40 Burst results for "Johns Hopkins"

Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on Mark and Melynda

Mark and Melynda

00:37 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on Mark and Melynda

"Melinda Show streaming live on the news. Radio, K o B. J ack. So far so good. That's what the data indicate, in terms of the Corona virus in the public schools. That's the story in the Washington Post this morning, it says the feared outbreaks in the schools Have not materialized. At least not yet. Is the way they're. Yeah, yeah, you just give it a moment. Johns Hopkins University is tracking the data confirmed cases among students, 0.78% among teachers 0.15% here in Texas. Among the students who are back in the classroom. The infection rate is zero. 0.21% extraordinarily low and it's lower than the surrounding communities. This's great news. Everybody ought to be celebrating this. This This is important and it's outstanding. Very good news, and it should open doors to more of the younger Children getting back into school. Again. That doesn't mean you open the doors like they were last September at this time, But you do it in a way where they can go to school. They can wear the mask. They can. Stay away even if you have the rotating teachers, But you should be able to go back to school and not be in prison. Like some of the parents have described schools where you sit there. You don't breathe. You don't talk. You don't even open your eyes in fear that you may catch the Koven. This should show you that you're able to go back. Do the safety measures The washing the hands everything we've been told and get these kids back on track. When they first released the numbers last week in Texas and said 2300 kids had become infected. I saw that number, not dog. That sounds like a lot. And then when you look at the percentage, yeah, more than a million kids are back in the classroom, so the actual infection rate is 0.21% very, very low. All right, the numbers or 51283605 90 is this one of your favorite headlines in the morning in the stack of stories, I will say it's a Obvious headline to me, the headline reads. Americans are talking more about politics, having less sex. Well, yeah, politics is not sexy. That's not bedroom talk, and there's another part to Yeah, mid are doing more housework, according Tio Ah, a survey that was released by the American family. They released this yesterday, and it kind of highlights different things different obstacles that have come along with them. Pandemic and spoke with families on how they're doing. If it's if it's hurt their family, emotionally tangible, like in partnerships in stop and of course financially, And I like in this survey that it points out that A big majority feel that this pandemic has brought their families closer. It talks about how 56% of respondents said it made them appreciate their partner more and 47% said it deepened their commitment. That is good news. I feel like maybe that was, you know, 2020 hindsight here. Maybe that is why we're having to go through all of this. We had split our families so many different ways And it's not like I don't mean just a split like the parents aren't a part of it. You split them with this one has to go with this kid to do something You're always running. You're always busy. You don't have time to sit down and reconnect as a family in this pandemic has forced you to do that. And I think that that is the silver lining in all of them, and I remember some of the stories back in the spring and the early part of the pandemic. Experts were forecasting or worried that it might tear families apart. Everybody being at home all the time. Well in an advisory brain made yes, yes, so that's pretty encouraging. I would imagine. Ah, lot of men in America, though. Don't share your enthusiasm for that headline and see that it's such a great thing..

American Family Texas Washington Post Tio Ah Johns Hopkins University America Partner
'Unfathomable': US death toll from coronavirus hits 200,000

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 7 hrs ago

'Unfathomable': US death toll from coronavirus hits 200,000

"The U. S. surpassed two hundred thousand coronavirus deaths yesterday that's equivalent to a nine eleven attack every day for sixty seven days Dr Anthony Fauci calls the two hundred thousand US death stunning sadly that number is still climbing deaths are running a close to seven hundred and seventy a day on average and a widely cited model from the university of Washington predicts the U. S. toll will double to four hundred thousand by the end of the year at schools and colleges reopen and cold weather sets in a vaccine is unlikely to become widely available until next year the Johns Hopkins numbers are supplied by state but the real toll is thought to be much higher in part because many corona virus deaths were probably ascribed to other causes especially early on before widespread testing I'm Julie Walker

Dr Anthony Fauci Julie Walker University Of Washington
Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on Pat McCrory Show w/ Bo Thompson

Pat McCrory Show w/ Bo Thompson

00:31 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on Pat McCrory Show w/ Bo Thompson

"Counts in the W B T news Center stadiums and other large venues in North Carolina will be allowed to reopen it very limited capacity at the end of next week. If current Kobe trends continue to move in the right direction before then. Means the 1st October Panthers game should be able to have some fans and attended governor right? Cooper says The change will allow a capacity of 7% of facilities with seating for more than 10,000. That would be 5200 for the October 4th game against Arizona wanted to make sure that we're talking about a large outdoor arenas where there would be plenty of space for social distancing. The 10,000 number was determined to be a good number. Cooper and State health officials say they are making the latest changes because covert 19 trends have been relatively stable here for the past two weeks, as most people appear to be following safety guidelines to protect others. Panthers officials say they have a responsible and comprehensive plan to keep everyone safe. Mike Doyle WLBT News The nationwide death toll from illnesses related to covert 19 has topped 200,000 that, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 94% of covert deaths in the U. S. Or in people with co morbidity is that were complicated by the new Corona virus. Talk. 11 10 99, www Check traffic.

Panthers Cooper Kobe Mike Doyle Johns Hopkins University Centers For Disease Control An North Carolina Arizona W B T
'It's a shame.' Trump reacts to COVID-19 death toll hitting 200,000

AP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 12 hrs ago

'It's a shame.' Trump reacts to COVID-19 death toll hitting 200,000

"Leaving the White House for a political rally. President Trump tells reporters that the 200,000 Copan 19 deaths in this country, the highest of any nation is sad, but also on accomplishment. I think it's a shame. I think If we didn't do it properly and do it right, You have 2.5 million deaths. Johns Hopkins University says the actual death toll is likely higher than today. Stab Relation. University of Washington estimates another 200,000 people could die in the pandemic over the next three months.

Johns Hopkins University President Trump Copan White House University Of Washington
Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on Fox News Rundown

Fox News Rundown

00:27 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on Fox News Rundown

"Got went out around the noon hour, Teo get in my car yesterday, Jenna. Few drops on the windshield. So Yeah, I was a little sprinkling going on. I did see a little bit of that yesterday. Myself. Yeah, it was just enough to get the dust on my car to kind of turn a little muddy. I hated that mud on your dashboard. Really? On your windshield. Yeah. Other state in 18, 06, the Lewis and Clark expedition. Return to ST Louis, more than two years after setting out for the Pacific Northwest. Stephen Ambrose had a great book about that, after 0 10 11 12 years ago about that expedition in a fascinating What those what those people did. Taking Ah, you know, basically exploring the Louisiana purchase through the northwest up toward Oregon Washington State. It was quite It's quite a story if you ever get a chance to read it. About Lewis and Clark. Canadian woman accused of mailing a package of containing rice into the White House. Included a threatening letter in which he told President Donald Trump to give up and remove your application for this election. Court papers say Pascal Ferriere Of Quebec was arrested Sunday at the US kind of the border and made her first court appearance yesterday afternoon in federal court in Buffalo, New York, She faces a charge of threatening the president. The envelope containing the toxic substance and the threatening letter was addressed to the White House. But Intercepted at a mail sorting facility Friday. Yeah, that's not going to get through now. You see something that says White house on it. They're going to be really cautious. Basically, after 9 11 we get We finally got the message. Hey, there are people out there who want to hurt us and do bad things. Well, what do you do when Vladimir Putin which I think a little Vladimir is the biggest rat that ever lived. These He's trying to be the next Stalin. He's I think he's just a jerk. What are you doing? Putin offers you Russia's new Corona virus vaccine for free. Oh, yeah, Glad given the United Nations staff in New York and around the world are now facing that choice. After the Russian president offered Tuesday to provide them the Sputnik V vaccine. Whoa! In a speech to this year's general assembly, marking the body 75th anniversary Only results from small. Early studies on the Russian vaccine have been published, raising concerns among some scientists that it isn't ready yet for widespread use. I'll tell you what I'd have to probably just have lost my entire mind to be involved in a thing. With that little weasel. Good gravy. Well, supposedly he got his daughter so inoculated with this. Well, you think he cares about anybody but himself? Think about that. Think about the doctor that gave the daughter that shot, though That guy's got to be brave. Oh, yeah. Don't work if it doesn't work. If she has side effects, I kill you. You have no it just says here. Try some of this tea. Let's face it. The guy's My son, the Ah Retired Air Force and Part of his work was he was in military intelligence, and he knows a great deal about Russia. He says. This guy is the real deal. He is a jerk, and he don't care who he killed. So Anyway, enough about Vladimir Putin. I don't talk about the U. S AA kind of a bad toe landmark here. The U. S. Surpassed 200,000 covered 19 deaths Tuesday, which Johns Hopkins University called Unfathomable. Eight months after the pandemic began. University of Washington predicts the U. S death toll will double 2 400,000 by the end of the year. Wow. Going to have in three months. California's death count from covert 19 past the 15,000 marks Sunday. Johns Hopkins University has California's total of 15,026, the fourth highest in the United States. New York has had the most covert 19 deaths with over 33 heat 1000. For some people that someplace is getting harder than others. But there you go. Some totals from the Johns Hopkins University. You know, I would Ah, a couple of years ago had to chance to goto Baltimore and pick up my my son and I and my nephew to pick up his car being shipped from overseas. And took it even during even took a drive around Baltimore. About every other corner. There's a Johns Hopkins building. I mean, it's that medical facility there in Baltimore is incredible. Ah, in there do a lot of work course on the virus. 6 16 now Stephen 10 and coming up Saturday and Sunday Que nous, says radio bringing you the Wichita Open. With Mike Kennedy. Yep. Saturday and Sunday Be 1 P.m. to 5 P.m.. So if you wanna listen to a golf tournament did get in, you know when it's going to be out there on the links Bless his heart, he man. It was shaping up to look like such a beautiful, You know, weather weekend for something like that, And that's usually such a great thing to go out and see. But no, no. Yeah, Who's telling Spectators now who was telling us the other day that there were going to be out there? But they know they're being much too. Don grant somebody anyway. They were saying that not many people around the 17th oldest year? Nope. So, usually that's usually such a good spectator of really great event, and maybe we can have it back next year. That's saying a lot of a lot of things about a lot of things this year. Maybe next year. You like where the Chicago Cubs or something? You know for all those years, OK, it's coming up on 6 18 Stephen dead. Let's do leadoff sports this morning with Dad Chamber. Well,.

