19 Episode results for "Johnny Marr"

Mt. Rushmore of Guest Musicians Improving Songs

Mt. Rushmore Podcast

38:04 min | 1 year ago

Mt. Rushmore of Guest Musicians Improving Songs

"This is the Mount Rushmore podcast. My name is Jeff joined as per the used by my good friends. Richard L. O.. and Michael Michael. They like to debate deliberate. The most ubiquitous of any given topic and this week's topic is the Mount Rushmore of songs. That were made. He'd better by guest musician. Who Thought of this topic? Why believe it? Was You all statements that you make AAC like as a question of whether or not who's very well dressed day jeff you are in your ass. Cotton Velveteen Pants. Well I I will say I have chosen this topic. Not because I have a bunch of strong opinions on it but because I was speaking with j Anderton who has Z.. Bat seventy-seven podcasts. And he said I'm a big fan of your music pod episodes of your podcast. I really and I would say I'm a big fan of our music episodes and it's not because I'm the most informed music lover Z's it's not like we are either well you guys all if you don't aren't informed have interesting opinions and I wanted to hear your opinions on. This topic. Picks so ten bands I talk about the replacements. Placements the Matt's podcast. And the cure cast west as Michael Winfield's We'll go for it and I want to hear your opinions and I'm going to pick Richard because I just am digging your beard. That's a pretty good. It's really quite spirit. Growing out a long long nice moments Michael Movember has turned into DC. Beagle is a little bit more trim and tight. I got a little bit more than mountain. Men thing going. This is one that we talked about Before before we were recording off air. Was Eric Clapton Playing on my while my guitar gently we also VILEST I. It was pretty much the slam dunk on. I think academy all the categories are all possible choices in this category. Great Guitar Solo very instantly recognisable as Clapton And something where he had to be sort of talked into coming into the studio. Apparently just. Because you know it's intimidating to go in the studio with the Beatles. Yeah and he didn't know if the rest of the Beatles would even want him there. Oh it was something where George Harrison basically in friendship chip with him a free four yeah previous to that and Harrison's like why don't you come in and you know. I think you would be perfect to play guitar player Solo on this one. Yes arm- that I've I've been working on. Yeah and Clapton. I was like I don't WanNa go in because I don't know if the other guys you know the other Beatles are going to be going to want me in there. Is it going to disrupt erupt in the VIBE. Of course it was during the recording the white album so the vibe was we all kind of Haiti up. Yeah so it's Kinda hard to disturb that vibe and actually turned doubt that Having Clapton in the studio kind of got everyone on their best behavior oh which really respective like spectrum. Respect him as a musician that wise like oh I think it's partially that I think it was also partially. Just you know if if you have a guess yes over for Thanksgiving. Dinner thing is just wrapping up Thanksgiving right now as or we're recording. This you know your family kind of tries to be put on their best behavior. Even though if they've been fighting like cats and dogs leading up to that and that's something that happened with the Beatles frequently whenever they would have guessed they didn't have a ton of guest musicians in there. But I know the same thing happened with Billy Preston. Yeah he was in the studio they basically everyone got into a much. It's better mood and got more collaborative. Get along much better with each other. One thing I thought was interesting. was you mentioned Billy Preston. He Hitlist got like credit for working with the Beatles right like it seem that Clapton wasn't noted like in the liner notes. I wonder if this is just around the time of like you. Know the wrecking crew would just play all the music for particular artist right. Do all the stuff in studio and I wonder how much people paid attention to that. And but it's weird to think of someone has become such a you know Qatar legend as Clapton. And then he's just not on their they don't mention it until you have to dig it up later or find out later on like the Beatles Anthology or whatever it was right also strange that like George Harrison song and it was like. Oh yeah bringing the other the guy to play over me. Yeah that takes a lot of gotta be humble in legal. Let not just anyone but frigging Eric Clapton. There's a joke joke about Ringo. Not Being the best rock drummer not only world. The best earners and I would say this is Jeff. macbook emrick being a recording engineer at apple although not the producer of the Beatles albums as George Lewis the engineer ear for those apple. He's engineer so he's he grew up with the Beatles you'd be the Guy Miked up instruments at the very beginning and early records but then later on when he recorded with Paul for being on the run or something like that he would actually be the engineer the producer but he said George Harrison was hardly a on par with an Eric Clapton. Right from guitar standpoint in in there were times when Paul would have to show George and stuff on guitar on Mike and Mike Paul all I can discuss this played guitar on tax man. Oh yes his lead. Oh I didn't know that. Which is one of the Best League Tar than any Beatles Song all that Turner Edina Qatar Solo at the end of the gets very kind of like clicked about Alicia? Yeah yeah that's that's That's McCartney and is this also a little bit of couples therapy for them to. I think there was an element of that 'cause Harrison at Shag. Pattie Boyd or something. uh-huh sorry I think that was. That was after that I'm not familiar with the. Oh that's the timeline. Is the garden. Rishi that you reverted back to length All in universe continuity you know yeah baby. Marvel editor puts a little box at the bottom of whatever you said with an asterisk. This is what the the the Londoner said I believe are meeting fishing ships as we speak. I think it was octopus garden. was that where I think Harrison where somebody was referring to Eric Clapton at his neighbor Clapton as being the octopus who'd reptile his arms around his wife. Pattie Boyd. Chu Yeah so yeah any Pattie Boyd has a few more than a few songs written about her to okay so cool so that was also Michael. Okay so Michael. What is your second my second choice? Is Dave Grohl playing on the a song. No one knows by Queens stone-age although he also played on the entire album of songs for the Daf right and this is the also in. What's the other spin off? Don't they have like a spin off band of no no eagles death metal. Oh yes but maybe you're probably right Roland what I. What is it Dave Grohl of the FOO fighters of Nirvana playing drums on. No one knows by Queens of the Stone Age and what I thought one. I really liked the song I think has kind of has the slow prodding kind of guitar part. That kind of leads into this really big drum part in which I kinda saves the song where like the vocals really kick in. And then just this guitar this the drums by Dave Grohl really just kind of rock out and just Kinda take over the song and make it much better song and it was around the time that he he was like friends would Delete Singer Josh home from ninety six or something he'd known ninety two even he'd known for a long time and kind of admired his work and you know he went off after Nirvana ended in two fighters news. kind of getting kind of worn out on doing the foo fighters thing and he was just kind of Wanted had to get back into doing drumming which was kind of made his made his bones at initially so I think it was a good collaboration working with like you know them them for a full album but specifically this one song I think is just the best thing that they've done and I think it just him as a drummer I think brings a lot of gravitas to to this band. Yeah and I think to push them forward a little bit and we really could've done a mount rushmore of Dave grohl guest cameos really putting like you know his work with tenacious d right or just right on down the line. While I was looking for like more information about Dave Grohl you can find I did on the Internet. I looked start doing. Yeah as we've all been trained to do I got. I got those newspapers there. August unlike those from the library on those Rod Roach Yup this woman in the school talk. Turn your nervous of his voice but he does like a ton of guest appearances especially with like live acts like a few years ago. He's touring with like cat power and that's why the fuck are you playing with cat power. I mean power. Bear that place right such a mess but like he has a few weeks ago. Maybe it's a few months go. We're talking about like Keanu reeves as like just the Ever since yeah yeah Dave Grohl is just seems like one of those guys on par wants to play with everyone. Everyone wants to play with him. He did that really good like HBO kind of Quasi Documentary Series about making a new foo fighters. Elmore he worked with all these different speaking of guests people. All these people were like guesting on a foo fighters album record in a specific city. The music was kind of bad but like the making of it. I did it sound city. It's all at sounds like bird on something in Seattle and working with people down Saint. Louis listen but he worked with Rick Nielsen cheap trick. Yeah just all over random people. Yeah I think he just has. He's like one of those Vin diagrams of like. Oh who would you wanna work with Dave Grohl. Because he's awesome awesome good guitars good drummer. He's got just like Boniface. Yeah at the zoo. It's played he played with Zu Zoo. Aleppo Palooza funny that There's something oddly connected. There I think of Kurt Cockbain is kind of the James Dean of grunge or rock and he died early enough to not become com corrupted by all the things that famed as two older celebrities and Dave Grohl. It's almost like he learned from that somehow win has kept almost like he's Rockin for two now he's kept that innocence or definitely picked up the pieces right away he didn't stay mired in being part of the legacy of sadness. Yeah I'm still a musician. You know one of my best friends has died but I gotta move on. Still gotta go do these things and yeah. He's an interesting character. Cool cool choice. Alright Richard Richard you and then halftime after all right so my second choice is someone that we do We have discussed on the show before as I am not surprised for having played guested on multiple parts Maybe has as much Bona Fides as Holly Holly Hunter would have said in the old brother where art thou for playing with other musicians as Dave Grohl Johnny Marr and specifically his playing on the talking heads song. Nothing but flowers okay which I did not realize. Was Johnny Marr Playing Guitar until I was doing some research research for this episode. Do you love that song. So naked and didn't never just never realized it was Johnny Margaret. Apparently he played on like four songs on that the last talking heads album. That was the first one that he Recorded with him and he flew out to Paris's right after the Smith broke up. So this was the eighty eight eighty nine something like that. Yeah they were done. Their last album came out in eighty seven. Yeah so it was like a year or two is like a year or two more on eighty eight. Yeah yeah so it was a little bit after after after they broke up but you know he was just kind of having enjoying being a gun for hire at this point and didn't have a connection to the talking heads. It wasn't like Oh. He was friends with David Byrne so he asked him. You know it was just like one of those hail like you're playing. You want to come down to Paris. Were recording a new album shirt. Sounds good missile. The first track that he worked on with him and apparently it was nothing more than the baseline and the trump like a drum loop. There were no chord. Changes and Steve Lillywhite. who was the producer of the album? Basically said just yeah. Just do whatever you want to with it. Which Johnny Marr said was as isn't intimidating as hell? Because you're coming into this new situation with this great band you know David Byrne can has this reputation for being this kind of Quirky autour and suddenly. So you're asked to just sort of stew. Whatever you want? So he said what can I do some court changes. Oh yeah sure do that. So he wanted to basically basically creating creating the song almost from scratch just he could record the guitar part for it or at least creating the court change. I know you understand records. Michael my earliest waist over I started looking up towards the heavens praying for an early dash. Your laptop has that light. That pop. This isn't you gotta plug within Genius Cortex but you know and it's and Michael. You're more of the smiths expert than I am. Sure and this song at first glance it if he has no the song nothing but flowers is got to sort of like afrobeat kind of rhythm to it which I wouldn't necessarily associated associated with Johnny Marr but then I started thinking about something about some of the Smith songs that kind of almost have a some like account to be an or African afrobeat for a beat. Kinda feel to it so I guess it makes it made more sense. Well once thought about it why he would sort of gravitate to a song like that and be a good fit for it but I think just we discussing the history of him playing with with a lot of different big bands. Well one of the strangest Johnny Marr. Things was two thousand seven. He joined modest mouse right at for we were dead before the ship even sank and I remember being like why the fuck is Johnny Marr with modest mouse and there was a lot of his guitar. gangly bits throughout that album and it. It was an interesting album worked. He was only with them for one album in a couple of tours or whatever but I didn't I don't know if he necessarily improved proofed and he was just added modest mouse in particular is abandoned. Has A lot of layers. Like there's a lot of guitar work. There's a lot of drums. There's a lot of everything everything there's a lot of not being able to understand what brock is saying because he tries to cram all of his lyrics into the song right. It's very interesting interesting. Listen to is like He. I don't know what he writes. I if he writes the music and then crams lyrics zander. Rice all these lyrics and then he writes writes the cords. I Michael no idea but it's just it was very strange to have two of my favorite things. Combine was kind of electron on into this weird thing. There was like okay and then he left and I was like sure quite like peanut butter and chocolate. Yeah it was like T- things that you really love and kind love. It worked but I don't need it for forever right. Yeah and that's the bigger talking heads. You got an album at four songs worth Johnny Marr. Like Song are sticking from the Smith was asked like that's a song that's kind of I think of as having some sort of a world music sorta feel to it even if it's not over Overt I think his playing you can see where you can make a connection between that and the later talking heads when David Bird was really getting into world music music. David Byrne surprised. He wasn't on my list at all. Now look like a weird. He's had a lot of weird people that he's worked with him. At Saint Vincent Kirsty McColl also saying on that note stay lower also saying steely lily. White was the producer and that's when when she was married to him. Oh I do find it interesting. Though this as a pick as someone who fundamentally changed what the song was going to be into a song and with. I don't think any of my picks did that. Yeah if they change the song in that sort of way. That guitarist and musician comes comes in is like well. It's not just playing solo to like a set song. It is literally changing the structure of the song or helping define what structure is so I found that apart fascinating you know Jen. My wife was asking us about this topic and I think she mentioned kind kind of celebrity hip hop producers in how they frequently have guests on and I think of this topic as being important that is a guest recording with a band a group of people that have spent a lot of time together had previous recordings together that are essentially this small family and that there's nobody who's really an outsider and a P. diddy recording because he's the only insider he's the only person who's probably the domain staff at right. There's an entourage but you know I I'm going to go back to the real quick. Just weird like Johnny Marr. Just joined the band. It wasn't just like I'm going to play on this album album. He was just like Oh yeah. He's in the band now. And you're just like okay guys. See like Superman joining the avengers or some that does it seem like he outranks them a little bit. He's has had much more experience. Or maybe not even a decade Moore. But Moore's lifetime in rock and roll yeah okay dudes. We're halftime a want to invite you to tune into our next episode. which is the Mount Rushmore of spoi- tation films? Jeff on the hot seat. I this is the best time of year for US Christmas time it is grilling time Christmas for us really. We'll all shift one mike to the left and I'll be in the participant microphone. Not In the judge microphone. But it's exciting for me to participate in that but that's something to look forward to next episode so if you haven't already go back and get the link for this podcast where find share it on social media with your friends. We we would ask you to give us the gift of sharing in this season of giving in and stuff like that. Yeah please help us. Don't buy gifts for for P and don't forget to God you imagine getting that in your stocking here. Download the Mount Rushmore. I guess you tiffany the tennis bracelet. That is we are your lump of games. You can do that for a solid but you can even go one better and review and rate previous episodes. That'd be super cool. Probably a lot of driving in your future with the going over the river through the woods to grandma's house and all that kind of stuff this. This is a great podcasts. Lists do when you do that. I think I think I think it's time to go back to the topic. And and then Michael would be letting us know his third choice. Well your wife. Ken was very prescient on one of my choice. which is ludicrous on missy? Elliott's gossip folks from the two thousand two album under construction. Okay and what I one of those things that she talked about she was like. Oh yeah like. Nowadays every rap song has has a guest vocal. That comes in but I love the way on this song in particular. This song is kind of like this this response to its missy Elliott singing about like people talking about are you talking about like who she's sleeping with all the drug she's doing all this stuff and then the song is kind of plods on little bit. I love the song and it's really fun. And then right near the end right before that Song added ends itself Ludicrous banks through the door and say that's really super great braggadocious. All about me bit about how. He's how he stepped on the scene and he smells gray banging all the checks and he just feels great and eh you know He. He pulled himself up by his own. Like reps rupture rap stress. Just like. He's on the scene and isn't he great. He's awesome awesome and it's just I I love it because it is a breath of fresh air in a song that is already fun but just feel like it's going gene. We're kinda comes in. And Ludicrous is just this really super loud personality and one of the most ridiculous things is that he drops a reference and and an impression of Timmy from South Park washing out. And it's just so weird to be like shh Timothy. There's if you're going to do like a a barman thing like I don't know a reference to spongebob squarepants. It's so strain right wonderful. Where does does it come from? Where did that happen? What happened there? I don't know like South Park. And all that exploded in nineteen ninety seven ninety eight ninety nine in and it was weird to have this new Simpson's like cartoon that was taking over everything especially hot top tee shirt sales but like a couple years later. Have like Timmy. Reference in like a missy Elliott nesting. Doll was ludicrous. Chris to have it blueberry ludicrous or is this love them Richard. What is your third choice of of musicians? Who approved a song by guesting on the thing? And you mentioned curtsy McCall. Yeah that's ago. Yeah which is prescient on your part. Oh because my next choice is kirsty. McCall singing co lead vocals on the folk Song Fairytale of New York Fun just just a great Song Christian McCall just a great singer credible. Voice as mentioned was married to Producer Steve Lillywhite at the time who is producing the pogues album and the story goes that they were trying. They were working on the song and he needed a temp vocal for with whoever is going to be the female vocalist. Who is going to do that? Part wasn't wasn't originally supposed to be her but there in the studio and then the home studio you may have. He has a record this temporary vocal track and they liked it so much that that was literally the vocal tract that they just wind up using So they were never in the studio really together which I found really fascinating but at it between her and Shane macgowan. That you've got her with this. You're very beautiful Irish voice than you've got Shane. macgowan who does not have beautiful. Now definitely has an Irish voice wooden sates. It's a beautiful Irish voice But I I don't know that if you didn't have that contrast between the two that song wouldn't have worked on another I I don't know that it works for anyone other than her as the CO lead singer of to your to your original guest musicians. Who made the song better? This is one where I I. I think clearly Christina McCall coming in elevated the song from something that would have been a very good poke song to an all-time you know. Oh Crystal Glass I think a key Pearson seemed to do that a few times in the eighties candy. Yeah yeah by Iggy pop yeah and then. Rem of people wasn't Blinn. Carl do that a couple of times. Maybe Yeah Yeah Yeah. Possibly kind of the the rose among the brier the right the beauty among the the beasley sounds. That's cool choice. She also I I feel like she has a little bit of the tragedy. Among a seventy who died die young died young. And then I'd buy a boat. A boat defending her children or trying to get their children. Children out of the way of this like Spanish billionaire who is on his yacht and was traveling too fast McLeod into them and he wound up not getting any jail time over in England. They're still a big justice for Kirsty. Movement is it really yeah. It's still something that that is. I think today yeah. Who'll choice? All right winfield. Well very strange that you guys mentioned Papa Pearson from the beef fifty two's guesting on Rem's shiny happy. People is a delightful way too positive happy song on the same album that has losing my religion from Ninety one's out of time which oddly featured I think the worst example example of musician like making a song worse I know this one. Yes is it radio song yes is care as one. Oh yeah with the rap on Radio Song. What's a rough one one rough? Listen it's bad song to start the album with bad like guest rap. Talk about a good to go from. I'M A I know we're talking about Ki Ki Pearson now but like to go from ludicrous to one and it just like it's awful. It's so hokey and Philly and Terrible Yeah but Shiny Happy People I think is so much improved by this Bouncy Joyous affirming Colin response sort of Song in the thing that she brings just like this lovely voice Jason so big compared to you know what's his name. Thank you my side. Where where he's just he's got a good voice but it's so low key and she just comes in and just like love them love and it's just so wonderful wonderful? Yeah they have a relationship in that. They're both from the same town and they've probably seen spent a lot of time together other. Yeah Planet Athens College Yard Party somewhere. Yeah but she just adds so much to the song it's just like this super bubblegum pop. We know we mentioned arch. I don't remember we were recording. I don't think we were but we were talking about. LA- are cheese and sugar sugar. Yeah it's just this joyous bouncy song and she it's just a joyous yancey personality yeah what a place for them to meet. I think of the the to freak shows who came from Athens thins who found their way out of whatever genre there in into alternative radio than to actual actual pop charts the mainstream charts to be recording. What may be the most sarcastic song like I? I don't know if If that I I can't imagine there isn't a little bit of Sardonic. NECE into the designee handle happy. People will re- reading an interview with Michael Sipe repeat like it was more like a challenge. Can I write this kind of sappy. A overly positive type song. Yeah and you know the best thing about the song is that it gave us a K Pearson muppet. Did it really did win now. Michael Stipe guested. On Sesame Street there is a Kate Pearson Audit uh-huh that sings along with him to shiny happy monsters. Okay which is fantastic. She she also was on a couple of other songs on there. But checkout me and honey to which is another super super good song yeah chain. Having people isn't a bad song is just literally therapy. Bright like honey honey okay. Ricardo your final choice. So it's interesting. We're you just mentioned Buzi Collins. Oh wait hold on. A second can rewind that. Did Anyone mentioned Buzi Colin. Uh No can we insert that in an post as it really would have flowed really. Well do that. Yeah no Buzi Collins along with me. CEO Parker and q tip from tribe called quest and Fred Wesley also as well and trombone on to the delight song groove his. Oh Yeah I I was someone who was familiar with Buzi Collins through parliament funke Delic when I was growing up. The song is properly about eighty nine that he nine ninety. And that's when I was really getting into base and that's when I really started getting into funk Bass and so we'd see Collins is one of the people I really listened to you. It was like a hero of mine is a bass player and to have him on this. Like you know hot hot this dance kind of we out dance club type. Song was there once discombobulating but then also at the same time it totally made so yeah in the song is really driven by by this baseline. And you've got me Parker and played saxophone. Player are in Fred Wesley. Who is a trombone player James Brown? JV's Adler fabulous flames fabulous missio. Parker might have been both and and boots collins actually played in James Brown's backing band on weight as well So it really gave the song sort of this funk credentials. Yeah Bona Fides. Oh Yeah I would say. Yeah and boots. He's got a little bit of a speaking part in the middle of it. I feel like the entire pee. Wee's playhouse is just gonNA wrapped rep saying today. It was. It was just what a fun time in music. Yeah when Act like the delight could become like household names yeah period in time and it was Kinda sixers back winners. There's like this whole sixties funhouse of mix of genres and looks and styles. Yeah so having this like sixties early seventies seventies kind of vibe than having someone like Buzi Collins be a part of it who was the epitome of kind of seventy school. Yeah just made sense. Oh Yeah I think. Delight light is almost being cut from the same cloth as the B fifty. Two's in store Welcome wagon for any freak soon. Wanted to hang out and have fun and I believe you're referring to the love shack the love you just see the faded sign out of the road. How far are you away? Fifty not move fifty years but the the dance music as a meritocracy if it moves you in groups. You doesn't matter. If you're a celebrity a your just a backup guy for a fading Act Right you got a place in in that world and I think new the New York music scene blondy was in at the same time the talking heads at the same time Fab five Freddy exclaimed. All these guys was doctor. She lets anybody who doesn't funky congruity. No I think it very much came up with the same club. Seemed like Madonna was exploring like during the vogue. Yeah era but this was this was like a different side of yeah it was a DJ Toa and forget the other guys who was married to a lady mosquito really at the time. Oh you had like dislike nightclub girl. You had the Russian guy. DJ BY JAPANESE DJ was like this weird mix apple. I can see them saying the united headed nation building around like seventy spunk. Lee Representative Collins to come in here to play bass on this track. y'All let's see what the boots I love the name of the fact that he's also Taller Yala crazy. There's a couple of times he asserted throws Panera. Be Remiss to not point out not just talked about Buzi Collins while also q tip from a tribe called classes Does the rule rap version in the middle of the lower does been in the middle of the song which I think really fun kind of. Yeah kind of like rap and the he did a lot a lot of like guest raps on a lot of stuff. That's so I would be remiss not to mention that is in I think my first Order fill out for the Columbia Record Club Glove D- like who is in the heart and three feet high and rising over in the first CD order. It's funny those are like. I have no experience variance of delight other than that song. Yeah nobody does I do not know a single thing. That try me on Very you who who is some good songs they were the American pizzicato five. There's a deep cut for every book but Jack twiggy exactly. They're like the American version of that But I guess to wrap everything up for me. I remember. This may be one of the first times where it felt okay to like something that was like like very blatantly Danson awesome pop beat grown up Because Buzi Collins was involved. Yeah Buzi was was cool with it. it was okay to be cool with it too. I remember Reading Buzi started. It'd with James Brown Louise's fifteen and but that was before read. James Brown had fired his entire band onto her and dropped me the probably like missed a beat he and so he needed a band of quick so he hired a bunch of fifteen year olds. Okay that's how you get some opportunity. Okay winch miss it we did. That's it all right so some fun. Picks like to point out this this episode. We're talking about guests making thing better better. Yeah did not have guessed. It didn't have guessed we we really really brick. Oh Yeah we should've Gone Ryan Love On. At least I do want to. Who Name person who feels like they're guest because I've been told they listen to our podcast and that is thank you? Thank you. Thank you gene in Noida. Bauer Gino take our who works with my sister-in-law Jackie Bascom. Start Jacky newcomb at Harvard or Yale. Harvard which is the one that good will hunting. We're in the Harvard Sky Hygiene arguing and now I'm GonNa go pick some Some some songs Just because it can open up a big can there Let's go with China. Happy People Featuring Guest Song are singer Kate Pearson I didn't know Johnny Marr. Plan nothing but flowers and I gotta go learn about that You both mentioned it so while my guitar and leaps seems like it would be important to do And and then see what was the fun other one Just because he's got so much cred in this make a scope and the ratings Dave Grohl. No one knows literally if just the people that Dave Grohl have has played with and collaborate. Yeah listen to listen to just the people who just the musicians we'll like triple are just saying Dave Grohl. I think we'll bump us up a little bit. Okay this has worked. said it's g speak it you raisin in clicks six this has been the Mount Rushmore of musicians who guest on a podcast in made the no more of almost Burma is over there. Just pulling his hair. Gary you can do it The thing that we just did my name's Jeff. I'm Richard. I'm Michael Back.

