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Coronavirus Is Surging In The US

Morning Edition

07:27 min | 2 d ago

Coronavirus Is Surging In The US

"One, But however you define it. Corona virus in the U. S is surging. Some parts of the country air passing more restrictions to try to combat the record number of cases this as we have yet another Corona virus outbreak in the White House. NPR's Alison Aubrey is with us now. Good morning, Alison. Good morning, Rachel. So when we say the White House we mean in the orbit of Vice President Mike Pence, several aides to the vice president have tested positive for covered 19, including his chief of staff. Nevertheless, the vice president decided to keep traveling to keep campaigning. What's the reaction been to them? You know, the decision to keep his travel schedule intact was made in consultation with the White House medical unit, the spokesperson said. Yesterday and pencils office says this is in accordance with CDC guidance for essential personnel there, basically making the case he has Essential work to do, including on the campaign trail. But public health experts Rachel are really questioning this definition. Here's Josh Sharfstein of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He served in the FDA under President Obama. The vice president should be limiting interactions with others because he could be harboring the virus and he could wind up becoming infectious. And so if there are essential activities that he needs to do in person, he should take extra precautions to do those, but otherwise I think he should be staying at home. Especially given around the country, including places. Pence is scheduled to travel such as Minnesota. The viruses circulating widely, right, So let's talk about that. Alison. What do the numbers tell us about the virus right now? The U. S has been averaging about 68,000 new cases per day. This is about a 30% increase compared to just two weeks ago. In recent days, new cases have reached record levels in several states, Utah, Tennessee, Illinois in Chicago over the weekend. Stronger restrictions took effect of bars and restaurants must close earlier in the evening. This is part of a curfew in the city. Other parts of Illinois have stricter rules, too, including new limits on the number of people allowed together and Rachel. They're certainly a lot of reminders around the nation to stay. Vigil eight, right? Hospitalizations from Cove. It have been on the rice too. I mean, does that mean we're likely to see more fatalities in coming weeks? You know, probably there are still a lot of people dying about 775 people per day in the U. S. On average. That's a lot lower than the highs of last spring. Part of this can be explained by the increase in cases among younger people who are less likely to die. But Rachel there's also been an improvement in treating people in hospitals. Physician Anish Mata is an infectious disease expert at Emory University. He is also a principal investigator for the H M Death Severe trialled at Emory. Last week, the FDA gave this antiviral drug full approval. Red death, severe reduced recovery time to 10 days for 15 days and also importantly, run desecrated treated patients had less use of mechanical valve leaders and other advanced oxygen's airport techniques. Compared to patients who didn't get room disappear. Now it's important to point out Rachel. This is not a home run treatment. It hasn't been shown to significantly prevent deaths among very sick patients, but it does have some benefits and Allison doctors now have other treatments they can offer as well as from desperation. That's right. Doctors have more tools in the toolkit. Now they have You know steroids, such as Dixon Math Zone better information about when to put people on blood thinners. Overall, the death rate appears to have dropped. In fact, a new study that included an analysis of thousands of hospitalized patients found that at the start of the pandemic patients had about a 25% chance of dying. Now they have an 8% chance. So still high, but definitely improvement. Yeah, definitely So younger people, you know, you mentioned more younger people have been diagnosed with the virus. So as we start to think about Thanksgiving Is there any way Tio Tio ensure that college students don't bring the virus home as they leave for break? You know, if you have a college student coming home to you find out if they're being tested, many schools are offering or even requiring an exit test or a departure test. Just before students depart for Thanksgiving break. I spoke to David Paul Thiel, He's a professor at the Yale School of Public Health about this He says. Of course, it's easy to identify symptomatic people. But this isn't good enough. I'm worrying about the student who feels just fine but who happens to have been exposed recently and who could be heading home to visit an elderly relative. And so we don't want to be sending little ticking time bombs home for Thanksgiving. I completely agree that we need to have everybody tested within 72 hours of departure. Now. Not every school can manage this given the cost. But many campuses are offering departure test, including big schools like Ohio State and many small liberal arts schools, too. During such as families that have college age kids either, right? I mean, my own family. We're trying to figure out what we do anything. We're all trying to figure this out, right? Everyone started figured out. So what can you tell us of this boy now, Zim? Well,

Rachel Vice President White House Alison Aubrey Mike Pence FDA Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Emory University NPR President Obama CDC Illinois Chief Of Staff Yale School Of Public Health Josh Sharfstein Anish Mata Minnesota Chicago
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on WTOP

"C. Good afternoon. It's 403. Thanks for driving with us on a pretty Tuesday, October the 6th 72 degrees in Hi. I'm Hillary Howard. I'm Sean Anderson. Top local story We're following for you is your money Stocks took a sudden drop in the final hour of trading after President Trump tweeted that he is ending stimulus talks aimed at helping people during the pandemic. Now we'll have Maura on that part of stories. We go through the hour here on Double d t. O p. But let's find out where Wall Street end of the day live to double the GOP's Jeff Kleban. Jeff it was a whipsaw afternoon on the reaction was quick and furious. The Dow went from a 200 point gain to a 400 point loss in just a matter of minutes after the president said. Calling off stimulus negotiations until after the election. The Fed chair also had some not so upbeat news today. Your old pal said recent economic data may be masking the state of the economy thinks the unemployment rate is more like 11% and Powell went on to say without more aggressive and continued action by both the Fed and Congress. The economy's recovery may be weak and drawn out. It's not just unemployment benefits and stimulus checks that are on the line. There is MME, or eight for small businesses and airlines is on the line. Airline stocks tanked this afternoon. By the closing bell. The Dow was down 376 points the S and P 500 index finish a day down. 48, the NASDAQ Down 178 points. Those roll 1.5% losses. Sean Hillary, Thanks so much Jeff 404. There is growing concern in Congress that the Trump administration isn't doing enough to respond to the spread of Corona virus at the White House, and what that could mean for you local lawmakers are calling for stepped up contact, tracing to find out whose it risk around here. W T. Opie's Mitchell Miller has more from Capitol Hill, Virginia Congressman Don Beyer says the public's health is at stake here. Very concerned about the people we represent being exposed to the krone virus because of the reckless White House actions. Democratic lawmakers from Maryland D. C as well as Virginia have issued a statement pressing the White House to provide Mohr information on testing and contact tracing and to work with state and local health departments. The White House has defended its health protocols. But in a separate letter D c delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton has written the president's personal physician asking the White House why it's not working with the district on contact tracing, noting that the mayor has offered the city's assistance on Capitol Hill, Mitchell Miller, w T. O P New DC, is reporting the highest number of new daily covert cases it's seen since early June. Public health leaders want residents to remain vigilant they should hold the White House is not putting them at rests with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School. Public health Dr Joshua Sharfstein. People who live in D. C should have an expectation that the federal government isn't putting them at risk. No Tina one day jump in the Daily number of D C. Covert case is going from 28 up to 105 Sharfstein says. It could just be a reporting leg, and the mayor's office says it's monitoring developments looking for trends know that there are outbreaks. There happened to be one of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue right now, but it's there could be others. And so people just have to say that I'm Christi King W T. No Penis more about covert levels in Virginia, Maryland and D c double d t o p dot com. Search test for 06. Meantime, some local teachers have a 4 30 deadline hanging over their heads. That's less than half an hour from now, and it's when they have to tell Fairfax County whether they'll go back to their brick and mortar schools, taken unpaid leave of absence or just resign. It's a tough decision the union spoke to about 1300 members and discovered around half of them did not think it was safe to go back. The school system, the biggest in the state, wants to resume in person classes for at least some of those students. It says it needs enough teachers tto handle about 3.5% of its 188,000 students Stay with us here on the GOP in the minutes ahead, new concerns about Corona virus spreading among American military leaders will talk to our own J. J. Green. It's for Seven. You've got into public.

White House Jeff Kleban Virginia Mitchell Miller GOP Hillary Howard president Congress President Trump Maryland Fed Sean Anderson Sean Hillary Fairfax County Congressman Don Beyer
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:12 min | 3 weeks ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To speak with Dr Amos Adalja, infectious disease physician for Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. So, Doctor a Dahlia, widening the conversation a little bit and think about where we are as a country. You know, we're at this moment here in the New York area in New York City, where Alex Steel is where Public school students are our back to school. Now we have seen Children go back to school across the country and certainly more recently here up where we are, and I think probably where you are a cz. Well, what are we learning So far as Children do go back to school. We obviously saw a wave of college students go back and then subsequent cases. What are we taking from? Both the anecdotal evidence and some of the data that you're looking at. You have to separate them. They're not all the same. And we do know universities are special circumstance where they basically are minutes gathering. They're not going to be the same thing as a K through sixth grade. So far, we've seen kind of a standard approach. When you look at the K through six schools that some of them have done better than others and opening schools where the outbreak is uncontrolled is definitely challenging. And what you're seeing also is that schools need to have a plan in place to be able to deal with exposures and classes, explosions in classes as well as being able to Switch from hybrid to two in person very quickly and on a dime if necessary, So all of that's been challenging principles, but I do think that their overall we've not had any major concern from the school have not seen major outbreaks linked to them so far, So I do think that's encouraging. What we're seeing so far, especially now will know with New York City starting in person. Schooling being the biggest school district in the country. Well, and speaking of the word cluster is getting used quite a bit now whether it's in New York City. We've seen some clusters like 20 zip codes. They governor Cuomo highlighted. Also the top World Health Organization, officials said the outbreak at the White House constituted a cluster. What does that mean? What we can we contain clusters. We can came contain clusters, but it becomes more challenging because people will then have multiple contacts and you have multiple people with multiple contacts that becomes very hard for a contact or Eastern case. Investigator to get on top of The fact that it happened at the White House and people know who was at the White House on who they were in contact with so many cameras, and so many resources does make this cluster maybe a little bit easier than one that might happen at a rock concert. But but it is something that's going to be challenging because there are AH lot of variables. We have to figure out who was tested when when their exposure was who was a significant exposure who had been significant exposure? And clearly this cluster is going to be challenging, and I do suspect we will Seymour cases that emanate from that cluster because there's already the president. The first lady Ho picks Some journalists. I've been hearing about testing positive. Senator Lee, the president of Notre Dame, So they're like this likely was, you know, in retrospect, will be called a super spreading event. Right. So, Dr Adalja as we think about where we are, even in the seasons and the time of year, people have been very worried about, you know, sort of colder weather coming. People not being able to be outside as much we know that they're almost inevitably is going to be some sort of resurgence. How soon will we know? And what should we be looking for? To ascertain whether this is a very worrisome surge or whether it is manageable? What did the data and what sort of the inflection points that we should be thinking about? It's hard to know exactly when will no, I think we're already seeing some states having an uptick in cases and the percent positivity and increasing in hospital hospitalization. I do think that we're in that time period now where people are doing left things. Outdoor. So I do think that the next several weeks are going to be key understanding understanding. Does this virus accelerate in the winter? But what I would be looking at is percent positivity and hospitalization. Those numbers of the two most important ones understand where we are, and I suspect it will be heterogeneous across the country. It's not going to be all in one big wave. It will be many hot spots that flare And in the kind of alternating seesaw depending upon what's going on in those areas in the in the Sunday Sun Belt states just we round up the conversation here is we're waiting for President Trump looking at a live shot of the White House there, Marine one, So it looks like President Trump will be coming out of the White House to go on Marine one to Goto Walter Reed will have spent a few days Under care of doctors seems to be precautionary. We still hearing that he has mild symptoms than he's been working through the day. How do you treat a 74 year old man? That's been termed Ah, obese with Cove it How do you treat it? Well, you you do the basic stuff supplement. It's going to be kind of supportive care first, so that's going to the I V fluids. It's going to be Tylenol ibuprofen for the Fever's That's going. He's already gotten a Regeneron experimental. In a body cocktail you made If he needs oxygen, you may use drugs like Dexter met his own or Ramdev severe on him. It's you know, we're treating lots of 74 year olds with this, So there is a lot of Canada care types of things that are going to happen. He did get an experimental antibodies, so that's going to modulate his infection, and we don't quite know exactly how effective that will be, but hopefully it will blunt any of the severe complications. But it's going to be just a standard that we do for many of the patients. I get admitted all the time. All right, were really, really glad we got to catch up with you. Thank you so much. Dr Amos Adult Gia. He is infectious disease physician at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, each others on the on the phone from Pittsburgh and, of course Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health is supported by Mike Bloomberg. He is the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies, and Bloomberg LP, the owner of this radio station. The Johns Hopkins Folks have been Just absolutely critical to us and really the country understanding everything that's going on with this virus, Alex and so the latest headlines as you said, we are..

