yeah, I mean, I think I know CNN, the guy who wants CNN is like Friends with Donald Trump. Obviously, these people who own, I don't know how many there are who own the major cable. And then obviously the big papers. You know, they're wealthy and unfortunately in some cases wealthy business owners, which prefer Republicans because they get all the tax breaks. And you know, and then they have the friendships and whatever. And I don't know the behind stories, but yeah, there's, you know, the fairness doctrine going away. Right. And 24/7 news that is reliant on views clicks and attention. I think that's where it's coming from an unfortunately people are more concerned about clicks and dollars than they are about just getting the news out. What we used to be as a country where it came to news and we could all no matter what party you were in, go to that ABC News NBC News CBS world news tonight, whatever it was. And we could all just, you know, we might not agree, but we all believed them. Right. No longer happened. We killed that. Right.

Desantis Biden Harris CNN Donald Trump Senate Abc News NBC CBS
Why a $20 Million Donor to the Democrats Left the Party Over the Vax

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:29 min | 6 d ago

Why a $20 Million Donor to the Democrats Left the Party Over the Vax

"Us right now is one of my favorite guests super smart and interesting and also courageous. Steve kersh, Steve, welcome back to the program. There's a lot of things I want to cover with you here. The first of which it caught my attention, your team sent this over is kind of a interesting thing where you say that the American left or the Democrat party no longer shares your values. That you're a $20 million donor to the Democrat party and that you might jump ship. I'm super interested in this. Tell us about it. Well, I can't speak to any member of the Democratic Party. I mean, I'm given over 20 million to the party in the last 20 years. And I can't get a return phone call. I can not get anybody on the phone to talk about what's happening with the vaccine. That I've contributed to or even candidates that I haven't, nobody will talk to me in the Democratic Party. The only return calls I get are from people like senator Johnson in the Republican Party. And no Democrat will want to face the facts about the vaccines and the safeties and the safety signals that are in plain sight. And we can't even have a discussion. I can't even try to get a meeting even with doctors to talk to them. So nobody's returning my calls. So if they're going to ignore me, I'm going to ignore them.

Steve Kersh Democrat Party Democratic Party Steve Senator Johnson United States Republican Party
The 10 Most Important Races in 2022

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:37 min | Last week

The 10 Most Important Races in 2022

"Master dot com, Joe day dot com, team Herschel dot com, Ted bud dot com, Morse the number four Senate dot com, Adam laxalt dot com. JD Vance dot com, Doctor Oz dot com, smiley for Senate dot com, Ron Johnson for Senate dot com. That's not order of importance. That's the order of the states. Blake masters in Arizona, Joe Dan, Colorado, Herschel Walker, and Georgia, Ted bud in North Carolina, I think, oh, got that wrong. It's then C, but NH I was using the abbreviations. Chuck Morris in New Hampshire, Adam laxalt and Nevada, JD vents and Ohio, Doctor Oz and Pennsylvania, Tiffany smiley and Washington state and Ron Johnson in Wisconsin. That's the key. Those ten races. And I hope Peter jail gives them all Peter Thiel gives a $100 million to each of those races. Sets up an independent expenditure committee. If you're listening, Peter, I'm just saying, give a $1 billion away and win the country. It matters. It matters. We got to stop these crazy judges. Yes, we got to fix tax policy. We can fix that. We're going to have the House of Representatives in any event. And great candidates winning all across the United States last night. Republicans low end, they're going to pick up ten high end. They could pick up 40. Depends on how badly Joe Biden screws up and what happens with inflation. And right now, the misery index, I think it's baked in. The house is one. Democrats are giving up the retiring in droves. They're running away. And they should. Because redistricting plus the misery index means a Republican wave in the house.

Ted Bud Adam Laxalt Senate Ron Johnson Joe Dan Chuck Morris Jd Vents Tiffany Smiley Herschel Walker Peter Thiel Blake Peter New Hampshire Arizona North Carolina Colorado Georgia Nevada
FBI in for a Rude Wake-Up Call Over Hunter Biden Investigation

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:52 min | Last week

FBI in for a Rude Wake-Up Call Over Hunter Biden Investigation

"Joining us right now is a friend of the program someone who is super smart and does phenomenal research and investigations, Miranda Devine from the New York Post also author of the laptop from hell, Miranda, welcome back to the Charlie Kirk show. Thanks Charlie grot to be with you. Thank you. So I want to talk to you about this story here. FBI, director ray, are in for a rude wake-up call over the Hunter Biden investigation to your latest piece up at the New York Post NY post dot com. What do you mean by that? Well, on Thursday, Christopher wray, the FBI director appears in Congress before they oversight committee and the Republicans there are planning to really grill him on a few very sinister and concerning issues that have come to the fore in the last week. And you probably know already about chuck gresley has had several FBI whistleblowers come to him and give him information that basically the FBI just sat on buried the Hunter Biden information that came out in 2020 in August 2020 when graz Lee and Ron Johnson were both investigating the Hunter Biden and burisma corruption connections. And then again in October 2020, which was, of course, the month that we at the New York Post broke the first story from Hunter Biden's abandoned laptop and October was also the time the month that tiny bubble linsky, the navy veteran and former business partner of Hunter Biden came forward publicly to say that Joe Biden was involved in his family's influence peddling scheme that Joe Biden was the big guy who was slated to get 10% of one of the Chinese deals and that Tony bubba linsky himself had met twice with Joe Biden to discuss these deals. So

Hunter Biden FBI Miranda Devine Charlie Kirk Charlie Grot New York Post Ny Post Christopher Wray New York Post Chuck Gresley Miranda Graz Lee Burisma Ron Johnson Congress Linsky Joe Biden Navy Tony Bubba Linsky
Supreme Court Political Hackery Revealed in Sam Alito's Rome Speech

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:22 min | Last week

Supreme Court Political Hackery Revealed in Sam Alito's Rome Speech

"This political hacked Ness goes all the way up to the Supreme Court. I guess there's a new low, but Sam Alito is she wrote about Sam Alito went to Rome to correct some jokes after overturning roe. He said apparently Sam Alito went to Rome and let his free flag by guaranteeing he is now known internationally as a head. Yeah, this is him. Here we go. I had the honor, this term of writing, I think, the only Supreme Court decision in the history of that institution that has been lambasted by a whole string One of these was former prime minister Boris Johnson. But he paid the price, what really wounded me was when the Duke of Sussex addressed the United Nations and seemed to compare the decision whose name may not be spoken with the Russian attack on Ukraine. Wow. The crisis test has Boris Johnson and Trudeau. I mean, now he's admitting it. I mean, it's out in the open now. You've got a Supreme Court, the majority of whom are conservative hacks. Right. And we'll deliver for all the people who and Sheldon White House is right about this and he's been right about this for three years now. He's delivering for their donors the same way a congressman would.