Dave Grohl Michael Michael Johnny Marr Eric Clapton Mount Rushmore producer Buzi Colin Beatles Lee Representative Collins Jeff George Harrison Richard Richard Kate Pearson David Byrne missy Elliott James Brown Pattie Boyd Smith Haiti Billy Preston
EP.100 - JOE CORNISH & LOUIS THEROUX

The Adam Buxton Podcast

1:18:57 hr | 1 year ago

EP.100 - JOE CORNISH & LOUIS THEROUX

"The rosy she got four I did one more gye. Hi <hes> mud cars. Now you fucked that podcast out and started listening. I took my micro and bounce up but then I recalled it all the noises while as Adam Buxton I want you to Gye. That's the hey how you doing doing podcasts Adam Buxton here welcome to episode number one hundred and well. It's more more or less business as usual myself and Rosie are taking a walk on a sunny Friday evening out here in the countryside of Norfolk in the east of England and doc turned into a very nice evening. WHO's a little muggy earlier on? I'M NOT GONNA lie to you. I know it's worrying and shocking but there it is on the upside though it seems to be festival time for the insect community who are thriving in this weather and I would say pretty much grew the house at the moment everywhere I go. I'm walking through spiders webs just trying to Komo pick them out from my hair and my bed the whole time and us for the flies. Whoa if anyone needs flies? Give us a shout. They're all in all kitchen. I think it's because we live near a a stream and also there's a lot of cows in the fields around us and I feel as if we get more fly action in castle buckles when the cows are out but maybe some of you will be saying no. It's nothing to do with the cows. Don't try to bring the cows down buckles colds. It's you and your filthy kitchen that the flies love well. It's a bit harsh on me my wife and the rest of the kitchen cleaning team but <hes> might be true but look let's get to it showy episode so number one hundred as you well know features a stupid and rambling conversation with writer and director Joe Cornish and journalist and documentarian Louis through both of whom I have known since we met at school aged thirteen we got together at Joe's house in south London earlier this year two thousand nineteen and this is a special anniversary episode. We talked about this podcast as well as Louise Appearance On desert island discs school days. The most recent remake of a star is born spoiler alert key plot details are revealed in this conversation so if that's GONNA upset that you leave it for another time and towards the end we listened back to a tape of the three of us aged eighteen doing David Bowie impressions and that recording will give you an idea of how far we've come since then speaking of it there is even a new song style Bowie Song from Joe Created specially for the hundredth episode. I didn't expect it. There was a lovely doubly surprised that Joe unveiled at the end of all rambling called back at the end for more bits and pieces but right now without further ado here we go yeah aw okay you ready. I would harmonize happy say to you you. When are you going to do you own a tune-up? Yeah I do start again. Okay this is this is not happy. Uh Day to day to be eh as a barbershop trio yeah congratulations thank you so much. Amazing occasion wouldn't amazing achievement. I've made it to a hundred. I've never done one hundred of anything it. How many years would that be about four years started in late twenty fifteen? What's the best episode they're the best? One Joe wants to know. Besties sees and worse dis. Obviously I'm not going to say worse teas but besties depends who you ask about your children and you can't choose one over an exactly right. Let you have a favorite child. That's true no well as it is with children. Definitely there could be an easiest child so if someone asked you on a bad day which is your favorite then you would say well that one because is there always easy but of course they will mean something very very unique and you would be completely lost without any of them and that's how I feel about every episode of the podcast except some of them are boring and some of them are better than some of them. Don't work good some just don't sometimes you met someone who worship yet. It was a bit disappointing. That's Titan of ass- okay. Here's an example of one that I totally miss read at the time and felt weird about Johnny Marr so I interviewed Johnny Ma went to Manchester and people like that one exactly but I came out of it feeling like I dropped the ball and I hadn't done a good job with him. I'm not a Smith's expert there sort of Mega Smith's fans there and I felt anxious that I was letting them down and that I hadn't done a good job with Johnny and I'd ask the wrong questions and it was just going to be annoying so I couldn't even listen back to it immediately because it just there was other ones that were good to go and I could put those out and then weeks turn to months then a year and it was just sitting there and then I went back to it and I thought Oh no no this is good. He was great he answered all my questions and he was a brilliant interview so it went out but then I had to <hes> as I have done a few times Ryan email instead of apologize a little bit and say look. I hope you didn't take this personally but isn't that funny though that you can't can't always judge how well something's Gone Roy after you've done it. Why why do you think well generating general thing if I've done something on T._v.? And I have a sense of whether it's worked or not. I think I mean you. I know when great bits happen <hes> and you know and terrible bits happen but sometimes it's middling sometimes a conversation that can feel quite boring actually is fun to listen to. That's the Nice thing about podcasts as well. Come uncalled bulls. Which ones have you listened to viewers yet that you thought having that I didn't? I can't tell you the ones. I didn't know that would be the person exam but you know I always knowing GonNa get some good Buckley's action. What about have you listened to the beginning yeah and the end and then a little bit of the person but then sometimes I tune out right okay which ones I really liked? I really like the Motema one. We were talking about this the other day any I'd like the tree I like the wise old ostry and I like the dog Rosie Reduc is real well. That's what you say but we've got history with fictional dogs. That's true. I've never heard her talk being in her company in real life but she's never talked shine and you make assumptions about her voice about what she sounds like. She's all over the Place Personnel Feminine Voices For Women Dog. No no that's true Rosie was Jody Morris Chorus students you regard him as inspiration question we both liked animal magic and we could that went out of vogue for awhile anthropomorphized being patronizing yeah I think it was patronizing and I think some people thought it wasn't scientific scientific the actual. How would you know that the animal was really thinking? Did anyone think that's some of what did they think that it was actual. Animal mind reading no did was the really a controversy about it was viewed as a little bit who viewed it that way you're saying it went out of vogue because worried about the science fell. Johnny Morris was giving children the wrong idea about there is no Schubert. Do People thought that it was getting in the way of actually seeing animals as what they are because Z. Shocked by footage of light shoreline during an antelope or an elephant fucking do lines did he. Oh you could get quite close to in the zoo when he was a zookeeper yeah and it would veto lots of penguins fell out of vote because zoos themselves on now sort of problematic in some ways for people some people. I don't know maybe that's what it was because you do attitudes tool sorts things have changed changed and animals are included in there wasn't a second what's changed. Its offensive to rob any living creature of its agency by providing it with a voice has that you're that's offensive. That's offensive offensive what you just said as a fan yeah why what he said offense. I don't know being provocative but it seems to be the thing to say these days. I do worry about it though seriously I worry because I worry about how I am very disappointed any sticky social situation by saying how dare you only said day you and then you're saying how dare how day like this. How dare you again this listen? This is very behind the scenes but sometimes I when Rosie's not feeling well. I do the voice of Rosie Fucker Day sometimes but she's still there. She's still there very well because it seamless yeah I couldn't tell which is which is you you are a good impression. You heard my Bowie. That's true well. It's the impression I used to be able to do. I used to sometimes do Roggio it anyway but I can do rosy. I like it when you sum up the people you're interviewing at the beginning. Yeah you take a deep breath and then you have a very pithy little Sir my station I listen to you I write. I like it when you voice switches from you. Just become information bucks. That's right yeah. I like that it's authoritive. I like it to ship your gripping. The we of in to Manley Ann's title Harry Knuckles a bonus bit. I've written knuckles view buckles knuckles buckles knuckles down but some people don't like well there. It is always people that don't like it for the Bob Mortimer Episode I. I wrote little encapsulation of Bob's work with Jim. Moyer raves and I thought it was a good little overview but I got a tweet from a guy saying joined the podcast but you totally wasted seven minutes of my life with that intro. I'm more concerned that you take the tweet from the guy to heart right. Is that all it takes Yep a tweet from God treat from a guy because you don't know don't you find this. When you get anonymous criticism online you invest that person with all your own best qualities you assume that they are intelligent you assume that they are successful handsome beautiful and interesting and you think just like getting a bit of harsh criticism from someone you admire Joseph Nye said that's a flat no yeah I'm not going to go with that? One might think it's more that you go through life imagining that most people like what you do and of course a lot of people don't just reality coming home is he's quite painful. I don't imagine they're particularly point. You don't know how old they are. You don't know whether there educationally subnormal or kind of day there don't know whether they're in some sort of institution. You don't know whether the Matt do you not look at any feedback for your films well then you get critics. If you release a film you get like more than two hundred professional critics writing long assessments of your work probably more than any other rum form right. I guess in terms of like an industry built around the critical analysis of all the books for more than T._v.. Radio but it's of the ecology of life that people out there who hate what you do I'm doing a couple of programs jobs at the moment for various reasons pretty sure they will get along with some good reviews some bad reviews and no one gets good reviews all the time every new it will be weird. Wouldn't it up so you just got to go to just realize that's part of yourself sunny days every day. It's not going to happen. It's like being at a party and you're the D._J.. And Ninety percent of the people in the room and loving the music but then there's one guy in the corner with his arms folded just making faces is it is it is zero. Johnny Moron corner is Dizzy Russell and Johnny Morris Dizzy Ross was a big fan of Johnny. Morris Dizzy Ross gloves anthropomorphic typing johnny loves was dizzy. He loves grime. Yeah D.C Roscoe to crime he did he was at grind pint yeah so yeah. That's who it is but the thing is the point is don't concentrate on them. Concentrate on everyone else. WHO's having a good time? Don't change the record headquarters suit them. You'll just alienate everyone else the disco party well what I think is the best thing to do is just plow your own Farro as much as possible and the problem is the problem that we always had me joe with a lot of stuff is that it feels wrong to always do the same kind of thing like the way to be successful. Generally is defined what the most amount of people like and then you just do that all the time so the the ones. I'm well aware that a lot of people really like the city funny lighter podcasts that fast about the ones that are a bit more serious or with some writer they've never heard of or whatever but I really like those ones right because I like listening to those types of episodes of other people's podcast. You know what I we definitely feel as if it's nice to include all those different things Johnny and dizzy what what we're just a weird that they turned up together the disco johnny died didn't he Johnny Morris was the ghost of Johnny turning up with zero zero school was doing the voice the ghost of Johnny Morris. Is that what it is that makes sense now. This is the kind of kidding Chitchat. I'm offend that happens when three white privilege to smell L. SIS male fat boys. Get what I want to be boy. I mean different about the other Hermano the but I'm excited about the big thing isn't the boys could be banned too late to form a band. Who is a tell you your cousin got labeled as his head fuck boy whoa Justin Justin through yeah I wasn't he in the zoo? Lander Segal wrote it. He wrote it right yeah because there was some cumberbatch yeah yeah I haven't seen the film but it got came in for some criticism schism insensitive portrayal of a trans person and the I read a review that referred to many of the people involved with the production as his head boys doesn't really tell us what a fucked boy is. What do you think it is just a general derogatory? Tom Phil Heterosexual man who reached you just just likes to read the definition I have here is boy a week or contemptible man well. That's fair enough that real in charge I have you got it. Badger is on this round and round in that heads the chord progressions the in the impoverished fragments of Choon and there's the Scott every at the start of every does the brain bose. I was trying to think of some introductions view. Both I mean I know we're already into the podcast now but I was going to say as if it was a boxing match I was going to say on my left. Journalists Documentarian Author Desert Island Discs castaway away the center of Banter Louis Through my right director not Christmas themed show though is it no and I didn't I couldn't come up with all you know. You're GONNA central boundaries. Good the say as something funny but it's getting into the future getting into the pugilist row spout what you mean is. I have a pile of bon mot produced all through the year and I carry them in a huge sack to deliver around the world millions. Come back from that and what what's Joe's Monica going to be. I tried to think of I thought this Stephen Hawking of talking but then thaw snow machine machine accurate representative Yes intro for me well. I didn't have got stuck at the Center for Louis Theory and then. I got stuck hoping you might help you'll create Easter bunny of funny. Hey that's a very good whoa what about my professional achievements though writer and director and I was going to say something to describe you work together <hes> and for Nineteen T._v.. Comedian award winning radio broadcaster the APP writer and film director Yeah covers it and that's everything Easter Bunny of fun Easter Easter Bunny of the east about all right. He woke ownersh on my left. Journalist Documentarian author desert island discs cost away the central Bentiu Louis through. I'm not as well on my right author writer writer director presenter nineties comedian satirical behemoth Genius Handsome Man Sis had fought boy the Houston funny funny joke Kabul's corners. Yes thank you wow that's amazing. Thank you all right right now. Gentle pony noise I can tell you I've put the contemptuous pony in my book. Have you yeah very useful. It's going to work with the Audio Book but people who writes I wrote Joe then deployed his contemptuous pony noise and hoped that people would imagine it but that's what it is by the book and you're wondering <hes> so Lou one thing I've been trying to build is a <hes> <hes> Louis through on desert island discs sampler see if it works my friend Joe Cornish well. I've wrapped among friends. My friend Joe Cornish that was the best bit has the best bit. That's a good noise. That's one of your size. What was that in re in response to don't very probing question that was laverne really touching deep psychological cord? That was me digging deep. You did a lot of Sun. There was breath on the a desert island discs interview so here's the thing about doing island discs. The first thing is they asked me a year before so I had a year to think about going on it. The other thing is like for everyone I had in my mind wind kind of fantasized about what if you were asked him. What would you choose as your records and and then when it happened I kinda built up an and I suppose it also always thought Oh if we ever asked only do it if I'm ready to do it in a spirit of bringing delivering the goods opening up and and talking about personal things so I may even have gone overboard because I think you could also go on? It not talk about personal stuff but I think I thought that's the price of admission is a little bit of spilling your Gotz so when I went on I just had this feeling of our felt very almost divider this fever. I'm really excited to do this is great. It's very flattering thing to be asked to do and I'm going to talk about personal stuff which are not excited about doing but I have to do it so it was almost like seeing these questions come in quite difficult questions. One of the questions I think was what in your life making documentaries has changed you and is that feeling of like I'm going to have to actually dig can be introspective and go to a dark place so I was trying not to be Glib and it was expressed as a sigh. Why a dark place I don't know I think it was because changed you in fenway a nice? Maybe I don't know that's a great question for some reason. I think I wanted to talk about because I I think happy things. Maybe don't change you as much or sunny. Don't leave as much of an imprint right okay. They said if glide off you that's the brain is like like Teflon for positively and Velcro for negative. I disagree. I disagree I think because I think happy things are fantastic but do they. You remember them. Yeah Yeah and you want to get back there. Don't you you you WANNA keep having that hit of happiness Alexis. Yes yes to this feelings of great happiness I do. I remember those moments of uniquely. Yes and I tend to bury the to you the. I think I'm slightly the opposite. I'm proud of it making noise for noise. See if I've got a noise on the sampler just to brighten the mood here we go. I've got this one. I've got to you did too sexy frog noises those noises more frequently in your television book. I think I will now that. I know that I can do. I never heard you make those nights. I was very over tweaks like I had this feeling of. I think I was quite nervous and I think I thought that I would just aware of I had a sense of occasion. I began talking in a way that I do normally talk quite enunciate. Can I let you off the hook because do a lot of radio not. That must you're talking to to raise bedrose and it's very revealing medium for the voice. Isn't it <hes> stomach noises. Oh very very difficult. Also when you start listening to yourself that can be very very difficult. You can't get panicky in terms uh-huh of forgetting how to breathe and stuff like that. It's quite a little psychological minefield especially the atmosphere of studio one of those weird. At least you're clearly. I don't think any of us ever had clicky mouth. You're supposed to not eat chocolate. Aren't you before go on the radio junkie dry mouth Komo sometimes people well. That's another thing I think people. If they've had a bit of a jazz cigarette they can get quite clicky mouth. What is your best radio voices? Let Your Best Mike Technique to mean to sort of go close. I don't really know if I know what you mean you did. What do you mean listen? Let's all the size that you did on. Oh Jeez remember Joe when we were on X._M.. Some guy sent in a mini <unk> disk and I think he did it in a spirit of enthusiastic affection but he had cut together over a few weeks every time either one of US said I'm <hes> or you know any kind of little bit of hesitation or Flood Song Vala Amazonas uh-huh ass. You did it off to the gods. This guy and the thing went on for about ten minutes and we don't beat on X. F._M.. About four or five weeks or something we get this mini disc of discounting well every nervous bit of that's good. That's just duration I think he will not. I don't think he was trying to be mean but it completely destroyed. My confidence stood for how long not quite a while I just couldn't stop thinking about it. Go very self conscious. Hey did you said you're not difficult to destroy a company Brandon Person. Hey didn't know you were so robust the thing I'm getting at is you know I think of the story before Volvo have worked for the BBC voice training. I had a little voice trained four. I was a presenter on Back Roads Radio Fulfill Review Program and it lasted about half an hour with this lovely lady and she said do you have a pet. I said yes I have a cat. She she took a piece of a four paper until the corners off and stuck them to the microphone like little cats is and said talk to this. Mike like you talk to your cat. That's sick. I was offended. I was really offended. I'm offended and then she said okay. The other thing to do is imagine you're in bed and you're walking going kit kit and that having your in bed and you're talking to your partner whose head is on the pillow next to you and that's why everything on radio four aw is extremely sexy yes slightly sexy and that's why it sort of weirdly compelling an addictive because no other radio station does Lauren Laverne was due to leave. Yes you did it automatically then we asked you what your best which shows your natural you went straight close to the MIC straight quiet. It's quite creepy real. Well coming up. What do you say show L.? He sings bit like that. Ah Daddy Daddy Doodoo I find it some intimate and I was trying to match Lauren Laverne tone and then you find your sort of instantly on natural completely playing natural game all right. Here's maybe the idea his. I wonder wonder I don't I've never been aware of people in that. Show sighing so expressively so I signed the most of anyone who's ever been you ever listen to listen to to you okay so maybe I in. I overshot anyway. Sorry going here. We go out montage of size. That would be a good name for a band they think more. I think it's more romantic novel right there. We go well those all different ones. That's extraordinaire on program. I sound Mike. I'm having an attack wall smoking a massive tube or having a relaxing Wang two people say the wedding will we covered similar territory on our radio show with the arches right Yes yes you did a holy cut out all the size and nonverbal guttural noises from an episode of the arches because when you're radio actress very important that's one of the arrows in your quiver is to be able to express movement and dissatisfaction action with grunting emotion yet with grunting that always coming into rooms and Grunstein exactly. You're very very good at it. Another famous film star who of course relies on grunting <music> Brosnan right classic grunted. I think when anybody goes on radio it's a close Mike Environments Shakespeare production where they're trying to make it more naturalistic but they have to use the actual words of Shakespeare but the quite like to add some other words but they can't they tried to with noises so they go to me thinks she does protest too much chose the very into modern noises. That's the mother well. I keep on going on about this but the most modern noise I can think of which is a very podcast noise particularly from N._p._R.. Star presenters is when someone is saying something and the presenter wants to express surprise is an interest and they the noise they use his <hes> <hes> conversation with someone wouldn't be in a monologue useful noises also has natural to me in your say but I want to hear more but I haven't heard that I only started hearing that noise a few years ago we see and I know that I only started doing because I do it myself now and I never used to do it. It sounds to me a little bit dismissive. It's sort of who to thank you yeah. Exactly it's the Hutu thunk noise but with an intellectual sheen her it's usually about you know someone gives you a legal immigrants stat <hes> ah really to me. It's like I'm interested but not that interested. I'll give you a noise and then we'll talk about something else. I call me bothered to actually respond to that with words. Is that the North Yeah Oh no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no speaking of noises. Did both of you see a star is born. Yes Yes lady Gaga Asia. Yes Josiah Gabor. How did you enjoy that by sitting and watching it? I liked it. I liked the first yeah I go. I'm pointing meeting at the beginning of madness very good yeah man that first twenty five minutes killed himself. It's at a spoiler alert. Is he supposed to do the spoiler alert before on the intro Donna whoopsie at the Grammy's he turns up her new manages to stay woops turned up just tumble of Renton as he did a we did a public we we but he didn't public later that evening manager is there when he arrives and even English manager says your your holding her back. She's not interested in you. He goes very mean to you and then he's Oh maybe he's right. I think I'll kill myself well. It's not following this. Daddy issues you know with huge IMA flip over walk. Who'd you flip cross Christine O'Donnell U._C._L._A.? React to that place as the Chris Christopherson a dad and he's he's rather the brother I wanted to do some Sam Elliott but they argue about the data and they argue about their children who is the favourite and stuff yeah this daddy issues going on. There's <music> alcoholism clearly that pills addiction struggling with the English manager tips move the he was good in that role I thought he was. I thought he was very good but that's the story of a star is born. That's the third remake I believe so they can't just completely reinvent the to that degree in one of the maybe the first one has a black and white one the incident of embarrassed technicolor the award of changes in one of them. It's the older star a slapping. The younger star in public isn't it in this one. He disgraces himself by being drunk at the grammy he does. He do a we yes yes. He does a we we in struggles to play the guitar. Phil Richardson's peak in. We've seen an struggles to get back. I think oh it's peaked way before then I think so if that's the embarrassing thing in the two thousand eighteen version what will the embarrassing thing being the twenty forty version ooh good question that Italy by then surely the thing is the embarrassing diminishing and seriousness isn't so it'll be something quite Mainali. He wears the wrong color shoes but it's a peculiar thing in the modern version isn't it. It's a peculiar thing to to write like to choose like pissing yourself in public his an it's an odd thing to go his anyone of the Pistou should've gone said that's not enough. That's not quite what is it could be sort of random and weird and gross sup- pissed themselves in real life. Didn't someone do piss themselves at Glastonbury Marquis Smith maybe did he. I think he might have done something that's for sure. Do you think anyone's done shit shut themselves onstage. Well Gary Lineker shot got himself in the World Cup didn't he and that's why he in twenty what was professional football is different center. I think athletes do it they do it. It's a way of getting to have a big it just to wash the toddler. Actually they can run faster Connie's light. It's like throwing when they slide Outta. Go that's because often one of the other teammates is readied