White House Bloomberg School of Public Hea New York City Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Dr Amos Adalja Alex Steel president Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Philanthropies Dr Amos Adult Gia World Health Organization President Trump governor Cuomo ibuprofen Senator Lee Ho Seymour
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:28 min | 3 weeks ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thanks so much futures negative. 57 1 of these, Matthew Winkler learned his editor in chief of Bloomberg News. When he had the audacity to hire me years ago. Was how much I hate bar charts because they're a little hard to read a lot of good research on this, particularly out of Yale University. So today, I have to admit he just kills me. With the mother of all bar charts. I'm sure you figured this out himself on keeping Corona virus at bay comma. Or not. And it's real simple, Matt when clearing your wonderful piece for Bloomberg opinion, China Yes. Us in the world. No, that's a telling bar chart, isn't it? Tom, you're always too kind, And it's always good to be with you. And I have Tio confess that bar chart that you refer to was created by my wonderful colleague Shinpei who I'm shocked columns Way talk about the data a lot, And it's usually shin, who figures out how best To showcase the data. So there's your answer now as to The big question. What's going on? Here? It is that The supposed correlation between containing Over 19 through contact, tracing and masking and all these other things that were supposed to dio and economic performance is true up to a point, but it's especially true. When it comes to China. The virus started there early. So you could say China had a head start. But since then China has had the slowest rate of increase covert 19, so it's clearly containing it and at the same time it's economy is the only one in the group of 20 that will be strong enough to show growth. Through 2020 and robust growth actually going into 21 22. You don't see that really anywhere else you do see South Korea, Even Germany. You know a handful of countries that have been very successful in the group of companies that have contained the virus, but It remains to be seen whether we'll see their prime minister of Italy Matt Winkler, comes out moments ago wearing masks outdoors may become compulsory nationwide. Can I assume China did that months ago? Yeah. I mean, that's the thing If you you know, go back to whatever. Six months ago, China was was the authoritarians self but getting people to behave the way one of them too. And That included Very strict, masking very strict contact. Tracing, uh and the scientists. We all trust here's hoping have told us that's the way to do it. So that it's interesting. The China obviously is by your reporting engine pays reporting done much better than the rest of the world here. I mean, what is the expectation? I mean, I think the economic data coming from most of the The world is pretty concerning at this point. Is there any expectation that the rest of the world can learn anything from China here? Well, you know, actually, the rest of the world should just be trusting its own scientists. And health experts. That's really the answer. And you know what? Shane and I did was we went first. Teo, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health For all this data. That's where it comes from. And we're also looking at what their prescriptions are for the rest of us and It's not a complicated recipe. Actually, it just means that everybody's got to follow it. And in I guess you could say in democracies that's proving to be Sometimes a top settle Matt. We have to leave it there just cause of breaking news in the rest of it. Matthew Winkler, former editor in chief editor in chief emeritus here, writing and exceptionally terse, smart note, how Asia's doing it different as well. As you can imagine. In 9, 22 Wall Street time and Washington time Paul Sweeney. The headlines were out. Speaker. Pelosi says the White House is not contacted her. But she says the Trump virus News is quote tragic. And very sad and have note of Paul swinging a gram in a difficult election about, says the Barretts. Supreme Court confirmation hearings, Quote on track. He also says that he spoke with Mr Trump this morning in views the news with great sadness. Yes, I think you know, smarter, Brennan suggested earlier, Tom, the nation's waking up to this news and and trying to get a handle on what it means across a whole host of issues. Theologian, of course, that campaigning Ah, prior to the election, the Supreme Court issues as well. It's just the health and well being of the President Trump and the first lady and their You know their inner circle. Tell my sisters, you know questions. That's what probably see of next several days. Extent that there's any more infection here, but clearly interjecting more uncertainty into this marketplace. A cz we see that with the futures with the S and P down about 1.7% here in the futures market, Negative 60 earlier now Negative 57 on SPX 33 10 is that level. On S and P 500 down 27,000 to 33 down 456 points but ball I would suggest with a bid falling away given this political crisis that The market's been orderly and it's disorder this morning. Yeah, I think so. Tom, I think this is kind of what you would expect for this type of news here. Obviously, a shock to the world and I think you know as it relates to what has been really moving the markets over the past several days is thie. You know the ebb and flow of potential fiscal stimulus package And I think what we're seeing in the marketplace today is maybe just this uncertainty suggesting that the fiscal stimulus maybe a little bit less. Certain that maybe even was over the last two days when we saw some strength in the market place so again that affecting the marketplace overall, so Andi jobs dated today. You know, probably a little bit, You know less welcome than expected on DH. That's also kind of weighing on the market. I would suggest headline again Speaker Pelosi saying she was tested for the virus this morning. Nancy Pelosi, 80 years old. Senator Grassley on the 25th amendment watch. And of course, this is all of the legislation out of the early 19 sixties on what do you do when a president is incapacitated? There's different sections of the 25th. Amendment, some for grievous illness, some for say, minor surgery or someone is has anesthesia. It worked. There's processes involved in Paul Sweeney. One of the people to focus on here is the president. Rest comfortably, is the senator from oil? Not Mr Grassley. Paul Age 87. Yes, Yes. So lots of President is the youngster in this way We wish him well resting at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Futures that negative 54 stay with us. This is Bloomberg..

China Matt Winkler Matthew Winkler president Tom Bloomberg Speaker Pelosi Paul Sweeney editor in chief Supreme Court Corona Bloomberg News Yale University Senator Grassley Mr Trump Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School The market Shinpei South Korea
Worried that flu season and coronavirus pandemic could overwhelm hospitals, health officials urge public to get flu shots

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | Last month

Worried that flu season and coronavirus pandemic could overwhelm hospitals, health officials urge public to get flu shots

"Health experts are still concerned that the typical flu season will be much worse due to the pandemic now is more important than ever that people get their flu vaccines were very, very safe and a moderately effective doctor Daniel Salman is director of the Institute for Vaccine Safety at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Corona virus and influenza have similar symptoms. So what should you do if you're not sure which you might have. Dr. Andrew Prakash co directs the Johns Hopkins Centre of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance. He says, contact your doctor, but don't just show up at their office. Let them know what your symptoms are and have them guide you through the process of where you're going to. Go to get tested. And for what? Michelle Bash w T o P NEWS.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Influenza Johns Hopkins Centre Of Excell Daniel Salman Influenza Research And Surveil Michelle Bash Dr. Andrew Prakash Institute For Vaccine Safety Director
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:51 min | Last month

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Begin with a headline from the Bloomberg Professional Service, France's daily Corona virus cases have jumped to a record 16,096 this after the U. K reported the Most new Corona virus cases since the pandemic started. Stocks were climbing on speculation that talks about a new round of economic stimulus will resume amid growing concern over a resurgence in Corona virus cases around the world. We're off session highs still green on the screen and update here with the S and P off 28. Now at 30 to 65 up 9/10 of 1%, the Dow is up 223 points of 8/10 of 1%. NASDAQ is up. 109 HARD by 1% 10 Years up one 32nd of the Yield of 10.66% gold up 4/10 of 1%, 18 70, Beyonce and West Texas intermediate crewed up 1% $40.30 a barrel Recapping stocks higher SNP, rebounding on a news report that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin plans to restart negotiations on government aid. I'm Charlie Pellet. That's a Bloomberg business Flash Right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Well, we've been giving you some updates about the virus. Clearly it is of concern to investors. It's of concern to the people who run colleges and companies and all of us just as human beings so Let's check in Get the latest with Dr Shelley Hearne, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Advocacy, part of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Of course, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health its support by Mike Bloomberg. Founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies and founder Bloomberg LP, the owner of this radio station, She turns on the phone from Charleston, South Carolina. I love charged Charleston, South Carolina fortune. So I'm going to start there. Dr. Hearn tell us what life is like down there because any time we're talking to somebody outside of our little bubble as it were We want to know what's going on. Well, you know, we all have our bubbles all around the world. But Charleston, you know, you can always count on good food and lovely people. So it's it's It's not a bad bubble. It's not a bad bubble. But let's talk about a nice and family down in South Carolina just outside Charleston. And I know the numbers have been tough in terms of the virus. Well, the number is South Carolina is still struggling as you are tracking around the country who we're seeing different searches different improvements in places and it really kind of boils down to how seriously people are taking public health measures. And unfortunately, just like variations in food from the south to the north. We're also seeing variations in the acceptance of mask wearing the care with social distancing. And so that's what's going to keep this virus alive and well around the country is If we get complacent on and put our guard down if it will return. Well, you know, just a follow. I mean, you are so involved in time in terms of, you know, understanding, health and cities and communities. You know, Jason and I ke that there's you know, one thing you wear a mask. That's one thing we see. Repeat over and over. But there's also that idea of You know, taking care of your community? I mean, this is largely with this virus is about that's why you wear a mask. It is. I mean, you know, we're hoping for vaccines were looking for other kinds of therapeutics. But the really important element is even if those come on board The absolute best thing we could do for our families and for our neighbors, and our entire kind of economic tribe ability is to really practiced these basics in public health. It may not be sexy, but that's actually what's going to make the biggest biggest difference. And if we all did this together Oh, and did it. You know universally, we could probably really dampen this down, Get ready for a tough winter and do much better. I worry so much about our economy that if we if we focus in on just stemming and suppressing this virus by Community measures. It's what's really going to help open up our ability for strong, healthy commerce down the road. So Dr Hearn talked to us about the public health system because you know, Carol and I have talked on this program a lot about this notion that The virus has served to accelerate so many things for good and bad. It is forced us to deal with some things that maybe we didn't want to deal with And now we have to And especially when you parrot with what we've seen in terms of a really reckoning around systemic racism and some of the deep, deep inequalities of the great chasms that we've seen and Having spent a lot of time in South Carolina, having grown up in the south. I know that a lot of that is so apparent there in your state, even in Charleston. What do we need to do at this moment where we do have something of an opportunity to start to close that gap when it comes to public health? Well, it's a it's a brilliant question is the exact one that we need to focus on. So just like, you know, a healthy company needs good roads that needs good education system so that Workforce, eyes ready and prepared for the job. We actually need to have that same kind of capacity in our public health system. These are and the good thing of the pandemic its spring in alive. You need to have at the genealogist. You need to have labs. This is every day. It's not just when of virus is spreading. But we use those tools all the time to keep us healthy and well and actually..

Charleston South Carolina Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Bloomberg Professional Service Mike Bloomberg Johns Hopkins Center for Publi Bloomberg Philanthropies Dr. Hearn Charlie Pellet Beyonce Founder France Dr Shelley Hearne Steven Mnuchin U. K
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:13 min | Last month