Vladimir Putin Johns Hopkins University White House Stephen President Trump Baltimore Russia New York United States President Donald Trump Stephen Ambrose Johns Hopkins Building Lewis TEO Ah Retired Air Force Pacific Northwest California St Louis Jenna University Of Washington
'Unfathomable': US death toll from coronavirus hits 200,000

Mac and Gaydos

00:24 sec | 18 hrs ago

'Unfathomable': US death toll from coronavirus hits 200,000

"Death toll from the Corona virus has topped 200,000 by far the highest in the world, hitting the once unimaginable threshold six weeks before the presidential election. The count is kept by Johns Hopkins University, and it's based on figures from state health authorities. But the real number of dead is thought to be much higher, in part because many Kobe 19 deaths, especially early on We're probably described other causes. Meanwhile,

Johns Hopkins University
Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:48 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on AP News Radio

"The U. S. surpassed 200000 coronavirus deaths yesterday that's equivalent to a 911 attack every day for 67 days Dr Anthony Fauci calls the 200000 US death stunning sadly that number is still climbing deaths are running a close to 770 a day on average and a widely cited model from the university of Washington predicts the U. S. toll will double to 400000 by the end of the year at schools and colleges reopen and cold weather sets in a vaccine is unlikely to become widely available until next year the Johns Hopkins numbers are supplied by state but the real toll is thought to be much higher in part because many corona virus deaths were probably ascribed to other causes especially early on before widespread testing I'm Julie Walker

Dr Anthony Fauci Julie Walker United States University Of Washington 67 Days
U.S. surpasses 200,000 coronavirus deaths, eight months after first reported case

Mitch Albom

00:36 sec | 18 hrs ago

U.S. surpasses 200,000 coronavirus deaths, eight months after first reported case

"Toll in America today in the United States reached a milestone, according to the researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, the team who have been tracking Corona virus since the pandemics origins. The U. S has now surpassed 200,000 deaths. That's the highest number of deaths for any nation, though many researchers agree that other deaths elsewhere are incorrectly attributed to other causes, or that Corona virus wasn't being tested for At the time. The first U. S case was detected back in January, a Washington state man who had traveled to Wuhan, China, Evan Brown, Fox News and

Johns Hopkins University Evan Brown Wuhan United States Baltimore America Fox News Washington China
Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "johns hopkins" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"These. These states, you know, they still have The judges. And by the way, your governor hasn't been so great, you know. Your church is still clubs. There's still love death, sir, averaging close to 770 a day and a widely cited model from the University of Washington predicts a toll will double to 400,000 in just the next three months. A vaccine is unlikely to become widely available until sometime next year. I'm to McGuire AP News I'm Tim Maguire, the nation reaches a grim milestone. Johns Hopkins University reporting more than 200,000 people dead.

Johns Hopkins University Tim Maguire University Of Washington Mcguire
U.S. surpasses 200,000 coronavirus deaths, eight months after first reported case

WSJ What's News

00:32 sec | 19 hrs ago

U.S. surpasses 200,000 coronavirus deaths, eight months after first reported case

"We had another grim milestone in the pandemic today more than two hundred thousand people in the US have now died from covid nineteen according to Johns Hopkins University. The US leads the world both in total confirmed cases and deaths more than six point eight million cases happened reported here since the outbreak began. Broadly speaking deaths have been falling since the beginning of August but reported new cases increased sharply on Monday and experts warned that with schools reopening and people spending more time indoors as the fall begins another surge of infections could becoming.

United States Johns Hopkins University
US coronavirus death toll passes 200,000; Philadelphia mayor in quarantine after virus exposure

KYW 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 21 hrs ago

US coronavirus death toll passes 200,000; Philadelphia mayor in quarantine after virus exposure

"Death death from from Corona Corona virus virus in in this this country country was was on on February February 29th. 29th. Today Today we we have have surpassed surpassed the the 200,000 200,000 mark. mark. That's according to state health figures. Compiled by Johns Hopkins University, Your CBS News Medical contributor, Dr David Vegas. Our numbers outpaced most countries in terms of numbers of cases and in terms of death. And you know, the deaths are probably under estimating the actual number of deaths. Because many people have died without Cove in 19 testing because of the lack of availability at many times during the course of this pandemic of Cove in 19 testing, New Jersey has had more deaths than any state but New York with 16,076 people killed from Cove in 19. Pennsylvania's death toll is the eighth highest in the land. Mayor Kenny says he was exposed to Cove in 19 but is tested negative for the virus. He's currently in quarantine and we'll get retested next week.

Cove Mayor Kenny Johns Hopkins University Dr David Vegas CBS New York New Jersey News Medical Pennsylvania
US hits 'unfathomable' milestone: 200000 dead from coronavirus

Curtis Sliwa

00:39 sec | 23 hrs ago

US hits 'unfathomable' milestone: 200000 dead from coronavirus

"Describes the tragic pandemic Milestone reached today in the US boxes. Evan Brown has more live at least in more than 200,000. US deaths now due to Corona virus are recorded, according to the researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Who have been tallying Corona virus cases since the pandemic began. The U. S has the most number of deaths worldwide, though five other nations surpassed the U. S and deaths per capita. Some scientists say other nations are reporting lower figures because they may not have started expansive testing as early as the U. S or could have attributed a number of deaths to other causes, sleeps up. Have been thousands of flags around the Washington Monument, close to the

United States Evan Brown Johns Hopkins University Washington Monument
The US is close to 200,000 COVID 19 deaths

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 23 hrs ago

The US is close to 200,000 COVID 19 deaths

"The US nears two hundred thousand cobit nineteen deaths according to numbers compiled by Johns Hopkins University which has been tracking the virus from the start the first coronavirus case in the U. S. was reported on January twenty first of this year by late may the country had hit one hundred thousand deaths and while the numbers have gone down since the peak of the pandemic in the spring the corona virus still claims the lives of hundreds each day yesterday in the US there were three hundred and fifty six deaths with fifty two thousand seventy new cases reported I'm Julie Walker