the ground with some with some bumps Joan football wall happens a lot. One of the boys gone in ahead of time with Saddam lubricant. Some trouser Lubar can dedicate in the modern game. It's become increasingly feature in the modern game feces. You're so naive but listen to fancy having a go at talking like Sam Elliott because that was a good character. This is true it beforehand. You know how he does these prepared no now. I click like a really good impression for those of you haven't seen it. I'm going to play a few clips before this is the brother of the Bradley Cooper carry much older brother older brother who's speaking through a massage speaking homework Mac and also get had counteraction where you can't really on our brilliant voice all name kind of growling hacking bay yeah well. You can't count on it. I think you should tear for the shoot. You idolize for no Gut Damn Buchan reason. He could speak more clearly when he's angry. He's hanging Gar memorial fucking say fuck. God Damn for all your fucking day. Can You understand what I liked though because he actually is better people talk econ understand what they say sometimes they tow but it's also traumatic or this is what actors do to compete. They felt quite each other. They quieter and less intelligible yeah well so that they're trying less heart than brand new kind of invent NAT Lambeau <music> Mama. What do you have to come wilderness cheeky cheese today out no time and now you've got mumble wrapping delight? The mumble rap mumble core mumble rap light who number Corey's movies. He's though right if you're a fifty cent was always court good because he didn't really opened his mouth that wide Greta Gerwig was part of the mumble core film movement fifty cent was the first of the mumbles was in dopey call mumbling but not open his mouth very wide seem to be saying. How Acer Rocky is he a Mumber Kentucky don't know that some of them are quite sort of Gibberish e? Oh I know who's a playboy carty playboy carty. He's always blink never heard of have you know he's he's been busy related to todd carty. Yes playboy cartoons todd carty son Todd Carty payments were playing tough. Eugene Clark is Yankee in Grange Hill. Thanks Lou Okay Well Mobile Sam to you want to you've never bought a girl stays before more comprehensible. He was talking to somebody who didn't know that well so yet enunciate. Maybe <hes> this is the key to because you know I think you're a very good actor. No I don't know that way because you so far exploited the fullest you've found your voice clipping complement and then it went and this is what I'm building up to is that Samolis found his voice. Yes that's avoid or act. You can't work in retail. You can't work at a drive through go. Do you think is the closest finding your voice enacting yeah. But what is your voice. It's a lot of pressure isn't it that there is a lot other pressure. Well you gotta give him some lines and act that that's what happens to an actor. If you are some to speak without a script freeze in your in your voice tell you one thing he's never brought a girl on stage before tell you one things never bought a girl out on stage before. That's how it all over again. That's how Sam Elliott speaks Nolan is data to clear it. Wasn't it in your own way. Let's be to Sam Elliott. Please hello yes. Do you think this one while I was thinking kind of numbly Semolina. Oh yes well. I mean I can definitely okay listen or anything else. You can work as directors. Let's get you to Somalia. So what's your first reading of the line. I'll tell you one thing he's never bought a girl and just say the words just say the words. I've done some audition action listen. I'll tell you one thing. He's never bought a girl out on stage before. He did a little head not after I'll tell you one thing okay so this next one. We're going to tech team. That's straight droid. You want me to go okay. I'm GonNa give you the first drop. The look just relaxed the face and just don't move your teeth at all in fact. Keep your teeth cleaned together. Close Your Eyes Okay seriously ready. Don't take action. Tell your thing is no it. It is already. It's better already dude again. He's never got it on stage before. I liked that. Did you throw something in say as though you're a lot of pain trying to tell you one thing number on stage before I think the teeth thing is getting but don't open yet do everything you just did relaxed to keep my eyes so you got pain. Toys cleaned is close yeah. American action pain is closer laxity American accent. I tell you one thing is never bought a girl out. I'll stay before see that's good already. Isn't it could be so your natural voice might be American Erkin Faraway the further away you get from me the better isn't it amen. Hey man what's been my best role. What have been best in? I'll tell you the thing I always think of whenever I think of act like I don't do acting anymore. Really it's a shame but maybe I will when I grow into my looks a bit more. Maybe I'll be back. It'll be like Farnsworth doing the straight story getting nominated for an Oscar. You would say your best role best you look at that the thing I always think of the compliment them most at the time was when we were doing the Joe Show and we did the nineteen eighties house and I played the matriarch of the fat boy slim family who were all web designers China's recently and I remember Jane Goldman saying why why did you watch that he longs to know research into the eighties our project yeah that's a good thing to think yeah it was trying to remember is good. You play up a very gregarious woman. Yeah it was a little bit to your mother right right Yep Yep Yep but it's very very funny freaking out with the sodastream I think wanting to there's a kitchen nightmares white man. You're looking through the face magazine and you're looking at boy. George and you say something funny. I can't remember I remember that the thing about this isn't a good low to be phoning over one's own work well. It's okay. It's the hundred podcast. This is all about about me but it's true you think that's your number one performance your best. which was the big change Oldman life? She said she just said you're acting was really good. No no one ever paid me a compliment on my acting before. I thought wow I'm acting. I'm an actor but it's big you see you got to find the right vehicle for that sort of thing. Mr Comes back to you need to possess the whole movie or Atkinson Rowan Atkinson. You need a home. He needs a whole film built around him. It's your job you can do. You had a series more or less built round you didn't you other persuasion ists was that built around you and loss chances. Oh yeah maybe I should have wrote that with. Tony Murray wasn't big enough. The wasn't tell you why not because the pilot for that show which was about a band in Brighton guys part of abandon their slightly lose rush and the pilot for that was directed by Stephen Merchant who was a friend of the CO writer Tony macmurray and they were. I remember when we did the pilot. They were filming the second series of the office so so they were right at the vanguard they're enjoying the success of the first series that was just taking off and that was the beginning of a return to a very naturalistic style of comedy after everything had been quite big for a while I think and grotesque grotesque. You know what I mean so I'm waiting for it so you ain't you were directed to play directed to turn it down. Turn it down. That's always the direction I get down down down. No further turn it up unified something where you could turn up to the Max Breath wigs high heels Florida dresses screeching. That's the other thing is that I used to like dressing as a woman or whenever I got the opportunity and now I don't know where you're at with that kind of thing. Probably it's not okay. I don't know this is going to be a good reason for it and there was seldom a good reason of me. Those are good gag in the Eighties House with the kiddies ready brick and saying Mo- khloe played it very well didn't he that kid yet he went on to be in a lot of stuff that kid yeah and what was your line was. It's how K. Lurk doc central heating for kids. Wow you really did see it recently. I don't remember anything he's like a beautiful boy. That's what you say about Boy George beautiful so because she's so brilliant but you know Ishi so fragile she did mom so often on she used to ricochet from extreme enthusiasm and joy to anyway. We'll see beautiful cited by the House freaking out about the was ruined the car remember he was trying to do in the door to get on smack the kids she using the anti smack in the face heroes water isn't she says where. Where do you find that seem to play ground? She said yes. I've got the dirty this is. I just bumped into you at the supermarket was backing out of blocking space and I hit your. I'm sorry we all angry now. Tom Barry Hyper now and making me very angry <music>. So how'd you feel about <unk> out. <hes> looking at some report cards worried about this. He's actually got some order cards. That's what we used to call them. Wasn't it Westminster Cards. Yeah smell the report cards. I found a stack of a lot of them. Didn't my dad did. I found them in his town. Well Yeah We. Let's split them up. We'll divvy them between me and Louis all right because you should be reading your fine. You shouldn't be self editing. What would you say your Stove B._T.? Three can I say before any reading of the report cards. How did you feel about reports? I remember clearly feeling sick to my stomach when when they arrived and when I saw the envelope flop through the letterbox and I knew that it was that terms report it used to sit a ruin the beginning of a holiday because I was so terrified so mortified by the idea of the judgments arguments that were coming my way and my parents being disappointed by them. I didn't mind getting reports because I think I usually did all right right. The thing is they came at the beginning of the hulls yeah so there was a general feeling of Africa wasn't there. It was like Oh you know so you might get a little bit ticked off but then it was way gunman. This one came last in the class is that true in French and Physics with mathematics twenty. The second place out of twenty two shot up thirty four percent. You got on the physics. Whoa what year was that eighty three not that I improved in physics that was my first year thought you'd be or the French? Let's see what the French teacher to say. Korea Pounder Physics Lewis Physicians Gone Down He has had a reasonable term and he's worked quite well however there are many weaknesses and he count afford to relax his efforts mad. I don't know when I read these as an adult I can see the house muster and the teachers knowing the parents will read it so there's a little bit of performance in there probably isn't there yep like making it seem as if they are absolutely on top of your every foible voidable and strength and weakness really demonstrating value for money well. They must be a lot of techniques to right because I'm exactly each one Ding Dong. We've got a big old stack. The parents need to feel that children are getting proper care and attention individual care plus. This is an expensive school and apart from you the child this is all the parents getting really this is the only evidence of what they've spent their money on part from the keys to physics he had his ups and downs but his heart is in the right place and he wants to understand what is going on but I do wish you would get some shirts that fitted as otherwise. He is quite smart yeah but you had. Out of funding from Scott you shirts to ties where they yeah because you did your talk but not me roll like Mr Constrictor. No I had big shirts I would. I've never been a tight your guy I when not a hairy chest exposed man no but I had baggy I had shirts untucked remember they they will stylishly Kaftan. Didn't you can Afghan sort of Northern Alliance tribesmen the thing with its his shirt tales right out like little skirt and it would hang about Don's you had a little dancer used to bells on your fingers. You Remember Joan dancing boy. It's a bunch of Mazi they say look he's sticking around so we used to skip and he dons with his bells and his skirts around. Do you remember that. What was was the worst report you ever got? was there phrase that sticks in your head from those days Joe's I got some bad ones going joe so I went through a really stupid phase at school. where I just didn't give a shit? I think I remember that what was the other face. Take it was particularly we start studying Charlemagne and my God it was the most boring thing I'd ever I mean it just felt like dying. You know when you go in with the other French king when no any French Kim Kim but when you're young and you're full of sap and energy and excitement spunk you absolutely brimming over with spunk and your toll to study some medieval French king it was terrible Arab yet but I swung through on my art and in creative language like story writing so that kept me afloat anything involving the learning facts I was not good at a tool or any abstract concept I really couldn't grasp making stuff up and telling stories and stuff very very good very straight. They made not special allowances by remember any level because you started out doing history and then at a certain point. They said you know what fine yeah it's a waste of time. Joe Need to history history of art art and let you do all as your third as we go slightly Jeremy who is well cherry jamming. What would they had you done to just Cassara was flat lining dining? There was nothing else that would have been just a complete waste of time yeah. We you getting reports that said your son is a moral cheeky disruptive but that there was a short period when I was a cheeky disruptive one yeah Tonia Tom though I think I had a shot when my mom brought some round and I thought I just sort of did always did pretty well in my <hes> in my report cards and my member on what running said Oh I think you'll like this. It's quite funny on and there was one or two of the maths level ones just said he's wasting. My time is wasting his own. Time is disrespectful. It's cheeky. It was actually quite upsetting to read how we all did quite like there was a class where there was a teacher who said right if you don't Stop Julian tools now now look of you. Don't stop mess. I'm going to go out of this classroom. I'm going to stand outside the door and I'm gonNA wait till someone comes out apologizes and the lesson will continue until the happens did he say the lesson did not continue obviously one. That's not a useful strategy. Maybe on exaggerating <music> now look. He was the one that told me if you don't buck up your ideas you're going to end up like Mike Adler. He left school last year and in the holidays where I saw him he was working at a petrol station that something similar happened to me. When I was working in tower records in piccadilly one of old schoolteachers came and bought some video cassettes it probably would have been awesome records and he was in the queue and then he came to be served by main he looked at me and Gosper said Joe Cornish how the mighty have fallen he used that phrase the weird pies the mighty what because I was because I made films I directed plays? I was a bit of a sort of what's the character in rushmore called stinging track face to face to face is you don't call rushmore. Was it called Rushmore because that's the name of the school and what did you say in return. I give you a discount on that fuck in Ram record but now I'm not a shit off yeah. I just felt very depressed. Did you upset you yeah. I just felt fat. Maybe he's right. That's just bullshit. Shit Ranger has little phrases that people say maybe didn't even think about it. Never gave you must have been afterwards you the rest of your life but I- Roenick like how the mafia fallen uh on their feet working in Britain's video stores discount you're in this position of power in absolute cats go to the toilet so it was my birthday recently and one of the present site got from our Danny was spying through a keyhole a box set of David Bowie demos that he made in nineteen sixty nine that were released earlier this year in April so these have never been heard before some of these songs songs and they include titles like mother Grey Level Round Goodbye Three D. Joe and Angel Angel Grubby face advice and so I haven't heard these I haven't listened listen to them yet really yeah so I thought we could have a go at imagining. Which one should we imagine was going to be Angel Angel Angel groppy? I've written one have you. It's called Goodbye Three D. Joe but you were you were wanted to do an angel angel face. Well can do both enjoy Elaine Joel grubby faiths. That's very strident. He was much more fe of was. This is nine hundred sixty nine. He hasn't busy got that wrong as well but this was him trying out mid seventy S. That's why didn't release it because the world wasn't ready yet. Hey Angel Angel Grubby face. The way you eat is such is hesitates. You've got chocolate online. The blaze June lane June grubby face view toucher big disgrace that something like that Oh ooh the human raise angel easy might face fluttering there in God's Good Grace Nine Monkey monkey marks upon your your F- baby face is totally silly angel. You can't come into God's presence show Hanzel groppy phase sitting on the steps civic-minded tongue Japanese lady. This reminds me of remember doing that. David Bowie convention was yes in Nineteen eighty-eight found a record of that. When I hear it Elven you'd have to go on you ready ready to go see from Reggio Convention? I'm your host. The phone on wrote is a hundred is going to be and mine to disturb leagues. Donors in the sport is most and pinups in the eldest one had lost legs. Well joking joking too you ah tuning right vote cookies. Take time to be putting your shoes on this. Is it doing in one thousand nine hundred eight that was we were on holiday in New York. We were staying at a friend's house Chad. We were nineteen well. I was nineteen. How old were you would have been just turned eighteen? I was fourteen and and we were staying at our friend. Chad's you were recording Chad was away. I think we have sat round but steamed and we go into doing David Bowie voices artistic person so well. Is there more nuance now. Yes what we did. There was a come from it was just it was it was because he was this. was there a specific. I was feeling very very blue. Extras of the film theatricality is a word way associated Zuber. Let's see which is no word and and he says you're no spring. Chicken Chicken Suns Ring Yeah. Maybe yeah you definitely visit theatricality flying around in the Lebron. Thanks thank you. I'm a little bit over forced back in. They were heavily rely on just the woods in Wiza- we were very very very powerful. I wasn't you very drunk on their own hair. I was feeling very very high. We probably want this is this is muggy smoke times yeah but this is all throat clearing before this is all throat clearing before so we we've had a go at Angel Grubby face. What does he actually sound like? This is the first time I've heard it. Let's see if we're anywhere close sunshine the fingertips of Tom hazing sudden big <music> until it's good isn't it. That's why we're not very different from the Bowie that I was doing yeah and me he wa- It was nothing to do with Chuck Lewis Quite close. Now we should play chose one every is she didn't have cocaine in those days <music> fraudster and lift glasses back in the day didn't require special display you could make red and blue lenses from colored sweet rapidly and assemble the frames from a box of green crackers than all the dump pensions would spring into life. Dennis Quaid Fighting Sharks Jason's big bloody knife. You're is might feel funny. You might start to feel new dimensions of terror in Amityville Goodbye Three D. Joe uh well since you said you were just a Guinea. Don't listen to them that can marginally Senate goodbye. Three world likes done mentioned since. Assume that you'd have dolphin job now. They're releasing twenty more avatars then imagine might thrill I almost wet my knickers when they announced a new movie from Romans Zuniga's but used technique they called active shut the could live three d films out of the city. Oh gotta put on bow ties. The girls there just to attend the premiere of the Polar Express Express and they gasped and they marveled an offer that banks for the gift to the world of a three D.. Tom Hanks glasses. What Plastic Lenses Liquid Crystal D._I._A.? maxes sold out from Burlington Bristol but it soon soon became clear it was just a device to charge doubled brise goodbye three D. Joe since you had to. They said you just you don't listen to them that can Magen listen goodbye three world laxton mentioned since you had to that you'd have the job now. They're releasing twenty times. Wow you all the bag for the hundredth episode. Thanks it was impressive because that's it's like a peon. Is that the word please Paean to three D film technology. You Will Boeing absolutely adult films. He was a cineas and she loves anything that would absorb him into the theatricality of the experience and if he was still alive today God bless him he'd be very excited about in the forthcoming Avatar films he likes. He absolutely does little blue bums. I love to have it so I just love watching little blue bums hopping talking about food. What do they do with the towns when they plug it into the youth? What do they do it bonding with plugs? The horses all says just having talking with them yeah a mental link sex. Wow that was amazing man okay. Do you want to hear what Goodbye Three D. did. You actually sounds like sequencing threaten yeah so that's this thing you're dealing with. Was it the voice octave too low. He hasn't found his social. <hes> core progression yet has a he's working in kind of major courts. He's working in quite social tuneful melodic while he was still coming out of his runs Ron Fangs. He's coming out of his anthony. I'm just coming onto David you ready. I'm just I'm just coming onto my Anthony Newley. I'll be two minutes. I'm ready now for the two hundred <music>. Wait continue. Ah Welcome back pod cats that was a little little bit of Rosie. You heard growling that was fun. growling happy growling sometimes he'll come into the room and get on the Sofa while me and my wife are watching T._v.. And she'll have a tea towel or something in her chores and she will Weichel it at us hopefully and <hes> then we have to grab onto the other end of the T. Thailand wrench it around and that makes her happy so that's what you had then <hes> Rosie Ozzie she's gone. I heard her racing off in pig. Well it is Friday night so that was Joe Cornish Louis through chatting with me there before all hand very grateful to them both for making the time not just for this episode but for so many other episodes before and for continuing to be so loyal and supportive whenever I ask for their help by the way Joe wanted me to tell you that he is now on instagram previously cone bowls has been shy or reticent or Aloof however you want to read it when it comes to social so media but <hes> earlier this year he decided that he was going to take a plunge and join instagram his name on there. Is Mr Joe Cornish or one word. 'em All J. O.. E. C. O. R.. I S. H.. I'd look there earlier today and he's posted quite a few pictures from various parts of his illustrious career few bits and pieces from old adamant Joe Days I've pop up there once or twice and there's onset pictures from his films attack the block and the kid who would be king <hes> bits and pieces of him working with Edgar a picture of him on the set of one of the Star Wars movies <hes> sat certain Millennium Falcon also things the next episode of this podcast one hundred and one will be the Catcher in the Rye Book Club Myself Richard Iowa and Sara Pascoe talking about J. D. Salinger's classic novel in a pretty informal and unstructured way but look as it's <hes> episode one hundred yeah. I'm just going to pretend that I've won some sort of award and say okay thank you to everyone who has helped and does help with this podcast especially everyone who has recorded episodes with me <hes> whether they've gone out yet or not I really appreciate your time. Thank you very much thanks to ashamed Murphy Mitchell for production support and Matt Lamont for additional editing on this episode but <hes> thanks also to Anika Meyson and Jack Bushel for their work on previous episodes. Thank you so much to Helen in green and Luke drove for the beautiful podcast and merchandise artwork that they've provided over the years thanks to backstreet Merch who do the podcast merchandised as a link in the description of this podcast. Should you wish to go and visit and see what there is there thanks to screw pip who helped me out very early on giving me advice about the podcast and being generally supportive thanks scrupulous. Thanks very much to everyone. At a cost I really appreciate all the hard work finding sponsors and <hes> dealing with technical queries and all sorts of things they're always helpful and friendly and I'm very grateful to them. Thanks very much to Kevin and toby be at really quite something limited for designing and maintaining the Adam Buxton app thanks to various other friends family and colleagues who helped me with the podcast Malkin Zivie Goff uncle Dave James Stirling erling Clyde tallow. Dan Hawkins Becker Emily and cheeky but I think the three people who I owe the greatest debt of gratitude to as far as the podcast goes <hes> Rosie of course she isn't here right at this moment. He's off <hes> Yipping but <hes> boy I really love Rosie and in many ways she's the reason that this podcast came together when I used to <hes> take her out for walks back in the early days and record voice notes and then think to myself well. Maybe I could do a podcast and she's transformed my life rosy in all sorts of ways so thank you rose and of course shameless. He deserves another thank you I suspect I can be a bit of a pain in the ass to work with shameless. It's always nice about it as well as being very good at his job so thanks shameless and speaking of people who have to put up with me being a bit of a pain in the ASS. Thank you very much to my wife <hes> Mayo and she probably won't listen to this <hes> if she did she would find it cringe I think but I'm very lucky to know her and she does a great deal to enable me to <hes> continue making this podcast one final. Thank you to you. Yes that's right. You listened right to the end of this good for you. If you keep listening there's even a little extra final nugget breath of stupidity after like and subscribe that's your award for battling right the way through a whole episode of this nonsense. No seriously I appreciate it until next time we share the same sonic space. Please take care. Did you know that I love you in where Sir the <music> uh-huh and also sleep with air plugs Yup I did how did you hey still audible sliced through the plugs. Actually you know when there's been noises outside the house we when we lived in Halston all occasion that'd be kids who are a bit more rough de tufty and you can you guys. Can you please stop you're doing or you check out the window and it didn't go so well. They members of the rough tufty club. I think a couple of them because you know that the prison gang the rough detesting when I know is what the tough de clubs evolved into to keep itself like up to speed with the young people the Nazi low riders Area Nations in the rough tufty club sovereign someway the they're above the two. They're sort of the worst of the prison gangs because it's more like an organized crime. I'm getting the merged with the city club. Go to you just say club. The sooty as you said yeah so gene sweep weed becomes children's T._v.. For some reason it's that really so is it an and they're all subset of the Puffing Book Club. Is that true yeah like like blue. Peter Badges shanked yeah but it's also a lot of things that started as nice things have devolved to like we used to be helping America also ladies across the road because the road when they.