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We're really excited. Tio have Michael Jordan join a draft Kings teams up with Michael Jordan. All this and more coming up in the next hour of Bloomberg best. You know, health officials are increasingly worried about the link between colleges and universities. In the spread of covered 19 and Bloomberg's Francine Laquan Kaylie Lines had a chance to ask Lauren sour about it. She's assistant professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins. Let's listen in. We're seeing that there is a correlation, and I think a lot of people are trying to study just how strong that effective on school's re opening in local clusters, particularly when you think of schools with older Children and with adults, so colleges, universities high school things like that. One of the biggest challenges is making sure that the teachers and the family members are safe. And so we don't want schools to be driving clusters in Towns and communities where they've gotten the virus under control. So this is particularly challenging when you have a police like a university or college that's bringing people from other states, Other communities That may have large outbreaks. And so we're seeing these outbreaks pop up in many places where schools are not taking the virtual approach. So what does that mean? Learning? I mean, if you're you know to keep, I guess citizens safe. You need to close restaurants and bars. But, you know, keep the schools open so that you don't have to close anything. Everything at once were cases to really search. Yeah. I mean, it sort of seems like in the United States who has chosen to keep bars and restaurants open over to over being able to open our schools. And so when the first step to being able to open schools safely is the clothes is to stop community transmission, so that When you have to do the contact tracing associated with small clusters of outbreaks or even single cases in the schools that you can actually track where the infections are coming from and track where the transmission is coming and going. And that's really hard to do when you have ongoing community transmission, and we do know that these bars and restaurants are part of what's driving community transmission. So you know the idea is that you limit the activities that don't need to happen going out to bars going out to restaurants, and then it's safer to open the school's Lauren, where I am here in New York. I had to wear sweater toe work. Summer has definitely over fall is coming. What happens when a people can't spend as much time outdoors and have to go indoors and be that collides with the regular flu season. Yeah, we're really concerned about that sort of intersection towards the end of fall. You know, you hope that you that everyone can sort of stay outside and be outside for as long as possible. But it has impact in a lot of places. So you're gonna have mixing of people in smaller spaces consigned spaces where they may have gone outside. If they don't limit their activity, then they're just gonna do those activities inside. Same with bars and restaurants. So if people can't go to bars and restaurants, but they're allowed to remain open and they can't set outside. Perhaps we'll sit inside. We have seen that in some places that have flu early, like in Australia, the cases they're lower, which is great to see. It means a lot of the activities that we're doing for Corona virus are Helping to sort of called the spread of flu as well, and we would expect that, to an extent. I think we're hoping that happens here, too, that we have a very light flu season because the challenge was having flu season Corona virus First, We don't know that co infection may cause disease It may cause people to get thicker. But also it's really hard to differentiate on a quick screen in the emergency department, for example, between Corona virus symptoms and flu symptoms, so we want to keep people out of the hospital who have flu we wanted, you know, keep those eyes open for Corona virus cases and keep people separated as well. I just quickly want to touch on treatment. The debate over a convalescent plasma and its efficacy, continuing to rage at the Weighing in saying there's no evidence to prove that it actually works. What do we know? And what don't we know at this point, so common has been used in a lot of approaches to a lot of different seasons. So I think we can say we know it's relatively safe even in cold and we've seen that the safety data look pretty good. We Don't know much about a efficacy. We're still learning a lot. One of the challenges that moving forward with the approach that happen now is, it may diminish the people who are willing to sign up for clinical trials. So then we then it becomes limited how much we can actually learn about efficacy. And so you don't want to just do something just because it's safe. You want to take Carlos and plasma only it's also effective in in treating, and Karen Corona virus. And in the current situation, we've had several negative studies that haven't showed that efficacy that it's you know that it's working yet, and I have my hope is that people continue down the path of doing the randomized control trials doing that rigorous clinical study. So that we don't just rely on observational data, which can be fraught with different biases, Different problems, study design, and that sort of retrospective look back at the data can be problematic when you're making those assessments about how effective it really wass Lauren, who will have the formula for a vaccine that will be easy access and distribute to go first. How far away are we from the in the U. S. Here. We have two studies one by modern and one by five. Bio tech. You know the goal of general somewhere around 30,000 participants. There's been talk of stopping those early. But the key is to get to that point where we've had enough cooling infections in that study population that we can understand the efficacy of the virus, and some people are predicting that we'll have one by the end of the year. Lately less optimistic. I think sometime next year we can see will probably see some really good vaccine data that allows us to push forward. There's work being done on who gets it right. So that's going to be the next big hurdle is how do we prioritize? That that vaccine that works really well, that was Laurence, our assistant professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg founder Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies. And coming up apples, massive push into five G in some other things that has off..

flu Lauren Bloomberg Johns Hopkins Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School assistant professor Michael R. Bloomberg Michael Jordan Bloomberg LP Francine Laquan Kaylie Lines United States Kings Bloomberg Philanthropies Karen Corona Towns Laurence New York Carlos Australia founder
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:39 min | Last month

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Best stories of the week powered by 2700, journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries around the world into these Pellegrini on this weekend edition. A Bloomberg best We're seeing these outbreaks pop up in many places. Health experts grapple with college cluster's distorting at the beginning of the end, but I would say we're Coming up on one of the more uncertain periods in American history. Billionaire investor Bill Ackman grapples with political reality. We're really excited, Tio have Michael Jordan join draft Kings teams up with Michael Jordan all this and more coming up in the next hour of Bloomberg best. You know, health officials are increasingly worried about the link between colleges and universities. In the spread of covered 19 and Bloomberg's Francine Laquan Kaylie Lines had a chance to ask Lauren sour about it. She's assistant professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins. Let's listen in. We're seeing that there is a correlation, and I think a lot of people are trying to study just how strong that effective on school's re opening in local clusters, particularly when you think of schools with older Children and with adults, so colleges, universities high school things like that. One of the biggest challenges is making sure that the teachers and the family members are safe. And so we don't want schools to be driving clusters in Towns and communities where they've gotten the virus under control. So this is particularly challenging when you have a place like a university or college that's bringing people from other states. Other communities That may have large outbreaks. And so we're seeing these outbreaks pop up in many places where schools are not taking the virtual approach. So what does that mean? Learned? I mean, if you're you know to keep, I guess citizens safe. You need to close restaurants and bars but keep the schools open so that you don't have to close anything. Everything at once were cases to really search. Yeah. I mean, it sort of seems like in the United States who has chosen to keep bars and restaurants open over to over being able to open our schools. And so when the first step to being able to open schools safely is closed, is to stop community transmission so that when you have to do the contact tracing associated with Small clusters or outbreaks, or even single cases in the schools that you can actually track where the infections are coming from and track where the transmission is coming and going, and that's really hard to do when you have ongoing community transmission, and we do know that these bars and restaurants are Part of what's driving community transmission. So you know the idea is that you limit the activities that don't need to happen, going out to bars going out to restaurants. And then it's safer to open the school's Lauren, where I am here in New York. I had to wear sweater toe work. Summer has definitely over fall is coming. What happens when a People can't spend as much time outdoors and have to go indoors and be that collides with the regular flu season. Yeah, we're really concerned about that sort of intersection towards the end of fall. You know, you hope that you that everyone can sort of stay outside and be outside for as long as possible, but It has impact in a lot of places. So you're gonna have mixing of people in smaller spaces, complaint spaces where they may have gone outside. If they don't limit their activity, then they're just gonna do those activities inside. Same with bars and restaurants. So if people can't go to bars and restaurants, but they're allowed to remain open and they can't sit outside. Perhaps sit inside. We have seen that in some places that have flu early, like in Australia, the cases they're lower, which is great to see. It means a lot of the activities that we're doing for Corona virus are Helping to sort of called the spread of flu as well and we would expect that, to an extent. I think we're hoping that happens here, too, that we have a very light flu season because the challenge was having flu season Corona virus first We don't know that co infection may cause disease. It may cause people to get thicker, but also it's really hard to differentiate a quick screen in the emergency department, for example, between Corona virus symptoms. And flu symptoms, So we want to keep people out of the hospital who have flu we wanted, you know, keep those eyes open for Corona virus cases and keep people separated as well. I just quickly want to touch on treatment. The debate over convalescent plasma and its efficacy, continuing to rage at the weighing in saying there's no evidence to prove that it actually works. What do we know? And what don't we know at this point, so common in place has been used in a lot. Of approaches to a lot of different seasons. So I think we can say we know it's relatively safe even in cold it. We've seen that the safety data look pretty good. We Don't know much about a efficacy. We're still learning a lot. One of the challenges that moving forward with the approach that happen now is, it may diminish the people who are willing to find it for clinical trials. So then we then it becomes limited how much we can actually learn about efficacy, and you don't want to just do something just because it's safe. You want to take Carlos and plasma only. It's also effective in In treating and curing Corona virus. And in the current situation, we've had several negative studies that haven't showed that efficacy that it's you know that it's working yet, and I have my hope is that people continue down the path of doing the randomized control trials doing that rigorous clinical. Study so that we don't just rely on observational data, which can be fraught with different biases. Different problems with study design and that sort of retrospective. Look back at the data. Can be problematic when you're making those assessments about how effective and really wass Lauren, who will have the formula for a vaccine that will be easy access and distribute to will first have far away away from that in the US Here we have two studies one by modern on one by five. Bio in tech. You know, the goal is general somewhere around 30,000 participants. There's been talk of stopping those early, but the key is to get to that point where we've had enough. Prove it infections in that study population that we can understand the efficacy of the virus, and some people are predicting that we'll have one by the end of the year. I'm slightly less optimistic. I think sometime next year we can see we'll probably see some Really good vaccine data that allows us to push forward. There's work being done on who gets it right. So that's going to be the next big hurdle is how do we prioritize that by that vaccine that works really well? That was Lawrence, our assistant professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg founder Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies. On coming up apples, massive push into five G in some other things that.

flu Bloomberg Lauren Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Johns Hopkins Michael R. Bloomberg assistant professor Bill Ackman United States Michael Jordan Bloomberg LP Francine Laquan Kaylie Lines Pellegrini Bloomberg Philanthropies Kings Towns Lawrence Carlos New York Australia
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:16 min | Last month

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Reality. We're really excited. Tio have Michael Jordan join a draft Kings teams up with Michael Jordan. All this and more coming up in the next hour of Bloomberg best. You know, health officials are increasingly worried about the link between colleges and universities. In the spread of covered 19 and Bloomberg's Francine Laquan Kaylie Lines had a chance to ask Lauren sour about it. She's assistant professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins. Let's listen in. We're seeing that there is a correlation, and I think a lot of people are trying to study just how strong that effective on school's re opening in local clusters, particularly when you think of schools with the order. Children and with adults, so colleges, universities high school things like that. One of the biggest challenges is making sure that the teachers and the family members are safe. And so we don't want schools to be driving clusters in Towns and communities where they've gotten the virus under control. So this is particularly challenging when you have a police like a university or college that's bringing people from other states, Other communities That may have large outbreaks. And so we're seeing these outbreaks pop up in many places where schools are not taking the virtual approach. So what does that mean? Learned? I mean, if you're you know to keep, I guess citizens safe. You need to close restaurants and bars but keep the schools open so that you don't have to close anything. Everything at once were cases to really search. Yeah. I mean, it sort of seems like in the United States who has chosen to keep bars and restaurants open over to over being able to open our schools. And so when the first step to being able to open schools safely is the clothes is to stop community transmission, so that When you have to do the contact tracing associated with small clusters of outbreaks or even single cases in the schools that you can actually track where the infections are coming from and track where the transmission is coming and going. And that's really hard to do when you have ongoing community transmission, and we do know that these bars and restaurants are part of what's driving community transmission. So you know the idea is that you limit the activities that don't need to happen going out to bars going out to restaurants, and then it's safer to open the school's Lauren, where I am here in New York. I had to wear sweater toe work. Summer has definitely over fall is coming. What happens when a people can't spend as much time outdoors and have to go indoors and be that collides with the regular flu season. Yeah, we're really concerned about that sort of intersection towards the end of fall. You know, you hope that you that everyone can sort of stay outside and be outside for as long as possible. But it hasn't packed in a lot of places. So you're gonna have mixing us people in smaller spaces, confined spaces where they may have gone outside. If they don't limit their activity, then they're just going to do those activities inside, saying with bars and restaurants, So if people can't go to bars and restaurants, but they're allowed to remain open, and they can't set outside, perhaps sit inside. We have seen that in some places that have flu early, like in Australia, the cases they're lower, which is great to see. It means that a lot of the activities that we're doing for Corona virus are Helping to sort of called the spread of flu as well, and we would expect that, to an extent. I think we're hoping that happens here, too, that we have a very light flu season because the challenge with having flu season Corona virus first We don't know that co infection may cause worse disease. It may cause people to get thicker, but also it's really hard to differentiate a quick screen in the emergency department, for example. Between Corona virus symptoms and flu symptoms. So we want to keep people out of the hospital who have way wanted, you know, keep those beds open for Corona virus cases and keep people separated as well. I just quickly want to touch on treatment. The debate over convalescent plasma and its efficacy, continuing to rage at the weighing in saying there's no evidence to prove that it actually works. What do we know? And what don't we know at this point? So common Listen. Plaza has been used in a lot of approaches to a lot of different season. So I think we can say we know it's relatively safe even in cold it. We've seen that the safety data looked pretty good. We Don't know much about its efficacy. We're still learning a lot. One of the challenges that moving forward with the approach that happen now is, it may diminish the people who are willing to find out for clinical trials. So then we then it becomes limited how much we can actually learn about efficacy, and you don't want to just do something just because it's safe. You want to take complicit plasma only. It's also effective in In treating and curing Corona virus. And in the current situation, we've had several negative studies that haven't showed that efficacy that it's you know that it's working yet, and I have my hope is that people continue down the path of doing the randomized control trials doing that rigorous clinical. Study so that we don't just rely on observational data, which can be fraught with different biases, Different problems, study design, and that sort of retrospective look back at the data can be problematic when you're making those assessments about how effective it really wass Lauren, who will have the formula for a vaccine that will be easy access and distribute to go first. How far away are we from the in the U. S. Here. We have two studies one by modern on one by five bio tech. You know the goal of general somewhere around 30,000 participants. There's been talk of stopping those early. But the key is to get to that point where we've had enough cold infections in that study population that we can understand the efficacy of the virus, and some people are predicting that we'll have one by the end of the year. Lately less optimistic. I think sometime next year we can see will probably see some really good vaccine data that allows us to push forward. There's work being done on who gets it right. So that's going to be the next big hurdle is how do we prioritize that by that vaccine that works really well? That was Lauren Sour, assistant professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg founder Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies. On coming up apples, massive push into five G in some other things that has off its to.