United States Johns Hopkins University Julie Walker
The US is close to 200,000 COVID 19 deaths

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 23 hrs ago

The US is close to 200,000 COVID 19 deaths

"The US nears two hundred thousand cobit nineteen deaths according to numbers compiled by Johns Hopkins University which has been tracking the virus from the start the first coronavirus case in the U. S. was reported on January twenty first of this year by late may the country had hit one hundred thousand deaths and while the numbers have gone down since the peak of the pandemic in the spring the corona virus still claims the lives of hundreds each day yesterday in the US there were three hundred and fifty six deaths with fifty two thousand seventy new cases reported I'm Julie Walker

United States Johns Hopkins University Julie Walker
The US is close to 200,000 COVID 19 deaths

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 23 hrs ago

The US is close to 200,000 COVID 19 deaths

"The US nears two hundred thousand cobit nineteen deaths according to numbers compiled by Johns Hopkins University which has been tracking the virus from the start the first coronavirus case in the U. S. was reported on January twenty first of this year by late may the country had hit one hundred thousand deaths and while the numbers have gone down since the peak of the pandemic in the spring the corona virus still claims the lives of hundreds each day yesterday in the US there were three hundred and fifty six deaths with fifty two thousand seventy new cases reported I'm Julie Walker

United States Johns Hopkins University Julie Walker
'Unfathomable': US death toll from coronavirus hits 200,000

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 d ago

'Unfathomable': US death toll from coronavirus hits 200,000

"The U. S. death toll from the corona virus has topped two hundred thousand according to Johns Hopkins University the very sad occasion for our country house speaker Nancy Pelosi at a memorial service this morning for covert nineteen victims this was preventable not all of it but much of it what could be lost in the future is preventable too if we embrace science the bleak milestone of two hundred thousand is by far the highest confirmed death toll from the virus in the world and it's still climbing desert running a close to an average of seven hundred and seventy a day I'm showing up where

Johns Hopkins University Nancy Pelosi
The Latest: British PM to announce new social restrictions

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

The Latest: British PM to announce new social restrictions

"The US nears two hundred thousand cobit nineteen deaths according to numbers compiled by Johns Hopkins University which has been tracking the virus from the start the first coronavirus case in the U. S. was reported on January twenty first of this year by late may the country had hit one hundred thousand deaths and while the numbers have gone down since the peak of the pandemic in the spring the corona virus still claims the lives of hundreds each day yesterday in the US there were three hundred and fifty six deaths with fifty two thousand seventy new cases reported I'm Julie Walker

United States Johns Hopkins University Julie Walker
U.S. approaches grim milestone of 200,000 COVID-19 deaths

WBZ Midday News

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

U.S. approaches grim milestone of 200,000 COVID-19 deaths

"And a grim milestone for the United States is a number of Corona virus related death approaches. The 200,000 marks we could be there. By dinnertime tonight. The Ape's Julie Walker has more from Johns Hopkins University, which has been tracking the outbreak since the beginning of the pandemic. The global number of deaths is reaching five times as many with almost a million dead from the pandemic, according to Johns Hopkins, a staggering number that seemed impossible earlier in the year. However, experts say the really numbers are far higher. Because of undercounting related to how death sir classified here in the U. S. While some states like New York have been ableto lower the death toll since the peak of the outbreak, other states are getting hit with a resurgence and experts warn of a coming second wave. I'm Julie

Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins United States Julie Walker New York
The Latest: Czech health minister resigns amid virus surge

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

The Latest: Czech health minister resigns amid virus surge

"A grim milestone as U. S. related coronavirus deaths approach two hundred thousand according to Johns Hopkins University which has been tracking the outbreak since the start the global number of deaths is reaching five times as many with almost a million dead from the pandemic according to Johns Hopkins a staggering number that seemed impossible earlier in the year however experts say the real numbers are far higher because of undercounting related to how deaths are classified here in the U. S. while some states like New York have been able to lower the death toll since the peak of the outbreak other states are getting hit with a resurgence and experts warn of a coming second wait meanwhile the race for a vaccine continues with the debate over just when one will be ready I'm Julie Walker

U. S. Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins New York Julie Walker
The Latest: Czech health minister resigns amid virus surge

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

The Latest: Czech health minister resigns amid virus surge

"A grim milestone as U. S. related coronavirus deaths approach two hundred thousand according to Johns Hopkins University which has been tracking the outbreak since the start the global number of deaths is reaching five times as many with almost a million dead from the pandemic according to Johns Hopkins a staggering number that seemed impossible earlier in the year however experts say the real numbers are far higher because of undercounting related to how deaths are classified here in the U. S. while some states like New York have been able to lower the death toll since the peak of the outbreak other states are getting hit with a resurgence and experts warn of a coming second wait meanwhile the race for a vaccine continues with the debate over just when one will be ready I'm Julie Walker

U. S. Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins New York Julie Walker
US Coronavirus Death Toll Surpasses 200000

Guarding Your Nest Egg

00:14 sec | 2 d ago

US Coronavirus Death Toll Surpasses 200000

"In on 200,000 Kobe deaths, the most reported from any nation in the world. The US that for the Johns Hopkins University tally is an increase in Corona virus cases in 27 States increase in deaths in 19 States, According to the Cova tracking project.

Johns Hopkins University Cova United States
U.S. Covid-19 death toll nears 200,000

AP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 3 d ago

U.S. Covid-19 death toll nears 200,000

"Covert 19 is now blamed for the deaths of more than 199,000 people in the US with six and three quarter million confirmed cases since the outbreaks began. Those numbers tallied by Johns Hopkins University's As of Saturday evening. The global death toll is approaching one million, as confirmed infections are spiking again in a number of countries.

Johns Hopkins University United States
U.S. Covid-19 death toll nears 200,000, edges towards 1 million globally

AP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 3 d ago

U.S. Covid-19 death toll nears 200,000, edges towards 1 million globally

"Is now blamed for the deaths of more than 199,000 people in the US with six and three quarter million confirmed cases since the outbreaks began. Those numbers tallied by Johns Hopkins University's As of Saturday evening. The global death toll is approaching one million, as confirmed infections are spiking again in a number of countries. But in London, hundreds of demonstrators gathered in Trafalgar Square to protest Corona virus restrictions to crying how the measures have affected daily life. Similar protests have been taking place in Australia, Israel and Romania. Back

Johns Hopkins University Trafalgar Square United States Romania London Israel Australia
"johns hopkins" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Radio

05:30 min | 3 weeks ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

"Satisfaction with. Medical care which is linked to reimbursement rates for Medicare Medicare. Awesome was actually make money. You know opens up a lot of doors because it shows this other sort of big picture part because right now, when we do that kind of in hospital work, we don't have any long-term link because we have proven anything. So we we sort of offer you know the in hospital mediation between here's the science. Now, we're going to refer you on because we know that the science is good right and then. So it gives it gives evidence that there's something about hearing Karen that's worthwhile to pursue different ways. So it opens up a law on the initiative were air but then what really exciting actually is. Not, hearing it act happened and it has gone into effect yet but you know we're we're somewhere near it. There's complementary aspects. The mode that hasn't occurred yet part of that is. We need to think about Medicare reimbursing for I mean impart hearing aids for people with severe profound moss especially because the OTC devices technically will only be for mild and moderate. And we need to think about the fitting and the Oral Rehab in the counseling goes around this and. Win The congressional budget. Office. which literally does this every year people don't realize this is a regular thing. There's all these bills that come in and say, we're going to cover hearing aids right and then they have to score the bill. And hearing AIDS are only a loss right now because there's no proof that hearing aids do anything for healthcare. Prove, that hearing is. delay the rate of cognitive decline and could delay the time on set dementia. For example, even if it's just a few years, you can turn that into a health economic analysis and you could actually show dementia is so costly that hearing aids would be a cost effective thing and then Medicare covering hearing aids would save carrying the long run which I think all of us sort of think about this and we're like, yeah, that makes much sense. But without evidence again, the Congressional Budget Office says, okay. If thirty million adults in the US have hearing loss. And eighty percent of them don't have hearing aids. We assume they're all GONNA get hearing aids. It's just a massive billion dollar cost to them that they're not really gonNA eat it makes every bill look back but now we open up outside. So politically, we open up a real chance to have a comprehensive hearing plan in the US that we have otc you various entry points we have the hospital based screening entry points, and then we have long-term coverage support to maximize utilization, which that's the real goal I think in the long run is like a holistic. You. I. Always think of it as like a spiderweb that all works together instead of right now, where we sort of had these disjointed efforts that nothing is really working in a rural real operating in silos and I wanna see it all in one place which the research in a weird way sort of turns the key and let's all that sort flow. That was maybe the most insightful like five minute clip I. Think I might need to clip that because that was. Your. So spot on there I mean. Everything that you guys are doing at Johns Hopkins I knew. Sort of inherently like this is really really really important and you just articulated why and I like I'm going to be thinking about this after this conversation for a while because you're so spot on there. I mean. You know with regard to OTC with regard to Medicare..