D. Joe David Bowie writer Sam Elliott Joe Cornish Johnny Louis Theory Rosie Reduc Marquis Smith Johnny Morris Lauren Laverne Adam Buxton director Grammy Boy George Johnny Marr Tonia Tom Lou Joan
The Gut Connection: Exploring Your Gut Microbiome with Dr. B, the Gut Health MD

No Meat Athlete Radio

1:15:30 hr | 3 months ago

The Gut Connection: Exploring Your Gut Microbiome with Dr. B, the Gut Health MD

"This episode of no athlete radio is brought to you by by optimize irs and their digestive enzyme mass signs go to optimize IRS dot com slash no meat that's BE I. Dot. com slash no meat and use coupon code no meat to say forty eight percent off select packages. Hi, this is help. Hi. This is Katie from Washington DC and you're less no meat radio. All. Right. So today we have Dr Will Bush wits or doctor be who is a health md on Instagram, and first of all, he is the author of the New York Times instant best-seller fiber fueled he is changing lives as we speak he is an md he is gastroenterology little hard word Gastro andrologist and internationally recognized as gut health expert. His passion for the micro bioscience is contagious and his skills for spreading his scientific message in relatable and super entertaining way is what makes dr be really stand out. And he has sixteen years of medical training under his belt and was the chief medical resident at northwestern and chief gastroenterology fellow at UNC receiving the highest award given by both his residency and fellowship I. I personally chatted with Dr be for wister. Vegan Fest Podcast Rape Before his book dropped and we got deep into his personal story and transformation there. You can check that out. We've got two parts because we talked forever and we loved it, and in this interview today, we go over a ton of information. Around gut health and science behind it all and it's all really easy to understand because of his life analogies that he uses which I absolutely love. One thing we didn't have time for though was his doctor Bs f goals acronym that he uses to tell people what they should be eating for a really healthy gut. So I grabbed him after this interview and recorded a little something for my hooked on plants Instagram to go out to day, and it's him explaining all of the foods that should be eating. While, you're trying to heal your gut or just prevent any kind of disease because every disease in every health aspect of yourself begins in the gut. So go check that out on hooked on plants Instagram, but there is so much in here. He is an absolute wealth of knowledge. So enjoy the interview with Dr Be, and don't forget to check out his book on Amazon read the reviews and you'll be inspired just from that and check him out on Instagram to okay welcome to the no meat athlete Podcast Dr. Are. We love or we live right now we are live. Gout it's good to see you how are things get? How are you? Can Ask you a question and I want you to give it to me straight because I think you willow yet. So, ready to get pumped up for this podcast to give myself like. In the in the mood. Yeah. Listen to the Hamilton Soundtrack. Judge community now no Johnny Marr. Track one three one is dislike the traditional. Alexander. Yeah, and then track three is not thrown away my shot and it's like going to. Know me that lead man thrown away the shot. Let's go. You know meet athlete. Oh that's awesome. No, that's inspiring. Isn't it just gets you fired up. I feel like music. Music has a big part in your whole life and your whole career feel. Oh Man I. Wish I could have a soundtrack like in thing. But then. I wouldn't walk, I would just dance everywhere I go there would be no luck involved. It just be like moving from place to place but the. What's wrong with that? Make everyone laugh smile no I. If I had my way that would exist but I think you've got gotTa make it happen I would dance down the streets if I if I could all day everyday. Chores that crazy person Happy talking. The Gut Health Guy Maybe. They got something we're going on. Well, as I was prepping for this interview I was like you know what I feel like you're so many nicknames. First of all your poop whisper self-proclaimed. You are fibers, new publicist, which I feel like ritual Kinda gave you that title congrats on that interview by the way it's It seems like it's reaching far and wide so so awesome. And then the plant point master I kind of gave out plant based Rockstar, of course. And the doctor be the real DR G. And I have to give Andrea props for that. Because last time we were chatting we were on Vegan podcast we chatted for two hours. So we made it into part one and part two. So anyone listening wants even more view. We're done which I know they will check that out but Andrew gave you that one and I think it's my favorite. Really more than poop whisper lots. It's pretty to the poop doctor I like rock. Rockstar. But that's Me Being Selfish I've always wished that I could be a rock star that's in my book. I talk about like new. You could be a business rockstars you get enough plant points like this is my way of like making my own dreams come true even if it's not actually happening. You are Jaeger of the vegan world. I wish that guy his hips don't lie their incredible. Title though how he does that like? How could you move like a snake and you're like ninety five years old it's incredible scales. Energy. Still got it. Got It. Am I missing any nicknames? I mean there's so much. How far back are we, GONNA go. Okay related to. Fiber Field Abba. No. You got five or fields covered I mean you're you got a revealed covered. I'm very proud of actually. New York, times bestselling author. Instant. So Amazing I absolutely love your book. I've got it in three different versions now. Audible and the PDF that you sent me an actual hard copy. So Yeah it's amazing. You are changing so many people's lives and transforming their health thousands of reviews on Amazon. So everyone listening definitely checkout fiber fueled at Amazon and get it in your mail right away because it really is so refreshingly straightforward three real-life analogies and relatable stories because it's it's you shining through right like you're so relatable and fun, and it brings people back to the basics of nutrition like it really is helping. So many people transform their health and and he'll their got. So congratulations on the success of it. The last time you spoke it was right before your book dropped and I feel like it's a whole other life that you're leading now. So how are you doing with this fiber fueled madness? Mike the guy, the guy who had this experiment and all of a sudden experimental blew up nail crazy hair and like all over their face I'm like what the heck just out. It's kind of insane I mean look I could not be more proud of that book I put my heart and soul into that book. And it was a pure passion project and I didn't know if there would be any response at all and when the pandemic hit. I kind of. Had A couple of weeks in May have told you this when we talked before? I had a couple of weeks in late March. Early April rows kind of moping around like I was like a broken man. I was like a broken man I was just I do. Like wearing sweatpants everywhere and my wife, let's go do something and I'm just like lean on the couch making moaning noises. Is, launching up during a pandemic. Well because basically happened is all my plans got pulled. He's like I was supposed to fly out to L. A. to be rich rose five. All these different things and everything else on strategic boom squash like all this work that you've done squash it's gone. And so but then I just got Kinda pissed you know. I just got kind of pissed. Yeah. Well, because I worked for two years on the PUCK. And I'm not GonNa let is frigging pandemic. completely destroyed my book launch rate and so I kind of busted my tail trying to do you know as much as I could to get the word out and. I mean it just feels really good like the most important thing truly is when you get these messages from people who read the book I was literally I'm not exaggerating Julia is Rena message this morning. From someone who's like. Basically. I have been suffering with arthritis for years to the point that like it has affected my mobility. And I tried different diets, none of them have worked. In now in following your plan and Mike, I would really woke up this morning with zero pain. Latin I'm just like okay. I didn't expect that to happen I would not have told you that it would happen. But it did and so it's really cool. So awesome. Yeah like I say you're transforming. Lives it's it's really incredible to work all of the reviews like on instagram posts, them a and testimonials, and it's it's truth. You know it's people are actually getting in tune with their own health finally and you make it really easy. The Gut microbiome. where we're going to talk about it, you know it it. It is complicated there's a lot to it but at the same time, the solutions are actually quite simple and it's just kind of a return to basics. That's what I was just GonNa. Ask You. I was GONNA say let's go over gut health one on one one a one basics because. I'm sure a lot of these listeners are everyone in no meat athlete is very educated but and heard about the microbiome. But let's just go right back to the beginning anyways and say, you know what? What is the microbiome and the USA the number one precursor of a healthy gut microbiome is the diversity of plants the eat that is Dr beat quote. far-reaching and can you expand on that and also explain what despite this means to? Sure. So it's just kind of like do a cannonball into the year and talk about these microbes. All right which. are that we as humans we think of ourselves as a dominant players like we control our environment and yet. The more that you learn the more you will realize we are completely intertwined with our world and our microbes are what is connecting us. So, we are covered from the top of our head all the way to the tip of our toes with gut microbes or with microbes, and they are invisible you can't see them but they are concentrated mostly inside your intestine specifically inside you're calling. and. They're not just like hanging on for the ride they're not just casually they're they're actually dynamic players in Human Health Abbaye are connected to your nutrition. So you know the food that you eat bike if you want to get the nutrients out of it, if you WANNA process digested properly. We need these microbes. To. Our immune system to our metabolism to our hormones to our mood the way our works. There so intertwined with human health that I. It's very weird for me to say this but legitimately believe this to be the truth. The, most important thing. For Human Health. Isn't even human. It's not a part of us these microbes that you know again, like their single cellular, we can't see them with our naked eye, but there's thirty, nine trillion of them. They're they're like dynamically affecting your immune system, your metabolism, your mood, your brain, your hormones attrition. That's power. And so we want to, we want to support them. We want them to be successful and they are living creatures. They're alive as you and Julia as alive as the listeners a home. And they need to be fed. And they're hungry. And the way that they that we feed them. Is With what we? So whatever we put in our mouth and swallow we're GONNA send. down. The tube. And it will come into contact with these microbes. And certain microbes will eat and certain ones will not. Because, if you didn't give them the right food, they're not going to be fed and they are picky eaters just like us. So So their preferred food is. Is Fiber. And this is the sort of backbone of my argument in my book, which is that fiber is the preferred food of our gut microbes. And we live in a society where we're just not doing it. We're just not eating any fiber. and. We eat the same iceberg lettuce with like one tomato that we sliced four ways we call it a salad dumped blue cheese and throw croutons on top right. and. So. We're just not giving these microbes need and the key. Going back to your statement Julia is the diversity. And the reason why diversity is so critically important is that diversity within the microbiome? Easy measure of health. This ecosystem just like the Amazon rainforest. Just. Like the great barrier. Reef. And if you look at any ecosystem at any biologist will tell you the key to the ecosystem is biodiversity. You want all the different players to be there, and so for example, just real quick I I don't like snakes. Mosquitoes. Annoy me but. If he wins the Amazon rainforest and you take all the snakes mosquitoes out of the rainforest, you would create a hole in the system that the other animals are not designed to fill. And I would create problems and instability and other animals would die as a result of that. So. The same is true in our gut we want as much bio-diversity as possible. In each one of these microbes. Is. A. Picky eater has its own preferred. Food its own preferred type of fiber, and the way that we get as much diversity within our Mike revile is the eat as much diversity of plants. Within our diet and we do that we are supporting a bio diverse gut microbiome and it becomes this hardy strong resilient ecosystem that is perfectly designed to take on whatever our body needs just to do. And is going to support human house throughout the entirety of the body that includes the immune system and metabolism hormones and mood brain and all those other things. You say it's like a command center and it really does sound like a fun game doesn't it? is because the video is A. Affable. You are not you know you're not cursed with Stumm Gut microbiome that you're stuck with for the rest of your life. You have the ability to mold and shape it and turn it into. The Gut. microbiome of your dreams Debbie it can be like so sleet and wonderful, and you just have to put in the effort and time that's necessary to get it there And that right there. So empowering for people to know that you can change your gut microbiome and you will be able to digest certain things. Eventually I think that is the most empowering part of all of us and. I find it. So fascinating that the gut microbiome trillions of microbes that you feed and then they pupil stuff to either you know. Either help you or hinder you literally what they're doing. You are what your gut microbes poop out. Yes, exit been this is this is this is the key is that if you got and I think we'll talk about this more and more as we go through but. If you took fiber. You're sterile. It just wouldn't do that much because the final which just pass through. Yeah. If, you have gut microbes. But you don't give them fiber. I mean honestly, you're not really getting the benefits from these microbes that you could be getting. Guess what that is the way that we live in North America right now, the average person has gut microbes not feeding that. So you basically have these starving microbes in they're they're they're not empowered helping. And but if you take fiber and you feed gut microbes. Than they will take that fiber and they will transform it in this beautiful powerful way. It's magic carry potter. It's like know it's a beautiful thing and How's IT GONNA probably end up going someplace that I didn't to go stop stop stop aboard. Multi late. I was like, okay. Do I go there? Do I go there? Not Abort Anyway. It's a good thing. It's a good thing. You can insert whatever it is. One of you is a beautiful thing and. It's like magical in in what they do is they produce. These short chain, fatty acids and the protein fatty acids are what truly are making the difference are truly are healing. It's not the fiber itself is short chain fatty acids. From the fiber when your gut microbes consume it, and that's the beautiful thing and the flip side is true to is, as you said Julia. The flip side is also true which is that when you eat unhealthy food. You will feed the unhealthy microbes and they will take that food and they will turn into stuff that could hurt you the bottom line. They can turn it into things like, TMA? Oh, more into. A means or Sulfides, or there's all these different examples of things that either cause cancer or inflammatory associated with Crohn's disease zero supplied are all these different. Conditions Diseases that you just don't want, and unfortunately they come the those things can come when we feed unhealthy microbes so No you have a choice. You can feed the good guys and they can empower you and strengthen you and fortify you. Or. We can feed the bad guys and stay. Can you know basically work work overtime trying to take you down and eventually succeed if you give them enough time Yeah. We'll get into TMA oh, and and what causes disposes and creates more growth those bad guys versus goodguys soon. But before that I think maybe we could do fun little. Fire round. Talk about the gut connection and. So I'll say, the guts and immunity connection fire out kind of basic understanding of what that is and we'll go through just a few of those. How does that sound? Was, rock. Yeah. Okay. I know you like gain. So I feel like this is a bit of a game. Want to. The game that connection game. Okay. So let's start with gut an immunity connection and the importance of a healthy got when it comes to viruses like we are all experiencing right now covert. The got the guy in the immune system are inseperable. Seventy percent of your immune system is right there a literally the single ourselves separates seventy percent of your immune system from thirty nine, trillion gut microbes. So they are completely intertwined. They talk to one another constantly and if you want a healthy immune system. You need healthy gut and we have studies that have demonstrated that you know. For example, we have studied with specifically cove nineteen suggesting that there is alteration or damage to the GUT microbiome in people that get severe covid nineteen. And we also have studies with respiratory viruses that a which are you know similar to the way the covid nineteen behaves. with respiratory viruses where when you feed gut microbes with fiber. They actually will enhance the way that your immune system functions and help you to optimally clear that virus not too much too much is how people end up basically having what's called a d.. Which is acute respiratory distress syndrome. That's what's getting people into trouble with this virus where they end up in the ICU on a breathing tube, you don't want that s too much immune system. But you don't want to little either because when it's too little than the virus is not being cleared up so we need needed just right and that's that's the way that it works is these gut microbes. Help, they're basically support for your immune system. So that I can work just right. He had the book you explain before we get into the next connection there. In the book you explain as a bit of a House Party and there's a fence let the microbes all within the intestinal wall. Sorry. Maybe you can expand on that because I go. It's a house party in the pre Cova Times where there were no restrictions in you could just have a great time and. Basically what it is. They're so close that although they are technically separated by this barrier, which is called the layer and again this epithelial air, it's just a single So thin the can't see what the make it i. By. even though they're technically separated from one another. Is the energies are being shared with one another and so when you when you have a healthy gut? That is the best way to have a healthy immune system and when you're got is unhealthy. Unfortunately, that's when we find that the immune system is unhealthiest well, and one of the things that I did in research in my book Julia is I looked at all these different auto-immune. Diseases. and. So I'm talking about like lupus rheumatoid arthritis and Multiple Sclerosis Crohn's will sort of quite whatnot. And I asked the question. Have they looked at the GUT microbiome? In the setting of these people who have these autoimmune diseases. And I found a you can see in chapter one of my book there's a table with like. Literally. Thirty different diseases. Every single time they stuck a the Gut microbiome in the setting of autoimmune disease. The finding was damaged to the GUT microbiome. It's to the point Julia that I'm convinced that it is required unconvinced that it is required. To damage the GUT microbiome in order to develop an autoimmune disease. And so that's how powerful disconnection is. If you protect the guy, you are protecting the immune system. Yeah. Amazing. Okay onto the next one and. I'm not very good at this fire round on me. this great though. The Gut and mood depression and anxiety connection. So. Are. Glued to this before that, our God is connected to our brain and it's called the brain gut connection They are constantly talking to each other. We're talking to each other literally right this moment. And part of the ways that they communicate our through nerves. So there's this one big nerve called the biggest nerve information being shared both ways. But also got can produce. Transmitters neurotransmitters to be honest with you. So for example, ninety percent of Serotonin. which is the happy hormone It really contributes to our mood to our energy levels to our focus. If you give someone a drug for depression you are affecting serotonin levels. and. Ninety percent of Serotonin is produced in the GOP. And it comes as no surprise that they have discovered a people who suffer with anxiety depression or other mood disturbances. have alteration or damage to their gut microbiome. In the follow up, is that we have studies that show us that for example, there's a randomized controlled study where they looked at implementing plant based Diet. And they found the in this randomized controlled study like very well controlled not not a population study epidemiology study. This was very controlled. That, when they gave people plant based Diet, there was improvement of their depression source. And so that would suggest that because reading plants. Is Affecting your gut microbiome anytime you eat plants you're affecting your like around, and when you do that, you have the ability to actually alter your mood and improve. Very cool. Okay now gut digestion and bloating. Gwen. Yeah. So we rely on our gut microbes to help us to process and digest our food specifically. Talking about fiber and complex carbohydrates, which are things that you find in plant foods. In the idea of like why this happened. As to do with human evolution. So or perhaps we should call it co evolution because we didn't evolve by ourselves evolved in concert in relationship. With these gut microbes, we did it together. And you know if you think about humans, we started been Africa and we read it we radiated out across the planet. And as we moved, we have found ourselves in all of these different ecosystems like you know you could be in a rainforest or desert or in the Arctic. All these different places that have. Different foliage. and. There are literally three hundred, thousand edible plants out there right now. So many lives are having like. The average American is w fifteen of them but there's literally three hundred thousand plants out there in our world right now. and. So we as humans as we radiated out across the globe, we needed ability to adapt to our environment. But we are not adaptable. For not, we're not very adaptable at all, but our gut microbes are incredibly adaptable. So like literally in twenty four hours. You will spawn. Fifty new generations. Of. Gut microbes. Are In one day fifty generations I mean. Humans take us back right now all the way to the pyramids. Happening on a daily basis so they're evolving universe. and talking. And we've already spawned a new generation of microbes in the time of you and I have been hanging out, they're busy. They're busy. They're dribbles. dribbles on. Steroids end. Or something. ANIME but they're they're they're constantly changing. The, they're constantly changed. This is part of what we're able to tap into where we want to enhance in optimized gut Wants to adapt our gut is that they constantly change and so but the point is they have the ability to adapt to whatever food we throw it. And so we learned to rely on them. For. Digestion. Some when it comes to processing. Fiber in. Complex. Carbohydrates. We personally don't have the enzymes to do it. Our Gut microbes do. And we need to be able to do it for us. and. If they struggle if they don't do it properly. That's wind blowing in gaffes discomfort. Distress. Those symptoms that people feel like they have food sensitivity in some people even refer to it as inflammation. That's what you experience. What's not inflammation there's not any evidence to suggest that it is information instead what it is. Is it's sloppy digestion. Because, we're gut microbes were not prepared for what you just sent down there. So this is the reason why we really we rely on them but at the same time we need to respect. Their space in with a means of this that we need to properly feed them so that they can stay strong and be capable of supporting us with whatever we want to do. Yeah and that also plays into cravings correct and they are actually telling us what we should be craving. That brings me to the next election, which is the GUT brain connection. So maybe we can get into that now. Yes They do they. They have a say in what we prefer and what they're trying to do is they're trying to enhance their own personal survival. So I'm here talking about these microbes that love fiber but guess what there's microbes though sugar. Is microbes a fat and they will try to work on you. To get you eat those things and if you're used to eating those things, then you're more likely to crave those things. But the good news. But it's kind of cool is that our taste buds can change. In that's because microbiome can change. and. So for me personally when I changed my diet, like I used to crave eating like rabbi stakes. Now look everybody steak unlike discussing. Really have no interest no interest at all I have no taste for it. And On the flip side I would have asked me ten years ago. Can you imagine yourself like craving salad back? What are you talking about? What is But now it's like that's what I want like from myself I want to sell it. And so So it's fascinating to consider the power that they have over our food choices. We talked about mood already but even our memory, our brain function the development of other neurologic conditions like Alzheimer's Parkinson's those things have all been connected back to our gut microbes and so the point is that once again we're proving. Is. When you want optimal bodily function, you know the Breen seems so far removed from the guy. But if you want optimal brain health. You start down there you start with the gut. Yet so fascinating and I love that you know it is your second brain. That's what people say all the time. I feel it in my gut and you literally do you can actually feel different things and all comes from the Gut because it is your second brain. and. It goes both ways you can have gut feelings and they can be a positive thing, but you can also express your stress. In your gut to is very commonplace for people when they when they get emotional when they get stressed that they start to have their digestive system get upset and there's actually an explanation for why that happens. So our breen releases this hormone called C. R. h. atropine releasing hormone. In CR age, it comes from the brain travels through the blood gets to the guy and actually induces despite. In so damages the GUT microbiome. So then you damage the gut microbiome. And As a result. You become less capable of producing all of these different neurotransmitters, short chain, fatty acids in the things that you need. To protect your mood. When you damaged the guy you end up affecting your mood in creating more stress creating more anxiety. which leads to more CR each release. It gets make officers cycle right and so you got to break out of the cycle and one of the ways that you can break free from that cycle or create a cycle that's to your benefit. is to actually feed the gut ends reverse the spouses. The power in the plants. And the fiber, of course. And and you can go even deeper talk about genetics the gut in gene expression. So. That's so wild this whole concept. The so when it comes to genetics. Okay it's weird even for me to acknowledge this and on a doctor, this is what I do but. It's very strange to consider that like if you look at the entirety of our genetic code. Less than one percent of our genetic code is actually human. More. Than Ninety nine percent of genetic code comes from these microbes. In Beyond that, they have the ability to control our genetic code. So, our code is not just like this like we honestly thought Julia when we when the When we first cracked human genetic code in the year two thousand. We honestly thought that we would have the roadmap map for human health that we would understand all of that. We would be able to predict who would have cancer heart disease but explain it all. And it hasn't worked hasn't worked in the reason why is because genetic code is not a blueprint Your genetic code is instead something that is malleable. It can be altered. It's like switches. So, it's like the wiring you know the electrical wiring in a house where you can flip the switch and you can turn on a light. Or you can flip the switch and turn it off and guess who's doing the flipping your gut microbes they have control over your genetic code. So. It's quite insane to consider the power that exists. there. And again empowering, right 'cause you could be. Everyone just kind of says, Oh, it's in my genes heart disease diabetes, whatever it may be but really yeah, it could be in your genes but you have the power to switch that with lifestyle changes and changing your microbiome. Got Nine Ninety nine percent of your genetic pool can be changed. You can trade it out and make it better. And so why not why not have sort of the you know in the same way that we think of leveling up in terms of contrition in the same way that we think about that in terms of our exercise. You know why not think about leveling up in terms year genetic code. And make yourself stronger. So, and then the way any way that you do that is with your gut microbes. This episode of radio is brought to you by by optimize irs enzymes are the workhorse of digestion break your food down into usable macro and micronutrients. Nearly everyone lacks digestive enzymes and that's why we suffer from digestive issues bloating indigestion and gas. You're not what you eat your what you digest, we lose enzymes as we age. So if you don't have enough enzymes, you might only be absorbing forty percent of the food that you're eating what a waste. There are two big problems here with the enzyme world. The first is that the most digestive enzymes are cheapened ineffective and the second is that most do not have enough pro tease for digesting healthy high protein diets. That's why I am so excited to tell you about the enzyme product called mass. Mass. symes is the most complex most potent digestive enzyme I have ever seen or. With over one hundred and two percent more petits. Than I think I'm pronouncing that right then your nearest competitor and three hundred to five hundred more per serving than most popular brands. That's critical. Because protein is the most complex macro nutrient breakdown. Nobody athlete was able to arrange the lowest pricing just for our audience and I guarantee it's the best deal available for this product with volume discounts combined with your accustomed ten percent off coupon code. No meet. You can save up to forty percents off select packs, packages of mass symes. That's an amazing value and the deal is only available at by optimizes dot com slash no meat. You won't find that on Amazon or anywhere else. The best part is if you don't feel how mass symes transforms