flu Lauren Sour Bloomberg Johns Hopkins Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School assistant professor Michael R. Bloomberg Michael Jordan Bloomberg LP Francine Laquan Kaylie Lines United States Kings Bloomberg Philanthropies Towns New York Australia founder
From ‘pandemic pods’ to mask breaks: What Johns Hopkins experts say about back to school

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

From ‘pandemic pods’ to mask breaks: What Johns Hopkins experts say about back to school

"Virus. When their kids are going back to school or getting together in pandemic pods. The question of mask breaks has come up. Is that a good idea? Double d T o peace. Kate Ryan has our latest look at parenting in a pandemic doctor and that Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools, said anecdotal accounts of the spread of Cove in 19 after mask breaks were allowed suggest they may not be a good idea. Instead, she says, we have to help our young people to know how to keep their masks on, Anderson concedes. That's a tall order, but I think that we have to have more practice around how students can give incentives. Fact or being a strong and here's to this mandate because it's part of the safety protocol. Anderson spoken to Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Webinar Back to school concerns. Kate

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Johns Hopkins Center For Safe Anderson Kate Ryan Deputy Director
Washington, DC Coronavirus Update: 1 New Death, 65 Additional Cases

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:26 min | 2 months ago

Washington, DC Coronavirus Update: 1 New Death, 65 Additional Cases

"776 new cases, eight new death, there have been more than 98,000 positive cases reported in Maryland. And word of an uptick of more than 1000 new cases in Virginia, 1114 to be exact and 11 do death. Covert positive cases in Virginia now total more than 103,000. Latest numbers illustrating a downward tick, as we say locally in Maryland and Virginia, But it is a small downward ticket experts say. We're not out of the woods. Not at all. They continue tracking new cases, hospitalizations in the all important positivity rate, looking at of all the people getting tested. How many of them turn out the house, Kobe Joshua Sharfstein with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, says the number COMPTEL us whether enough testing is being done and whether there's community transmission. The latest seven day average positivity rate in the district is 3.3%. DC is meeting the standard for having enough testing because it's less than 5% and if it's relatively stable at that number, then you're still seeing continued community spread. The picture is similar in Maryland, which sits a 3.63% Virginia's at 7.2% which means it could perhaps use more testing and also still has a fair amount of between new transmission. John Aaron w T. O P News and we're the kids in the Corona virus del mix some silvery new stats this morning from CBS News correspondent Vicki Barker on the

Virginia Maryland Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Kobe Joshua Sharfstein Vicki Barker DC Cbs News John Aaron W T. O Comptel
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Aggressive as I have been and saying that we need to reopen schools where schools can be safely reopened. I've also said this is not the year for a field trip to Gettysburg, right. This is a very unusual time and there's some things we just have to postpone. Sports are a tricky one right because it's an important part of our livelihood. Sports also take a lot of our testing capacity right because they're testing the heck out of these folks. All the time and sports theoretically can be postponed. Right? We may be at a good point in September, October, November this year if we look back in retrospect. In these therapeutics or that helpful or we get a vaccine By the end of the counter here, we might look back and say Why couldn't Why don't we just wait a little longer? Could we have been more patient like I get people are getting sick and stir crazy and famine fever. But I am concerned not as much about the athletes with sports as I am the other staff concerned about people sharing a bathroom in the stadium, so I'm concerned about The athletic department and the locker rooms and the places other than the field. You know, sports we tend to think of Young, healthy case were very low risk on a field in the open outdoors, and I've said numerous times we talked about it before Christmas. It is very hard for this virus to her, somebody young and healthy, but they could be transmitters. Right, So the other people involved in sports. That's what I'm concerned about. I think I said this to you Last time we talked. I feel a little bit better today. So thank you. Thank you. Dr McCarry. Dr. Martin carries a professor of health policy and management at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School, Public Health and also president surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr McCary Thanks a lot for coming on the show. Great to be with this press. You're listening to the fox years run down. Stay tuned for Armstrong and Gettis, starting at six on talk Radio, 5 67 These days being prepared for the unknown is more important than ever. I'm sure you've noticed the world we live in today is anything but predictable. We could all benefit from something reliable right about now. Well, what could be more reliable than real gold and silver? I'm asking you that I'm talking about real gold. It's over that you can hold in your hands. If you choose called the Oxford Gold Group and do it right now learned how easy it is to get real golden silver. Send securely to your hands to your home or A.

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"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:42 min | 2 months ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Opinion informed perspectives and expert data driven commentary on breaking news. It is time now for Bloomberg opinion and joining us today is columnist Neil Ferguson of the Hoover Institution at Stanford and Neil. I always loved having you come on, because you bring me something I have not thought of, or red before, and you've done it again with your piece on Tic Tac. And the fact that it may be a super weapon for China and its culture war. We've heard a lot about the possible national security threat from gathering data. By TIC TAC. We've heard about the possible rivalry with the United States and sort of industrial policy technology. But you've got 1/3 and fascinating sort of massive problem here. You think with Tic Tac Well, yes, You know, David, it was hard at first for me to take talk seriously. I'm not a tic tac type, but my eight year old son said, Dad, you need to check out the dancing ferret. So I spent some time checking out dancing parrots and all kinds of dancing animals. And, you know, my initial response was probably fairly standard one for somebody in his fifties. How could this possibly be a threat to U s National security? Give me a break on. Then I started to dig a bit deeper on DH. It became more more tree to me that the problem was inside a quite serious if insidious 1/2 of us teenagers have used Tic tac half, which is kind of amazing that the company Deal. Neil Ferguson. Oh, I hope we can get him back. I hope we can get him back because this is such a fast things happen because he really talks about a world empire did 1.0, which is what we had with Great Britain and the United States. And now, he says that China is working on an Empire 2.0, which is really based on what he calls it's ill liberal civilization is really attack on values really tryingto promulgate. It's popular culture in the United States the way in a sense the United States did in the Soviet Union during the Cold War. With the Beatles and blue jeans and rock and roll music, but afraid we may have lost actually Neil Ferguson. I hope we can get him back at some point in time Earlier today, Joshua Sharfstein, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health Vice Dean spoke to beat Bloomberg Television Tom Keen and Guy Johnson about what other states could learn from how New York has dealt with the Corona virus. This is part of what he had to say. They got right that The virus needed to take priority that threaten the virus was practically accidental to New York. And that you know this was the number one concern. And if they could get their fix, and other things could happen, and I think that was extremely important. And they convey that sense of urgency through all those press conferences and everything else on the second thing is, I think people in New York really understood that both because the leadership and because Of the sirens and all the things that you and that really mattered for what people did just one image here, folks. I live right up by the Mount Sinai Hospital complex. And I could tell you the sirens went all night and at one point I counted eight ambulances outside Mount Sinai emergency in the the absolute crisis of this I believe that was back in April. Joshua Sharfstein. What do they need to do in Texas and Florida? To do a New York State of mind. Well, I think it's Again prioritizing the virus, getting those levels down so that they can safely do things like open schools on go back to some, you know essential activities that are threatened. Bye Bye, Corona virus. I think you know the leadership. The messaging has to be clear, consistent Constant, and there needs to be, if not a total shutdown like they had in New York. Restriction on some of the activities until they really contrived that number down and not you. No, let up. Until it's really low enough herself Sting how close to herd immunity our way, You know, it's obviously a question on everyone's mind and nobody Knows for sure. And you know, I think The fact that the virus affect a lot of people without them knowing it. Onda number of people that effect without them, knowing it could be us made it different numbers makes people wonder whether no more people are infected that we really appreciate, which would make it harder for the virus to transmit. An important concept, though, is heard immunity. In this context is not, you know, absolute. It's relative meaning. It's not like suddenly we have heard immunity, and now the virus is just going to go away. It's more like we slowly get more immunity in the population, and it's just a little bit harder to spread some point that'll help push from areas into A time when the virus is going down in the population, but it could still come up if it has the right circumstances. So It's nothing like wait for like we wake up one day and we have heard immunity. It's more like I'm slowly we're seeing that it's just harder for the virus to spread in certain places, and that may Partly be the case in New York that it's you know, particularly in areas that had such high rates of infection that it's a little bit harder for the virus to get around there, and that's just an extra level of security. But still of people our records in New York Thank you Get Corona virus, So I think I think we shouldn't be waiting for her community. We should be taking steps to protect ourselves. And then maybe we'll start to see the virus come down eventually. Let's talk about schools. You mentioned it. Just a moment ago, I saw a report over the weekend. 97,000 Children around the United States tested positive in the last two weeks of July. It's around 1/4 of those tested. Is it the right decision to try and re open schools in September? There are lots of other factors. You need T put into the mix, but nevertheless we still have significant numbers of Children that are carrying the virus. They may be asymptomatic, but they still have it. I think it's a very questionable decision in areas with high rates of viral spread. I think it's extremely likely particularly Highschool students who are mixing with each other and classes. Andi. All those things are going toe, you know, passed the virus around of potentially other people could have infected. Some kid could quite sick their family members. That's what we want to avoid. And this is Bloomberg..

New York United States Bloomberg Neil Ferguson Tic Tac Joshua Sharfstein China Mount Sinai Hospital complex Hoover Institution David Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Beatles Mount Sinai asymptomatic Stanford Soviet Union Texas Britain Guy Johnson
Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

NBC Meet the Press

05:21 min | 2 months ago

Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

"We hit five million US cases yesterday for some perspective. The first nineteen case in the United States is believed to have occurred on February six. We hit one million cases on April Twenty, eight, eighty, two days later. It then took just forty three days to hit the two million mark on June tenth. We hit the three million mark on July seven that was twenty seven days later then just sixteen days later we rich four million US cases and July twenty third and again it took us just sixteen days to hit this five million reported case number right here in the United States joining me now is Dr Tom ingles beans, the director of the Center for Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dr Ingles. Be Welcome back to meet the press. WanNa get a little big picture here. You know last week you were you put out a lengthy list of ten recommendations. You guys didn't call it a reset, but sort of like how do we get control of this virus? Now another one of your sort of colleagues in the larger sense Michael Star home is an op Ed. He's basically calling for a reset of some sort New York Times today editorial page calling this. It feels though as public health officials are all calling for some sort of reset. Partial. lockdowns things like this and yet we are not having that conversation at all on the political side of things. Are, are we doomed to sort of live with this virus now if we're not GONNA at all look at your recommendations I DON'T THINK WE'RE DOOMED To this fate I? Think we we know what to do. Other countries have done it. I think the purpose of these resetting reports these for a kind of a reestablishment of the basics. Is that we know that another country's universal masking fiscal, distancing, avoiding large gatherings. Those kinds of things have worked. If we look at countries like Italy and Spain and France, they have a total of about seven or eight deaths today and we have thousand, but it's not magic what they did. We know what they did. So I think if we act together in national unison, we can get there and that's what the purpose of these many of these reports are I want to bring up the issue of masks there've been some people that said if we had ninety five percent compliance unmask wearing, we could get rid of we could sort of get this fires under control. Is that unrealistic and we do need to do more than just mandating masks Do. Not, alone. Not by themselves or alone the solution, but they are a critical part of it. We know that physical distancing makes a big difference. We know that large gatherings are places where super spreading events occur and people have the opportunity or the virus has the opportunity to get around quickly and for. Many people at once. So we have to do a number of things together in terms of you know simple things like diagnostic testing results coming back much more quickly. It's it's unacceptable for the country to have to have testing comeback a week or even two weeks later it's not useful at that point there's no point even doing the test. So a number of that we have to do, but they're not they're not complicated they may be hard, but we have to do them kind of in unison. And all of those, they're not hard except when you when the word politics gets involved, it makes everything a little bit harder and I wanNa keep you out of the political space here. Let me ask you a question about that scenes and to sort of set expectations doctor Fauci implied that the first vaccine that we get, he hopes it's seventy five percent effective. The FDA has said they will approve any vaccine that's at least fifty percent effective. Can you explain to the public what that means what it means and what it doesn't mean and what our expectations should be for the first vaccine Well, we know that many of the vaccines that we use are not perfect. They don't prevent every case of disease but if they prevent a substantial portion of disease than that can help us get to a point where most of us are protected, the disease can spread quickly between people anymore a concept that is called her immunity. Herd immunity doesn't mean we will won't disease anymore. It means it's not gonNA efficiently as efficiently spread in an epidemic form. and. Is there a percentage figure in your mind that you think will sort of give us a huge? Huge step in the right direction is at a vaccine that is at seventy five percent or does fifty percent do you fear that could be a false sense of hope. I think we would take fifty percent because it's fifty percent is a lot better than what we have. Now we've we've no tools to no no vaccine tools or medicine tools that we can use to slow this down. So fifty percent would be would be far better than what we have. Now of course I think we all want something that is seventy, five, eighty, five. Ninety percent effective. But we'll have to see what we get and I think for the amount of time has passed since the beginning of this pandemic to have a vaccine that's even fifty percent effective in in the coming months or the beginning of twenty twenty, one would be phenomenal. But again, we hope it's better but fifty percent would be better than what we have now. Tom ingles be from Johns, Hopkins One of our experts that we have on here regularly, really appreciate you coming on and sharing your expertise with us. Sir.