Sam Alito Supreme Court Rome Boris Johnson Ness Duke Of Sussex United Nations Trudeau Ukraine Sheldon White House
UK, Irish leaders join funeral for peacemaker David Trimble

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

UK, Irish leaders join funeral for peacemaker David Trimble

"The leaders of Britain and Ireland have joined for the funeral of politician David trumbull who shared the noble peace price for helping to end decades of violence in Northern Ireland Trumbull who led the Ulster unionist party for ten years became a key architect of the 1998 good Friday peace agreement after he reversed his long held opposition to negotiating with the IRA linked party Sinn Fein then he shed the noble Peace Prize with moderate Irish nationalist leader John Hume for ending the sectarian conflict Britain's outgoing prime minister Boris Johnson and Irish premier mihiel Martin joined trumbull's widow and for children for the service at harmony hill presidential church near Belfast trimble died on July 25 at the age of 77 I'm Charles De Ledesma

David Trumbull Ulster Unionist Party Ireland Britain Trumbull Sinn Fein John Hume Mihiel Martin IRA Boris Johnson Harmony Hill Presidential Chur Trimble Belfast Charles De Ledesma
The latest in sports

AP News Radio

01:00 min | Last week

The latest in sports

"AP sports I'm Dave fairy Yankees outfielder Aaron judge has become the second fastest player with 200 career home runs as he smacked his major league leading 42nd of the season in an 8 two pounding of the royals only Philadelphia's Ryan Howard has done it faster Judge is batting four 47 with 9 home runs in 21 RBIs in ten games since the all star break White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson was hit with a three game suspension and fine for making contact with an umpire on Friday Anderson played on Saturday after appealing the penalty Novak Djokovic is holding out hope that he'll be able to compete in the U.S. open despite not being vaccinated against the coronavirus The 21 time Grand Slam champion says on social media that he's been training as if he'll play it flushing Meadows Tony finau shot a 7 under 65 to match Taylor pendrith at 21 under through three rounds of the rocket mortgage classic Phenol is trying to become the first to win consecutive regular season tournaments in three years And Henrik stenson is the leader at the live event in New Jersey three shots ahead of Dustin Johnson I'm Dave ferry AP sports

Dave Fairy Aaron Judge Ryan Howard Tim Anderson Yankees AP Royals White Sox Novak Djokovic Tony Finau Philadelphia Taylor Pendrith Anderson U.S. Henrik Stenson New Jersey Dustin Johnson Dave Ferry
New Founding's Matt Peterson on Justice Alito, Christian Nationalism

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:20 min | Last week

New Founding's Matt Peterson on Justice Alito, Christian Nationalism

"With us right now is a great American patriot cofounder and general partner of new founding and also the president of American firebrand super PAC and friend of the show. Matt Peterson Matt, welcome back to the program. Hey, it's great to be here, Charlie. So Matt, I want to get through a couple news items here. But first, I want to play a piece of tape here from justice Alito's speech. I think he gave it in Rome, which is super scary 'cause that's where the Catholic Church is headquartered and not allowed to do that. And I want to play cut 94 here. And the way the media has responded is a new line of attack that you can see in kind of the smart coordinated circles, the people that are considered to be smarter than not. However, they are all kind of coordinating their attacks around Christian nationalism, play cut 94. Over the last few weeks, since I had the honor, this term of writing, I think, the only Supreme Court decision in the history of that institution that has been lambasted by a cold string of foreign leaders. Who felt perfectly fine commenting on American law. One of these was former prime minister Boris Johnson. But he paid the price, Matt kind of mocking Boris Johnson there, Sam Alito, who I think is the best thing George W. Bush ever gave us, probably my favorite member of the court. They're attacking him as being a Christian nationalist. What do they mean by that, Matt? Well, in their minds, of course, they think Christian nationalism is a smear. They think both of those words are bad. And if you put them together, it's too bad things. And that's one big bad thing, and it's a scary monster, which I think in their minds means something like handmaid's tale and enforced Christian religion. They think it's racist too, somehow they seem to only regard whites as Christians, interesting. But white people who are Christian controlling the country and shoving their views down everyone else's throat is what they mean by it. And the hilarious thing here is that neither of those words are bad and when you put them together, you actually get what I think millions of people throughout the country think is normal.

Sam Alito Matt Peterson Matt Matt Boris Johnson PAC Charlie Catholic Church Rome Supreme Court George W. Bush Handmaid
Justice Alito Cracks Dobbs Jokes Abroad

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:15 min | Last week

Justice Alito Cracks Dobbs Jokes Abroad

"Want to play for you justice Alito abroad, talking about European reaction to the Dobbs decision. Can we play cut number one of justice Alito yesterday? A few weeks since I had the honor, this term of writing, I think, the only Supreme Court decision in the history of that institution that has been lambasted by a whole string of foreign leaders. Who felt perfectly fine commenting on American law. One of these was former prime minister Boris Johnson. But he paid the price. Post hoc ergo propter hoc, right? All right, so that's a joke. And don't take it as anything other than a joke, because of course, former prime minister Barack Johnson is still the prime minister, but justice Alito is gracefully telling non Americans that they don't get the make Supreme Court law. The United States Constitution dictates what Supreme Court law is. And even if they made a mistake, 49 years ago with roe and doubled down on that mistake, 30 years ago in Casey, now the court has it right. It is up to the states.