your digestion, you can get a no questions. Asked me back return for your order for the fastest shipping Goto. BY OPTIMIZING DOT COM slash no meat that's be I optimize dot com slash no meat and use Coupon Code Novi Save up to forty percent off select packages. Okay. Now, how about the gut in weight maintenance and hormone imbalances wealth because they're kind of connected? Sure so We think things is being very much calories in versus calories out in if you could just get you know. If you could just control your calories, then you would have no problem losing weight Gosh. If. Only it was that simple. Know. Obviously, it's not because if it were that simple. Have a scenario where seventy five percent of Americans are overweight. Which is where we are right now. And so The reality is that we've discovered that your gut microbes are a critical player in this conversation. that the food that you eat is not just simply calories in that it's the food that you e coming into contact with your specific gut microbiome and how that's going to affect the food that you eat. So they've done studies where they take humans. Okay. Who are one will be obese and one will be skinny. And may actually do a poop transplant. Into mice. And so these mice one will receive the microbiome of human who's obese and one will receive microbiome of human that a skinny. Again like human microbiome going into a mouse, and then they feed these mice literally the exact same number of calories. And what ends up happening is that the mouse that received the obese microbiome becomes obese. And the one that received the skinny microbiome becomes skinny even though they're literally eating the number calories. So it's not just carries in carries out your guy it's like I think of it like swimming in the ocean. Swim in the current is behind you pushing you. Like another strong swimmer, but I can look like Michael Phelps out there. a human torpedo just like careening through the ocean yet. But when the oceans pushed against me and the current strong. Even if I am strong swimmer, I can get nowhere. I can hack away at ocean. And do my best and still be stuck. And that's what you see happening when you find people who. Can eat whatever they want and get away with it and still be skinny like down. Or on the flip side. The person who literally does everything right follows all the rules and can't lose the weight. Even though they're doing everything they've been told to do. and. So this is the role that the gut microbiome place and the just real quick on topic of hormones in similar fashion to gut microbes. Are, deeply intertwined with our hormones. And you know estrogen levels are affected by Gut microbes on androgen levels which are male sex hormones are affected by Gut microbes, and this is why in women you will find that damage to the Gut microbiome has been associated with endometriosis. POLYCYSTIC Ovary Syndrome And Mutual Hyperplasia. Multiple different types of cancer that are estrogen sensitive. So like for example, endometrial cancer ovarian cancer breast cancer. And in guys. So if you have, you know like for these guys are listening or for the women who have a guy in their life and you WanNa get guys attention. This is the most important thing about the with right now let's not. Your Gut microbes affect male sex hormones. And there's no surprise then that your gut microbes and damaged, your guy has been associated with the development of erectile dysfunction. You can tell a guy that he's GonNa get heart disease that he's going to get cancer that he's going to get diabetes he's not going to change any. But if he tell him the solution to rectal dysfunction, all of a sudden these super-motivated, he'll do whatever you tell the Pirka what? So. That's One of the reasons why that game changers scene was so popular, right? It's like. plant-based. Exactly yeah. Yeah but blood flow rate there is important to you, right. And what was important that's affected by as infected affected by. Again, going back to these metabolites, these things that are gut microbes produce would foes is affected by metabolites of these got microbes and at the same time also testosterone levels in being the fact that there's this one back through sentiment's been shown to be specifically associated with male sex hormones. How many of these microbes do you know the names of? What it would be really like. So there are they're wild names they sound like magic tricks. There's I mean there's literally they. They believe that there's up to potentially thirty six thousand different types of microbes that we have. And there's Certain microbes that are sort of like we all share call, those the keystone species species like basically the foundation. But then there's the parts that make us unique and so there's still a lot that we're learning I. Mean we're just starting to crack the surface of understanding what each one of these microbes does and how we can affect A. Sequoia. The whole other world down there. Okay. Well, that was a good fire round. Belong long-form fire. Relief. It was fire fibers fire, right? Secret. Code the Secret Code. So, let's take it back to where despite. Within. The actually starts and it starts from before were even borne. So can you maybe go through a lifetime of a typical person and the main culprits that we should be avoiding that could lead to despite within the church you know from the very beginning of our lives and also animal products do for the micro biota with. Okay. So. Are The reason why we say that despite a starts before you're even born is bad i. am of the belief that it's not just what mom eastern pregnancy, but it's even what mommies before pregnancy. Matters because ultimately. On Well and let me let me fully pack because there is there are some things to say about all this that I think are important for everyone understand sometimes people get a little bit upset when I talk about this stuff. just because they're like, oh my gosh, was need for my kid and we all get very sensitive. If it means the we know we have in some way affected our kid. But to volume pack this you know basically what happens is when a child is born, the child's passes through the birth canal MOMS Vagina and what's fascinating to. Is that the vagina has its own microbiome, which is separate from the Gut microbiome but we in pregnancy weight in pregnancy in the third trimester, the original microbiome actually starts to change and resemble mom's gut like revile is so weird to think about. Time in life that this happens the only time in life. That the vaginal microbiome stops being badgered like violent stars resembling the GUT microbiome. Is At this time late in the third trimester of pregnancy. And that's because the child passes through the birth control birth canal. and. It is the first like exposure of this child. To these microbes And so it's like Mom's gift to this child. And, of course, if we don't pass through the birth canal be opportunity for that exposure is you know potentially lost but I want people to understand that like you know both my kids were born by C. Section and they're totally healthy. You can have healthy children born by C. Section feel guilty if that's the case. It's more so to say that we should control what we can't control in c-section should be done when necessary but not win. It's unnecessary. So So the child passes through incomes into the world. And the food that we feed the child is milk. And what's really interesting to consider is that MOM's breast milk. Evolved with these things. That are not even. Like they're not even nutritious to the child's okay. So you basically mom's breast milk has these things that. Are. There specifically to feed the gut. Microbes. and. How that happened how we evolved. To have breast milk to feed the Gut microbes is just absolutely. I find to be fascinating. Okay. So. breastmilk feeds the Gut microbes because it contains prebiotics milk Ligo sack rides are these things in the breast milk that feed there's over two hundred varieties that we've identified so far of human milk lego sack rides. Feeding the Gut microbes, and so in the child's ultimately truces food typically around five or six months. In the solid food starts the way the foundation for the growth and expansion of the gut microbial within this child. And the these new food choices in the child's. Exposure to the world. You know putting everything into their mouth and all that kind of stuff. Basically, their gut microbiome grows and grows and grows. Until by the time they're two to three years of age. They have a fully formed adult size gut microbiome. So. Did a three years old and that's it. My son is three and he's as big of a microbiome do. So. and. If we disrupt that process whether it be by C. section or bottle feeding instead of breastfeeding. Antibiotics than what we in the finding is in all three of those cases c section. Feeding or antibiotics we find that there's an increased risk of metabolic issues that includes childhood obesity that includes the development of diabetes. We also finding increased risk of immune issues, immune confusion. So there's increased risk of things asthma seasonal allergies. Mom and also autoimmune disease further down the line including window. So. Again. If your child is born by C. Section, it doesn't mean that you have unhealthy child. It doesn't mean that they're going to develop these conditions. It just means that the likelihood or the risk is slightly higher, but you can raise your child could be perfectly healthy whether they're born by C. section whether they are bottle fed. Whatnot And it really starts with making sure that they're getting the right food from that early age of six months as they grow up. So and then. Basically. Come up and moving through the rest of wife you think about this transition through the rest of life. And what are the things in our life that can affect the health of our gut microbiome. Well. There's so many aspects. It's hard to cover all of them, but think about the food that we. seventy percent of the American diet is processed food. Guy So that's got chemicals got no fiber in its got chemicals that we like just introduced fairly recently. into the human diet. We have an excessive amount of animal consumption. So the average person in the United States eats more than their body weight in meet. On a yearly basis. we have gained on average in the US. Is Terrified. On average people have gained thirty pounds in the last forty years. Lee Us, Ma and yet we longtime. Lover. Longtime. That's a lot of weight. and. We continue to you know we were eating more than our body weight in meet. Forty years ago, and we are eating more than our body weight and meet today even though regaining more weight. So we have not disrupted this What I would describe as bad habit that we have is a culture. And and then what's leftover you now in terms of our diet is fiber from plants, fruits, vegetables, whole green seeds, nuts. But that only makes up about ten percent of the average American Diet. I can't imagine it's radically different candidates to be honest with you or Australia. Or the UK. We all are culturally quite similar. And you know. So if you think of the Gut. And there's the scale of balance. But we have is that on the side that feeds the good guys. There's only ten percent. On the side of the pizza inflammatory bad guys we have ninety percent the wait is all on one side. We need to flip that balance and if we flip that balance. You know look I personally in thriving on a Vegan Diet you are thriving on a Vegan Diet but. The people who are listening here to know meet athlete. It's not that there's only one way that you have to be in the strongest argument to be Vegan is the environment which we see what's going on out there right now. And it is the welfare of these animals which I think we all have compassionate, our heart, these animals. That's the strongest argument in terms of veganism. But if you WANNA talk about Healthier Gut microbiome, you're never going to have a healthy microbiome only ten percent is on the side. That's good. Ninety percents on the side. That's bad. This is by the flip and what we see in the blue zones is that ninety percent is on the side. That's good. Ninety percent is feeding the microbes, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, seeds, Semi Games, and in the blue zones most of them are not Vegan. But their consumption of animal products is nowhere near their body weight. Loss Center something. Ninety ninety five percent plant-based exactly. Exactly and then, and this is this is a healthy diet, and so there's different ways to approach diet and be healthy but the microbiome is teaching us that you need to put the weight on the side of the plants are very clear. So Anyway. So that's our diet, and then if you WANNA just Kinda zoom out for a moment to talk about what else think about medications that have been introduced like antibiotics and they're real anti-inflammatory drugs in birth control in steroids. Think about. Our lifestyle you know where? Like right now you and I are on these screens talking to each other these screens than exists for years ago. And Blue Light late in the evening I'm there like on my instagram account at ten thirty eleven o'clock at night like responding the comments and that affects my ability to get a good night's rest which affects my gut microbial. Working too hard, not spending time outdoors, not exercising far too sedentary television and video games and computers have really made those worse cars of things have made things worse for us. So you think about the way, the people with one hundred years ago. And the way that we live today. and. In just one hundred years, it's radically changed. Yeah. I those changes are bad for Okay. So now on the flip side. What can we do to help our GUT microbiome? You always talk about diversity of plants, of course, eat the rainbow to find pot of gold and like that and dishing animal products or at least minimizing. Vastly So maybe you can go over the habits changes people can make to help support gut diversity, and while you're at it, talk about short chain, fatty acids and making fiber sexy again, and as you eat this fiber, you get these cf C. S. C.. F. as short chain, fatty acids within your microbiome, which is which has gold. Oh absolutely this this is a story of empowerment. Frank this is the story of empowerment because the important thing is that you are not a victim. this is about education and understanding the biology of how our body works and using that that information. To inform your -tarian lifestyle choices so that you create a diet and lifestyle that heels. In when you do that when you have died in lifestyle their heels. Health becomes effortless. Because, you're just living your normal Tuesday life. Going to the home depot, the bed bath and beyond or whatever you're GONNA do. You're living your normal life, but because it's life that is built around. Healthy. Habits. You are empowering your gut microbes and you are shifting the balance in your favor so that they're there to heal you. and. You know it comes back to this. It starts with the connection between fiber. And these microchips we alluded to this earlier. Let's take a little bit of a deeper dive. When you consume fiber from diverse mix of plant foods. You are feeding as many of these different microbes as you can possibly feed. And they want to reward you, they want to thank you for feeding them. Because when they reward you, you feed them more. And so what happens is they consume the fiber and transform it into things like Buta rate. ACETATE impropriety. These other short chain, the acids. In nutrition and so funny to me because we spend all this time Mike per separating. Mike, you know living in fear of things collecting violates. Accolades in like whatever it is that people conjure up as the next new, food? Demon? And it's so silly. So silly because usually beans contain all these things and the longest lived populations on the planet beings. So it's Kinda stupid but. For wasting time on that stuff when we should be talking about chain, fatty acids, their the ultimate anti-inflammatory molecule the ultimate. And anti-inflammatory is important because he dog. Back there. Zach once out. Obviously. anti-inflammatory is critically important because we're living to an unprecedented age at this point. You know the average life expectancy in the US is about eight years and similar in Canada, and so with that level of life expectancy, we want low levels of inflammation. An anti inflammatory diet in anti-inflammatory lifestyle is what will keep a strong and healthy as we age and short chain. Fatty acids are the anti-inflammatory, the product of being anti-inflammatory the anti-inflammatory lifestyle. They directly reduce inflammation through the immune system, but if you were to zoom in on the God, they reversed despite. Healed the gut they empowered the good microbes they suppress the bad ones they actually patch up. Things like leaky gut fix that. They prevent cancer number to cause of cancer death in America they prevent it. They optimize immune system they are. They enhance our insulin sensitivity. Diabetes. The jump in the bloodstream they spread throughout the entire body have affects on all the different organs they go to. They affect the heart. We think that they reverse coronary artery disease or at least reverse in slow the progression of Atherosclerosis. Go to the brain. Actually repaired the blood brain barrier people to have. Brain fog. Brain fog some doctors don't acknowledge it. It's real brain fog is wiki brain just like people have wiki, you can get wiki brain. Thirteen fatty acids fix up. They also crossed the blood brain barrier, go into the brain and actually repair it directly repairing their runs actually preventing Alzheimer's disease. So what we have is the ultimate anti-inflammatory molecule. Something that is critically important to healthy aging. And human health. And it is the product of when fiber meets microbes. So yes Julia to answer questions. Sorry I'm kind of lost my mind and went crazy there by. When we when we want a healthy gut, we feed microbes. All right. We feed the microbes by being a diversity of different plants in our diet. We avoid sabotaging our guy. The way that we avoid sabotaging it is by not consuming an excessive amount of alcohol by not consuming red meat or other animal products. By avoiding saturated fat by the way that includes coconut oil coconut oil is extremely dense than saturated fat so we should be reasonable in tried to minimize that. That we when we choose antibiotics, we choose them because they are necessary. And we take them for the minimum duration that we need to in order to achieve the fact that we're looking for. So in. The last thing. So like optimize their diet trying to sabotage you're on the last thing is that there's all these other lifestyle factors. That can enhance the health of God that are not. It's not has nothing to do with your food is not your something where you need a fork. Instead, it's exercise. And Sleep. And observing, your circadian, rhythm which is your biorhythms meaning that you eat meals at the appropriate time potentially some. Having healthy relationships spending time outdoors. These are important factors that can play a role in optimizing your gut health, and when you do that, then you are going to be as strong as you can possibly be. Cuddling dogs. Any other good bacteria. I. Love It. It's all connected and. So for people out there that are struggling. they they feel like they can't eat anything without some kind of pain and they're being told to get on the elimination diet eliminate certain food groups. I love how you say train your gut like muscle and move away from the element elimination and towards abundance but it's all about brain back. Beastie boys reference. Going low and slow. That is the tempo. So. Can you elaborate on that too just just the fear around around. Certain. Food groups is Totally, the go like a muscle. A muscle, it's the I can't get away from this analogy, five years from now I'll probably still used this analogy because it's the best. Is it perfectly explains the way that your your gut works think of it like a muscle and so. What that means is that if this is a muscle what happens if you stop walking right Knee. And you stop walking what happens. Well. You won't feel pain in your knee. You're. GonNa. Grow weaker. And then you're gonNA gain. Weight. And then you're going to be metabolic dysfunctional have high blood pressure, cholesterol diabetes, and then you can have other medical issues. So when you hurt your knee no, one would ever stop walking. Instead, you rehab the knee. You build up the strength. You get it back. But like if you hurt your knee, you're not GonNa go and play basketball on right that would be excessive. Ridiculous. Instead. You start with the fundamentals and the basics and you eat your body into it as you rehab the person with damaged, Gut is like the person with a damaged knee? When you have damaged guy, you shouldn't avoid the foods we know that the number one predictor of healthy gut is the diversity of plants in your diet to avoid foods is to move in the opposite direction. And what ends up happening is your gut actually becomes weaker. So you think that you are helping may temporarily feel a little bit better because you're avoiding the food. But. Then what you find is that your food sensitivities get worse and worse and worse in your diet gets narrow narrow narrow narrow until there's nothing left. It doesn't work. Solution is paradoxically the opposite. The solution is abundance. And it really just starts with understanding that you need to exercise your gut. So if you have sensitivity what's safe to beans If, you, eliminate beans entirely. You're going to get worse and worse and worse over time at processing beans because you're not eating up. Right, your gut is getting weaker. If you take the beans new say. Yo. I'm just going to eat a Brazilian being five being shelley. Yeah, you do that. You are going to be miserable because that's way too much s conceptually the same as going to the gym. In trying to lift three hundred pounds on the first day of the year in the gym. WHOA. You didn't train for that when he doing, you would never do that. So how do we do? How do we? How do we rehab or how do we build strength when we're trying to? Work with muscle. You go each choose the appropriate not for you. You Internet. It's not. Super Small Right. In you ease your body into it. And then you come back next time you'll be a little bit stronger. End So, you can go up and do just a little bit more. Maybe. You start with to watch. And the next week it's three. We got that his five. Next thing you know a year has passed. And you're ripping off curls with thirty five pounds when you started to. Write. But to get, there is a process and we understand that process when it comes to exercise me to apply that same concept to the way that we have our gut. If you are sensitive to beans, you start super bowl. And you introduce a little bit more over time you get to the point where You have no restriction. You can eat as much as many beans you want and had the financially. Good. Yeah Awesome I also telling people to grab whatever at the grocery store that they've never tried and then bring it home, cook it up and introduce that new the new prebiotics from that amazing plant into their life because that's a really fun way to do it and it's a great way to just make sure you're getting all that variety and. All that you want to expand the you want to have. More. Variety within your life and another thing to do is like I literally at every single meal I'm just like. What can I do to kind of adjust this up a little bit? We can do that. So yes, sometimes it's Fresher For some of some into marriage places. Sometimes, it's like I'm just throw a whole bunch of the fridge and see what plans they got there go for NASA. A. Smoothie for example, this morning I did movie. But when I was like, you know what we berries, raspberries, blackberries, own knots, hemp seeds, boom all going on top. Nice. Yeah, how many plant does you have in your smoothly will? would have to help but I think it was probably like eight or nine. Perfect. I. Touched on just prebiotics but I think we could just get into that a little bet the prebiotics. probiotics versus post -biotics which a lot of people probably haven't even heard of post -biotics. He has maybe get into that and let let people know what that does to the microbiome. Yes. Oh. probiotics are what Matiba heard of and they're all the rage. You have people out there trying to convince that the only solution to got health is to take robotic. and I'll explain to you why does just stone cold on? Like that's just not that's just not the truth. And more recently returned to hear about prebiotics products are the food. For these gut microbes. Fiber is the main prebiotic. This entire time we've been talking about fiber that's what we want. We want were that. But what really matters at the end of the day? Is. Not The fiber. It's not the products. It's not the probiotics instead. Comes back to what happens when these two things together when prebiotics and probiotics mix. When you get is the ultimate which are the puts botox and you guys are hearing here I like all your friends maybe talking about probiotics prebiotics and you've come to the party it'd be like, yes, have you heard about post botox is that is the money that is the money. mind. We'll be was planned and this is what really matters. And so short chain. Fatty acids are an example of the post -biotics, and so again it's not it's not the products, not the product but what it is this formula prebiotics plus products equals put us. Botox. And when you observe a formula when you enhance the prebiotics than you're gonNA ultimately get what you want, which are these post politics at the end. And you know when we come back to probiotics moment. We each have unique go like Rod. Julia give you a product. What's actually what I'm doing is I'm giving you a generic capsule with some formula of microbes and you're gonNA, take that and your incidents going to mix with your unique gut microbes but there's no one on the planet with Liquor Bombings Hugh? It's it's completely individual. And that probiotic is like we're just at best crossing our fingers and hoping. That the mix that's generic mix it's going to work together with your gut microbes that are inherent in a mate to you. To produce some sort of health benefit. This is why they don't work many times, but the flip side is that. What you do have. Is I know living inside of you. You already have products. That are already there. So why would i? Why would I feel motivated to introduce? PROBIOTICS THAT ARE NOT YOURS When I could just feed the ones you already have. And make apply those. Exactly build them up, build up your innate unique microbiome, and the way that you do that is with the food choices that you make. And when successful than you have this broad that bursts getting back to the bio diverse microbial. Resilient and it's cranking of. Yeah. So eat plants with fiber, which are prebiotics and diversifier. And if say someone has gone through an antibiotics round, what is your advice to that I know that you say don't take probiotics while you're on antibiotics, which is kind of a new idea, right? Afterwards continue to the plants possibly take probiotics to help strengthen during that time of. But don't just rely on probiotics for everything unless you're. Robotics. This is going to shock a lot of people even potentially some doctors but there was a study that was published two years ago in the Journal cell out of the Weizman Institute which is in Israel, and basically the study showed convincingly. That when you take a an antibiotic. And the chase it with a probiotic. You actually slow the recovery of the microphone. After that antibiotic, she slow down the recovery process. So I don't treat my patients were on antibiotics with products anymore I used to. I don't anymore. So now what I do instead. Is I followed the same rules that I do when trying to heal a got and just double and triple down on those same rules. So what that means is that Number one feed the good guys. Sydow a diverse plant based diet is the ideal diet to feed the goodguys. Number two do not sabotage your gut. Now is not the time for saturated fat from animal products. Now is not the time for sugar. Where for processed foods OR FOR ALCOHOL Okay. So don't sabotage your recovery. In. Number three, take advantage of the opportunities that exist to strengthen your gut without even lifting a fork. Get a good night's rest. Do some exercise. Spend some time outdoors spend time with people that you love do all those things and when you do this, these rules that are designed to enhance optimize your gut microbiome, they will work in your favor. So the recovery is very quick and get you back on track. Perfect. LOVAT. And again, just practical info from Dr Be. Make it easy. And, yeah, you aren't you really simplifying a complicated topic and letting the world know about it. So thank you for everything that you're doing as a big picture thought I think that we should leave everyone with this amazing idea and the sciences backing this now that we are literally all one. Are microbiome is that's ecosystem within us but we are a part of the ecosystem of the world and earth and it's really really awesome to think that you know humans, plants, animals, all of us are all interconnected just like the microbiome is those little microbes within our microbiome us on the planet it is all one big ecosystem. Pretty Cool and you have so much more in your book that we could go over. But we're running out of time now and I could definitely talk for another couple of hours with you. But you have something called F goals and maybe on dot plans, we can do a little Dr BS, food recommendations and acronym F goals that used to remember that an elite people with that. So they have to get the book. and Ya, he'll their gotten intern heal themselves. Absolutely So. Thank you again for having on such a privilege. It's kind of on. It is a surreal in a way to come on the no meat athlete because I was listening listening to this podcast years ago as almost making the transition myself towards the plant based Diet. So it's really cool. 'cause I never thought that I would be like this person here being interviewed I've always been the consumer and. So Yeah pretty cool. So to this is one of my my one podcast I would always listened to you know we. got. Nice Duggan that. Who WanNa connect you can definitely find the on instagram at the health. You can find me on facebook under the same, the the health home, the come to my website, which is the plant, Fed Gut, dot com I have tons of free resources there. Any email is the people love breakdowns of studies when they come out like whenever there's breaking news in the health space boom off shoot off an email to you guys. My book is called fiber field. Is Eleven Health Program So again, this is my passion project and I'm super excited Julia is I recently launched? Of course? Yes. Course San. Completely online seven week course with me. There are parts that are videos. There's a workbook there are live QNA's There's a private facebook group. Basically people are in there right now and they are loving it. I'm getting amazing feedback actually Beta tested the course twice in the past and had amazing results with those people too. So the bottom line is that I'm really excited about what this course is bringing to the table for people who are serious about reversing spouses enhancing their gut microbiome. Change in the world does the Real Dr J.. And on Instagram to people definitely have to follow your own sharing, such amazing sharable stuff and. Also testimonials from people taking the course right now and changing their lives. So definitely check him out on ground here. Thanks Dr to be that was great. Thank you.