United States Dr Tom Ingles Twenty Twenty Dr Ingles Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Tom Ingles New York Times Director Michael Star Center For Security Doctor Fauci Johns FDA Italy Spain France
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:14 min | 2 months ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Say. The Toronto based firm working with advisers after appointing activist investor Eric Rosenfield, too, it's poured last month believes that shares are undervalued. Yelp shares plunging today after low after second quarter revenue dropped to the drop because of the Corona virus related restrictions weighing on business advertising. Analysts expect challenges to linger in telefax scene is available Yelp down now by 14.3%. I'm Charlie Pellet. That is a Bloomberg business Flash. Thank you so much. Charlie Pellet. This is balance of power. Bloomberg Radio. I'm David Weston, one of the big issues facing parents and Children. This right now is the prospect of going back to school with the governor of New York. Andrew Cuomo, just announcing today that in fact, New York schools can go back. Physically into the classroom. Well earlier today, our colleague French ng Lacqua spoke with Andrew peckish of Johns Hopkins about exactly what are the risks involved in returning to school? We should mention here. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP, and Bloomberg Philanthropies hears Dr Pescado. It's a very difficult time right now, because the true risk of going back to schools for, uh, for kids is still a little bit unclear. One thing that's certain no, is that it'll be very difficult to send kids back to school. If you've got a high level of transmission of the virus in the community, because essentially a school is exactly the type of environment you want to avoid. If there's large amounts of transmission in the community Now, if your community has well controlled infections, and you have good testing and Contact tracing in place. Then there are perhaps opportunities open up more aspects of in person learning, so I think one of the confusing things becomes the fact that It really is dictated by local conditions. And so there will be some differences across states across the country in terms of how schools are being re opened, But everybody has to maintain these basic principles of understanding that they have to minimize the risk of transmission in this population. Andrew, from what you're hearing are the schools that have decided to reopen and taking, you know, taking appropriate social distancing measures that is the most difficult thing. To really put into place and again. There's a spectrum of responses are plans that are being put in place the different schools. Certainly some schools are trying to mix. Online within person learning by limiting the number of students that are coming in limiting the number of days students are coming in those approaches seemed to make sense again, particularly if the virus is president. Low levels. I think it's difficult in any situation to justify going back to what we saw last year in terms of schools and going back to full classrooms, and everybody's showing up at the same time on and every day Because again, those are the scenarios that there's really no place in the country that is controlling the virus well enough to allow those types of activities to resume. How critical our phase three trials that air starting on these vaccine candidates?.

Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Bloomberg Yelp Charlie Pellet Michael R. Bloomberg Andrew peckish Bloomberg Philanthropies president Andrew Cuomo Eric Rosenfield Toronto Johns Hopkins New York David Weston Dr Pescado founder
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on WWL

WWL

03:50 min | 3 months ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on WWL

"Me and being Appreciate your time. I really given hope you come back on with us. Elena Martin analysts at the procedures, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and a research associate at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School. Public health. We could take a break. We come back. We'll talk about higher education. And what does that look like? They're Louisiana College is ready for the start of the fall semester. Now is the Corona virus, change things and look at that, both from a student and a teacher. Perspective will be back Tommy Tucker, Glad you with Tuesday morning, home of the Saints and L s U paid 70 am wwl New Orleans 153 WWL FM in HD one Kenner New Orleans radio dot com Sports Station. WWL first news. It's eight o'clock. Good morning. I'm Dave Cohen on your official weather station. WWL a nice little treat for us. A break in the humidity for the next couple of days is a little front comes in not pulling us down it all it stays in the mid nineties, but the heated X only gets to about maybe the upper nineties to 100 degrees through Thursday. Your local weather expert WWL TV meteorologist, Dave knows Bomb Kids, you're gearing up to go back to the classroom they start next week, and Jefferson Parrish, the state's largest public school system, Some other districts and Catholic and private schools are beginning as early as this week, with Children returning to campuses, while New Orleans in ST Tammany are waiting until after Labor Day next month. W W else, Chris Miller reports no matter when they start if there are Children and teachers in the school buildings, a local public health official says there will be spread of Corona virus. Dr. Joseph Cantor, with the Louisiana Department of Health's good Distancing and mandatory mask wearing will help blunt the spread of Corona virus. One kids go back to school. But you just can't stop it all. There's going to be a lot of exposure. When you have this much community transmission, Dr Kantor says there are bound to be Corona virus, positive students and teachers in school and it will be disruptive, possibly even causing periodic school closures. FILM New Orleans says production is returning to the city this week with an Amazon prime Siri's that was filming prior to the shutdown, getting backto work. Several major studios, including Disney and Sony, are also anticipated to begin shooting in the city in the next couple of months. Meanwhile, Jefferson Parish officials have announced the return of Holly. What's out there is well as we hear from WWL TV. Shareece Gibson officials and Jefferson Parish say film production is back, with some projects restarting as soon as next week. Yes, New Orleans will be the first to resume shooting. Officials say they're working with new guidelines and safety protocols in order to keep the film crews and the communities there filming and safe. Production's like claws and queen sugar will restart in the coming months. A couple of West Bank bars of the latest closed for violating Cove It orders and WWL TV Sheba Turk says be awhile before they can reopen Gretna Police took action against a pair of bars over the weekend for serving alcohol. ALPA Tron and nannies and two heroes must stay closed until the City Council reconsiders their business licenses, the state fire marshal's says statewide in July, nearly 700 bars, restaurants and other businesses Failed inspections. Louisiana Governor John Bell Edwards this afternoon, is expected to announce he's extending his order keeping all bars in the state closed and keeping the state it phase two of re opening with a mandatory mask mandate in place. The current phase two order is scheduled to expire on Friday. You can hear the announcement of the extension At 2 30 from the governor right here on W W well along the East Coast. Things were getting ugly. CBS NEWS Update. The Carolina.

New Orleans Louisiana College Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Dave Cohen Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Kenner New Orleans official Tommy Tucker CBS Governor John Bell Edwards Jefferson Parish Louisiana Department of Health Jefferson Parrish research associate Dr Kantor Louisiana East Coast
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:56 min | 3 months ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The findings out of South Korea comport with those of other smaller studies research into French primary schools released as a preprinted in. June. Found no evidence of transmission by children in schools and research from Iceland published in. April. Found that children under ten. We're less likely to test positive for the virus than those over ten. Another small study published in July based on data from hospitals in the Chinese cities of Wuhan and Jintao found that among sixty eight, pediatric covid nineteen patients. Ninety six percent were infected by another adult in their household, and there was no evidence that the children transmitted the virus to others. It's unclear from the study how the other four percent of children became infected. There could be a number of reasons that younger people are less likely to spread covid nineteen says Justin less ler an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health. The virus may not replicate in children as much as it does in adult meaning and infected child would have less viral material to pass on. Furthermore because children generally have no or less severe symptoms, they may be less likely to spread the virus by coughing or sneezing as a sick adult might. Still. That could be a mixed blessing says less ler. If a child is infected but doesn't seem sick, they could be sent to school and wind up infecting others. It's a tradeoff. He says, if they're not shedding a lot of virus, it may be less likely, but they may be having a lot more contact because they are not ill. Absent proper health safeguards that could be big trouble for schools. School aged children typically have more contact with other people than adults while school is in session, and even if they're not coughing or sneezing, children are generally pretty good at spreading disease through other habits like touching everything in sight or crying. Another big unknown is whether children who are a symptomatic or pre-symptomatic consp- read the virus Dr. Yvonne. Maldonado, a pediatric infectious disease physician and epidemiologist at Stanford. Medicine points out that the aforementioned South Korean study only trace the contacts of symptomatic children. One thing we do know about a quarter of US teachers are at higher risk of severe illness from covid nineteen, according to a July analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation because they are over sixty five. Have a pre existing condition such as chronic, obstructive, pulmonary disease, COPD. Body mass index over forty and unfortunately discussions over kids..

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School South Korea COPD Iceland Kaiser Family Foundation Wuhan US Justin Maldonado Dr. Yvonne Jintao Stanford
American Airlines is selling middle seats again, but is that safe?

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

American Airlines is selling middle seats again, but is that safe?

"Airline industry this month is seeing a rebound in flight booking, prompting carriers to add new flights and put more people on planes like it's rifle. United Airlines, American is now selling middle seats again. It is that safe Any time we stepped out of our door and are in close proximity to other people, even if that middle seat is open, there is going to be some risk of transmission. But Crystal Watson, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, says any mitigation including an empty middle seat is helpful. Hope is that with that physical distancing, it's less likely that a transmission event will occur in our focus has really been on. How do we build customer confidence in flying again to Anna Garrity, chief information officer of JetBlue Airways says. So flyers. They want our crew members to be healthy when we're serving them. A focus on air and clean surfaces Reduced service Touchpoints. JetBlue is among airlines, leaving middle seats empty, meaning your choice to fly is now more than about convenience and price. It's about confidence.

United Airlines Jetblue Airways Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Anna Garrity Crystal Watson Senior Scholar Chief Information Officer
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:19 min | 4 months ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"NASDAQ Gonna record dollar down for 1/5 Day s and P heading towards its fifth straight increase. Amazon chairs top $3000 For the first time, Tesla's has extended a five day rally to almost 40%. Uber surging after the company agreed to buy Postmates and a $2.65 billion stock deal. Uber shares their up now by 5.7%. Here's where equity markets stand off session eyes but an update nonetheless. SNPs up 45. Now up, 1.4% have been ofus. Muchas 1.7%. Dow's up 382 off 1.5%. NASDAQ is up 215 up 2.1% 10 years down 7 30 seconds, with a yield of 300.69%. Gold up 5 10 17 80 for the ounce and West Texas Intermediate crewed up 800.1%. $40. 70 cents a barrel. Recapping S and P up 45 up 1.4%. I'm Charlie Pallet. That's a Bloomberg business Flash. Balance of power continues. And once again here's your host David Weston. Thank you so much Charlie Pellet. The quest continues for a vaccine for the Cove in 19 virus with new reports have expanded clinical trials by Oxford in AstraZeneca. Welcome now. Dr Matthew Fox, He's Boston University professor of epidemiology. So, Professor, Thank you so much for being with us. First of all, give us your take is an epidemiologist. But what's going on in this country right now? Because we thought it was all going down. It seems to be coming back again. Is that because we came out too fast, we will reduce the restrictions too fast, Or is the virus itself transmitting? Thanks for having me. Yeah, It is definitely a case where we've come out of the lock down too quickly. So you really have to think of of the epidemic in United States is being several different of Pacific epidemic going on at once. We have what's going on in the Northeast, where we're just now coming out of the lockdowns and things were very much under control. For the moment, though, that could obviously change depending on how we choose to come out of the lock down. Then you have what's going down on the South and Southwest, where Hello, Professor. Can you hear me? Hello, Professor. Professor Fox. I think we may have lost Professor Fox. We will work to try to get him back. In the meantime earlier today we talked with the vice dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His Joshua Sharfstein talked with Francine Lacqua and Tom Kean. I should know the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg providers. Here's Professor Sharpstein. I think that was the reason why we've seen such high numbers, particularly in the South and the left in the United States, But I think you know there's A little bit of a shock to the system happening right now, and I think people are getting worried again. So I think we're seeing people pull back bars close, even Governors who are bloomer sort of definitive now taking it very, very seriously. So hopefully that will you know, over the worst kinds of disasters. I just don't know if it's going to be enough. To really control the virus. Any time Professor When you look at you know how it's ripping through some of the Southwest in the U. S. Is it a little too late to do anything concrete about it, or you know to at least reduce the number of fatalities. Or can we really put a stop to it? So it is possible to control. I mean, other countries have been able to control really out. You know, serious outbreaks like this on it starts with, you know, starting to shut down a little bit again, which is what's happening in some places, But then you're gonna have to keep that in place for a while. So that the virus just doesn't have the chance to keep moving around. And that's what's going to be really hard for the United States. You know, as soon as you go back from the brink for like a day, people are like, how come we can't do this? How come we can't do that, and And then it's just gonna be like a low boil for a long time if we can't really drive the infection, right? Josh every day. There's a different story. Today. It is an actor. He is 41 years old, and he's had a terrible, terrible many months battle with covert and died at Cedar Sinai in Los Angeles yesterday. It was the incredibly gifted actor Nick Cordero. Great. There's a 1,000,000. Nick Cordero's out there who aren't famous. Will you explain to our audience once more that the young are not immune to this virus? You know, his death really does put an exclamation point on that. I think his 41 with a one year old at home, and there are many people in that situation and There's a lot we don't understand about the virus, and there's a lot That doctor's taking care of patients with the virus say is very scary. And you know, it is still largely not understood this disease on it clearly has serious effects outside along. The lungs are bad enough, but their major effects in the blood And elsewhere and not put it sneaks up on people and why some people do well and other people don't see is just not understood. Just there. Two important stories out. Updating the vaccine race to Wall Street Journal Stories is wonderful. It's maybe more corporate where the New York Times story really dives into the genetics of are in a Code that they're trying to find. Are you optimistic that we can use of the neurology of are in a genetics to get us to a faster vaccine? So it seems quite likely you can get to a faster vaccine to RN ey. The question is whether it will prove to be safe and effective and There's a lot of hope I don't really have the scientific background. But I don't think anybody really knows been studied extensively, But we're going to do the studies on. It's really important that they're done well and you'd impartially and The standards that vaccine are used are the same as the standards any vaccine and have to work. It has to be safe. So you know, we'll see Eventually whether are in a technology is ready for this, and I hope it is. We've been listening. Dr..