Alito Dobbs Supreme Court Barack Johnson Boris Johnson Justice Alito United States Casey
The Top 10 Cities With Emerging Housing Markets

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:59 sec | 2 weeks ago

The Top 10 Cities With Emerging Housing Markets

"The number one city for emerging housing markets yesterday. Elkhart goshen in Indiana. Number two, Burlington, North Carolina. Number three, Johnson City, Tennessee, number four. Fort Wayne Indiana, Indiana doing very well in this study. Number 5, billings Montana. It comes with a snow shovel from Andrew and Todd when you buy a house there. Raleigh, North Carolina kind of makes sense to me. That's number 6. Rapid City South Dakota is number 7. It felt a little bit in the rankings every year, but still that people are moving to Rapid City because it's affordable. North, port, Sarasota, Bradenton, Florida, is an 8th place. Again, we're talking about low cost states, low tax states. Number 9 to pick up Kansas. To pick a Kansas and rounding out the top ten improbably the salia Porterville. Dwayne is looking at me like, this hell yeah, Porterville? Yeah. You ever been to Visalia? I'm not sure that that would be my recommendation to anyone moving out of favor. For about 5 minutes.

Elkhart Goshen Indiana Rapid City North Carolina Johnson City Fort Wayne Burlington Tennessee Montana Raleigh Todd South Dakota Andrew Bradenton Kansas Sarasota Port Florida North Dwayne
Steve Bannon Says We Need a Real Investigation for January 6

The Officer Tatum Show

02:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Steve Bannon Says We Need a Real Investigation for January 6

"I wanted to just ask you a quick follow-up question because I know you're very busy man and I think that you have a unique perspective here on January 6th. So obviously they're charging you. You've been found guilty, right? You've been found guilty of contempt of Congress. However, nobody has ever had any legitimate prosecution done to them, jail time, sentencing or anything done to them. As far as I know. So we know that once you appeal, it appears that this is going to be something that you can win. However, why are they doing this to you? When they've never convicted anybody, nobody's ever, I mean, I convicted, nobody's ever going to jail over this. So why are they doing this to you and what is your thoughts on January 6th? Is it a hoax or should there be a legitimate investigation in the January 6 just not the way that these Democrats are doing it? Officer there has to be, I think, a detailed and thorough and proper investigation of it and what I mean by that is a real congressional committee. Remember, people in the minds will think back to board gate and other Iran contra and other big investigations who had the way Congress is set up. You have a majority who's a majority. Now it's the Democrats, but you have minority minority has a ranking member had minority council. They have the right to cross examine the right to see the evidence, all that. We need a real investigation on January 6th and by that, I mean, you know, how to actually babbitt get murdered. What's the Intel? What would the Intel briefings? We know from House members who have already sent a letter to preserve your documents. The house members on the administration committee saying, hey, we've got intelligence briefings the day before and a couple of days before that that had no idea of any of this stuff that was going on totally different than what happened. We need to know the FBI's involvement. We need to know the CIA's involvement DHS involved that what happened to the president Trump's call for the National Guard troops. We need to find the 14,000 hours of footage that hasn't been released. There needs to be. There is going to be in January with the new Congress when we take control. There's going to be a real committee. I think headed by a Jim Jordan or Matt Gaetz and you're going to have, you're going to have Democrats in the minority as ranking members, they'll have their and I think part of that's got to be to get to adjudicate what also happened on 3 November as part of it. Because remember, the January 6th was a build up that came from the big steel. You've got to get to Arizona. You got to get to Wisconsin where they're trying to do certified air. They're trying to be certified in Arizona. So this investigation has to be thorough. And I think what it has to go by the rules that traditionally had in Congress.

Congress Intel Babbitt Administration Committee Iran Matt Gaetz DHS FBI Jim Jordan National Guard CIA Donald Trump House Arizona Wisconsin
Steve Bannon Found Guilty of Contempt

The Officer Tatum Show

01:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Steve Bannon Found Guilty of Contempt

"Well, I really appreciate you coming on. I know we had a few technical difficulties, but the reason why I want you here, not only because I respect you as a man, I respect what you're doing, you have been a game changer in this movement. And I want you to have a voice at least on the influence that I have. I want you to have a voice pertaining to this whole contempt of Congress situation. Can you explain to the listeners what happened and why this is a hit job and not an actual, I would say an actual charge with merit. Well, look, for the audience, maybe I haven't solved the details. I was found guilty on Friday in a federal court on misdemeanors related to the contempt of Congress, the jury, which was a working class journey and we got the book. We never put on a defense. So the jury, I respect their decision, given what they heard in the courtroom. The courtroom was essentially nothing. I mean, it was just basically what the subpoena that called me to Congress to testify and then my lawyers letters saying I couldn't list because president Trump exerted executive privilege.

Congress President Trump
Flashy Preacher Robbed in Pulpit During Sermon

The Officer Tatum Show

01:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Flashy Preacher Robbed in Pulpit During Sermon

"I want to talk about this pastor in New York. Now, you know, when I first read that a pastor was robbed, thugs came into his church, looked like an online church. I guess he has members there. And I got to read more of the story is developing because there's more stuff coming out as we speak. But when I heard that a pastor was robbed at gunpoint, who came in on live stream, robbed him, had everybody get on the ground. I felt bad for the pastor. I said, man, that ain't right. Look at his brother out here trying to do his thing, preach the gospel of the lord Jesus Christ, and he got brothers in that robbing and stealing and trying to kill him. It make any sense, but you know what I'm saying. But then, when I read the report and he said that they robbed when they came in and they were still a jury says police reported two suspects took $400,000 worth of jewelry from the bishop, his wife and possible other church gores. Now, you know, these other people ain't got nowhere near $400,000 worth of jewelry. However, the past and his wife probably got $399,000 worth of jury and everybody else in their wedding rings or whatever the case may be. Had the rest of the money.