AIDS Medicare US Congressional Budget Office Oral Rehab Karen
"johns hopkins" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Radio

02:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

"The. World Voice Technology. Power these worlds starting to intersect power these worlds starting to collide what cool things are gonNA come from this intersection of technology. Without further. Ado. Let's get on with the show. Okay. So rejoined here today by Dr. Nick Read. Nick tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do. Sure. Thanks for having me. So I am clinically trained doesn't audiologist. However I spend A. Day Job in this world. Epidemiology. Assistant. Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Adversity Bloomberg School of Public Health which is a mouthful. And I'm core faculty at the Center for the Kook Later Center for a health, which is also at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Charles. Awesome. Well, thank you for coming on today. It's great to chat with you. Again I know that the last time we spoke was when I was doing the. Videos. So sort of the natural progression of those is now the podcast but I wanted to have you on because like you mentioned you work at Johns Hopkins you know you're working in the. Whole Epidemiology field, and I just find a lot of the work that you do super fascinating i. think that it's going to be really I think a a really important piece to driving more awareness more just of a broader understanding of the importance of hearing protection, hearing conservation, and the idea that hearing loss ultimately can lead to some pretty nasty co morbidity and so I WANNA get. into some of the different ways in which you know the work that you all have done outlines ways that you might be able to kind of mitigate damage, and so to start with a one, a lead with the kind of the like end point actually when I kinda like lead with the ending we'll come back around to it. So recently the, Lancet. Lancet Commission Dementia Prevention, they issued a list of different both points around ways to prevent dementia and what was striking for anybody that's working in and around the..

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Dr. Nick Read Johns Hopkins Lancet Commission Dementia Pre Bloomberg School of Public Hea Lancet Department of Epidemiology Kook Later Center core faculty Professor
"johns hopkins" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:09 min | 2 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on WTOP

"O P News and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore is grappling with the same issues in a town hall event on undergraduate student life, University officials said. There will be a lot of changes such as mandatory Covad safety rules We have stood up. Ray of safety ambassadors whose role is to monitor compliance. Johns Hopkins chief risk and compliance Officer John Link said there will be disciplinary actions if needed. They start with encouragement and end with sanctions. He also said they're hoping once students return to campus. They stay there and don't mingle outside the university community, possibly exposing themselves to the virus. We may very well decide that once you're on campus, we don't want travels. Michelle Morello w T o P News In New Orleans to Lane's university's dean of students has sent an email to students warning them of suspension or expulsion if they host parties or gatherings of more than 15 people. It comes after reports of a serious of Fourth of July party's over the weekend hosted or attended by two lane students. Checking the early going on Wall Street with Jeff Play ball and all the valleys up to 100 points. The S and P 500 index is up more than 1/2 percent Money news in 10 minutes on the GOP sports at 15 and 45 powered by Red River technology decisions aren't black and white. Pink red and here's Dave Preston. The Wizard's arrived in Orlando yesterday, but their hopes for making the N BA playoffs may have not taken flat. After Bradley Beal announced he would be sitting out the summer reboot dealing witha right rotator cuff injury. The team may be on the bubble for the postseason. They're in a different kind of bubble down to commissioner Adam Silver telling Fortune brainstorm health. It's a very protected environment together. This virus has humbled many and so I'm not going to express any higher level competence. Them were found in the protocols, and we hope it works as we've designed it. Brooklyn guard Spencer did what he won't play this summer after testing positive for the Corona virus Baseball nationals working out this morning on South Capitol Street. They're also having players practice in Fredericksburg, the team's alternate camp general manager, Mike Rizzo. All those people are going to be important in in our 2020 regular season on, we're going to keep those people. Razor sharp down there with with a great player development staff down there on some and some really good players that you will see in DC regular season that's played their first exhibition one week from Saturday. NASCAR seven time champion Jimmie Johnson will raise Sunday Kentucky Speedway after testing negative twice for covert 19. Johnson missed the first race of his career last weekend. After a positive test Friday. Dave Preston w T o p Sports coming up police searching for an uber driver suspected in a sexual assault. It's 10 17. Hi, It's Rita Kessler. Ladies, have you been told that your pelvic pain is normal or that you should watch and wait rather than seek the treatment you need for your gynecologic condition. Then it's time to discover this C I G C difference. The center for innovative G Y n care specialists.

Dave Preston Johns Hopkins University Adam Silver Johns Hopkins John Link Jimmie Johnson Bradley Beal Covad compliance Officer Baltimore pelvic pain Michelle Morello Ray Rita Kessler Jeff Play rotator cuff injury Mike Rizzo New Orleans Red River
"johns hopkins" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:28 min | 3 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