GUT Julia Amazon Instagram Stumm Gut Human Health autoimmune disease Mike United States diabetes C. Section UNC irs Johnny Marr Gout bloating
The Career Musician Ep. 51: Managing Your B(r)and with Xander Smith & Baron Grafft

Rock N Roll Archaeology

1:53:30 hr | 6 months ago

The Career Musician Ep. 51: Managing Your B(r)and with Xander Smith & Baron Grafft

"You're listening to the career musician podcast with Creator and host. No Mad with twenty plus years of experience in the music industry nomad has done just about everything to earn a living as a career musician from being music director to celebrity artists, playing iconic arenas and stadiums, composing for film and TV, and even playing your average local club gigs. He's done at all. All nomads mission is to empower musicians across the globe with strategies for a sustainable career while blasting stereotypes and to bring you tried and true wisdom from his colleagues in this crazy business, we call music welcome to another episode of the Korean musician podcast with guest Zander, Smith and his good buddy baron graft now zander as a guitarist he has played with. Or written with Linda Perry the Runaways Dee Dee Ramone Adam Lambert Steve Perry George lintz Lisa Loeb and herb alpert. The list goes on from there. In addition, he's got one of those right and left brain things going on, so he's really good at logistics and he loves managing things, so he started managing herb alpert spent. Yes, that's right herb. Alpert of the famed am records now barren graft is the guy who connected Zander, myself and barren is in sales and I always. Always say there's a lot of sales that goes into being a musician, because basically you have to sell your skill set to the client I. Love these words of wisdom by Zander. Be where you say you're going to be when you say you're going to be there and be on time with a good attitude. Look, that is the basic ammo of any career musician. That's rule number. One will check out this episode with Zander and barren right here. The career musician podcast. Zander Smith welcome to no man's place studios. Guests of course, thanks for having me now run run run so I just made a faux. PAS and call Zander Ryan. That's okay I basically am right. That would be the way I like it I. Like it seriously. I really appreciate it and things that I have to say right. The ramones would do that. See they don't go I have to say right off the Bat I could tell you where a career musician. Why is that well because the way you answered my? And now not only can I sell you accrue musician, but I tell you were in some form of management. Because you actually responded to each question discussion topic in my email Oh. Yeah! I was like okay. This cat knows what he's doing right. You know I love that and number two. When you came here today to the studio. You just have all your things together you just I could tell you a road cat from pass I'm sure you're studio cat, too, but I can tell you experience in both lanes well. Okay got it shows. I love a lot of hard work. I love it right exactly and a lot of people take it for granted hard work. It takes right. Yeah, yeah, so okay. Let's start from the beginning. Yeah, tell me about yourself. Where from I'm sure as my listeners know, and you can tell I'm an east coaster in east coast for sure. Tell me about you. Okay well, I'm rarity I'm born. Los Angeles California Oh man. You are the real deal. You're an anomaly. A Unicorn. Yes, born not only that, but born right there at the end of Pico. In Santa Monica California right on the beach there wow so early seventies. was born here and And, then my parents moved out. To Phoenix Arizona when I was in grade school and the reason that plays into the story wouldn't be that interesting, but it really did shape. How I did how quickly or slowly I got involved in music so in the early days. My Mom's a Hippie is records everywhere. I'm not iskoe Straight Square kid. That doesn't know anything about music till high school I mean day wind. My mom is is like here's a guitar. Here's Neil. Young yeah, get this going I. Bet you when you were in the womb. She was plan. All kinds of stuff to the only moved out to California from Detroit. Because, of the Mamas and Papas and all that whole set sixty stuff hippy stuff, so so it's all around. It's everywhere, my dad. Gifted musician, my grandfather, who I was named after a professional musician in in Austria and Bulgarian all around Europe. I mean like orchestra leader had his own radio station found some sheet music when my dad passed the whole deal. That's cool viola player. That's really cool. Grandmother Concert Pianist, so music's around everywhere. Okay right, and so that's that's that, but we move out of southern California to Phoenix which is very different scene total. Total culture shock for me as a kid I've already got longish hair I already know how to play Beatles songs, and dear prudence by time six seven, and then I'm in Phoenix, which was interesting, so it kind of in a weird way sort of slowed me down in that the only thing in Phoenix is heavy metal thing in country music in fact. I just did a GIG out in Phoenix about a month ago and turn on the same radio station is playing the same ten songs that they were nine, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty two. I. I turn on its Scorpions. It Sammy Hagar. It's hard. Rock and heavy metal hit into us a whole side tangent because I, wonder how the hell do we still have the same play lists for forty fifty years or more it's. A little slow. Yeah, they got their lane and they know their listenership and they don't want to veer from. A everything. Is Niche specific today with music? Anyway so what happened was were maybe somebody on the coasts. Or the big cities might get introduced to a bigger spectrum of music earlier. Kind of slowed me down, my my dad's only listening to weather report. He's only listened to jazz and that's heavy man. Right doesn't like pop music at all. Not Interested. My Mom Hippie rock all day long. So I've got these influences in these records, but nobody knew so I'm missing out on things that are coming out in the early eighties. I'm totally missing out on new wave and PUNK rock. Okay, and all this stuff so i. get you know so. My roots are basically classic rock, so I got all those chops so when I pick up the guitar. I'm learning. Electric Guitar Judas Priest's I'm listening Beatles I'm listening all these classic rock bands and I've got that DNA but then when we moved back here, none of my friends listen to that at all so I go into the closet. As far as Mark Classic Rock. Roots because if you're living in LA. Okay in the eighties. It's. Progress Jane's Addiction. It's the year it's the smiths. It's on the outer edge. Then see I wasn't. I don't know I'm not from here. Yes, got you know I'm like what? What's happening here so and I got to go in the closet. Rock roots because my friends are like depeche mode when you mean you're listening to. That is the new rock and roll ammo. And that's what I said the on like. Wait a minute first of all I can tell that you're a career musician. Because you handled email so nicely, he answered all of the discussion topics. One by one I was very impressed. And then he just showed up. You know before on time which I always say on time is late. Early is on time. You know so listen. Richards can quit smoking. You and I can show up on time podcast there you go i. mean if we want to stay in the game. We need every edge. Possibly see that wait. There's so much weight in that statement. You just made stayed in the game. Okay? We're GONNA. Get to that. We're GONNA get all right nine. Beginning, but you're talking about this punk post. Something what I'm saying is I. Don't know this is even happening right, but it is intrinsic. Till I see a kid I'm late in the game on this although I, got a deep knowledge of our parents music. And what we call Classic Rock, which was also big in. We'll say the flyover states and stuff. But the but the peers I'm about to go up against for gigs are way ahead of me as far as alternative. WHAT WOULD BE PRE alternative new wave and PUNK ROCK MUSIC? which would shape the way you know guitar playing it so I'm sitting there and I'm learning diver down. I'm eleven, twelve and I'm I'm getting close learning. All the you know wasn't an easy album. Because use a lot of weird effects, a lot of weird effects. He wasn't in keyboards yet. Underrated van Halen album for that reason faves. Delays stuff doing come on. People hate dancing in the streets right best, but what is what's that music? Okay! Chalet you tell me what's happening. Exactly what the what the third out! Yeah! Figure it out so keyboards clever. It's you're GONNA. Take a motown. Sorry, yeah, crazy south! David's do of course he's doing. In yeah, that's fine, but that's why they made such a great team. I love that records lead to. Give me some. But living in Phoenix I don't know that that's just the diver down symbol. That's all that is. This is a diver thrive around Redondo beach. Any you see that sign everywhere. That's what. You're not gonNA seniors on so I'm confused, right? Anyway I get here. With all these chops, and I pick up a guitar magazine. The Guitar was called car, and I'm looking through it, and it's talking about Johnny Marr Oh. Yeah okay. I don't know anything about Johnny There's no myth happened in Phoenix. It's it's it's the red rocker man at Sammy Hagar. All Day long out. There is also an interesting difference between. I would imagine being a musician at that time I'm using now is there's no internet? Yeah, yeah, there's no. Cure exposure was so much more limited geographically right. What was popular where you were big? We had one kid my job is. who showed up in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty four. Okay with with Doc Martens Skinny Hispanic Kid. Shaves on the side. Mohawk, ask. All in black. and. He was the coolest weirdest kid in school and a guitar player, and just to tell you how how not hip? Rows live in Phoenix. He had just he played us. The first single off the new you to record, which would be the Joshua, tree. Five epic at Pant, it was it was with or without you. which is as bad as wonderful, but as tame as you get, we're not talking sex pistols here right, but he's like he pitched it. As if this is going to change music, check out. This is youtube there from Ireland. Did in it did. was. It wasn't if you were that kid in in in Chicago New Yorker La. Did Not. Let me play you early. ECHO on the Bunyamin. Let me play you Roxy Music. Let me put. You're not going play. Check this out right. Tober something early to that's that's his out is we could even get? Was that one kid at it? Shout out to my Chavez. Where he's at you, guys keep in by the way. I never saw him again, but he had a little band called technical difficulties in his title song was. I said that sounds great high guitar part. He wasn't even a Youtube Fan. You know who is a fan of the alarm. Remember that banned the alarm. wails, who was a youtube sounding kind of bent? But maybe we don't know. Maybe you to was an alarm sounding. Bam you know you never know Oh of course you. I was just GonNa. Say No, no, you don't know. The Orange Tower gives you man I'm saying that's I'm tower records. He's referring to of you. Don't know Google babies so okay, so that's the deal so that so when I get back here. Some read this magazine with Johnny Marr. He's talking about. He's talking about the the Alternative Guitar Solo. He's talking about. No Hammer runs no this like. Here's here's the alternative guitar. Approach to guitar playing and I'm like this guy I mean. There's no lead in this thing what's going on later on to find out that wow I mean the Smith. Is really something that's abandoned taking I mean. Other than the doors. I don't know what other ban is is in its own lane where it's like you came in. Describe what music they play. You've got this weird poet singer. That's not really even singing. Totally on top of this mix of rockabilly and like. Chord changes in the sounds and the effects that Johnny Mars doing. It blew my. It totally changed me because when I held that up against Van Halen or Shankar, any of the heavy metal guys who? Are Amazing I was like. This is an interesting approach. Right Guitar, talk about so then I just had like just had this back and forth dilemma for really the rest of my career I love. That is probably why I think. It's why I am not. Known or more successful is because I lived in the gray area because I. I just can't stay in a lane because you need with us what we talked about you. If you WANNA, get you gotta come it. In a lane and that's and you've got to push push push at that. Look this thing and mid forties I'm just now committing to that. I'm starting to buckle down and really commit to that so I mean I'm just. Testifying to the fact that you're preaching all year, so okay excuses I get and I'm happy that this happened, but I think when we decide early on in our lives that we are going to pursue. A career. Most times we are the town. The raw talent is there and most times. We Love Everything Jeb, so it really is hard to commit. It's not our fault, quote, unquote and again. I'm not like. You said I'm not complaining. We're not sorry. Paint a picture of us, not that at all, but because your taste were so diverse I think what happens from the guys I've talked to and gals that you know. They've all, said a similar enemy, which is the end of the day if you're if you WANNA be in show business, you need a paycheck right, and and it chooses you so if you get signed. Or you get a Gig playing guitar with someone or whatever it is, and it's paying your bills which you know when you're fifteen thinkable right? Just shut up and go with and especially when it happens, you look so excited, and it defines the lane, and that's why Z. later on these side projects and stuff if you talk to if you talk to Johnny Marr. You'll know that he was a hard rock guy. And they like me in probably like some other people. That's why he had those jobs disguised, but Joe. Moss, who found Morrissey? In Drag Queen Bar Wearing. Fruit on his head, doing lip synching right in the late seventies up there in Manchester. He knew this guy. This guy put a lot of Manchester bands. The other he looked at this guy's a duck star period he'd is has a stage prison sick and he had Johnny Marr. WHO's listening to slade in a lot of seventies, hard rock, smart, hard rock bands, and all these bands sweet slade. Wow, man, who's seeing the sex pistols. He seen the clash. He sees that movement going on, want to be part of it, but has the chops from before and Jomaa says listen I. got you needed to lead singer? Let me take you to meet this guy. And Johnny, Marr walks in and says. No Way. Transpired kidding me. That's my series, says he's a star and you're listening. You're eighteen nineteen. Whatever you got the chops. We got rough trade interested, which is going to go upstream to see more Stein, so you're gonNA. Be A SIRBU Their trajectory was a sire was the pretenders. Donna like he was way ahead of the curve on all of these pants, and there were so many more, and isn't that. Wouldn't that be post? PUNK slash new way with the whole. Even that was probably a bummer or not. What Johnny Marr shooting for you know. Johnny did really well so. Johnny was like. All Right, whatever in in your kind of like in this thing but I'm telling you. I'm telling you if he if he left his own devices, you might have seen different guitar deference in fact Robert. Smith's Robert Smith married his high school sweetheart. Okay, he's been with her forever in her brother was in when the cure went from three to four or five guys, he's. He was in the band for all the eighties. And he was a shredder. And it killed. Robert Smith, but he couldn't kick him out of the ban because this. Is sister was his wife. And if you listen, can you imagine that Barron? Listen to kiss me, kiss me, kiss me, which is the album that kind of them turn them into potential. Arena, Ban people don't realize is the cure played the Rosebowl here right when they did the wish tour and that's that's big huge. That's huge for alternative bands today were. That's so funny, so you listen to kiss me, kiss me and you listen to some of the songs alternative! I can show you. It sounds as it's fading down as we used to fade right here. Where you just a little bit la La. Couldn't get him out in time. Poke through. Awesome, okay, I feel like we need to reintroduction. First of all I had no idea that you were such the music historian, so I can't wait to your more all right, so we have zander Smith here. WHO's telling us this story and this this this? Little Tangent came about because I just asked you about where you're from and your influences, which is perfect, because again as you stated earlier, you're. You're all over the place. Your tastes are so diverse, so you really showed us that I love that now. Introducing bearing graft sitting right next to you, of course now we so so barren, although is not a career musician. Music is probably one of the biggest aficionados I know, and I know you from our daughters. We've known each other Jeez. I mean what you're. Like years now. Burbank DADS group over here. Dad's grew all around the culver. City Burbank the same. So now we know a little bit about US andor. Let's talk about how you guys cross paths a met and why you say so tight. Yeah! It's just it's just a very weird confluence of events we met through. Friends I found out. He has a band I'm really into I. Mean what he calls or parents music like that's always been a lion music right, and so when he and I start tall. You're in a band. We start talking about music and it's just. It just becomes this like it just feels like an ongoing tenure conversation about music, because when we even if we haven't seen each other for a while, one of us are called the other one. Into each other's Oh. Hey, I heard this. Hey, wouldn't about s and and we're not talking about like this album. That just came out. It's always like Oh. Hey, I heard this the other day. We're talking about like led Zeppelin album for many years ago or whatever it might be one of my favorite one of my favorite tangents that we've gone on is. We've got this very weird thing around the song Jesse's girl by Rick. Springfield little frequent love that song. It's crazy. Most Classic Guitar riffs ever, and it just shows up out of nowhere. Complete Jesse's role is not like for me. Jessie girls. It's not like life changing the to me. There's nothing that music that you go. Wow, like what you're talking about like. Oh music changed effort. That's not it just like occasionally resurfaces for you. Just the others that good saw stealing rotation on the on the radio also Xm shows up all the time, and so now whenever we hear Jesse's girl, the phone give you call. Universal wants me to call Zander. The real reason that's okay. What would you call alert alarm? On Yeah I. GotTa Call My Buddy Yeah Yeah I love that said I'll have something to say about whatever he calls me. Oh Gotcha so it started with A. What do you think about Jesse's girl right? Listen I've a really low bar to make an impression on me about music. I mean I'm just I love I. Love Seen Anyone. And do it. Yeah, you don't have to made it. But you know I agree even at a level like Jesse's grow. It made an impression. I remember I'm old up seeing him do that. Song on American Bandstand, I remember that day, and they were a power trio and gave him. Credit is whatever the hipsters want to say about Rick Springfield. Whatever I remember going because player, yeah, and that for trio they're delivering right now for a trio to hold up that kind of a tune because that's not a simple tune, it's complex. But it sounds simple. Average listener thinks he's just sitting in the silly song so many little intricacies with the riffs and the harmonies, and the counterpoint between the vocal and the rift, so in something that you might not know as a musician when especially when you're playing an instrument and singing I can't even imagine how drummers do it, but even guitar. To play certain rhythms, syncopated rhythms on guitar, and then seeing a totally different rhythm. That's one of the hardest things to learn it. Wouldn't you agree absolutely so a simple pop song like that? That's what's going on. For, those who might not be? Here for Rick Okay all right so so right Detroit family. You grew up here in La. The Arizona came back here. You originally are from. Missouri Yeah and what brought you out? West I moved out West. In Two thousand I was chasing acting career. That never really got off the ground. You never told me that you didn't know that. Yeah, that's what really brought me out here so I had a background in theatre and tech theater and I was thinking like. Oh go out there. It was kind of funny because I was deciding between New York and La and having lived through like. Twenty three Missouri winners was like I want nothing to do with the winner anymore. but it really was just like total flip of the coin. Gone either direction and I wound up coming out here and like that didn't work out, but then. I mean apologies to anybody listening in the flyover states. You grew up in rural. House by the way. You're smart. In Los Angeles. It's like why why would I go back? I get it, but then we get to this age. We want to go back. Give me a fly over state. This of course in quality of life in peacefulness and I. You, know I mean. Let's face it. The hustle and La's hard. What Line of work? No matter what? It is just driving over here, right? That's all we talked about. Right, but just driving over here from Culver City on me, I checked it. It was a total breeze. Who Wasn't one stop? It took thirty minutes twenty five minutes or so how? Does tacos to your door. Okay, and when I got here, you shouldn't have to feel like. Like it was Christmas morning. I got here. At twelve thirty in the afternoon with no traffic I was like. These which? was wanted to get back on the. Map allows before the cars, but I mean just to be clear and anybody listening to this. From Los Angeles I want I, WanNa. Make this point like this is how I feel like you always hear. People complain about the traffic in La because that's literally the only thing to complain about what? The weather is amazing, but. You WanNa do you could do? You do the beach you could do this. You can say Hollywood you all on the same day. If you want, but let's talk about the big giant pink elephant in the room because it's freaking me out, the big one is on its way, and they say it's not a matter of win. It's. Not a matter, if it's a matter of when, but where are you going to go that? You'RE NOT GONNA. Have a natural disaster I grew up with tornadoes. My sister lives in Florida. My buddies their natural just how to giant Tornado. Hurricanes in Florida and New York, but but New York really cold weather I don't think there's any natural. Well of course. The power grid. The sea level rising you're. Destroying the planet so I. Think Yeah, exactly there's all that's going to happen, and there's only one deciding factor for me where I live, is it? Mosquitoes. Just serious just can't hang. And that's why I'm here. Is it? That's? The only thing I liked everything. I have to live somewhere where there's no mosquitoes done. I like the fact that that's your reason, but I also like the fact that Mosquitos are here in la, but not quite as bad as other. Not like Missouri. Not like music. Where Minnesota's. We don't have the humidity me. Tell you the Swansea's. We did a GIG when ban way back when we were out in South Carolina. Can. This great gig was on this military base one of those where they pay for the whole thing. I don't know why we're doing the show. Off, we flew out there and the guy lived off of a golf course he had a huge ranch house or the big picture window. Everyone had their own bedroom. It was gorgeous. I always wake up early. either a runner Wall Lauren. I saw the line. Cheers and I was like. What am I doing inside? The guys are all passed out because musicians. I walk out there. I'm getting in that launch. I'm lemonade. And they sat down and ten minutes later I was was like Viet. Cong everywhere Vida. What is that he right now? That ran back inside bites ever. Noon I knew about Mosquitos like Oh. Yeah, you want to hear about Mosquitos let me tell you about minister of you gotTa. Let me tell you about it in. You got a point. That's it I'll I'll even take a ice and. They're brutal. I Want I want to ask you a question, though because you mentioned something, that kind of is something I've always kinda wondered about. Is You mentioned like at an early age? You realize I'm into music I to do. So I'm I'm I've always been curious like. What is there a moment? Is there something that occurred for either one of you guys or is it just like a feeling that develops what what was it that happened that you go not only like I like playing music, but like I'm really going to go after this I'm going to go all chips in and push and try to make this happen. have good analogy. I'll keep mine short. When did you find out that you liked girls? See. There's no one point that had happy said you didn't wake up one day. Say Oh, my God I like girls and then Oh, my Gosh! I have a crush on this one. Oh my Gosh! I'm fact infatuated with the opposite sex. It didn't happen just instantly. It's just something that kind of. Just inside, it just felt like it was. Develops all of a sudden you more aware of it? That's how I describe it. I don't know if you agree with that, but. Well the answers to one is the creative in one. Is the business side right right because now everybody that plays an instrument. Yeah, that's what I'm curious. Okay. That's different is is on on the the Jon Bon Jovi train right into the like. I'm going to sweep up to us I'm going to do everything castle where whatever you tell me to play whatever style I need to do to make it to be a business right, and that's a fortunately or unfortunately, my story, which is eclipsed my whole adult life. Early on and it hit me early on. In the beginning, when I'm six seven eight years old in my parents, friends around like I said they're all hippies and his music everywhere all the time and I hear certain things I'm not sure which one, but I remember the white album as being something. 