New York AI
Steve Bannon Was Wrongly Convicted

The Officer Tatum Show

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

Steve Bannon Was Wrongly Convicted

"So Steve Bannon was being charged, he is charged with contempt of Congress. And we all have seen the justice system in these leftists environments where people can kill other people, people can burn down, buildings, people can do just about anything, sell drugs, use drugs, shoot up needles in front of everybody, you name it. A guy can threaten it to kill a Congress member. I mean, people can do all kinds of stuff, but if you're a Republican, and this political climate, they want to bury you. So article from Politico is his former attorney general Eric holder under Obama charged with contempt of Congress and nothing ever happened to him. This is facts. This is not Brandon Tatum just running his mouth. It says the house has voted to hold attorney general Eric holder contempt of Congress over his failure to turn over documents related to the Fast & Furious scandal. The first time Congress has taken such a dramatic move against a sitting cabinet official. The vote was 255 to 67 with 17 Democrats voting in support of the criminal contempt resolution, which authorized Republicans, leaders, Republican leaders, to seek criminal charges against holder. The Democrats support came despite a round of behind the scenes lobbying by Senate or senior White House and justice officials, as well as pressure from party leaders to support holder to Republicans, blank blank and blank blank. I don't want to say their name, a voted against the contempt resolution. Nothing happened holder. So we could draw the conclusion that nothing should happen to Steve Bannon.

Congress Steve Bannon Eric Holder Brandon Tatum Politico Barack Obama House White House Senate Holder
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"And i'm just going to start out to say i'm a fan girl and i am so excited i usually don't cold reach out to people to say i don't know you. Will you be on the show. But i was so thrilled to have listened to your main stage presentation at the world domination summit which also always sounds like the wrong name. It's like no. That's not what it's about it's about people trying to rethink community and service but people go you go where serb regard for like ten years but you are one of my very favorite main stage speakers and i loved your book and pecos just rereading it and actually rebranding all my notes. I wrote for the book because you are not just inspirational speaker. But you're massively inspirational and you have such a great way of looking at things. Can you maybe start us off in the conversation. With what the heck you actually are doing now. And they will back up with that as well. what is creative trespassing. And what are you doing with that. Well first of all. Thank you for acknowledging my talk. It world domination summit and in fact within the context of that talk on to have a difficult time with the domination part within the context of my talk at wd s. I changed a domination determination. I don't believe in hierarchy and that's part of creative trespassing is how do we disrupt these systems and mindsets that are keeping us stuck in sinking and feeling that we have to be a certain way in order to succeed in the world and in work and in fact the opposite is totally true. And i know this. Because i have used myself as a test case and also were with lots of people in my long career And how valuable. It's been to bring in notions from the outside or outside nece. Our laws are fears are scars into you. Know buttoned up up tight. Rigid workspaces were cultures in life. And and disrupt the system so that we can invite everyone into participate with more creativity innovation and imagination. And that's kind of been my jam. I come from hitter as it more formal way of learning and looking at the world and play writing more specifically. And so what. I've done with that. Is i actually go into major and minor corporations like in a fortune. Five hundred companies as well as arts organizations and universities around the globe and i've preached the good word of bringing more creativity to solving problems and challenges and obstacles in everyday life and the workspace. So that's been up to have been keynoting a ton around the globe. I was reading an ira as the kids say before. Kobe hit and now. I'm delighting in learning how to disrupt virtual speaking and it's so much fun for me. It's unfair really i. I really like when once you're able to see and and celebrate a innovative process. That doesn't change if even if you change forms so just because i'm not on stages i can't play with the frame of the camera of a computer which i do all the time so this makes me so happy because i have been pushing in challenging people on this for months now is that people seem to think that they're supposed to sit in the center of this little static box ignore the mizzen seen of it and somehow have the perfect home behind them and And and not that. This is a window we can play with and that you can play on your side. I complain on my side and people seem so stack yes well. And that's it you know. I learned about creativity and studied it from the the nineties onward. And there's a seminal study that you probably know your listeners. probably know it's patricia. stokes talking about the. How constraints are actually fuel for creativity patricia. Stokes i hadn't heard a patricia talks by had heard about the constraint opportunities in creativity yes what she proved early on. Look it up. Is that out there are we are sort of born with this. Innate ability to solve problems like everyday problems with creativity and by creativity. I mean imagination if you can't figure out one way of doing it you're out another and we're all born with that. The problem is is over. Time these systems that are keeping a stuck have taught us not to trust her instincts not to follow her machination. But in fact stay so Trespassing is all about what i'm doing is bringing it saying. Hey constraints are great. Let's embrace them and allow them to fuel us to figure things out so for example. I'll start talk in a look into the frame of the camera. And i'll say hey everyone let's le- constraints are awesome. Let me prove it to you. See that frame. See how little it is. Let's leave it and enter the frame in an entire new way and you'll have people leave the frame and then come do like the imaginary steps downward where they're like stepping on an escalator or the pop up or they'll dance into the frame and so now they see a constraint as a wonderful opportunity to play in to use your imagination and one of my friends did that with having a cooking class where everyone drag their cameras into the kitchen and we're cooking and drinking from different angles and making ravioli from scratch and seeing how different you could be cooking but still all cooking ravioli and getting fairly drunk thinking about ways to do things differently. it's interesting because we're such storytelling people at the same time that we think there's a story and then we get stuck in that story instead of breaking the story to your story creator. This is really kinda where you came from. And i'm gonna backtrack a while here. Because you tell a a lot of your good origin story which i adore but you you from a creative family did were you limited by things with your family or did they really help you see this as a broader space there were no limits in my family and actually had the opposite you know instead of constraints. I had sort of like wild parents who were just figuring it out how to be parents as we were figuring out how to be children as we were figuring out how to be family in the world so my mom was an immigrant and English as a second language for her so she was kind of like fumbling through getting jobs and odd jobs in. My dad was in new york. City taxi cab driver and didn't necessarily have a formal education but street. Smart all the way so we were kind of scrappy wild family. Things were great. They were great sometimes when we ran out of money. But whenever we'd have money we celebrate and get a steak dinner in that we'd have no money again so you know my parents the one thing that they really gave me. Foundationally was That anything i did which is good was like fantastic. You know if. I drew something or i shared with them. An idea came up with as a little kid. They're like that's fantastic. And so i sense that support in being able to explore. Be curious early age and i trusted that. Support the unfortunate part which lead to something fortunate was. I didn't have a map for how to be successful. Because here's you people. Who are like. I don't know how to be parents. Let's just figure this out so a lot of my friends. I learned later in. Life had like a formal map. Like you go to school and then you get a degree and then you get a job and the new. Do that job for the rest of your life and you become an adult. I didn't have that. So i had to forge my own unique way of being in the world and understanding my value and i majored in theater. I got a degree in play writing and if the ground running getting jobs doing not play writing. But i mean i was. I was a professional play right. It didn't didn't pay the bills. So then i started to to figure out my own map towards success.