"For tracking cove in nineteen cases and deaths they help provide near real time data on how corona virus is spreading across the world in an environment where case counts are consistently inconsistent. Kyle Swenson reporter Washington. Post joins us for more thanks for joining US kyle. Absolutely, thank you for having me. As. We've been tracking the coronavirus pandemic throughout the world and here in the United States. One of the most important tools that we've been using is coming from Johns Hopkins University and they're corona virus dashboard, which really has numbers of the cases and deaths throughout the world throughout the United States i. mean has really become the premier source to find those numbers I think more people probably go there than they do to. The CDC's webpage you see it like on CNN and other news sources. They go straight to Johns Hopkins numbers, but it's a pretty interesting story. How this whole thing got started how it evolved to what it is. Kyle tell us a little bit about it. So it really started as a student project in late January a first year. PhD Student Johns Hopkins who happens to be from China names and Shin-dong. He'd been talking to family members and friends back in China. He knew about the virus that was spreading from Wuhan and at the same time, at Johns Hopkins. His program he was in was all about modeling diseases and using computers and data to kind of see their pattern, and so one day he was having coffee with his advisor. Dr Laura Gardner and they came. Came up with the idea of making a a dashboard that would track these cases and again. This was in January late January. So you know at that time, the virus didn't really have the global spread it yet to really kind of explode the United States so when they sat down, they thought that this would be a real small scale projects something that other researchers would possibly look into, but they didn't conceptualize. It is something that would all the sudden the gold standard for the world really and tracking the spread. The way you put it in the article case counter consistently inconsistent, and that's something that they struggled with throughout the whole project. Really and when I started, it was very crowd source they were beginning. Numbers of people posting stuff online and going through twitter. That's how they'd be getting a lot of the numbers. This was before governments really started posting numbers that they were gathering, so they started out that way, and then beyond that they soon found out all of the inconsistencies. Because we've we've talked about on the podcast before it varies from country to country state to state county to county people, counting probable cases of Covid I mean it just pretty unruly. They knew going in that infectious disease information like this was really spotty. There really is both internationally and also within the United States. There's no uniform way. This data is compiled and presented to the public. So as you mentioned you know at first they're just going through twitter accounts. They're going to media reports. It was real grass work effort. A real grass works work effort at the beginning, just trying to get good sources for the data, and then actually as countries in as the United States, and states and counties within the states began reporting data. It became even more difficult. I think for them. Them because there was so much inconsistency there and they knew that going in to their credit they were always open and honest about that and that those difficulties, but they really leaned into the mission I. Think Can Kinda the beautiful thing about the Johns. Hopkins project is it starts with a student, his visor, and really all these other people from across the campus began saying Oh. Hey I can help with this or we could add a feature that looks at census data or a hospital capacity in the counties, so a lot of these experts who had never known each other right had never worked before. The end jumping on this project, and of course by this time really everyone sequestered at home on lockdown because of the virus, and so they're coordinating this through zoom calls and emails, and it kind beautifully came together, but that's the great struggle with data and I know we've all been in the situation where we've all been scared. You know what the heck is going on here with his viruses. Mike Community do I need to be worried, and so we turn the data for some type of handhold and this project. They really right away realize that there was a need out there that people needed information and as much. As the information was difficult and sometimes inconsistent. They realized that having a platform was incredibly important for just getting people through this. You know if you go on twitter, see kind of like Johns Hopkins Tracker Super Fans and stand all over there so not every day. They're checking at every day. They're looking at it and it's really become a trusted source, and I think it's become trusted because they've been very open and we're definitely opened with me as I was working on the story about the difficulties that they face in the early days of the pandemic. Obviously, everybody needed any bit of information they could in. This was the first thing that they would do i. have it saved as a favorites? Tab On my on my browser, because check it every day when I'd go in and after that I. I mean a lot of times. What the researchers are saying an an in your story, too? They said that getting lost in the numbers to is kind of the story that is being told of American life throughout the pandemic kind of the inequities. They started seeing the trends, and how minority communities were being disproportionately affected by this, and this all started coming out once the data machine really started getting rolling, and they were able to tell another story when they started expanding it, and they made the US Dash, or they wanted to tell the story of the healthcare capacity the demographics of each country and then comparing. Comparing county disease data to the state as a whole, and this is where the real picture started forming I think all of us in the media had heard kind of anecdotally that, especially when the virus hit the United States that communities of color were really suffering more than more, affluent and wider communities, and what this truck or did against their great credit at Johns Hopkins. They realize that this was a way to explore that is that true and by giving more context and other pieces of data say you know if this certain neighborhood has these number of ICU but access to versus another you know that really. Really plays out along racial lines, and it became very very clear that the story that was there and the data was really one of very deep, seated generational inequality, and it was really interesting, obviously, because in the last couple of weeks we've seen kind of explosion of protests and demonstrations about you know. The black lives matter movement, and for a moment it seems that the coronavirus had been pushed off. The front pages and people aren't thinking about it anymore, but really if you looked at the data, John Hopkins did a great job of doing this. They were the same story very much, and they were very. Entwined and I think that's important for people to kind of recognize it. Respond to well I. Know We're all happy that the team there. Is University was able to get this. Krono virus dashboard up and running I suggest everybody. Go and read Kyle's piece on this. Because there's a lot of stuff we couldn't get to, and it's just a really interesting story about how this thing that got put together is like you mentioned the gold standard for the numbers that we all look for Kyle. Swenson reporter at the Washington Post. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. Pat I'm Oscar Ramirez reopening American. Don't forget that for today's the big news stories. You can check me out of the.

United States Kyle Swenson Johns Hopkins Johns Hopkins University twitter reporter John Hopkins China CNN CDC Washington Post Wuhan Dr Laura Gardner advisor Mike Community Oscar Ramirez ICU
"johns hopkins" Discussed on AP News

AP News

04:09 min | 4 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on AP News

"S. that according to Johns Hopkins university's tally the virus had killed nearly one hundred and three thousand Americans as of Saturday morning but concerns about the virus in containing it spread continued to be overwhelmed by anger raging in Minneapolis and other cities around the nation over the death of George Floyd the forty six year old black man died Monday night after police officer pressed his knee into his neck for several minutes even after Floyd stop moving and pleading for air that officer has been arrested and charged with murder AP correspondent Julie Walker has more on the reaction here city where police vans were to watch that Lana were C. N. N.'s windows were smashed do you see where the White House was on lockdown Houston opened the list goes on all along the way hundreds of arrests lots of property damage viral videos of police protester clashes with injuries on both sides Minnesota's governor Tim Walz says he spoke with George Lloyd's family about what's happening the disenfranchisement that went with what we witnessed with with George's death is one thing but the absolute chaos this is not grieving military police units are on alert to deploy the Minneapolis at the president's request I'm Judy I'm Ben Thomas AP news thousands of protesters take to the streets of Minneapolis for a fourth straight night and ignore curfew as the anger stoked by the police killing of George Floyd spread to more cities across the U. S. your city where police vans were to watch that Lana were C. N. N.'s windows were smashed do you see where the White House was on lockdown Houston opened the list goes on all along the way hundreds of arrests lots of property damage viral videos of police protester clashes with injuries on both sides Minnesota's governor Tim Walz says he spoke with George Lloyd's family about what's happened to disenfranchisement that went with what we witnessed with with George's death is one thing but the absolute chaos this is not grieving military police units are on alert to deploy the Minneapolis at the president's request I'm Judy Walker Israeli police have shot dead a Palestinian near Jerusalem's old city they had suspected was carrying a weapon but turned out to be unarmed the police say he was carrying a suspicious object that looked like a pistol and run away one order to stop that officers chased him on foot and opened fire police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld later said the no gun was found in the area the shooting came a day after Israeli soldiers killed a Palestinian in the occupied west bank who they said had tried to run them with his vehicle no Israelis were wounded in either incident tensions have risen in recent weeks as Israel has pressed ahead with plans to annex large parts of the occupied west bank in line with president Donald trump's Middle East plan which strongly favors Israel and was rejected by the Palestinians I'm sorry I shockingly I'm typical wire with an A. P. news minute in Houston protesters chanting George Floyd the name of the black man who died in Minneapolis police custody this past Monday the four officers have been fired one who pinned floor to the ground with his knee on his neck has been arrested Hennepin county attorney Mike Freeman former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chapman has been charged by the head of the county attorney's office with murder and with manslaughter last night seven people protesting the police shooting death of a woman in lieu of all were wounded when shots were fired there was mayor says they were not fired by police the videos that showed thousands of party goers in pools and bars along Missouri's lake of the Ozarks over the Memorial Day weekend now it seems at least one of those people tested positive for the corona virus health officials say they now have to inform mass numbers of unknown people about that positive test I'm timid wire thank you for listening to the AP radio network you can purchase prints of a piece for tiger fee for your personal or small business use every day a piece to top the first capture incredible images from all around the world they're on.