'cause you hear these early Beatles things. I heard the wide open. I knew right away. It was more sophisticated, and there was a lot of territory being covered, and I picked up a three quarter size guitar in and figured out dear prudence no. And I was like Oh. Wait a minute I could see all the colors here and I had a you know an affinity for and I was able to get closer to inside that music. I was like okay. This is something that I is special for me I'm good, you know. Maybe it might be different sports. Whatever someone else? Whereas okay, this could help to be part of my identity and also. Bring me pleasure I really try this medically, so I was a music. Ed from the beginning, but I don't know why. At nine ten I'm like I should get a band together. Yeah, right and not a band together just as you say just to get girls road, but it just seemed like we're gonNA ising. In trying to put that in. Became important to me. And that gut intuition that you can't deny air. Let me tell you. If. You're ever in a ban with me. Until I grew up some fucking asshole. Leave me alone, dude, I just WanNa think what's the deal? Where's the beer? Where's the beer coupons? Or whatever like I was wondering so intense about? Because if you were of course, you have to fifth grade with me. When we enter the car tests the talent contest. We were winning. And we were trying to decide between an REO song back in black, which when we were gonNA play, and the only reason you were in a band with me was because you played you play drums in the marching band and you. Your brother owned obeys like I was making you I was. You're going to be this? You're going to be that we were in. We're having banned practices at my house that was happening at ten ten and eleven. These guys were like. Can we go? We go ride motocross and what is? You don't understand. Wait till we get wait till we witnessed the steak me for this is to do the same thing we rehearse in the garage or the basement up in new. York every Saturday. We will do an eight hour hersal I make the guys bring a bag lunch. Guys, thanks! Guys were not hanging at the seven eleven or the pizza joint down the street. Bring a freaking bag lunch which we gotta work I was the same way so look. You were born leader, and I think that's the other part of it. That's where the business meets the creative right, so if you're a leader, right? If you're born leader, I mean and I don't mean sound pompous off. It's you have this quality in you that you can organize people, and you can rally the troops and motivate them and really steer your your team toward that goal right that unified goal. What's interesting though is that a lot there are. I say a lot, but there are many kids that might have this tendency, right? But But. Why is it? It is not a good mix. If you'RE GONNA mix it with musicians, and like creative types I think they don't WanNa. Be Boston they WANNA be is right I. Mean if you're reese witherspoon mood, right and you want it in your speech and debate. You've got you got it together or you WANNA be your year like a Koby Young Kobe Bryant. Like on soccer baseball like come on, guys, let's rally. Set Up to be organized. That's how to be successful whereas I mean, we're dealing loser. You're right. It's such a weird thing to be so it's kind of a kind of a of a bummer to be that guy, but at the same time. I I just need the guy that what you gotta do. And as you start to see success, you know and it starts working out in some kids. Drop off with some kids job line there like women. You, you're getting paid for this or played the school dance. I WanNa play the school Dan Right because all the girls. Care that I'm planning school. You know I started all of a sudden like people started coming around me because they saw an opportunity. And I think when. I let me clarify when I'm saying about. When did you find out you knew you like the opposite sex or whatever it is same sex, whomever order you'd like somebody. I'm saying that same feeling that happens. That wasn't my motivation. It's the same feeling, so it's the same thing that just kind of evolves over time. Yeah I always equated is like it. It doesn't feel like something. I have to learn right. I just know how to do and I think that goes back to what you were saying. Yeah, yeah, but I guess what I'm curious about is like what? When is the moment where you're like? I'm going to do this as a job because. There with. You know whatever else you want to put act or whatever else you put out there like. Becoming an uber famous musician I mean you're. You're looking at the same kind of odds? Group as Kids together and you go one is going to be. You know you'd have to get pretty big group of kids. Tell, you about the you're right. You know the one part of my plan. It didn't work out in that I. Don't know if you WANNA, call denial. Misinformed or whatever, but there were so few kids that were that committed that early on. Doing music that I thought it was a natural conclusion I did not know that the odds were that bad right i. read about the one that like I, said the only reason he jon Bon Jovi is everyone's like looking at whatever's going on with their career, and how many records itself but I'm looking for myself in those articles. I'm looking for the fact that he didn't just wasn't born famous or they just discover him in Schweppes department store. Sweeping the studio in order to get free studio time in the middle of the night to do the demos so that he could play for the guy that might give him a chance to the. Rejected that the average kid that's right, not average in his ambition. Or abilities but averages numbers. Has. There's a there's a trajectory that the Horatio Alger thing that it is possible you know, and so I was like. Oh, I'm the one weird kid in Phoenix that is like playing guitar all day long instead of running around not Jason Girls, hanging out at the mall and I'm missing around. That's what I'm doing, so any kid that does that whatever they do. They're going to be practice practice practice Carnegie. Hall is definitely the inconclusive. That's right. You know I didn't know that that was like you know I guess my story is a little bit like. The beauty queen right that gets on the bus. As the most attractive Prom Queen was in school in Topeka and the flyover or in the way, and then gets to La is like Oh. You're blind. I'm not only one man. Here in like and I'm in the dorm at UCLA. and. In the girl I'm like seventeen and the girl. That's two doors down from me. All of a sudden comes out of her dormant. She's head to toe like dress like a video like I'm like I'm still seventeen trying to figure out how to pass my classes near ahead of myself, and she looks like a modern like stilettos in the hair. Why what's going? How are you like ten years older? How do you how does even happen? She was like. Oh, I'm going on a day. I'll see you later and she walks down to the lobby of the door and it's Paul Gilbert picking her up. Oh my gosh. Right love Paul Gilbert. Grape guard player, great guitar player Vinyl Them One of the original shredders. Yeah, one of the original. Shredding and and. And the thing is is a medicine here and he's a really nice guy. You know. Oh, he's a sweetheart that who knows how old he was at that time He. It actually is the eighties. It's not it's not a Halloween party. This is happening in real time here. Mental is huge I'm five miles from the sunset strip, but I'm also seventeen and I just lived in Phoenix. So I'm still I'm seeing went to UCLA. Yeah, okay, so I was like what is happening. How that happens? That's a real person you had. Your date like totally. Like what it well you know. How did you get there? From Phoenix to Ucla and what did you major in? Will I was in I was in Phoenix for grade, school and part of high school, and I gotTa I. GotTa Get Outta here yeah. I gotTa go play Guitar. I gotta get back to California, so we moved back. I convinced my mom to take a job. Never remember. My mom is gunning for me to be this rock and roll. She's as part of it. Yes, she isn't. She's told her I was I was doing well in high school I said I might want to be a lawyer or a doctor. Just because I like to study, believe it or night and she started crying. She was like Whoa Neil Young. We had a deal like. Not Kidding for real. That's great. I was so disappointed as the offices so inches. What college you got to get in the band so anyway? She moved back. Here got a job so I could get residency afford it. I got into UCLA. Detainee ATTENTION UCLA because I was like this is just holding me back. I gotTA get out there. You know so going to school in trying to get through as quickly as possible, but you know getting in a car, my buddy's car whatever and heading out in the late eighties. Zing, what's going on I I played desires. You know before switched over I saw bill bizarre, and if you ever see decline of Western civilization part two, which is terrible. Do you! Have you heard of these movies now? No, okay, so decline of Western civilization part one. was done I think by penelope spheres. Who might have done? What? She did a lot of early documents, but it's it's the definitive punk rock Elliott punk rock moving, so she decided to make two. And naturally if you're like looking around at L., A. Like okay well, we did punk rock music. Let's do but Herman hairband heavy metal music, right the definitive like yeah. What was the western? To. which like most sequels is not groundbreaking all okay, but is amazing now when you look back because it's so sad. You got to look back at how kind of like pathetic, because because it's the bans that didn't become the huge hair. Band like Odin. Okay, okay I'm looking at up now. Okay, amazing Saipuddin! It's the decline of Western. Bill. Okay show them. There was one guy and he's. He's up one. Band Guy Who's in his pool up in the hills, just pouring. In his in his pool chair into it while his mom's on the side of things. We're going to be huge. We're going to be, but they didn't become poisoner contract. That moving okay, so so you played that year I. showed up at that scene. Yeah, and the band that was in for one minute. took me up tricked me in stole my clothes own. Yet because I showed up at the GIG, I had sperry top siders. Board shorts and a t-shirt. I'm just like a guitar shredder. I'm not I. Don't know about the whole image, right and everyone. There had SPANDEX and. And all that I was like. No one cares and they stole my clothes. You're gonNA wear this stuff. That's Hilarious, so he can take. It was just a minute, but like to have been able to peek in to being his Ariz, which was where Van Halen was discovered all the way up to poison and Motley crue, and all those as was right next to the Roxie, became billboard and a bunch of other clubs. But to actually show up with my axe, and how bill Gazuri this all Italian? Dude, looking like Godfather's pizza with old suit, and the two hookers on either side of him. He'll kid. You're playing tonight. That moment like meeting like Dean Martin or so. Pass away right after that. So I got a glimpse into. But that's what I'm doing. Is. I'm like trying to GIG and get in bands in. One I'm is totally into the police and their surfers and we're playing this music, and then this other band is like a heavy metal band. And what were you studying? Philosophy. Did you finish I did wow, this guy really does hit the books. So how did you have time to finish a degree in philosophy? And develop a music career philosophy, I picked because it was the lowest amount of upper division credits. You could get to graduate thirteen. What he didn't know. Is that philosophy? UCLA was number five right behind like Harvard and like. Three Core logic in math. That's why it was only a few courses in these guys were like brainiacs, whatever fortunately in the first couple years I just went right at it when I still had some brain cells in some attention span, and then I found out. I couldn't graduate UCLA, even though I finished all my required classes because I didn't actually have enough credits to graduate. So the last two years just took electives, just random things like film class, and whatever and just went and gigged just got enough to graduate so in a way I kind of missed my college education because I wasn't really focused on it. I was just trying to get on the road. But then you got a nice little hodgepodge of information toward the end. Yeah that's excellent throws. We've we've only gotten past one of the questions so far so? This is. ABC Guys. Question. One. I'm barren graph. You're listening to the career musician. With nomad. Being a career musician is more than just gigs and sessions. Are you a career musician? Find out on the career musician podcast streaming everywhere. Binge previous seasons of the career musician podcast and subscribe for all new episodes. Lasting the stereotype of musicians follow US EPA career musician podcast. Zander Smith I'M GONNA Guitar player Singer Songwriter, road. Manager Cat Juggler and you're listening to the crew musician podcasts. Here's here's what I wanted. Here's some things I do WanNa talk about. Your principles in your methods are coming out in conversation. So that's fine, you know I always ask my my guest. Talk about some of your principles and methods, but look the bottom line is with somebody like yourself. You're a businessman you understand on business works so your principles. You're going to be on point with good business practices. And you'll divulge more information as we go. Your resume your credits. People can find out. Let's talk about that briefly Zander Smith right. We can go to your website. ZANDER SMITH MUSIC DOT COM, and they can see more about your resume, but. Take me through the abridged version. You're out here. You Hustle and you want to get gigs now. You Finish Your College. How did you get from playing the Strip to working for her Alpert, one of the greatest jazz legends of our time. Well. First of all it starts out ZANDER. With an acoustic. Guitar. At the end of the day right because I can't control what other people are doing or how well bands are going to do or Whether I use her hair spray or not. You know what I mean I love in also. The DNA starts out with your prudence. Simon and Garfunkel. copywriters yeah, just always was interesting. That's always hit home for me. So I'm when I'm seventeen eighteen them all while doing those other gigs I'm also go into these coffeehouses and stuff that existed back then and doing solo sets, which fast forward through a bunch of different bands. I gave you a CD today when I walked in. and. Still do that in Pat Elastic, so you're developing your your singer-songwriter chops. You're singing and playing. And you're doing covers and you're writing. Right and you've had a lot of success doing that. Yeah, you know got a lot of stuff in brought a lot of talented people in. Maybe that's where the beginning of the manager business model stuff comes in. Because you got to go, get the GIG yourself yourself. You got to do it yourself. The ones doing it for you until you're John Maher even before. That I'm sure he's doing it all himself as well. So, that got involved later on as I slowly transitioned, so I became the guy when I became just a guitar player. Then I would sit around, but I had a hard time watching poorly run. Groups are tell me about a and I and I couldn't my own business and I didn't know how to just get paid and shut up I my ego is. Up Yes so. So what happens is slowly, but surely banned by ban project-by-project I kind of start falling upwards to a management capacity for a long time. I'm playing guitar and then like well I. Don't be the road manager. You know we're paying this guy. I can go get paid and get all that stuff done so acquiring that skillset while that's happening. Okay. I got to pay the bills so in between two different bands that were signed. I'm broke as a joke okay I, and I'm not try adapt not trying to work a regular job anymore. Even though I had worked regular jobs because I'm trying to be available to play right so. What ended up? Happening is I got to get the House of Blues Selling t shirts because my buddy disturbed me bone. He's like come sell t-shirts. Pay Cash on the table. That turned into a another career in production. Because I'm sitting there I'm eating nachos and drinking a beer and I'm watching you know whatever ban on stage selling t shirts, but then I'm bored. You know I'm curious. I'm watching the lighting guy I go over the line at Mike. How did you did it? At which by the way Baron still sitting here? He also has experienced in doing. I mean he'll sit. You know he's a former lighting guy, too. Much you didn't tell me. He's a multitalented guy. Did, not divulge so okay, so anyway the the short answer there's I again fall. My way upwards into sound and stage and next thing I know I'm the stage manager running that stuff? Get signed again I'm see I'm going to. Shift back over pivot got. All your own artist, okay? Okay, okay, but I still got this sort of like this fallback. Career doing stuff like that. The last guy had before her alpert. Chance your question. I'm road managing I'm playing guitar. For an artist, it's going around the country and And it's a tough get you know it's a tough case. Doubling Up Guitar and road manage and road managing printing out settlers while doing soundcheck. Right Planes Shakur and driving the van. Right you kind of like four jobs and I remember this. We were in Boston once in the singer was like. I didn't have a guitar part of this, but she wanted me to play sugar. which by the way for all your listeners? Percussion is the hardest instrument out there to be considering knowing gives it at credit, but you know soon as you're not on. It's like you know right away so. I'm printing out the guest list. Oh, no, because I'm managing to right, and and she just stops the song by the way got the people that were in this band were really talented. She had a killer yoke band okay. And, and they're all watching me do this and she's just like you're slowing down. You drop in the beat man and I was like. I'm printing out the guest list, which is not the answer, right? There's no excuse. Read the answer is either I'm so sorry, tasker. Of here we go. I got so sorry I'd say we'll fix it. We'll fix. At wit's end and I called my buddy who was a sound guy and I was like. Listen man you the only normal person I know in the music business. Really talented guy. You're a nice guy. You're actually your family, man, your professional You know you're not screaming at people own. You're not hooked on. He doesn't take gigs where people are screaming at. Show businesses pretty well. There's a lot of that breezy, yeah onstage. I said if you ever get a GIG. Take me with you to call me only I dropped that that you know that hit and about nine ten months later he goes. Hey, man I'm. Remember, what you're doing sound for Herb Alpert. And I was like I was like great. He's like I'm dying out here. It's just me. He's needs a he needs people. So can you come see? A Geoghegan? Maybe talked to him about working for him. And I was like I was really involved in my own thing at that point I was going to Russia and all this different stuff was very involved as a player. Last thing I wanted to do was go. Work with another artist fulltime, so you do in that just as Zander Smith the artist you time no that time I run run run run. Run your band which we'll get to doing great. Okay, we all over the place. Create opening slots record coming out KCRW. K Rock, all of it, and then I get this phone call and I was like me with the guy and her changed me. Because it was just a, it was a whole different thing was I didn't know it was just a Gig I was looking for. But I didn't know he would change me. As a as a person has a man as a future parent. and. Approach to the music business as a player. Initially, it seems counter intuitive to me when you have this successful band with a solo career going, and then you want to go work for a legendary artist as a tour manager I to me. That seems like. There's no. There's no comparison I'm GONNA stick with my artistry right. Most people. Would you know but the universe? Given US Rick Springfield Kimber against me because he wasn't all or nothing, it wasn't like hey. I'm a big deal right now and I'm doing two hundred dates a year and you got drop everything. Pack your bags and go. He was like I don't even really want to do this. He goes my wife and I are Kinda. We love we play couple shows. Year in fact, he said to me. When I win, didn't assessment I said listen you have a band here. You needed the very least. You have a great year. He produced a lot of records. You need a monitor guy. Oh they didn't have. It was just my friend Mike. He was doing both run around set. He's like. You need a monitor guy. You gotTa Sound Guy. Woman in the ban. Your wife is singing, so you need a lighting Guy Green now on stage because there's no lights. You probably need someone to set up all the really nice equipment. You need like three or four people at the very just to go do this thing. Otherwise. You don't need me that. That's if you WANNA become because he said I. Want it to be comfortable. I want to be smooth. This is the very least what you need. Is the team put together is how you do it. Yeah, he said to me okay well whatever you think, and then when we talked about were gonNA tour this year. What's the schedule? He said listen. You'll never hear this. He said. Listen you guys. Tell me when we're going to play. What are you talking about? He goes well these other guys in my band. He plays with burt. Backtrack. These two guys play with Sergio Mendez and play with Blah and everything and you. Obviously you got some talented guys at other jobs. He goes We're not really. We're not even really of do this thing. He goes. You guys. Check all your schedules and wherever you're not all working. Let's play some shows. That's how it was able to do it i. just did you develop them? In between the times when I wasn't doing so it's easy to say that, but did you develop a relationship with a booking agent? Had to say you have to. Do. You have in that position. Because look, let's be honest and most most banned like. Celebrity type artists bands. Management wants to musicians to be seen, but not heard yeah. Literally, so you can be seen, but keep your mouth shut. They don't want you talking to people. They don't want you. Making friends with the agents of the promoters of this are. They don't want you to get too close to the artist's. They control all that and it's all it's all we know the reasons why so? The fact that you but you the tour manager, so it's different. See as a tour manager. You have a mouthpiece that you're actually. Knighted to they, they want to use it. You have to use it right. You have to talk to management. Talk your go between lot of times. That was like a blessing in disguise. It was a blessing and you know what when one thing is thematically is is is he was so gracious and he was since he made us a priority. We made him a priority. That's amazing, so he was able to get symbiotic He was able to get Priority standing from part-timers which never happens. Right, if you put someone on salary, you put him on retainer. It's fine. Whenever, you save. Up Everything go, but for for him to. To get that to this day from the people that work from because it's still a part time gig really. Is Amazing, and that's just because of the way. He talked to us and intrigue us and we wanted to do that for him. That's amazing. That's what I'm saying is that's how it changed me so in the beginning, it was like Yeah Jazz Guy. This could be a cool little side Gig. It's going to be a lot less work than tormenting some rock band with a bunch of numskulls. Numskulls right so awesome you know and so I thought it was and then it just gradually kind of like became it shaped me so when I went back to my other gigs with other people I took that mentality. You know this is a guy that started am records, which is the first real indie label and the one of the most successful of all time on a handshake deal. This is. House her and and Moss, and this is the story after story after story. If you talk to him, you can talk to them about all the arts, and there's so many that we grew up with everyone from you know the carpenters does soundgarden right, but when you ask them about Sheryl, Crowe were you ask them about Cat Stevens, whoever and you hear the real story about? They came out, and you hear about the artists that they signed, but then let go like Waylon Jennings. Waylon Jennings in Phoenix Arizona. He's going out there. He's anr him. He does his first few records, but but understands that am while it's going to be really important to a lot of artists like Joe Cocker in different bands free. All these doesn't really. Have you know a dog in the fight when it comes to country music, he can't do for Waylon Jennings what RCA is GonNa do. And those guys when they approach him, they come up to in Whelan's young, and he's like no, they want me in. They let him out of his contract a man. Can, you imagine. To get I always dying era sign interscope in Ban in two thousand. We had to break up. To get out of that contract really. Think Jimmy Ivan is going to be like listen I! Don't know what you're doing but whatever it is, no one else is getting. And, then my people will tell me if you've gotta hit record. Attention to that's what I walked into that record deal. Is signed am having nothing to do with her. Just a coincidence, really nineteen, Ninety, eight, ninety nine last ban ever signed to the original ainum before it got absorbed by interscope Geffen am and I think DGCA. Like polygram all got sucked up into Seagram's. The Canadian Company for a minute bought all of that, and then they put interscope in charge of everything. And they just it was a bloodbath of core, and they dropped every band. You can think of but for some reason. Kept us, but when put the record out? They were like we don't know what's going on with you, but Ted fields over here really likes what you're doing. So in this case there's chicks in your man, so we're not going to drop you. We're not going to do anything with you and your signed for seven years the toy. That's a bands purgatory. That is Tara. We broke. We had to break up. Said are what do I do. He's like you can't do anything. You're keen and this thing you and the other songwriter. So, we had to break up. That's that's very different. So? That's my experience with. All navigating all those kinds of personalities, and then here I am. I'm finally hitting my stride as a as a original artists into ban, everything tried for since I'm ten and then I meet this Guy Herb Alpert. Who like? I'm not really trying to do this I. Just WanNa have fun. No, really no, no, no for real and slowly to start getting into my brain. He's. He doesn't realize talking me off of stage right. Right. You know. Man Okay so what I find interesting about like you said your trajectory, you start off as a guitar player in turned artists then morph into touring manager then back to a guitar player artist than a ban Lee. So your career this whole time it's evolving, but it's still. Evolving around the same. Three roles kind of per. Se, what's interesting? Though is most musicians. Like you, said not going to go for the management position. You're very. It's very even myself. Excuse me I would always look, and I can point the proverbial finger and say. Management is fucking up here. This is wrong. You're not doing this. Whereas production manager load in was jacked up. You didn't do I, could do and and I know. I can run the business, but I chose not to. Make you save yourself? And may maybe. I ended up being the music director for a pretty. A. Very similar I think that's where really the rubber met the road because I think I was. A lot of times I was bleeding over into managerial 's tore manager status. You know when I shouldn't I shouldn't have to add right if that's the corrector anyway. So it's really unique. I think it's really cool, but. Talk about run run run because and I'm looking up your email because you responded like I said you answered all my questions. Well, the talking points really they're not questions, but you mentioned something. You've Russia you're singing. would. What does the Song you saying yesterday Acapella? Berg to like twelve thousand. Some great things here that you're talking about I'm jumping around, but let's talk about run. Run run because that's what you said. You had a lot of success, so you know it's like. You know it's interesting. You know run run. Run was like it was the band originally creatively was the the combination of all the styles ever wanted to put into abandoned in one, so it was kind of it was my baby. You know and. We had a lot of great opportunities. It was a musicians band in innocence. Sounded nothing like rush, but similar in that had the respect from we really held their own we were. We were great live band. We had a lot of because we. We had a lot of problems as the music industry fell apart and change right when we hit our stride. Basically, the music business was over as far as record sales late two thousands right? Yeah, that's right when we come out. It's this like it's all falling apart. Our distribution deal falls apart this that the other thing yeah. Tough whereas you know if they'd had been a few years before that maybe. We'd be like Oh. You're in run run. Okay, you know we had everything going. On Blake did you know great? Sing all that stuff, but but pound for pound I always grew up in a van I was always on the road, so we were always a great live ban and we were able to mix a lot of. A lot of styles but bans would see us, and that's why we opened up everybody and we opened up for everybody, not because we had a huge agent because we had a lot of money behind us, but because bands would see us and be like wow killer band. That's a killer ban. I mean the list of that. We opened up for from the strokes to new order to really you name it, you know all different giant were. was impressive because they were like Oh. Let's give these guys a shot you know, and because of that we got to do a lot of great things running around got to go to Russia because we're opening for a really big Russian ban that came here. No one knew where they were, but they were stadium. Ban over there with Syria. They were called Mooney troll. Okay, and their lead singer is like a household name over there. And so and they were an alternative band they were abandoned was raised on contraband eighties alternative. Records in Vladivostok. You know seaman who come in with these records you know television and Blondie Bubba so anyway, one of our songs like these other bands. Oh wait. These guys are on something. They made us there. Which I also was the tour manager for you because these guys had no idea where they were going. Oh! In so many things on the pine. Pass me taking this Russian ban on day one. To Washington DC for their first GIG in the United States on the day, the inauguration of Obama, what's a bunch of rushing through? Customs must have been like a bunch of Russians in what looks like a basically a bomb Lamy. It's a silver bus with tinted windows, trying to get to the Russian embassy, because the because they're so famous in. Russia they wanted to have a lunch for them. And I'm like and I. Get this thing and the guys like quoted US please and we go. We get free lunch and we go in there I don't know where I'm. So out of at that point in studio for a month after for God, it was the inauguration, and we pull in in the middle of abuse. See and we pull up. There's you know the the pylons and everything and the secret service. Guys the lunch room manager for this. Russian been we walk in its full state dinner. The kind you only see on the West Wing. I mean caviar. Guys. Know Dress says Mississippi and the Russians were in suit. This is like like they're all. There's Putin in the knocked out. The rest of them are in their series. We walk in. Really that's so okay and you're there. I'm looking at them now. Okay, so all this information is online so they. Might go over Russia. Okay, and so so you're the tour manager. How did you become a manager for Russian? Tour manager because the village recorder, which is a famous story here in. Santa Monica. Can everyone every by one of the only? Real studios this left. That's still old school running. Yeah, Still Robbie! Robertson's got his office there. The whole thing real music. And I needed studio time for a run run run and I. Just don't have the cash I needed. You know I need a room is two grand a day or two thousand five hundred day, I'm like so make a deal with Jeff. The owner of the studio who'd come to see run right at the vibe was like listen I used to be the agent for the WHO and he told me he goes you guys. One thing about the WHO Leonard Skinner. Does date always could kill every other ban onstage? There were that good live he goes. You guys really got something. Let me know if I can reduce your I need some studio time. He's like even he goes. I can't give you that room. It's that we did this thing with where they did Asia okay, steely Dan. He gives the Asia Room. He's like. Deal give me this much cash, and you gotTa take these guys out on the road. I got this Russian band. They're going to be huge bubble. He found them. I'm like I know Providence. Two weeks I'll do it. That's only ended up with the Russians. But because I'm a professional and I want people to hear this I mean I'm as bullish? It is the next guy but. But, I'm a professional okay. I never told them about my band. I never hustle democratic. The remember like you're doing right now. In the back of the bus. What does this song and dance? Yeah, he plays it for the singer and they were like you didn't tell us. You have a ban I. don't worry about that. I'm just trying to get home and get in studio. And then so they became big supporters like a lot of bands, of course of course I mean I'm looking at here. Yeah, like you said the strokes psychedelic. Furs zombies. The walkman movie trolls trail the dead cranes, Sparta, the teenagers still on pickups and the living in so wow, okay! Yeah, Steve Perry, Okay Madonna Okay Wow. All, right so I love this story I. Don't want to interrupt you, but I'm. I'm kind of throwing in the facts here. What happens next movie troll Putin? So we go over her. Yeah, I, mean you know? We have our first show over. There isn't a place called