patricia. stokes ira nece Kobe Foundationally new york
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Welcome to creative. Innovators g she johnson. I was so pleased to have megan elliott on the show. She is out in lincoln nebraska. But she's working with people globally to help build next-generation pirates magicians and wizards in the johnny carson center for emerging media. She's built a program from scratch but with the support of many organizations companies and folks at university of nebraska lincoln but. She has an amazing history in australia. Working with indigenous culture in contemporary art traveling throughout asia and europe putting together ex media lab. She has an amazing. I guess that word used to be called rolodex list of fabulous people in collaborators. But she's taken that magic and built a whole new program that she'll enjoy And.

megan elliott lincoln nebraska johnny carson center university of nebraska australia asia europe
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Well can be creative. Innovators g johnson. Today we're gonna be talking with the dub lab team we're gonna be talking with alejandra cohen notice who's its current director and mark mcneill known as frosty its founder. Bill share with us the journey. It took to get this company into i. Four profit than a nonprofit business and its trials and travails now as it's trying to continue to serve the various communities locally and globally during the pandemic and we'll start with mark sharing with how this all got started. What what got you into music can radio and when did you start becoming music fan creator. What's your journey. I'm say it was slow. A slow start but it was important. Start to think that you know. I didn't have wide access on a hatton. Mom had a small but thoughtful record collection. You know she was a music. Have devote t guess like you know. I am now. But she had folk music in a broad range of of sound so that that always interested me to kind of dive into her record collection but then radio. I was more of like an am gold. Kid i was born in nineteen seventy six of the aero where you could hear still lot of few entrusting of am radio and for me. I liked the fuzzy static and fluctuation between channels on on that format really light scanning the dial But i was just into mark credited grow up in a military family. So i moved all over move nine times before i was eighteen and moved all over the country all over the us and also in germany. But coming up by i was i would consider minnesota passive music listener. I would appreciate the sounds. That came my way. But i didn't seek out sounds but i started to get into this idea of of broadcasting came from a theater background in i started to think about broadcasting as a way to kind of project ideas and messages to people and to be able to play with kind of mystery of the magic of of the voice and sound as a way to reach people and so when i went to the university of southern california for my undergraduate studies. Nine i immediately is about check. Wonderful right my gosh. Twenty all again. It's all part of the continuum. You know that i am moving so you went to. Usc brown to usc. And i started in just communications. The most general thing that i switched to theater then i switched to music industry near the end up getting feeder music industry..

Usc mark mcneill alejandra cohen g johnson Bill minnesota founder director us germany
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Got MC Ren DJ yella and put this group together and you know, the rest was kind of History. And then the history came apart at a point in time and you then went out on your own. Yes, but but you already were out on your own so so you kind of returned to be a creative solar preneur. I mean you were creating music. What was the journey after NWA so it's kind of weird because when I made my first record even before NWA, I was just messing around with technology and I was using a little royalty money. I was getting to buy computers at sixteen Seventeen. I had you know, every computer that came out a trash which in layman's term a TRS eighty. I had the Commodore vic-20 the Commodore sixty-four, you know, I had the Commodore Colt computer. I had everything out there or just to learn how to do that. And the reason I got into it was because when we used to tour everybody with party and drink and you know smoke or do whatever they did but wage Video games came out people stopped partying and wanted to go to arcades and wanted to play with the little hand-held coleco visions and stuff like that. So I started looking at that like wait a minute. This is like the new crack here and I walk in like I need to figure this video game thing out. So talk myself out of code taught myself how to do sprite animation those kind of things and literally while I was touring with NWA I was going to siggraph conventions and I think it was comdex, you know back then and learning and learning about technology and and got approached by companies who saw me playing with their demo hardware and stuff and like who are you like? Why are you so good at this and tell them I have a lot of time on my hands, you know because of being in this group NWA we can't go outside much, you know, and I got invited to do. The first series of the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers do visual effects on that. I did Casper Addams Family Silver Surfer a bunch of other shows and movies and then Thursdays are hopped over to Fox in Iraq that will start working on video games and vivendi Universal and I just was doing to parallel universes at the same time and making a lot of money doing that and that's kind of how I ended up getting out of nwa's because I had this other career going on. We were getting ripped off by my manager and NWA. I had a hit record with a song called supersonic off my girl group. JJ fad that I produced that I brought over to our label and manager was taking that money too. So I finally got fed up and was like, I'm out. I don't care if we got a hit record with Straight Out of Compton wage doesn't matter if the police are after me and I'm not making any money. So I got me an attorney and went up to my manager and got it straightened out got a contract left and off. A happy camper. So on all of these things where you would an individual independent contractor. Did you create a team around yourself? Did you create a different team around each project? Did you work for the companies as an employee? What was kind of the the people structure that let you be who you were trying to be with so many different directions? Yeah. So when I asked first got invited to do the Power Rangers thing for Saban, they didn't know what to do with me. They were like, you're good. We want you to work on this and we know who you are. I don't care. I'll sit in the office. You know, I mean, I'll sit in the office and do whatever so I just literally sat in the office and I worked on stuff, you know, I worked on the projects just like everybody.