Professor United States Dr Matthew Fox Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Bloomberg Southwest Michael R. Bloomberg Nick Cordero Professor Sharpstein Tesla professor Postmates Dow Amazon Charlie Pellet Charlie Pallet
How An Early Plan To Spot The Virus Fell Weeks Behind

Short Wave

08:44 min | 6 months ago

How An Early Plan To Spot The Virus Fell Weeks Behind

"The government's missed opportunity for surveillance of the crow bias. What slowed scientists down and the loss time that could have been used to give some cities an earlier warning. You're listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Lawrence so it least. Six cities were supposed to be using surveillance systems that were originally built for the flu to test for cases of the Corona virus weeks into that effort. Only one had done that. So where's a good place to start? Let's start in Los Angeles. They ran into some issues back in February. They knew that tracking the outbreak through the number of positive cases that were popping up. Just wasn't a great idea. Because testing was so limited right in order to get tested at that time you had to either recently traveled to China or had close contact with somebody else who tested so. It was like a really high bar to get tested. Yeah and that was because almost no state labs could run the CDC's corona virus tests at the time they had sent out faulty test. Kits see no even patients with the right symptoms. Really couldn't get a test. Which makes it really hard to see. What's happening in a community but for this project the surveillance cities they were guaranteed testing by the CDC and they could send their samples to the agency's headquarters in Atlanta. So how did Los Angeles Start? Looking for the corona virus so county health officials starting talking to hospitals about testing these mildly symptomatic patients. You know and they got pretty far with one of them Dr Prabhu Gander of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. He told me when the hospital's board discussed it though they declined to be part of it we only had one confirmed cove in nineteen case in La County and they were concerned that if the second case in La County was linked to this hospital. That there'd be a certain stigma that would potentially be bad for the hospital. Okay so they were worried about the hospital's reputation. Do I have that right? Yeah and he says. The hospital was concerned that patients would be anxious and avoid the hospital if they found the corona virus there now county. Health officials declined to name this hospital because they said they agreed to keep discussions confidential. Well okay so how did L. A? Eventually get testing started. Another hospital reached out to county health officials and that was La County USC Medical Center the Chief Medical Officer. There is Dr Brad Spell Berg. And he knew surveillance monitoring was important. This is a leading edge indicator. If you don't look at it you're missing the Canary in the coalmine. You're waiting for the coal mine to collapse on you. Yes Spielberg wanted to do this. But his hospital into one of the biggest issues in this story of the pandemic testing to speed things up they were gonNA use tests from a private lab but there was only a small number of them. That was against huge resistance. The whole system is like you're wasting our tests. Don't do this. But his hospital pushed ahead and began testing at the county's Medical Center and some of its clinics on March twelfth. When the results started coming back it looked as if five percent of the patients they tested positive for corona virus. Bruce People that had been going to work going to social events wandering around in the community for the days and days. They have the right. This was well before we had broad social distancing policies. Yeah we didn't have that almost anywhere in the country at the time but once officials in La county new this you know they realize that people have been walking around with the virus more of them that they knew and this was a really key turning point in how they responded until then it was about trying to contain the virus. Us contact tracing to track down every person who may have been exposed you know but one of viruses spreading undetected epidemiologists will tell you that containment strategy just isn't enough so in the days after those results Mayor Eric. Garcetti issued a stay at home order for Los Angeles your actions matter and they can and will save lives. Okay so that's what happened in L. A. What happened in those five other cities most of them also struggled to get going? You know for example. New York City didn't get results from its sentinel testing until March thirty first. I couldn't get more information about why it took so long. You know the city is obviously overwhelmed right now but at that point the surveillance was too late to be useful. I mean there are already forty thousand cases at that time. Yeah not exactly an early warning at that point and you know Seattle also had struggles Washington state officials had an idea of how they want to do a sentinel surveillance when they first started talking to. Cdc One of the things. I propose very early was that we use samples from Seattle lose steady. Scott Linquist is the state epidemiologist. He wanted to use the Seattle flu study. Which is a research project that was already testing people with respiratory symptoms surveillance? That was up and running. My point was why. Don't we use those samples? It's up and running. Let's do it and that was denied the problem according to the CDC and FDA was that it was a research project and it didn't have the necessary approvals to run clinical tests for patients and they hadn't gotten consent from the patients to do the corona virus testing so the FDA denied the request at that time. Okay actually make some sense to me so was Seattle able to get anything together eventually. Yes about a month after that the Seattle flu studied did get all the necessary approvals. And they're doing testing now but linguists thinks they clearly could have used it earlier. Could've let us know that it was here before we had the community outbreaks and transmission in the long term care facilities but We miss that period so okay. This effort came up short to say the least. These were weeks when we could have been looking for the virus but the system itself didn't work those extra weeks had to have made a difference right. Well it's to say recognize situation where we been passed as wanted to. That's Dr Joseph Z. A deputy incident manager at the CDC said the delays happened because it was an entirely new virus. It took extra. Planning for collecting samples shipping them ensuring healthcare workers had protective gear. But whether that time made any difference question about whether this revolt we delay APP on longer. resulted in losing visibility. In those half thing and it's and I don't think so. Three weeks is an enormous amount of time to allow cases to accumulate without knowing about it. That's Jennifer nozoe an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. If it has sentinel surveillance stood up in A number of cities cities where we would expect to see cases. I We possibly could have caught it earlier and possibly intervened before the case numbers exploded. And you know when you look at the data. It's not hard to see that. The places with earlier state home orders seem to have done better there curves are flatter and they avoided a lot of the hospitalizations and deaths according to models. It really wasn't easy for officials to issue those orders. You know if you remember. There was a lot of debate about when to do it. But from talking to these cities the ones that had this hard data from Sentinel surveillance community spread was happening. They were able to act. I write so okay. Obviously this a very useful public health tool does the CDC have any plans to do this in the future. Yes a number of the cities and counties I spoke to are planning on starting sentinel testing again soon because you know as the outbreak starts waning. They're going to need to find the flare ups and spot the new cases before it spreads even more the trump administration is also talking about using it in their plan for reopening the country. So we'll be doing sentinel surveillance throughout nursing. Homes throughout inner city federal clinics throughout indigenous populations to really be able to find early alerts of symptomatic individuals in the community. Dr Deborah Brooks is talking about doing that testing for people who don't show any symptoms but who may still be infected and spreading the virus the epidemiology. I spoke to said you know this is something the country has to get right. This time. You know not just waiting for cove in nineteen cases to walk into an emergency room but designing studies to go out and looking communities and actually get the early warnings that this kind of testing could have provided in the first place.

CDC Los Angeles Seattle La County Los Angeles County Department La County Usc Medical Center NPR China Lawrence Dr Prabhu Gander Dr Brad Spell Berg Medical Center Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School New York City Dr Deborah Brooks Bruce People Spielberg FLU Mayor Eric
U.S. Approves Abbott Labs Coronavirus Test For Hospital Use

Bloomberg Daybreak

05:26 min | 7 months ago

U.S. Approves Abbott Labs Coronavirus Test For Hospital Use

"Daybreak testing for the coronavirus is going to be key in determining whether we've turned the corner on the pandemic and to that end the US government is nearly doubling the amount it pays hospitals to run the large scale test for covert nineteen that's been developed by Abbott labs for more on the testing that is now under way and needs to be done we're joined by Dr Eddie Pecos professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health good to have you back with us doctor Pecos now there are different types of tests out there of course can you sort of walk us through them and the differences between them yes so many of the tests are going to look for the presence of antibody he's not particularly in your blood and that will be telling us how many people were actually infected in this outbreak because it's one of the things we really don't know how many mild cases there were having a symptomatic cases there were sold out in the first thing the test tell us what people really want the test though to tell us is whether or not they're going to be protected from reinfection and that's something that we're all still working on because the tests that people are going to be taking that telematic that you've been exposed to the virus don't necessarily tell you that you're protected from reinfection so the next couple of weeks is going to be really intense work in research laboratories to try to figure out how these tests that everybody you're taking are going to be related to to to how protected people are from reinfection well it sounds like you're saying that we're in where you still need to take that first step of finding out just how many people have been infected where are we in that process right now so there are a lot of tests that are being rolled out by different manufacturers there are also a number of tests that are being developed at different medical institutions to move this forward so right now a lot of these tests are being validated with patient samples just to make sure that they're not only performing well but that the people who are performing the tasks are doing them in an accurate way and relatively soon be rolling that out to to to be testing as many people as possible now four still in the rollout phase it is is it safe to start talking at this point as the government already is talking about re opening the economy in some way well you know talking about future plans planning what to do is fine I think it's really really difficult right now to put a timeline on to anything because you know our public health interventions are working but we're still in the middle of dealing with the large certificates is so planning is great timelines for implementing those plans are what really is up in the air right now so what are you looking for or is it in terms of scalability of the tests that will determine whether people have been infected right now it's it's all it's all about the manufacturing capabilities so making sure that the manufacturers particularly of the really good tests are able to produce large amounts of those tests that can be distributed same issue that we ran into at the beginning of the outbreak with a test for the virus it's not just about the ability to implement the tasks about getting those tests into the laboratories of people who can do them effectively terms of developing the test to determine whether people are at risk of reinfection where are we in that process so I think we're we're we're right in the middle of everything right now you know with the outbreak only being you know a few months old here in the US for only now starting to see those people who have completely recovered and can be monitored for reinfection so that's an important thing that that research laboratories are dealing in clinical laboratories are doing and we should know again some of those answers start rolling out in the next couple of weeks based on studies here in the US and we also look to Southeast Asia where the epidemic started earlier and they're already well into that phase of starting the people who have been infected and whether or not they're susceptible to reinfection is there more that can be done on the government side to facilitate further development of these crucial tests I I think resources and distribution are really the critical things you want to make sure that these tests are being distributed equally across the country and in particular again different parts of the country going to be a different phases of the outbreak so you want these antibody tests to be put in places that are in that recovery phase so you can start analyzing the people that have survived the infection and recovered well you don't want necessarily them to be in every place at the same time so again it's it's a planning if that distribution of resources where I think the federal government can really step in and help facilitate things as we look to ward those resources being ramped up president trump is now saying that he wants to temporarily halt funding to the World Health Organization over its response to the pandemic in about the thirty or forty five seconds we have left here how seriously should the medical community take that threat what would the impact be well you know the WHL plays a very critical role particularly in in in in other countries and resource deprived countries so you know I don't know if it's really justified to be able to in the middle of a pandemic criticize and all funding to an agency that is important terms of rolling out resources to to resource starved

United States
As Jails And Prisons Reduce Populations, Advocates Call On ICE To Do The Same