Johns Hopkins university
"johns hopkins" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:09 min | 4 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We discuss interoperability building. Scaling a digital health solution and the work that he and the team at Corey Health has done to bring cardiovascular care and prevention in two communities that more than likely would not have this care and also scaling in such a way to allow people to get that type of care during an era of cove in nineteen and beyond and so with that. Glad to have Dr Seth Martin here with US and today will be super focus around his thoughts on health care but also around interoperability and the idea of building in scaling a digital health solution but also the execution of that so Such a privilege to have you here Dr Martin so glad you could join us my pleasure to join you. Thank you for having me so Dr Martin. What inspires your work in healthcare. Yes I Have been inspired for a long time. I come from a medical family and knew for a long time that I was probably heading towards a career in healthcare and so I'm on the front lines. Now of clinical care as cardiologists at Johns Hopkins Hospital. And so the being able to help my patients solve the problems that they're facing and lead healthier lives and more time with family. Stay out of the hospital that inspires me. It's really from that that inspiration but also seen that there's still room for improvement in the way that our healthcare system serves patients inspired me to become part of the Corey health team and really work on building the future of of healthcare. And so think I'd love to sort of share some of that story and how Corey started. It's basically been at this point about five years in the in the making and I was fortunate to meet really incredible physician. France was marvel back at that time when she was at the beginning of her internal medicine residency and this came at a time that I started getting interested in health technology and had recently returned from a training and in mobile health technology at the NIH and really was becoming ingrained in me. The importance of working on a multidisciplinary team with more than physicians but engineers and and nurses and having patients as partners in research. Around that time that I was starting to think you know what could be some next steps to really help the cardiovascular patients that I've seen in in the inpatient setting of the hospital and an outpatient setting and I've done some work around promoting physical activity but that I knew that there was more than than that one thing that we the patients really need a full package And Not one thing and so France was marvel was starting to work in this accelerator program at Johns Hopkins around technology and thinking about building a smartphone APP for patients and connecting with some great engineers and early on we connected with Amazing Engineer League was in the PhD program that at Hopkins and really the we wanted to work on something that was addressing a problem. Our patients were facing and the problem that we honed in on. Was this transition from the hospital to home. We're seeing that our patients with who came in suddenly clenching chest with a heart attack in the hospital. We have all these great interventions putting stents in arteries really proven medications that help after that and we do all that really well in the hospital but then the transition happens home and that transition happens quickly and it's a really a paper based process where patients get given those instructions. Really lifesaving instructions the hill under that hospitalization and there. There's really this. We thought opportunity to improve implementation of everything we know by better engaging patients in their care around that time and using the time they're in the hospital to start introducing to to a tool not to papers but a tool on the devices that folks are having their hands on the smartphone to guide them through that recovery and so we started working with we got connected around that time through our Tech Innovation Center with team Apple Health and they were incredible partners as we began to build a smartphone based solution for patients. And it's just been an incredible journey of working with patients working with engineers working with other physicians like Dr Marvel. Working with nurses like errands spalding building. Something from scratch bring this vision to life of moving beyond just the paper based processes to something. That's really serving our patients to help them engage better in in guideline therapies. And so it's been a journey overtime of building the smartphone APP which is paired with smartwatch and a blood pressure cuff and getting that in the hands of patients and their families to and then to study this to see the impact that we're having and we're still working on the final study results but we just published a paper in partnership with one of our patients in the M J case reports and her words are so powerful about the the impact that this type approaches is having her and that's what inspires me to work in healthcare is to have a positive impact on the lives of our patients. And there's just so much I can do by delivering everything that we know how to do. But I but I've come to realize that my impact his. It's one thing to see a patient in the hospital and have that brief moment of time with them. It's one thing to see my patients and outpatient clinic every now and then every few months or six months or year that I can really extend my reach an impact. I can have as clinician if I can work with other folks and build technologies that can empower the patient every second of the day and it really the extending that reach. I think is going to be future of the master clinician understanding how to empower patients with technology because ultimately it's about what the patient understands and recognizes as important and has access to what they need to take care of themselves because they're ultimately the the person responsible and them and their family. I think I've also learned throughout this process the importance of the caregiver. Whether that's about the caregiver helping them engage with technology or helping engage with getting the aspects of their care that that they need to engage with. So.

Dr Seth Martin Johns Hopkins Hospital Corey Health France spalding building Dr Marvel Corey US Johns Hopkins Apple Health NIH Hopkins Tech Innovation Center Engineer
"johns hopkins" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Faculty member in the Welsh Center for Prevention Epidemiology and clinical research an affiliate factory for the Malone Center for engineering in healthcare. He's a dedicated clinician and clinical educator. Dr Martin's a member of the Hopkins Bedside Medicine Faculty. He serves as the firm. Faculty clinical coach and educator with the Janeway firm on the ostler medical residency as a prolific researcher and innovator Dr Martin led the development of a more precise system for estimating ldl cholesterol. He works with many students residents and fellows with whom he published more than two hundred articles in leading cardiology and medical journals. He serves as associate editor for the American College of Cardiology dyslipidemia clinical community as an associate editor for the Journal of Clinical Lipid as well. He's an NIH mobile health scholar and leads a mobile health. Interest Group focused on examining cutting edge techniques and facilitating interdisciplinary synergy. He's a founder of Corey health. Which we're GONNA dive into this podcast. On a patient centered digital health platform. That really helps cardiovascular prevention in celebration of the One hundred twenty fifth Johns Hopkins Medicine Anniversary. Dr Martin was selected as one of the hundred twenty five individuals who personify Johns Hopkins Medicine's mission to improve the health of community and the world by setting the standard of excellence and Medical Education Research and clinical care in. Today's podcast with Dr Martin..

"johns hopkins" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:44 min | 6 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Eight right all right if you would like to get in looking at the Johns Hopkins University of of of medicine coronavirus resource center looking at for example remember we said last week that North Korea seem to flatten their curve well they did not it was a it was a day were was flattened now they have reduced the rate of the actual growth of of new cases but by it is still it is still going up and you know the only one that you have seen that that makes making the claim and nobody believes that they have control the virus is is China which again had a head start on the disease as we all know by clearly over ruled probably for the United States a good six seven weeks six seven eight weeks and and so if it would be true that they have leveled in China and nobody believes it yeah nobody believes the numbers but if it is true they've had an eight week start so looking at the next couple of weeks and your doctor Fauci say look were you know we could have it you know we we we we could have it under control or know that we're going to have it in under control in the next two weeks but the reason that they've extended hours because they just want to give it as much time and giving people as much for warning as possible well look if you set up the essentially the government paycheck for most people to run through the end of April if we get to the point where it looks like April thirtieth we're not going to meet that mark on those recommendations would be would go further I expect Congress to act again.

Johns Hopkins University North Korea China United States Fauci Congress
"johns hopkins" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:46 min | 6 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"They had of the Johns Hopkins center for health security says this disease will not respect state borders and city mortars and will move around this country just like it's moved around the world so the question is if the virus spread from China to it'll eight cannot spread from Chicago to Iowa and if we work to open re opening parts of the country too soon would not be the worst thing for the economy if we see the virus spreading into more areas Chris I can assure you the president's number one objective is the health of the American public and protecting the American public and we're going to do everything to support the economy the task force will be reviewing it it'll be discussing it with the president there hasn't been any recommendation made yet so again let me just emphasize the president wants to make sure that we kill this virus and we do it quickly and the medical professionals are working on that and while we do that we have now a gigantic economic programs to support American workers and American business yeah I let's get to that you were the key administration figure negotiating that two trillion dollar some call it released bell some calling the stimulus bill one part of that is five hundred billion dollars a half a trillion dollars to help dealing with various big corporations how much discretion do you and the president house in deciding who to get out of that five hundred billion dollars to which clockwork rations and under what terms there's two parts to this program there's there's approximately fifty billion dollars that we can make director treasury loans that are subject to the president's again my approval those are specifically designed for the airline business and for the cargo business which our national security concerns and also give us flexibility if there are other national security companies and and let me be clear taxpayers will be fully compensated for those loans the other part of the package is for us to work with the federal reserve I think you know chairman Jay Powell and I now speak multiple times a day on a regular basis the thirteen three was a package that existed under the federal reserve act the federal reserve has the ability to make broad based lending programs available once the fed request that those actions that come to me I have to approve them his treasury secretary and in many cases I contribute capital to support that in consultation with the president so these are very important programs we think they can provide about four trillion dollars of liquidity to the American economy again we expect we will get paid back on these loans these are temporary support for the American economy that's very very very critical and we've already rolled out many of these already Mr secretary one of the big sticking points when.

Johns Hopkins center China Chicago Iowa president Jay Powell secretary Chris I director treasury chairman
"johns hopkins" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:01 min | 6 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on AP News

"Wire Johns Hopkins which has been taking account of the nineteen inspection to death says the U. S. now has more than eighty two two thousand cases the most in the world despite the growing number of cases in this country president trump says he still wants to see parts of the country return to business every day that we stay out it gets harder to bring it back very quickly and we don't want to stay at a White House coronavirus coordinator Dr Deborah Berke says there's growing evidence to major urban areas could see a jump in cases Detroit and Chicago we are concerned about certain counties that look like they're having a more rapid increase I'm going to look at Wayne County in Michigan and you look at kick cook county and Chicago so we have integrated all of our information to not only look at where the cases are today but how they're moving so we can alert FEMA to where we think it's the next potential hot spot is army hospitals being sent to two of the hardest hit areas army chief of staff general James McConnell dissector defense signed orders for three army hospitals deployed in New York and Washington state the five thirty first hospital from fort Campbell Kentucky and the night hospital from Fort Hood Texas will deploy to New York City the hospitals will be used to treat patients other than those with corona virus taking a load off the many hospitals now swamped with the virus patients in the New York City area the markets despite word that three point three million people applied for unemployment last week rose for a third straight day the driver the two point two trillion dollars relief package passed by the Senate under consideration in the house Bankrate dot com's Marc Cameron you cannot stop economic activity across at least half of the country and not have what is essentially a decline or contraction think of a minus sign in GDP this is a pain is the economy grew two point one percent in the last quarter of last year that was before the pandemic the U. S. economy grew at a rate of two point one percent in the fourth quarter government officials should enjoy that two point one percent fourth quarter growth from twenty nineteen many economists believe it'll be the last positive growth seen for some time as the country indoors a sharp contraction due to the corona virus many economists believe GDP will to negative in the current January to March quarter some see a drop of around six percent with much bigger declines in the second quarter federal reserve chair Jerome Powell we may well be in recession but again I would point to the difference between this and a normal recession this isn't there's nothing fundamentally wrong with our economy quite the contrary Powell appeared on NBC's today show I'm showing up where Fred curly Neal the dribbling wizard to entertain millions with the Harlem Globetrotters for parts of three decades has died he was seventy seven I timid wire AP news thank you for listening to the AP radio network Hey did you.