NWA Mighty Morphin Power Rangers coleco Saban Compton Iraq Casper Addams Power Rangers attorney Fox
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Welcome to creative innovators with Jean Johnson. Hi. I'm so glad to bring Arabian Prince to the conversation. Some of you may know him from his time with NWA others may know him from his really amazing DJ work or some of the great songs that have Beats from him under the hood latch, but you may not know how he got into all this trouble how he became such a multidisciplinary Creator and what he's doing now to help other people be able to create in this coven Tech world. My.

Jean Johnson multidisciplinary Creator NWA
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"So for your next big birthday, what do you want to have done by them? So the next big birthday is the 500 and I want to I want to grow this very successfully. I want the I want the VR piece to be done. I want us to see you with the other thing that I didn't tell you is that we are actually expanding into World music because we decided to move our end date of this program from the end of January to May so I have hopefully we can get back live, but that will also mean that we have more time to bring in more mentors and do World music as well. I want this to really I want us to really work on the expansion. Nationally. I know you and I have talked about that before to get it out virtually to other cities. How do we do that to activate more kids? That's always a it's always a thing on my every time I pitch is that how do we expand our cohort expand our diversity expand our reach and I think we're doing a good job of that. We've definitely grown from last year, but I'd love to expand more like, you know, what have we not mentioned? We are at the end of our journey. Together anything that you want to comment on Before We Say Goodbye. Well, I just want to thank you and all the other creative innovators that you have on your podcast. I think especially in a time of you know of covet and locked down. I think everybody amazing people who are pushing through especially the ones who are inspiring kids to do something creative and to hath hope I think that is so amazing. And so I just want to say thank you for highlighting for highlighting us and including the Inception Orchestra on this journey. So I asked people at the end off, who would you like to reach out to you? What do you need? What would you like? Who would you like to reach out? And then how would you like them to reach you? We're having a cool event on November 7th of November 7th. How would they how would they reach out? So we're doing a really amazing event. We're we're having master class is all day. It's a virtual event. It's free. It's just showing the type of work we do there's some panels so we'd love for you to go to our site. They'll be information on how to RSVP their wage, which is inception Orchestra..

Inception Orchestra
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Welcome to creative innovators with G Johnson. I'm excited today to share a kid in the condos interesting Journeys path with you said he has built from scratch the Los Angeles Inception Orchestra, which is not quite what it sounds like maybe it totally is he has a background in any thing from professional musicianship and longtime training to working for TRW and from a lot of this he brought together a unique new platform for young people to learn from professional composers how to become professional composers and the adds a little bit of tech magic in the top of it. So enjoy this conversation with a camera and he's going to be having some interesting events coming up or listening to this during twenty-twenty in the fall. So we'll have that in the show notes, but enjoy this conversation with Akira. Can.

Los Angeles Inception Orchestr TRW G Johnson Akira
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"What can we do like what time? Can we do what can I do? How can I exercise my agency to cause a difference in this community? Were you involved in arts and media arts in High School in your curriculum and college. What was the story there? Yeah. Absolutely. I've been I've been producing music since I was fourteen years old and Atlanta and my mom's, you know basement like I I've always been into music but I'm a huge lover of all kinds of music and I became a DJ on the side as I was pursuing my educational Pursuits and you know during a time when I was a teenager. I really wanted to be a professional rapper. I mean I was doing all of the concerts and I was opening up for Bow Wow at one point I was doing I was actually legitimately had an interest in doing that but then I realized that's not where my gifting totally was. And so ultimately I didn't decide to go into being a hip hop artist or a rapper and it just exposed me to being an artist so I still page Music for local artists it's something that's a hobby. It's more it's less of a a vocation but more of a calling if you will and so music is always been in my life also have djed for many years and I've also worked as a DJ at local radio stations here in Boston. I worked at wmbr which is that m i a g g whrb at Harvard University. I had a radio station called hip hop radio for several years and that radio station. I would interview people like dr. Cornel West 10th St. Coats Rock him from Eric BN Rakim other folks to really talk about hip hop culture and a very Dynamic way and so media is always been a part of my life out of my passion part of my calling and I saw a lot of that passion and a lot of these young eighteen twenty twenty five year old young adults. I began mentoring in Cambridge job. So as a way to really try to reach them, I would bring them to the studio during my my radio show and they would get to honestly see how to work a control board. They would get to see that you don't just go into an interview without knowing exactly who you're interviewing that you know, it was researched. You know, like wow, what is the Widow? All those books is because you do your research before you know, and so I saw essentially from start to finish how to put on a radio show and I did that as an opportunity to Mentor but also because most of them were are aspiring rappers and hip-hop artists and then in the midst of that I realized wow, if you are able to meet people where they their interests are you can expand their myopic Viewpoint and they can see the possibilities. So maybe you see yourself as The Hip Hop star. Well, it becomes that much more important for you to also learn.

dr. Cornel West High School Eric BN Harvard University Atlanta Boston Cambridge
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"And roll in that time in Saint Petersburg, which is very cool. But by trade, my dad's a civil engineer and my mom is a chemist, my brother who is six years older than me is very kind of interested in technology and did end up majoring in computer science in College. So there. was kind of this more or less technical side of things. But I would say art sort of ruled the roost in terms of my interest at a very young age and I drew actually before I even spoke. So I I started speaking quite late so I learned how to draw before I could speak which I I knew I could speak just was kind of maybe doing a social experiment on my parents because it was really fun to see them I remember seeing them react to things that I got right and I learned that I could sort of make this happiness happens very early memory but I do recall that that existed in my brain I guess I had a pretty good balance of both the arts and kind of more technical side of things while growing up I was really encouraged to express myself through visual art and music. I started playing piano when I was about six years old and was classically trained throughout my life. My parents sat me down at five and we're like piano or violin and I was like, Haha I guess piano because you don't have to tune it because my brother played cello and that was quite Painful beginning to my childhood of hearing him I thought it was beautiful. But my parents like. Stringed instruments it is a different world though they're much easier to carry. Our yes. I moved out of Russia when I was four we immigrated right before like during the fall of the Soviet Union basically. So my dad got us out of Russia to sort of give us ability to have a life that we could. Thrive in and I guess. I. Always kind of felt like the world was my sister in that way where I had the ability to be in a place where I could make kind of choices and create this. Sort of ECLECTIC and interesting future for myself. So that sort of where the basis of that mindset came from is I was told at a young age that you have possibilities here. So go and sees what want so that that left me with a lot of great work kind of how do you call it Why can't they think of this work ethic? Yes. That's what I'm looking for very good work ethic. That left me with kind of a really good. Forward, thinking attitude about what future with the future could hold and kind of made me a serial optimist, which is Great. So we talked before, we started on the recording about jobs and job titles and stereotypes around jobs. What did the young think she wanted to do and she grew up? To be honest. There were kind of two worlds that I was really interested in one was really wanted to be a librarian I thought it was very cool that they got to be surrounded by books all day long and The Libertarians that helped me in the library would always kind of dive deep into my interests and they knew so much knows very inspired by that. I also just liked I just liked the idea of hanging out in the library all the time, and the second path was always to be a teacher I remember recalling that I wanted to I don't know if this is a real award or not. I. Don't think it has I was like I'm going to win the best teacher in the world award what year so I don't think there might be something like that. But I really use that wash should play a national one in most countries I'm not sure if there's a worldwide one. Well..