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:38 min | 7 months ago

As Jails And Prisons Reduce Populations, Advocates Call On ICE To Do The Same

"There is a growing fear that a corona virus outbreak will tear through the federal government's crowded detention center for immigrants immigrant rights advocates are suing and detainees are on hunger strikes restrain immigration and customs enforcement or ice released detainees before it can French humanitarian catastrophe NPR's John Burnett has our story at present ice detained some thirty eight thousand immigrants in a network of private for profit facilities scattered around the country they're held in close quarters in jail like conditions while they await their fate in immigration court detainees are getting alarmed in the past week guards have pepper sprayed groups of detainees at two detention centers who refused to follow orders in a protest of their crowded surroundings I look at the book bundle three M. two meals on the plan worked out of Japan there's a lot of fear because we're not separated just to go to meals we have to line up in front of three separate doors all jam together we can't maintain six feet between this Tony Augustine is a Mexican national who is locked up at the rich would correctional center outside of Monroe Louisiana he was rounded up in an ice raid on a Mississippi chicken plant last August because he's in the country illegally like the majority of immigrants in federal custody Augustine has no criminal convictions a number for them if you want to finance in the list we have two televisions one is to the C. N. N. so we know more and more people are dying from this virus that's why were framed the guards tell us it's all lies you can't believe the T. V. but we know it's the truth a spokesman for lasalle corrections which runs rich wood says it has implemented a pandemic contingency plan which includes intense cleaning and disinfecting the living areas and monitoring detainees for illness but some federal judges have ordered ice to release a handful of sick inmates in Pennsylvania a judge said it would be quote unconscionable and possibly barbaric to keep them jammed in with other detainees a growing list of advocates from Amnesty International to the congressional Hispanic caucus are sending letters to parties complaining that more immigrants should be released on bond representative Joaquin Castro is chairman of the Hispanic caucus we Richard Gerson home on cruise ships now on a navy ship and it's no different with people were confined in a closed space in our detention centers where the corona virus can spread very quickly vice reporting at least eight detainees have tested positive for covert nineteen inside lock ups in New Jersey Pennsylvania Louisiana and Arizona the agency says the health and safety of immigrant detainees it's a top priority and to that end visitation has been suspended at all jails to prevent contagion but what about the guards ice reports at least six confirmed cases among employees at five different detention facilities Dr Chris barber is professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health in a call with reporters yesterday he said during an epidemic guards can easily introduce the disease into the facility as they have that right Chris island in New York most of these facilities have three eight hour shifts every twenty four hours people are in and out of all the time going back to their communities families human rights advocates point to other U. S. jails and prisons that are trying to reduce their populations to stop the spread of infections California has granted early release to thirty five hundred inmates in county jails in Ohio Iowa and New Jersey have done the same so far ice shows no sign of following the trend John Burnett NPR

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

09:58 min | 7 months ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"And we really? It's not a lot of money. And you can change your life in a really significant and positive way and a m dot com slash and dot COM NEUM DOT COM Slash Shapiro. Go check them out right now. Okay so what are the best case scenario worst-case scenarios here so Nicholas Kristof. Believe it or not has a pretty Good York Times talking about this. Best case scenario is the possibility that the virus mutates and actually dies out. Dr Larry Brilliant. I hope happily name an epidemiologist. Who's young doctor was part of the facial radical smallpox explained that only movies do viruses seem to become worse over time? Sars and mirrors both petered out possible here cove in nineteen will not survive as my hopes had Dr John. Charles a professor at Stanford Medical School China is reporting not a single new case of domestic transmission. Now they're serious doubts about whether China is lying or not if ever in doubt China Islam Channel Ads the. Who and who believe them? This is why when you hear prescriptions from. Who or their takes on life the WHO. You should really take that with a major grain of salt with that sad. According to Nicholas Kristof Singapore would be the best case scenario where everything is shut down for a while and then go back to a more open society. Tom Ingles be expert in pandemics at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health said the fact that Singapore Hong Kong Taiwan South Korea and China and some extent. Japan flattened curves despite having the initial onslaught of cases. Should give us some hope. We can sort out what they're doing well and emulate at Washington state seems to have been stabilizing. The weather may also help us because some respiratory viruses decline in summer from a combination of higher temperatures and people not being huddled together so it's possible that Northern Hemisphere nations enjoy a summer break before a second wave in the fall. Okay that is the second wave is what I'm worried about and I think most epidemiologist are worried about is what happens when you release people from confinement even if this thing goes away during the summer if it comes back with a vengeance during the fall it can be super damaging the Spanish influenza. Which by the way you know how ridiculous it is that our political world someone wikipedia and just changed it to the nineteen eighteen flu because they wanted to forestall trump's argument that you can say Spanish flu so you can say Chinese virus anyway. The goal would be that maybe this thing dies out loses sort of it's it's fire and it's flare also the death rates. I've been saying this for weeks and I've been criticized for the death rates that were being. Put out there by the whol. We're just not real in South Korea and in China outside who province about eight point eight percent of those known to be infected died. That rate was point six percents on a cruise ship. I talked about all this weeks ago. That's not to suggest the viruses and dangerous. It's very dangerous. It's significantly more dangerous than the flu. It is to suggest that people were suggesting that four percent the people get it are GonNa die. That was not true about four out of five people known to have had the virus had only mild symptoms even among those older than ninety in Italy. Seventy eight percents survived. Two thirds of those who died in Italy had pre existing medical conditions and were elderly ninety nine percents had pre existing condition. Dr Harrismith epidemiologist states. That I'm not pessimistic. I think this can work. She said it will take eight weeks of social distancing to have a chance to slow. The virus successful depend on people changing behaviors and on Hospitals. Not being overrun. And that's what I've been saying about increasing that medical capacity. Now there is the worst case scenario. Dr Neil Ferguson a British epidemiologist. He said he produced a sophisticated model. That showed a worst case of two point. Two million deaths in the United States is best case scenario according to Nicholas Kristof one point one million deaths which is obviously frightening as all hell the the hope that the US can emulate import south. Korea could be a leap because South Korea took the really seriously they have tremendously effective testing. It's very widespread. We are still as I've mentioned way behind in testing so far behind the end up with situations like Peggy Noonan so peggy Noonan from the Wall Street Journal was sick with two weeks one hundred one fever coughs and chills and she had to lie in order to get Kobe test. Because right now the the CDC still has restrictions that suggest you can only get a cova test even if you are in the most risky age demographic and you have all the symptoms. You can only get a cova test if number one. You have been traveling to China or number two. You know somebody who has been diagnosed with corona virus. Which of course is ridiculous. We've now had community transmission in the United States for weeks on end which demonstrates the dramatic lack of testing. And that is the fault is we will talk about of the CDC and at the highest level of the trump administration because in the end. The buck does stop with the president and doesn't mean presidents and doing the right things now to fix it. He is but it does mean that those two months the CDC was blowing it heads need to roll over there in Nicholas Kristof says that there is an interactive model of the virus. That suggests that up to three hundred sixty six thousand. Icu beds might be needed in the US. For CORONA CORONA VIRUS PATIENTS. At one time which is more than ten times the number available as a Harvard? Study that has said the same. How quickly can we roll those things out? That is the big question. We've heard no no estimate as to how all of that is going to be rolled out and that does raise the question of. How long are we going to have to do this? How long exactly is this going to last and as I say. Even this is a suggestion that there won't be a massive second wave that takes out enormous number of people. The the fact is that in China which is now claiming they've tamp this thing down there serious questions about whether they're lying about damping down in the first place in California. The governor has announced that we are in a state of lockdown Gavin. Newsom on Thursday ordered forty million residents to stay home except for essential trips extending similar restrictions. State wide area counties previously enacted. One of the serious questions about this particularly is number one whether it's effective number two whether it is designed to achieve the goals that they say it's designed to achieve meaning. How can you lock people down this long? And the answer is it's going to be very very difficult to walk. People down. This long stricter the lockdown the less time it can last. It's one thing to tell people as I said yesterday about diets. It's one thing to tell people for the foreseeable future no cookies. It's another thing to tell people for the foreseeable future no food. That's just not something. That people are going to be able to outlast for very long time. Here's Gavin newsom. Are Kendall of a governor announcing that it's time to shelter in place in the California number of days ago there were six bay area counties that lead with stay at home orders Now as I speak some twenty one point three million California's reside in a community in a city and or county that have similar orders estate as large as ours. Nation state is many parts but at the end of the day where one body. There's a mutuality and there's a recognition of our interdependence that requires of this moment that we direct a statewide order for people to stay at home. That directive goes into force in effect this evening and we were confident. We are confident that the people the State of California will abide by it. Okay so we'll see how long people buy because you cannot tell. People interminably stay in their homes again especially as the economy dies and these jobs. Do not come back. It's very easy for the governments. Say we're going to freeze everything in place. None of these jobs will die that. It's just not true. These are major systemic place. It changes taking place throughout our economy and they have significant significant ramifications. Newsom said this is not a permanent state. It's a moment in time. Okay well then we need to know how long the moment's GonNa last or what your estimate of the moment is going to be. I was talking to panic friends last night. Who have businesses in state of California and now those businesses simply will not run because nobody can go into the office and this order by the way from new some supposed until April nineteenth. Okay a full month. How long do you think this is actually going to last now? The as it were now in the star wars scenario Princess Leia says the the more you tighten your grip later. The more star systems Tarkhan the more star systems will slip through your fingers right. This is where we are the more. The government tightens its grips. Its the more there's going to be pushed back against all of that particularly as these losses mount. We work hearing that. We may lose this week over two million jobs in the American economy we are hearing estimates at the economy contract up to twenty percent in q two one fifth of the American economy poof disappears at the behest of the American government. So as they say you WanNa make the case that we ought to do that. I need to hear a very strong case. As to how this is going to prevent deaths it is not enough to say that. We're doing it to prevent. That's I want to see the plan for preventing the deaths. I WanNa know how many beds you're creating how many ventilators are creating. I want to know how you plan to stop the slow of this virus when we all go back outside after a month and when half of us don't have jobs and by the way all of the Republican relief efforts Democratic Relief. Efforts are not going to fix this problem. They're not the best you can do. At this. Point is provide floating loans to the banks to not call in their bridge loans to businesses back the commercial paper window for example but at a certain point people are not going to buy. American bonds and number two. What makes everybody thinks is going to be a v-shaped recovery the longer. These businesses are out the lesser chance. There is that businesses ever go back in if you spent your life savings to purchase a rib joint and they've been running that rib joint for ten years and the government is shut down and shut down every restaurant across the country actively do you think that's coming back anytime soon. And then one thousand dollar. A month check is going to surprise. It is not and by the way economics Israel life when people say well you're choosing the economy over real. No economics is real life. It is people's jobs it is people's livelihoods. It is how people live. It is the suicide -ality rate it is. The is the sense of community. This is not to argue that we should be weighing. The economy against human. Life is arguing that we should always take the tack that is most likely to preserve human life and that would also include. Human Quality of life isn't an argument. We should let everybody out right now. I've not made that argument anywhere in here instead the argument. I'm making his if you're going to if you're going to do the most restrictive thing any American government has ever done in the history of the United States to the American people right. We're not in wartime here. There's a virus if you're going to do this. Unbelievably restrictive thing. You better damn well have a plan for how we come out of this and that it saved lives because if you just destroyed twenty percent of the American economy and sent the unemployment rate up to fifteen or twenty percent and save zero lives in the process. Then I don't or here's a net loss of life because it turns out that poor people are more likely to.

China California Nicholas Kristof United States Gavin newsom government South Korea CDC American government Dr Larry Brilliant Dr John Nicholas Kristof Singapore Stanford Medical School China Peggy Noonan Italy Good York Times Korea Japan Charles
Germs Entering Every Orifice In My Face!

You Did What Now?

09:17 min | 8 months ago

Germs Entering Every Orifice In My Face!