Johns Hopkins
"johns hopkins" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:34 min | 9 months ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"A Johns Hopkins we have been searching for an answer is there a civil war are we in one now we can not now the Romans couldn't tell two thousand years ago and all of the civil wars ever since are very difficult in fact that's one of the definitions of civil war you cannot be certain you're inside of it until long afterwards so the question is raised what we're witnessing in Washington now for a time out until the new Congress because the house is going home what we're witnessing in Washington looks like moments in our history where disorder has overwhelmed the constitutional a structure and we then it's led us into conflict most importantly what happened in eighteen sixty sixty one but also what happened and seventeen seventy five seventy six seventy four seventy five seventy six in Pennsylvania that was a civil war a break with the majority of colonists who were loyal to the king by those who were not in the civil war period it was quite clearly a secession of states since then there's been no occasion to entertain it although the country has been resolved especially during the Great Depression Michael a very good evening to you I tell this story about Congress after witnessing the enmity that was obvious dripping from the remarks on the floor of the house ending the vote by the democratic majority to condemn the president to impeach the president as an abuser of power and up structure of Congress is justice the and code is about eighteen six to eighteen fifty nine late eighteen fifty on early eighteen sixty after John brown's hanging the anecdote is that at the door going into the old Senate building at the old Senate chambers and it's still there in the capital a hand written sign was put up check your guns I have the time I read this I was researching the civil war for the first time I thought no really I guess everybody was armed in those days and that was a way of preventing violence such as the caning of as of Charles Sumner in eighteen fifty six however after witnessing these last days and now the incomplete record because Nancy Pelosi has chosen not to send the vote of by her democratic majority to the Senate we're in limbo for this conflict but check your guns sounds like good advice good evening to you Michael good evening John it it really does seem as though we're entering the kind of terra incognito the uncharted terrain that precedes the crisis and we don't have to imagine or or or project to predict the crisis to understand that the dynamics under way today are eerily similar to those in the polity such as it was in the colonies in the early eighteen seventies organ in that last several years in the eighteen fifties seventeen seventies Michael meant the eighteenth century yes seventeen yeah absolutely yeah that and and we work a coherent policy but we will be coming up like an identity at that time and so those early years in the seventeen seventies entered into a shifting terrain of loyalty and commitment that happened in the very last years of the eighteen fifties and it really seems to be gathering force today and the nature of the election process which has been terribly riddled by the entire constantly of investigations that have covered the entirety of the of the trump administration's tenure has really created of a visceral understanding among all Americans that the nature of the polity which is based on you know periodic presidential elections regularly that that that that that naturally and always lead to new president but now the the amity and the the nature of political warfare has become so overriding that the entire in politics and this is been amply illustrated the last several years the entire effort in politics now is to unseat and destroy whoever happens to he is the current of the holder of the office of president and under those circumstances it becomes increasingly difficult to imagine how an orderly transfer of power after a presidential election as possible and there are so many ways in which an election now could be perceived as being it somehow he you know falsely twisted or you know that there was massive fraud or interference all of this was beginning to come to a head in twenty sixteen but one can only assume that it will be more intense and twenty twenty and the fact is that the the tightness of the election will will undoubtedly be at least an anticipated part of the upcoming election in a year and so that there is a vast anxiety that is hard to take the pulse of across the entirety of of American consciousness now because people understand in their gut that things could literally come apart as a result of of election outcome that one side refuses to accept and this is the this is the great anxiety that was only partly a laid by the insurance strangely from both Democrats and Republicans that this current impeachment imbroglio would would not seriously threatened the completion of this president's term press two little bit on this Michael B. as the impeachment imbroglio strangely now comports with our understanding of the states that descent to the point of withdrawing or no longer acknowledging Donald Trump as president for two example Nancy Pelosi representing the people of San Francisco Adam Schiff representing the people of Los Angeles Jerrold Nadler representing the people of New York what we were describing here are two states that are in defiance of the trump administration from the beginning Ryan certainly leading the charge are such as it is to impeach and remove him from office within a year of the election so in your in your proposal of a close election and good heavens how do you get close to them what we had in twenty sixteen well just watch in your proposal you're identifying the very states where there would be uniform celebration due to disavow eat up the make up of of these sort of most embittered and and most in rage state is very similar to what we would see right before the American revolution if you're looking at Boston and Massachusetts or say at the Virginia and it before the civil war you had South Carolina and you also had core areas of of of super premium abolitionist passion and intensity in in the north specially in the Midwest in the course again in New England and these are epicenters that that you you can't really call radical it necessarily in an ideological sense but their radical in their willingness to to push for the outcome that they require even if that entails breaking down the constitutional order and so what what you have today are those states you mentioned maybe including the Pacific Northwest and some other parts of well they're always leaders Michael I'm just pointing to leaders in the in the affair in South Carolina was a leader and others followed yes Hey in eighteen sixty South Carolina let right and so what what I think you have today is any outcome that that speaks to a a kind of a hung jury result in the presidential election where there's no clear decision we will protest any sort of remedy that would lead to such a decision so whereas in the two thousand people accepted the supreme court's decision often they accepted it with great anger and and and bitterness but they accepted it and I'm not sure given the make up of these these radical leaders and sort of radical upstate constituencies on both sides I'm not sure that there would be a willingness to do that detail about two thousand Michael there was an empty White House and both candidates were this were beseeching the American people to like them and Al Gore chose to pull back from the fight eventually after the machinations of the South Florida Supreme Court and the US Supreme Court so it is not comparable to having an incumbent who of the opposition means to dislodge by any means possible yes and and the incumbency itself isn't critical because all the other ten incumbents in presidential elections out of fifty eight that with an incumbent who defeated they all did as gore did Nixon this another example he had good cause to us to speak to speak of fraud in and massive yeah in nineteen sixty Hoggan nineteen nineteen sixty but he didn't and and so what you have today is the opposite of that sentiment among American leaders with they're willing to push and the other thing that that it's hard to fax just nana Michael will continue hold on hold that thought we're talking we're talking about something that won't happen except that it happens which is a civil war and we're talking about something that won't happen a close election that turns on the courts except that it has which is the year two thousand and I could go back to other court cases there eighteen seven eighteen seventy six comes to mind an ideal that was made to overwhelm the popular and.