engineer Russia Saint Petersburg Soviet Union
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Welcome to creative innovators was Jesse Johnson. In this episode, we welcome Sasha Same Oceana who has developed a tremendously unique career journey and a unique career destination. She shows with us what she does at JPL NASA in matching arts and augmented reality and virtual reality into storytelling immersion for scientists and engineers but also regularly people and even students who would like to wander through Web VR and were wandering through Mars she shares her story of how she got. To this unique job and unique role using the magic of technology and art, she'll share how her story of how she got. There is very nontraditional. She'll share how job titles are created evolved, but also how you can keep pushing ahead and asking for that next adventure and that next opportunity. So enjoy this conversation with Sasha and we'll share a bunch of links where you can get to these resources at the end of the podcast. Thanks for joining us. I.

Jesse Johnson Sasha JPL NASA
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"But we saw the writing on the wall we really knew what was about to happen, and so we ended the keys back to Branson and we set up a digital agency to start doing for other companies what we have learned how to do for Virgin over that seven year period of time primarily focusing on music and So when we set up our own shop, we ended up building out all of the consumer platforms for CBS radio as an example, which I'm was the largest radio company in America, we build AOL radio and Yahoo launched cast. We were hired by cricket wireless, which was higher by at and T. we were hired by them to design, develop and operate something called move music, which was one of the first subscription music services. In the states we had about three and a half million hang subscribers on that platform, and so we were able. To very rapidly grow our agency to a pretty significant size just by focusing on digital music experiences move was incredibly cutting edge at the time Debbie Mobile First Platform for listening to music, and it was a very early business model. I'm music on mobile phones it was, and it was also strategically very smart for cricket because it wasn't about necessarily building the number of customers it was about improving their average revenue per customer and lowering the churn of their customers, which were all low income customers that were paying by the month basically in cash. And it was great for the customer and it was great for cricket. I think the total aggregate value of that was about three hundred and fifty million dollars a year to cricket if you look at Churn reduction and average revenue per user increases. So it was great and for us, it was great because we got to build this really innovative music service that consumers lives. So we got to do a lot of that and ultimately we were agency by expanding outside of digital music so. Music was the thing we're most passionate about, but we were pretty good at building digital transformation, and so we ended up building out all of national geographics, mobile APPS WE BUILT APPS for consumer financial platforms like experience and Citibank. We built something for ticketmaster all the sports, platforms, Madison, Square, Garden, and the Knicks, and the Rangers Johnson and Johnson's global diabetes, platform management APP, for consumers..

cricket cricket wireless Branson Debbie Mobile CBS ticketmaster AOL Virgin America Johnson Yahoo Knicks Citibank Rangers
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"That night the night before or that morning from booking agents around the country who were basically offering up a ban. And it was basically a sheet that described what the band was, who they were, what label they were on what kind of pre buys you would expect from the record label and then they would basically be like, okay what's your bid? What's your deal send us over a bid? and. All the bookers in town would probably be like All right. I'm going to take a shot at this or now not really going to take a shot at this and you'd write a dollar figure on the top, and then you'd write what you were going to charge for like I'm going to recruit my security costs and some of the door costs and some of the bartender costs, and then I'm going to keep all the liquor but you're gonNA have eighty percent of all the door after I recall expenses and you'd facts that back. And then if they bit, they'd send you contract. You'd sign the contract and then you'd have to market right make your deal with the radio station you try and get the record label to buy as many tickets upfront as you possibly could. Put ads in the local paper and acting all kinds of things L. A. Weekly and anywhere else you could print up flyers and you'd hire people to go stick them in car windows and do anything that you possibly could just hit the ground that was not really scientific and the reality is that in a place like Los Angeles, what I realized was people did not go out just to see live music. They went out to see band specific ban. So if you bet wrong and you bought the wrong band, you could lose a lot of money and you are betting on that band sometime in advance to well in advance. Because you're trying to fill out your calendar as early can't we had seven days a week. To fill out four bands a day right. So that's twenty to thirty bands that you're trying to book every single week and you need to it as far advances. You can't because that gives you the opportunity aged feel comfortable you.

Los Angeles L. A. Weekly
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"And The letter meant nothing. Because I didn't have the authority. I. Wasn't a Business Guy I'm not an attorney I'm not I'm not an in-house, counsel. But it gave you cover. To go off and do what you did. If somebody happened to call up and say I see you're using our music who told you you could you could fax them at the time. Here's a letter from Ted that said I could do this. I would possibly get fired. In three or four years, I did that. I never got caught they never got caught and companies came back when they were funded because they were able to prove the model. And we were able to start an I'll give you one last example which I again I think I've used in your class. I got a call from Nokia they wanted one hundred thousand tracks. At a discount to give away with. Nokia music votes. And they said, we know you're wholesale seventy five cents we WANNA discount. So my running joke is that with my Oxford Cambridge, Warton training. I gave them twenty percent off instead of seventy five cents. It was sixty cents download. And I sold them the right to download one, hundred, thousand tracks. I then went to a guy named Shahar. I'm talking to tomorrow morning actually. And said, could you fulfil a premium model where scratched off a code on a plastic credit card size card insert in the phones? We're GONNA. Give away ten tracks with every fallen and they will go to a site and they'll redeem. He goes of course, I could build that. So he built it. But I knew that if I tried to run it. Through my digital business development food chain. They would say, how do you know this is GonNa work and you're discounting our music and and how does this brand protect our organization in every single scenario that's out there because that's business affairs is right I couldn't get through my department. So I went to a gun lycopene who runs special market city my he would do the pottery barn CDs and the by ten gallons of gas at Shell oil and get songs of the summer featuring the beach boys and Jen and dean premium items physical premiums though, and I said here take this deal..