"To you did what? Now podcast where we discussed stories and science and tech that. Make us ask exactly that everyone. Thanks for listening on your host. Stephanie Educator in Science Aficionado and Michael Program. Good afternoon stuff me our us today Michael there. You have the corona virus yet. Not yet but I don't leave my house so here how well I possibly could have been fighting a cold for the past couple of weeks. So I'm like Could already have it and and You know we wanted to talk about today. I know we've mentioned it a little bit about in our past episodes we've been following this story. What's going on with Corona virus? So we're going to go a little bit of a deep dive today. Especially considering I live in Austin Texas which was only about an hour hour and a half away from San Antonio. Have you been paying attention? What's going on in San Antonio but there was a somebody just confirmed the case within five miles of me. So okay yeah so. Apparently they had a they had some evacuees that were transferred to San Antonio to be in quarantine for fourteen day quarantine and of course they were testing them watching their symptoms released a woman from Last week and apparently the first thing she did was go hang out at the mall. Doku sure what you did. What now yeah. She had to North Star Mall. She browsing stores Middle Movies. End Up all right so yes absolutely. Yeah she went to the mall. She browsing stores ate some food at the food court and then got a call. That was like Oh hold on wait a minute we just got your test results back and you actually are positive. Boy So what are we doing? What's going on with this corona virus? That's a really good question and to help us with that today. We actually have a special guest to everyone say hello to e Rosalie Lee Rhoden born. She is a graduate student at the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Welcome Rosalie is have to say a disclaimer. That the views that I express only reflect myself and are not affiliated with any institution so definitely totally understandable. Thank you so much for joining us today. Rosalie excited. Yeah a little bit about what you've been studying and who you've been working with and you know what? Ha What has prompted you to take a special interest in this story. It's a bit serendipitous. I started out this semester. Full-time student and both of my courses are with Instructors who also are scientists at the Center for Health Security And so I have been intensively studying. Infectious Disease Threats to global security and Even before the the tourists started though I had been tracking this because as most people have learned but were not aware of Corona viruses are of particular interest to emerging infectious disease scientists. Yes so I guess before we go into a deep dive into you know what's going on in the United States and other countries as well toast a little bit about what the Corona virus is. How does this? How is it different from other viruses that More familiar with? And why have we never heard of this before okay? So the corona virus is a bit of a misnomer I will leave the name that they've selected cove in nineteen but I've also seen the CEO v. SARS to maybe more like the scientific name but it's a it's a family of our NAVIERA says There are mild viruses in it but it also has SARS inet which people may be familiar with in two thousand two thousand three. We had an outbreak of SARS There were eight thousand people it had about ten percent mortality rate it was contained within seven months And that was completely due to very strong public. Health measures and SARS is no longer extant in the population. But this is a relative of ours and Murs If your audience isn't familiar Moore's is a lot like SARS I believe it as a higher fight fatality rate in it's just the Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome versus the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. And this krona virus is in that family though so that sounds fun and I mentioned a map. Everybody but I mean those relatives that don't panic the yesterday's Exit K. C. D. Comic was all about how stay inside? I've been practicing for this forever like a guy that doesn't leave my house. Let's hit me pretty well. So you mentioned we started recording. You missing something about a gps map and how we're tracking it and so who how many people are affected is pretty much worldwide now. Where's where's the? Oh yeah well the latest. I don't know how many countries exactly but I mean it is definitely spread worldwide. And I can talk more about why I think it's spread even wider than is represented. But I believe the last count was around ninety five thousand cases. The mortality rate seems to vary and that is not necessarily surprising that something we saw with the nineteen eighteen flu different regions seemed more susceptible Iran. I believe just reported a four point four percent mortality rate whereas before you know regions of China were reporting a two percent. Sars was ten percent so that was considerably higher. I think either way what we should know is that the average person is not going to die from this however that doesn't mean it's not concerning that we don't need to prepare and that some people won't be affected in that way. Sure I hear a lot of things going around in media a lot of different things going on on facebook comparing it to the flu so Maybe speak a little bit about how does how does it compare to the flu virus in and is it more concerning are less concerning and in what way you know. That is the difficult part about this right now. This virus has only been known to us for eight weeks which is really wild in that time. Science has completely come together and I mean every day. There's new papers. People are analyzing it doing a sequencing and that sort of thing. One study that was done. I want to say it was on February third sequenced the virus that was in China and what they found is that they suspected emerged in November. Two Thousand Nineteen We only became aware of it And the global community in mid January and that is part of the reason that I suspect because there are confirmed cases of misdiagnoses. I remember one particular case January. Eighteenth a woman with This virus was misdiagnosed at a hospital in Wuhan and she flew to Korea where she was identified. And so I think the data is probably a little bit inflated. It may not be but the bias that we get. An outbreak is severe cases. We don't Miss Those. Those people need help. They seek you Hospital or they die. So they're definitely represented in the data. What is still up in the air and we're not sure is if the mild cases are accounted for and if there are more mild cases than we think that will further dilute the pool and there would be fewer severe cases proportionally talk more about the mile cases. I guess what what symptoms are what. What are we actually? Am I going to be seizing coffee? What is the the virus like? Whoa what is it doing to us? Yeah you're going to you know it's a respiratory illness for some people. It might seem like the common cold. The major complication that people are experiencing is a secondary infection and Monja And that is similar to the flu and in terms of comparing this to the flu. You know it's not. It's not exactly a good comparison and the reason is because we know the flu. This is an old foe. We're very familiar with it. We have vaccines that work against it. In varying capacities. We know what we can treat it with and I think we just understand a whole lot more the problem with this virus and I understand the public's frustration is that to be honest we we don't know much. The fatality rate changed yesterday. I think it was yesterday from the World Health Organization from two percent to three point.

FLU Rosalie Lee Rhoden San Antonio Michael Program North Star Mall China Austin Texas World Health Organization Facebook United States John Hopkins Bloomberg School Center For Health Security Respiratory Syndrome Graduate Student Naviera CEO
Latest on China's Response to the Coronavirus Outbreak

Bloomberg Law

06:30 min | 9 months ago

Latest on China's Response to the Coronavirus Outbreak

"The Chinese government has effectively put Wuhan a city of eleven million people on lock down in an attempt to limit the spread of the corona virus that is already spread to other parts of Asia and United States I talked to doctor Jennifer does a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins center for health security for her take on China's response well I think many people were worried about how China is going to react to the situation giving given a remembrance of what happened in two thousand three with the sars epidemic where there were deep concerns about officials hiding the scale of the outbreak initially and not being transparent about case number that that around I think compared to that situation we see a much more open and responsive China the health authorities reported the outbreak Kelly promptly and you know within weeks we saw the identification and sequencing of a virus that was shared publicly and you know researchers have been able to develop diagnostic tools based on that information so I think we are summoning courage by the response there continue to be important data gaps that would help us gauge the situation but for the most part I think all available evidence suggests that they're working hard to try to get a handle on the situation a short time ago the World Health Organization said that although the corona viruses that China emergency it's not a global health emergency for now apparently it was a divided ruling this they might revisit what should we read into that what should we not to read into it well for me what was the most important part of the decision that the World Health Organization made was not the decision but the convening of experts to review the situation I mentioned are still a number of very important questions about the brakes and the answers of which I think will really better enable us to judge what the world wide risk of this is the key one for me is how severe are the illnesses that the virus produces obviously were worried that there's been a discovery of a new virus capable of affecting humans but coronaviruses are not uncommon coronaviruses health and that caused retained respiratory illnesses and so it's not just the virus itself let's worry from it how severe is the a list of the virus produces and we don't have a great handle on that so I'm in favor of taking a wait and see approach to gather more information that becomes more compelling but I think what was really important for us to gather experts in an international kind of independent fashion to to review what evidence is available to ask hard questions and you have to assume that part of the questions they're asking is also an assessment of whether the officials are being transparent with the information they have over there so long I think but I suspect they don't know for sure is that if there had been sufficient concerns about stonewalling like they may have declared emergency because that would make them quite worried about China's ability to handle the situation but so far I'm I I think it should signal to us there's a sense that there is cooperation on the ground there between WHL they're the team WHL team on the ground and Chinese health officials that was going to a question actually how do these work as they call it is trying to call in help from outside and we're the cover is a WJHL they won't call up for example CDC another health officials who have gone to the area so we heard that about him from Taiwan coming as well as actually from other countries you know it's really up to the country itself to decide who to lead and not so far it seems like there is some degree of international corporation which I think is encouraging as we heard in the WHL there's a team logo on the ground helping Chinese health officials kind of threat to the optimality of this outbreak you mentioned doctor visit earlier sars because we all think about that right away what do we know about how this is similar to sars and how it's different I understand it's corona virus which sounds like a sars but there may be some important differences yeah so so out like sars situation we're dealing with now also involves the corona virus but what what was quite worrisome about sars was the fact that about ten percent of the known cases died that's a fairly high holiday and so when the things we're looking at right now is how many of their fans before the numbers have been relatively small and then trying to understand who the death have occurred what sort of people have been been dying from the infection so far it sounds like at least a majority of the deaths have occurred people who have had some health condition that might make them more likely that the come from an infection at the front of our could be a plant or something else and so that is potentially reassuring to say that that not be as deadly for an otherwise healthy individual we don't yet know the really important set of data that we need to understand how much this is or is not like sars another area where I think we need to understand is whether or not to what extent healthcare workers have become infected in caring for an infected chronic vampires patients and so on there have been some reports of healthcare workers of becoming infected not been officially confirmed and I think that's a point for which we are really in need of more information with that understand who the healthcare workers are what they were doing when they potentially became infected and you know how is it limited to I think the reports have been pretty health workers treating one patient is that actually true when did this occur etcetera that's I think a very important part because what we thought sars without all of the transmission within around health centers the healthcare workers who are caring for patients and then potentially spreading it to the contact and the community doctor Ruth mutation do viruses like this tend to mutate now so how far how fast yeah another reason why people are concerned obviously any kind of new virus emerges we always have to ask what are they doing now and is it possible it won't keep doing this the public it works to the possible to get more mild and I I think that's an open question with respect to this virus there's been a lot of speculation about whether or not a stable or whether or not it's mutating I think it's way too early for us to be able to tell that we're not even sure what generation cases were staying at this point we're still not entirely sure we fully understand the incubation period which is the amount of time between which somebody to come inspected and then eventually develop symptoms all of those things I think will tell us you know how many sort of generations of people become infected which then I think we need to understand that in order to understand how the virus maybe changing over time that was Jennifer does associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school

Chinese Government Wuhan
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Welcome. The not so standard deviations episode sixty nine and I'm Roger paying from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school public health. I'm here with Hillary Parker of stitch fix. All right started. Yeah. Let's do it. I have some a little bit of follow up. Just from the last episode perfect. First of all, I did get to do jury duty. You did all that. I did not. Yeah. Because you know, so the last couple of times I got called to do it. He's just call it the night before and see if your number is going to actually get him be needed to last like two or three times that I've done I've done that. Like, they've always called my number. So I've just gotten it. So this time, I I didn't even remember that you had to do that. I was just going to go ahead Szekely allow. My wife's like well. You should call like the night before like, oh, yes, I checked and they didn't call my number. So maybe the whole time you've been showing up and they didn't call your number. No. I did check the other times. I just forgot. Yeah. Well, yeah. I usually still even though I totally agree with you, especially now after that conversation. I I mean, I've always had the attitude of like, I'm a, you know, I'm obviously genius. And I'm like a careful decision maker. So like, it's my civic duty to show. I guess the good of the nation people need, you exactly. I still would be like quite relieved when my number was not called. But I don't know. I think I am now kind of interested again as more of an observer for the process, and like how decision making happens, and you know, practice my leadership skills cetera..

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school Roger Hillary Parker
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Welcome the not so standard deviations episode fifty eight and i'm roger paying from the johns hopkins bloomberg school public health and i'm here with hillary parker at stitch fix we are a fortnightly data science podcasts we talked about a variety of things that are of interest data scientists if you want to reach us with any feedback or comments about our episodes you can always contact us at an ssd asians at gmailcom or you can find us on twitter at nsf deviations before we start today i just want to mention that we have a patriot page where you can support us in making the podcast you can find it at patriot dot com slash nss deviations and you can support us at the one dollar two dollars or three dollars per episode level at each level you get a little kind of bonus that you can check out on the web page and so feel free to go over there if you'd like an support us making this podcast all right so the bit of follow up comes from tesla are where we talked last time we talked about self driving cars and like what and who who's to blame he's simply literally after we finished recording i saw this article in the wall street journal so there was a tesla crash and the driver died and the ntsb israel is investigated and it turns out the family of the driver is suing tesla because they believed that the autopilot system.

hillary parker twitter wall street journal ntsb israel tesla roger johns hopkins bloomberg school three dollars two dollars one dollar
"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"johns hopkins bloomberg school public" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Morgan the not so standard aviation's this is episode forty one and i am roger paying from the johns hopkins bloomberg school public health and i'm here with hillary parker of stitch fix so how're you doing hillary i'm doing great have polite you okay do you have any special things to tell us before idea and so i wanted said i say thank you to all the patrons from our patrons from patriotic and also wanted to mention that all the stickers are in the mail right now so if you haven't gotten a sticker if you're international maybe give it a week or two but if you haven't got the speaker soon or if you haven't gotten in the past definitely reach out um and let let us know uh and so and we started to we wanna give a shout out once every episodes to patrons um just as a way of saying thank you and first of all important caveat if you don't want a shout out a definitely ping us and let us know the preferred not to be named um and you know going forward if you decide to subscribe you can just leave us note when you subscribe saying you don't have a shout out so with all that diane i wanted to give a shout out to actually ri patron which was a ashley dark henrik sleep um so thank you ashley for your support and i was especially site about this because i remember actively remember like anxiously waiting to see if we will get any patriot i dunno for under he were also watching anxiously slow izzo does because it's hard to fit your solve out there and yeah and so i really appreciate her support and she um i know her through.

Morgan public health hillary parker diane izzo johns hopkins bloomberg school ri ashley