Johns Hopkins
"johns hopkins" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"So so it's a reminder that there's certain professions that fundamentally plug in to civilization and others that become a part of civilization because we choose it too. So we embrace music where we embrace art the kind of art that is not otherwise self-sufficient. So I'm not talking about pop music. I'm talking about orchestral music that generally is performed institutions that require funding funding, and that funding normally comes from someone who gives a great deal of money to make that happen. Correct. Because it can't sustain it does the same size through the appetite of the public yet the city in which you find those offerings of art boast that they have those offerings of art. Right. It's in the catalog is we have this philharmonic hall, we have and we have this art museum. And we have all these institutions as what makes us a cosmopolitan destination. Correct. So it's an interesting difference that we have art and science in the same phrase. I went to the college arts and sciences at the university of whatever are to go way back as a paired thing, we have Leonardo as the Pitney right actually, combining the two combined to one of the greatest examples of that. So I'm just saying a society has to want to embrace its artists in order for them to manifest as a fully expressed employed community, whereas financial forces can drive your interest in having an engineer or physicist on staff. Let's for example, mayor Bloomberg. Yes. Mayor bloomberg. Yes. Okay. Successful businessman, very much so very much so billionaire multibillion like a real billionaire not like people's at some of the people, you earn. Very rich Norlin when people tell you. They're very rich. They're they ain't right there me like don't look at that. I'm very rich. So here's the thing. He when he built his company, right? He could have hired NBA's who know their business. But that's not who we hired pretty high. He majored in physics and engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Okay, he hired mathematicians physician engineers. Wow. And would teach them the business side of the world. But he needed people who probably would go with gnashed teeth, right and attack a problem. They've never seen before. Right. And my wife was one of those earliest employee's out. She has a PHD in mathematics laws. It didn't know he worked for Bloomberg early. She was there. Bloomberg had one hundred employees. Oh my God. Yeah. See that more money than you. Now. So she was early in on that he recognized which she could bring to the table interest others that that she worked with. Yeah. That's so cool. Yeah. I right. So so go die Dider do either. Do if you to pick one of picked up when he loved and do it undo it. Okay. And you'll be better at it than others and people beat a path to your door. Give me some more. Okay. Here we go. Why haven't there been a greater number of advancements on solar energy given? It's literally a constant source energy. Yeah. The source of the energies free, but the devices to convert it into useful forms given the economics of what is going on. Right now has not yet reached that tipping point. So right now sort of the wealthy class that has the luxury of being green without regard to its impact on your pocketbook. There the first adopters of the electric cars and electric this and the solar. Panels. And the like what is missing from the equation is how much our tax money throughout the last century has subsidized the oil and gas into share you go. Okay. We built the roads. But the car that now we put their guests in they didn't build the roads. Okay. So if the question is can and should society subsidize the solar energy universe? In the way, we have subsidized though, the rest fuels the fossil fuels industry and in doing so with that tip the economics in favor of solar panels and solar energy sets point, man..

Mayor bloomberg Johns Hopkins University NBA Leonardo engineer Pitney physicist
"johns hopkins" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Johns Hopkins medicine, I've been here since two thousand two this fired by any woman that has accomplished what no one expected them to accomplish. I always knew that. I wanted to be a physician to very exciting time to be a practicing. Call chemotherapies that we're using now the biologics targeted therapies, the HP vaccination. We're ten years into the vaccines. We could look at an era that we are cervical cancer free that time for breaking open education is now because I think that have even grander affect on women's health as part of Johns Hopkins medicine Sibley Memorial Hospital suburban hospital and Johns Hopkins community physicians are improving health care for women and setting the standard of excellence in research and treatment. Visit Hopkins medicine dot org. Radio. Music for rioting. Three. To me. Because I'm the. Then they have gone back to. Come. But the naval all..

Johns Hopkins medicine Sibley Johns Hopkins ten years
"johns hopkins" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Johns Hopkins medicine, I have lived in the DC area my entire life. I see one enduring very stressful and difficult time in their lives facing, the diagnosis of breast cancer and amazed and inspired by their strength and the courage. They have to battle this disease and breast cancer surgery in particular has been changing so much in the last twenty years. We have better ways to diagnose breast cancer. Earlier surgeries are much less invasive, we have new medications better survival rates and better quality of life. The advances are amazing. We're getting there as part of Johns. Hopkins medicine Sibley Memorial Hospital suburban hospital and Johns Hopkins community positions are proving healthcare for women and setting the standard of excellence in research and treatment visit Hopkins medicine. Dot org. Live from Hollywood kids club with Julia Martinez. On one or two point seven kiss FM. Down the road. A fight fighter. World a fight. You fight myself. Still left afraid pain hurricanes.

Hopkins medicine Sibley Memori breast cancer Johns Hopkins Hopkins medicine Julia Martinez Hollywood twenty years
"johns hopkins" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"I never. Pretty UV for the first time. And I love your show, and I pray for you and your life everyday. Thank you. I'm alone money. Was had been with intelligence after. Going to school in Baltimore. At Johns Hopkins to be a neurosurgeon, but he was asked to come back with intelligence agency. So and he was. Murdered because he was friends with on more Sadat, and they didn't even check as to why. But anyway, so be it. And I wouldn't you couldn't for our whole listening to colossal prayer for those older people manipulate the weather. It's so true. So true to stop it. I would like for gone too. And just let it go away. And let me earthy natural again. It. So. And I would also Lyster audience to pray for me. I never heady surgery before. And I would really appreciate someone confronted with something. That is quite scary. And. I don't want chemo and radiation. So I would really appreciate appear your audience your audience. Will you've got my prayers, and you know, I was just talking with Janine today. And she, and I were discussing how she's recovering, and she was telling me that, you know, prayers and natural things and taking care of the body naturally also helps and that, you know. Do. Yeah. Your chances are very high. Then that you're gonna be fine. Supplement that you guys take and I also to a special doctor that has a it's a computer unit coal. Oh, I can't remember what it stands for. But it has healing Elena. The tonics with Shane, and they she and her husband does say that. I have very good genes. That's never heading surgery. And I've always taken what a supplement, and I don't eat junk food feeling that. If that's the case, you're going to be fine. You're gonna be fine. Thank you. You're going to be fine. And then if there's anything that you have to deal with aftermath complications could be taken care of with more supplements and making taken care of with a lot of rest and a lot of patients from a lot of friends and those who love you, Linda, so make.

Sadat Janine Lyster Johns Hopkins chemo Shane Baltimore Linda
"johns hopkins" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"A name is rachel dutton actually has been in the news a little bit and see what's something that some people might dismiss his not being serious science but i think some of the most serious scientific done out bears she works on the micro bio of cheese gotta do that exactly so she's just learned some really incredible things about this ancient process of rotting in fermenting food in how we figured out how the bacteria out there you know changing yeah these building blocks into things that i knew and really using that not just obviously that have the product of resets a yummy but also green early basic fundamental aspects of microbes talking to each other and how they produce compounds that kinda cooperative as offensive and so that she just doesn't really cool stories i think cb someone would be need to talk to another person is way out of my field but i think she just does really good work in sees that a young assistant professor sara horst h oreste she's at johns hopkins university and since space so you know she nikolas rocket sites one of those i'm linked to that but but i just heard her cut doc in person once very eloquent but also what i really like about sarah is that her work is even though she's she's only few years into running lab i follow her glitter on facebook she's really impassioned about making sure that everyone of amenities as well supported thinks about the place of the science in the time the scientist within the science and so i think she you know she thinks across many scales right all the way how you data on saturn down to how to make sure that the youngest and the most vulnerable amongst us are well wellsupported so me someone outside.

rachel dutton cheese johns hopkins university sarah scientist assistant professor sara horst
"johns hopkins" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"johns hopkins" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

"Several physicians at johns hopkins were be kind of kind of becoming aware they were younger physicians who are involved in research and they're become aware of of these procedures these searches being done and wandering is this something we should be where here we are this renowned institute of medical research is this something we should be doing and they were already and this is cut this is a whole other subject unto itself but at johns hopkins they were already doing procedures that were somewhat similar to to some of these things on intersex patients bridge exactly which is a whole other topic because these were done against anybody's them nobody was ask permission these were forced on children the does is it is it is a whole can of worms the intersex thing because that is like at least within the us that seems to be the the root of a load of surgeons expertise is hey these children have been born with ambiguous genitalia wigan to make a decision on their behalf of what to do with that genitals and they may grow up liking it or not find out 5050 chance let's that you're exactly right that's as unfortunately a lot of the kind of technical expertise that some of these surgeons already had was born of that but their interest group beyond that and so they opened what was called the gender identity clinic in nineteen 66 and they began treating patients with hormones and as well surgery they were kind of the beginning of this very strict criteria i think some of what you've already started to talk about some four hormone therapy or certainly for surgery um they had a there is a psychiatric evaluation that was standard that everyone had to undergo a you had to start with a hormone therapy and you had to spend a year kind of.

johns hopkins us