Nokia Shahar Ted attorney Shell oil Jen
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"And I. Believe me I'm not making fun of it or lessening the impact of it, but I had gone to New York these the Mariah Carey album came out that morning the glitter album. And over the next few months, EMI cut three thousand people from the staff around the world. Can Nancy Berry the chairman and the Vice Chairman were dismissed and Alon Levy and David Munns came into run the company. And all of a sudden I found myself in a role where I had to write long. Winded. Proposals of why we wanted to do a deal with rhapsody we did the deal with rhapsody in December of two thousand one. and. Why would we want to have subscription and aren't we giving away everything if people can listen to anything, they want for ten dollars a month. Why would we want to do it and I had to explain you're GONNA get a consistent amount of revenue. It's not gonNA peaks and valleys based on is there a hit album or do we have three bad albums this quarter and so the combination of looking ninety days out to meet the quarter. To basically what are your revenues for the next three months? Are we going to meet targets? There was this. Pressure to come up with revenue opportunities. My argument was that subscription would be a long term revenue opportunity at the time. I was looked at as the guy who was going to kill the music business. I really believe that if I could hear anything I wanted whenever I want I'd pay ten bucks every month and we also had to get out of this. Ignorance that most people only by two or three CDs a year. If you can get ten dollars a month from everybody every month you've actually increased the revenue base for the industry but I had to do and I've said this year class and I've said, don't take what I don't I don't want your parents calling me telling me you got fired because you did what I did. I would be asked for substantiating data Mark Mulligan. Now would be somebody that you might go to for research at media research to get substantiating data on a particular idea at the time there was no data, but I would be asked..

David Munns Mariah Carey EMI Vice Chairman Alon Levy Mark Mulligan Nancy Berry chairman New York
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Have them serenade your your your partner for their birthday anniversary or you can set up a chat for somebody's birthday where you say, Hey, would you like to talk about guitars with my partner because they're really into the same kind of guitar that you play and so there are those kind of VIP things as well. And then there's companies like stage which has been around since two thousand nine pretty much had decided to bring the oars in for quite a while and and all of a sudden they had gross something like five, hundred, thousand dollars in two thousand nineteen. But in the first three weeks of covid lockdown, they had already seen eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars rolling Grosso. All sorts of different different platforms than each of them is a little little different. A company that we work at this bands in town, which is not a live streaming platform it's a concert discovery platform, but they quickly adapted to help all the artists who are having to pit to livestream to help them discover livestream. They did that by starting their own twitch channel and using that as a way to focus on. Up, and coming artists and help them get audience but then they also added a watch live. So now you can get notifications either via their APP or email when a band that you like is planning to do a live stream concert, you can find out about it but just with a notification. So there's a wide variety of stuff happening there when thing been interesting is. That people now have flexible time to be able to speak to each other and connect and it. It seems like that's been an accidental benefit for what's been going on as you've been able to bring voices together that may have been tangled up in travel or Mer projects, and now they've got time to actually that I, think that's a really good point I think that people. Are Frequently too busy. There's too much going on it. All of us feel pretty busy during this at least those of us who are in the in the working world as opposed to maybe the education world I don't know how it is. In terms of students. They may feel like they're going crazy because they have so much free time, but in work. Don't have so much free time. I just got what's happening. It's almost the opposite. Yes I think everyone's having that right? It's like you get this your schedule changes and there's no excuses not to do more and you end up doing more as a result and so that's definitely what I've seen. But you know I used to use this kind of hack for business networking in the music industry, which is show up in a city and say I'm here for two days. Can you meet with me that works so much better than just being in the same city as somebody all the time because it's like, yes, sure..

partner
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Welcome to creative innovators with G Johnson Yep that's me and I am excited to bring to you great people from all over the world who are making changes, breaking things and remaking them around various creative industry. So bring us your great innovators and we'll bring them to you here in the creative innovators podcast. Dmitri said thought about creating a new music technology leadership conference last year and shares with us how a fire right next to it was going to have it made him rethink on a dime hard create a live conference. He has stepped up now with music tectonics and his other work to create entire virtual thought leadership areas remotely in our work from home environment. He works lots of great music technology companies in shares, how they are thinking about music live streaming, expanding new releases, and thinking about digital access. He shares other tidbits on companies that are doing intriguing things in our current listened from home era. Enjoyed this conversation with Dimitri. tectonics.

Dmitri G Johnson Dimitri.
"johnson  " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"johnson " Discussed on Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

"Places for people to discuss what's happening in creative industries for innovators overall. But you can start out and find us at creative innovators podcast dot com from there over time, we're going to bring all sorts of opportunities to you as well as ask you who you would like to see on this podcast. What creative innovators would you like to hear their life journey stories and who do you already know that you're massively excited about? Think of this like a informal version of the MacArthur Genius Grant. You can help us find people which by the way, how that works that there's people that nominate people for those grants. You can nominate people to be on this podcast. So again, we hang out at creative innovators podcast dot com were also going to be hanging out in all the usual social media spaces. Plus having a space for people who'd like to be in the conversation to hang out outside of social media we're just getting started. So we're going to be sharing three final podcast of innovating music to be also our first three podcasts or I should say are second third and fourth podcast in we're going to be then expanding into all sorts of other dimensions and directions. Thanks again for listening to this pilot conversation and we'll be seeing you next on creative innovators. Thanks..