Kazan which I've never heard of its south of Moscow and you know kind of like in the southern part of America. There's a lot of you know Spanish. Influence in the southern part of Russia. It's all Islam like causing and all the fans Tartarstan all these different places great way to put that by the way. Is that really helps you envision you, so you see this influence, so we end up and they do they call open air right? Opener shows is a big deal. They have a lot of squares over that part of the world. Right? You see Queen in the Ukraine and there's a big square, right? Big Squares here right a lot of space. They liked to do things where half a million people just show up and stand there, right? Dictators need to talk to people, so they have one. In the background, but the Russian flags ever we show up. It's our first festival open air festival. They invited to, and we walk out and I and I mentioned it in the very first day. You know there's like. A hundred thousand people. It's ridiculous. We were at the Viper Room. Two weeks before this before that. Right I think there were. Maybe one hundred people. Same set loose. At the end of the nuts at the end of the night Andrei Makarevich which you've never heard of in never heard of. He's never heard, but his the bruce springsteen. That's way it was described of Russia. He's a guy that came out at end of the sixties was right when Beatles everything he was trying to expose people to Western music, so he was like a singer Songwriter, and then he stuck around everything, so he's a household name from the Cold War days, and so having him come out would be like. Oh. Oh, Elton John and our festival or something he comes out he does give peace a chance and brings me on stage and I'm singing, and now it's the nighttime slot, and now it's just as far as you can see that many people, so that's our first GIG in Russia right messing up, and this is what you said in when you email me messing up the words to give peace a chance in front of eighty to one hundred thousand Russians, but realizing no one cared. You gotTa love that. Yeah like, can you? Basically give peace a chance to rap song. Added editor and there's a lot of lyrics on like writing them down high, and he's like you know. Give jets come and I was like. Could we do like help or something I know? Hell I. Spend a lot of money to bring us over. There I gotta get out there and you're going to make it happen. You know. That's crazy. Guitar player. Has Anyone ever told you this? I learned this early on to remember one time early Gig I unplugged almost stepped on my can't. Do Early Guitar Player why God, It'd be plugged in Guitar back turnaround a Blue Award. Inada guy pulled me aside. Go never do that again. You to smile. No one is even listening. You make. No one even knows you're playing. Looking at the drummer and the system, look over if you see a tax dispute, hey, yeah. Amy But man, the show must go on. Turn your back. Anyway to answer your question about the twelve thousand people and yesterday okay, they brought me back to play an acoustic show. Just myself they had the Russian promoters in were in saint. Petersburg hockey arena. Just by yourself just by the solo act well I pitched it to him. It was like listen. We have the opening slot. We can't afford to bring back the whole band, so I went back for this. All I'm trying to do is not make it as Zander, Smith, I'm just trying to keep the flame alive, so whether it's one of us. Are All of us just keep in the culture? That's amazing. You know and try to keep this career in this the see, but that's because you had a mouthpiece. You knew how to conduct. What if you just speak up? It's okay. Nobody's GONNA. Get Mad at you, right? Nobody's going to throw things at you. And what if they do okay duck? But just fucking talk right went up your mouth and be cool right right, and there's so many musicians don't understand that quite well. Get Hustle in there like get what I want, but there's a line there you gotta. Be Cool. You have to have to go for it, too. So I said I'll come over by myself. Okay so I'm about to walk onstage and like I said they're all there to see the headliner. They're not there to see me. I mean people are starting to know who we are, but we're still not selling twelve thousand four hundred thousand tickets. This is an opening slot for that band. And what I realized. This is like minutes before I went onstage was. When you walk onstage with the band, a rock and roll band especially in that part of the world, because they're still into rock and roll, and they still like deep purple over there. It's their huge. Drums. You Got Qatar Solos. You've got the model business model of a rock and roll, and if you're decent enough, they're going to be respectful. They may not love. You may not be axle rose or whatever, but they're gonNA you know. Now, there's. It doesn't matter if you're the guy in animal house for the Acoustic, Guitar like shut that guy up or your ten thousand people. You're the dude with Acoustic Guitar unless you are less, you have hits in a lesser known to be that guy you just annoying. Who are you know this guy singing right now? Right and I realized that right before I went on, and I looked out, and I saw thousands and thousands of people. Like when I was a kid going to see arena bands before the lights went, dowse sure was like. In my all of a sudden KUNA my, who the fuck in my like wow! Yet greet, here's your slot kid, but you better bring it because if you've never been on stage and had a crowd, turn on, you can't explain it. You have no ice. Seem Weezer fans? Opening, bands. Up! Alive in the early days like in those first couple with Weezer when I just have A. Local Ban be like Oh that was a bad move like we're opening for songs, so yeah, okay good luck because there's four thousand people that aren't there to see you Opening band is. Worse I saw White Lion. Nothing. Why Lion? Called! There was van that got booed off the stage when I saw him open for journey nineteen eighty-six. Another wiping no no. Don't forget me when I'm gone. That was their big thing on eighty six I'll think of the name any case. So you don't WanNa. Be that guy. But what you can do what we all can do in in life is is right size ourselves. We can look and go. What am I? What am I dealing with right now? Who is in front of me? And how can I go and not get punched in the face right now? How can I get you know awareness, self awareness, and I looked at that and I was like I can't walk I. Don't have what they're looking for. What can I do to ingratiate? What can I do to bring them in and make this possible? That's when I realized that to this day. Not that they are big everywhere, but the Beatles are are all their music. It's a household name there and the thing about these other countries, not just eastern Europe and stuff, but you go to Central America and South America and stuff like that. They love songs. They love to Sing I. used to see is bad lashes. mnay Mexican. Come come to house of Blues and they would be killing it. Playing hard knocks on, and then they would go into a ballot and it was even louder. Whereas in America, it was like Oh. You're bumming me out right now to play your ballot. Up The energy and I knew that and I thought to myself. I'm a walkout. They're gonNA play yesterday. But I'm not just going to go out there like a cover band any I'm going to tell him a story. A short story and I walked out there in in a minute or less short slot. I walked out there and I said listen. I said my mother family are all from Russia, and I said you know. She gave me a guitar when I was young, and she gave me a Beatles record all is is true and I learned this song as a little kid I hope you'll like this song I. Hope you'll sing the song with me and I started playing yesterday, and by the first verse in middle of I I. I had everyone seeing long. Wow, and then this is in real time what I realize as far as being a producer or an MD right. How to orchestrate your band I had never thought of this until this moment, but I'm playing up there. You know your ears become fatigued when you're listening whether it's lights or drums, whatever over and over and over again when you're just a singer songwriter up their guitar player. All you're hearing is Blah Blah. Blah Blah and strums drums, drums, drums drum, and it's it's incessant. Right especially. If you're a guy out there and you're playing ten thousand people you're really trying to. You're trying to bring the energy that you don't have with your ban not being there. Is No drummer behind you. In that moment I thought well. You know if you really want to get attention as a lighting guy, you turn all the lights out. That's a big Murai right, not adding read or whatever yeah. I thought well. There's just mean this and. I just stop. What if I just stop playing guitar right now? Right as it goes into the second verse and it Just Stop Playing Guitar in. It brought everyone into it and Fr-. There were some people singing. Everyone was saying now is ten thousand, and because they could hear them self singing and they looked around. It's about now. I made it about us in not just about me. And then I brought the guitar back in and then I had them. And, then they were like all right now. What do you got this one of my sons? And I played a couple more songs I did Russian cover, and I got the Fuck Office He was. Sixteen minutes say go but you. Me a half an hour. Seventeen minutes in fuck this guy. Why is he still there? Because whereas the Guy Agency that was smart. They gave you half hour that. Did six eighteen minutes view but see that's using your judgment. Yeah, why couldn't have done that in the past? But this is all poster this is. From them, starting to see how it goes. Okay, let's do a rapid fire about business and we're GONNA do rapid-fire for fun, so the rapid fire for business. I tour essentials. I love what you said Pack Light I so agree. And then you say it just read it. Okay all right. Just read it, he says. Tangent one pair of dark jeans flip flops swimsuit change of underwear and t shirt each day, a good slim fit coat, and the one electric car with some pedals in the carry on, never check a bag. Okay, so you end it with the all time, ultimate rule of a traveling musician. Never check a bag nephew, check a bag that has sure towel. Towel sign that you are a rookie. Yeah, because whenever you land you and thirteen. Other people don't need to be standing at the luggage rack waiting for you. Damn suitcase to show up. You just want to hit the ground and roll right not to mention the fact that you yeah that they lose bamboos. It and you can't afford to have that happen and. So where I learned, that was at the House of Blues. Call me in as a runner one day. What do you need me to do? Judas Prese without the without the original singer for a little while. They've got to stand in so when they've got ripper saying they're playing the House of Blues when he comes back, they're playing at shop. Alfred I'M Listening to blues I just need to get some cash, right? Broke yeah, sure I'll do whatever you on I love it. Hey, can you take this? Can you take Judas Breezy laundry to the fluff unfold? Not a problem sure down Santa, Monica, what's the big deal fluff. It was this big. Those guys have. They were the same this right cut off. Sleeves Cutoff little mini short. Sure metal shirts every single night. They have one outfit and there's wash it every single day. You. Don't eat any need all this stuff. I love it studio. Etiquette always arrive early with your own bottle of water. I love both of those so again early is is. On time early early bub-bubba. Okay, you know. We know that talk about that studio. My my other thing is keep your eyes in Eisenhower. Wide Open your mouth shut. So. Absolutely anything to expound on studio etiquette. No just listen and wait to respond to be. Ready Yeah unless you're the producer. If you're the producer than you're running the show and you need to do what you gotTa, do all right health and lifestyle on the road you said go to bed as early as possible. Never be around smoke and try to avoid CARBS. I love that first of all. I was always the first one to my hotel room. All the guys in Bamberg Man I forget you man, you're not gonNA. I would go out every once in a while. I have a couple of drinks, but then you know what guys look twelve, twelve, o'clock one o'clock come on and lobby calls it five calls in four hours and you want me to go. Hang Out, hell, no matter. Who are on the road in the beginning because they want that party, they want to be invited to that party. Right? You can't sustain. Best. Articulated perfectly okay. Business Acumen negotiating branding, etc, and you say stay true to yourself, but must be flexible to the one who's writing your paycheck. I think that's brilliant. I mean. You know it's a matter of finding that balance I. Think this whole interview about that. When to say no, thank you when you already know. It's a bad idea before you take the GIG and you still think well. Maybe let's talk about that because I believe gut instinct goes ignored too often with all of us as a human race I think an hour initial gut instinct is usually on point, right? Yeah that sounds like what you're saying. Yeah! Short Story! Go back to her. Please give him some credit. People told me this before, but I didn't start hearing it. In the early days when we weren't when he wasn't doing much stuff at all, play a few times a year. GIG came up. someone had worked with before had a miserable time with was really tough. gig Wasn't worth the money. And And, but the but this tour tour came up and it was three months, and it was a big paycheck was a big. All I saw was the the total. Chunk of change what I would come home with mid December show, and it's September when making this phone call okay, and for some reason you know at that time her was kind of. We were more chronic. We're really that involved, so it was almost kind of like a mentor like a father figure. I would just ask I. Don't know I just for some reason I called him that day and I didn't even know who was. Is it listen I got this GIG. What do you think he wasn't working? So it's not like. It was a conflict at all I was like. What do you think about this used him as a sounding board, he goes He wasn't this the person you went out with where this thing happened. Nothing having you really miserably told me that I said Yeah. You're right, he goes. It's not worth it. He goes all you can see. Is that paycheck? He goes, but I'll tell you something's Andrew. He goes. You're never going to see that money I said. What do you mean? You never gonNA finish that tour. Because you're either GonNa Quinton or you're going to get fired because you're not on the same page that hardest. So you're. Never, GONNA come. Now. It's like okay. That's when I said. No, thank you. Yeah, this is an interesting deal for me, because now in my real life, I work in sales. I want to hear all about this and so for me. I think what you said a spot like people. Nowadays people are so eager to go get hung yet and consume consume consume that. It that gut instinct thing is like this okay I know this is GonNa suck, but I'm going to do it and so for me. I have a bit of a different experience in that in my mind, I go I. I've gotten to the point now is that I? Don't have to go. Oh, I remember when I went out on tour with that person. It's this person's bringing me this kind of energy. And I've felt that kind of energy before so I already know what this is, and I don't WanNa. Feel it again I I already know and for me in my job. It's very much. How much are they going to pay me Because unlike you. I can get to the bag right. I get to the paycheck. But, if it's not enough money I, know people in my line of work, hundreds of lines of work that in the effort to make the deal in the effort to get the thing, right. They'll go through. They'll jump through these crazy hoops. Go through these headaches. Go through these terrible experiences, and then you get the money on the end of it and you're like Whoa. That wasn't worth it. For me is I'm. Going to do that. If the payoff is right, and sometimes the payoff is money. Sometimes, the payoff is other thing but I think the difference for me is. When I was much younger in my career. Go through these things upbeat. beat the shit out of me. Come out. Oh, man, and even when I get the big paycheck, it almost like Mantha that wasn't worth it right, but now where I'm at is when I go into. It is wide open. I I know this is GonNa. Suck I know you're going to need too much for me I know you're going to be unrealistic I. Know You're going to be this that and that? Because I already have that knowledge and I go at the end of this I'm getting this big paycheck. Then, it adds that perspective for me of okay. I I'm the one making the choice here right I know you're going to be difficult. I know what the paycheck is I. Know The whole game, and so I'm never caught off guard by, and I've certainly said No. Thank you to people where it's like I i. know who you are and I know what the the check's going to be at the end and the journey I have to go on. The potty of gold is a big enough then, but then you would I love what you're saying. Because now you hold yourself accountable, and you respond instead of react so every time that they overstep their boundaries. You take that step, you say. Oh, wait a minute. Wait a minute. Remind yourself knock on your head. I took this okay. How do I do this? I'm going to respond cautiously. I'm going to take my time I'm going to plot out a logical explanation. I'M NOT GONNA. React I'm not GonNa let it get my blood pressure up. I'm not going to expect you to be different. That's the big thing right at. Know who you are I'm not gonNA. Expect you to be different. Already told me who you are. You already told me Love, and even you didn't tell. Michael I worked with Zander four months ago. When you guys are the same person that I already know who you are and if I don't expect you to be somebody different I. Don't expect the situation to be different. If it's coming at me, nice go. Yup, that's who you are. That's how you do this. When you're you! That's how you do it then suddenly you removed the expectation of change. Suddenly, everything gets way more easier to accessible. Yeah, it's just like okay. That's one of those so I only say that. That's brilliant brilliant I. Love It I. Always say that being a musician is. Involves a lot of sales techniques because we have to always knocking on doors. They're getting slammed in our face. Most of the time doors aren't even getting nobody like us all I'm going to go over to that. Do you think that's a door told you? Door I know it's a door for him, yeah! And then all of a sudden, it's free concrete walk. So here's one thing I want to ask. You is sales. Okay? How do you deal with what some of the techniques that you use to deal with the fact that the door is not even a door. When you thought it was a door. In other words, my biggest thing right now communicate respond. Reply because when you don't reply. People assume the worst. Let's not make an asset of you and me, unless just fucking reply, even if the reply, you think even if you think the reply is not in my favor, and not. What I WANNA hear? Just tell me. Just level up and be like you know what I really appreciate. The song you sent over. Thank you so much. We did ask for you to send some song and I appreciate the fact that you sent some over. However, at this point, we are not interested. Thank you very much and stat of leaving me on the. Hook for the next I'm. Saying that's one small example. So how do you deal with a response for that, please? Their. Lack of responses their response. I think that's a bunch of bullshit listen. I never do that to people. No I know that, but that's okay, thank. You are but listen. That's okay. You have the ability to judge them right. And if you're unhappy. With their etiquette. They're they're responding or not responding lebarons? Then, you already know what you're dealing with. That's right you know, and then you can have your own internal cutoff as to. That's right. You know this is not the way I would treat somebody you have to. That said you also have to. You have to become familiar like what what the expectations are with certain people or certain group of people right like there's some cities where everyone's on time and some. Oh, everyone's late here in the city or whatever? They always put push it on a half hour earlier than when it actually talk about audience is really quick Passover. Barrett, let's talk about how you can be easily offended onstage whether you're in a small local banner, a big man when you go to a place where nobody's clapping. They were going crazy in Wisconsin last night. What's wrong with these Canadians? That's a great. What's wrong with the French or the Swiss? They say what are you talking about I? Have almost open my mouth and really blown it as a lead singer chastising wanting to chastise an audience that's not respond the way I need them to respond only to not get around to walk off stage the promoters like while they were totally captivated by you guys. And I was like I thought they hated us. Wow, so as is getting. With songs, or whatever and you ask, you gotTa Kinda. You gotTA. Sit there for a second and go zoom out. You gotTA. You gotTA. Zoom out and see what it is. You don't always know. Be always know what's really going on the other side you just got to. Keep pushing for it, you know. As, much as I conduct my business with respond, you know, reach out reply that I get it, not everybody does. How do you deal with this in the sales concert? You're talking about something that is. Old As sales itself and so one one thing one thing to understand is that like? There, there are people. As many people as you think love to say no. Not that many. Most people really don't like to tell you now and especially I feel like this is accelerating now because. It used to be like a handful of people. Have this go-getter never say die attitude well now we've been bombarded with all these inspirational stories of people who just never gave up. You tell somebody no now. It's almost like here's your green light to like Hammarby like. Rian light the come after me. Like I've never wanted any like door to door sales light. Just kill me right? Call me at dinner like leave me alone. If I say no, that's who you are right. Yeah, I'm green-lighting you to become that person now. Maybe you aren't that person, but overwhelmingly now that's the response because I don't take the I know and in sales we're taught. Don't take the I know right, but a couple of key things. What you're actually talking about is turning no in doing yes. And turning a non-response into a now. I like that so the biggest thing that one of the biggest things I've come to is. The one of my favorite sayings in sales's some will some won't so what next right? Some well somewhat somewhat next right? Okay fine. We're not a good fit. Cool Talk. Somebody get somebody else. And in this way I think sales is a lot like try to pick somebody up at a bar. Right like if I walk up, all I'm doing is talking to you. All I'm doing is buying new drinks. I'm trying to keep people away from. It's got that stink of desperation to it right? And how many times does that ever gone well for anybody? So you can't. You can't be that Guy Right, but you also in my world I have to get a now. I have to close the account. Okay. That's not happening. I can write that off. Nobody's GONNA. Ask me a question, so the biggest thing for me is I gotta give him permission to say no right. So for me, a lot of what I do is like hey, listen. It's been a while since we talked I sent you this information. I'm not sure if you have other questions. Maybe we're just not a good fit right right? Maybe maybe we're not a good fit is like one of the best statements ever because I think it. It doesn't if you're dealing with somebody. WHO's volatile, right? Doesn't doesn't provoke them. It doesn't mean you're a bad person. Michael. That doesn't mean I'm a bad person, we just. Right, Nobody's hurt. They're like that. You know what it's hard not to take your music purse only yeah, but you can't take it personally. To me is where I would get really difficult to invest so much soul in yourself. And the example I used was a musical example. Well, let's talk about. Let's talk about logistics. Hey, is sound. Check still at. Still at four am or has been pushed back because I heard artists mentioned something. Crickets okay, come on now. People fucking respond. It could be something as small as that or as big as your music, but actually the music you cannot take personal. Know why I spend less time. More time. Principles and methods baby right here by Zander Smith. That answer any longer. winemaking and giving the answer. I think think for me. It's always just like. Hey, this is no big deal. Yeah, yeah, if you know no big deal, the real break and that's how I am I'd rather you tell me no, then string me along right? Oh, absolutely, tell me know, and we'll still go have a beer and chill like I'm cool. You know what I'm saying like. Bring permission to say no. No more it's not a big deal at the happens all the time. Bro, you're not. You're not upsetting me. Afraid of no less no means competition. I WANNA. Say for anyone's listening right now that that if you could see us right now, I just realized that we are represented by we have we have you on the East Coast? We have the exact midpoint Oh. Yeah! Missouri and we have the Santa Monica. New York. And Missouri. I mean wow, he's midway. Planned to this. Real. We are a real focus group now. I have to say I have to say. Baron planned it because he's the one orchestra. Of course you. You're not even a musician, but you orchestrated. Come on. That was good all right. All right, so check it out moving right along. We're going to wrap this up as guitarist or a solo. Solo Act. You've played a record and written with. Daniel how do you say that Danielle Brisebois? Brisebois French artist no mortgage. She was any on Broadway. She was also no archie bunkers. Remember the spinoff from all in the family. She was a little girl. Remember that and got signed by Sony in Early Ninety S. her boyfriend at the time was. New Radicals Greg Alexander. Who worked deal where he did her record and his record it for the same record deal, and she did real well in Europe, so that was my first side man Gig. I would love that you're with her Linda Perry Linda Perry big songwriter. Yeah, you wrote with their did amazing. Shave fronted A. Club makeup was a monthly. All Star Band at the El Rey from ninety nine to two, thousand, two, and she front as we did twenty century Zeppelin. We did yes, she was The singer Bill Ward from Black Sabbath on drums and Kenny. Aren't off the coal I love Chiasso. A bunch of people can't through there. She was one of them. Then you've got the runaways. Dee! RAMONE will belly Steve Perry, George Lynch New Order, Lisa, Loeb and her album all over the place right I love I. Love the diversity. I really do so okay. Really. This has been amazing. Thank you for sharing. Both of you and I love tying in all of these. More philosophical concepts and the paradigm, and all these things okay so moving right along last thing we're going to this rapid fire. Fun Favorite Food, and you can both answer, or we can make this. You know what we could raise the stakes. How well do you really Know Each Other, oh? Usually. Get my wife over here. She's the only one that really knows okay. Answer from one another, or you could just answer as you whatever. Your favorite food. Spaghetti Bolognese. Oh, I like it. Yeah, I, Cook I make a lot. So I remember that my answer could always be something anything that I find that I'm the new that I'm excited about favorite food to cook. Perhaps Ooh, something that you say you know what your Go-to Oh. My go-to Spaghetti Bowl Dan. Guy Can make that. The only reason I said that is because on the road. That's all I'll eat because I don't trust food I. DON'T EAT. Japanese food in Japan no way at the top you didn't. Know. Over it was Austin area. Favorite libation, or where we just drinking like flat water sparkling water. Would we doing? A Pepsi. Pepsi I used to love Pepsi Grownup I'm pretty addicted. Sparkling water. It's pretty. Good I like that and you? Say It, say sheets like that craving when you want something, sweet or something feel kind of fills you up a little bit all right favorite sport. We don't have to as baron the east. As! Carbon talking about. Football. So for you, it's baseball. Do you have a favorite sport center? yeah I have to say basketball. From when I was a kid, okay, how do you spend your free time assuming you have any? Trying to take my kid around town and get along with the family. That's fun. I got three kids I don't even know what freedom. That is the best answer. What activities do you do on long flights? I like to watch really bad movies. I always go to the bookstore and get like price gouged on a paperback book. Really read a book and we. That trip read a book. If I don't finish it. Home I got. Three kids didn't fall asleep. When you read or are you able to stay up to get the read in no, I. Feel for you go. That's awesome that you. Movies no one will watch with me like I'm gonNA wonder woman by myself. Yeah, there you go there, you go, okay. I love that all right. I got to save this one for the end. 'cause I know you both have long answers, favorite TV, show or movie that you're currently streaming watching. Doesn't that to be something you really into at the moment? I'm in this weird pigeonhole right now. I'm watching a lot of music documentaries on Amazon. Is this a million of them all. Yeah, we're always. So many of them I just watch on Netflix. I just watched Echo in the canyon. Oh. Yes, which is I was talking about? Which of you grow up in Los Angeles like a lot of this stuff like I never knew. That sets a good. Yeah. Sure about using I'm watching. Everyone else is watching. Okay I'm what I watch Jack Ryan last night Jack. What a great series! I binged that thing over the holidays. I was like you know. What does the holidays I'm busy jackets so glad I don't have to watch hunt for Red October thirteen hundred time why? It's not get better than that or the fugitive. This is kind of like my Methadone for those is the characters. Alive and do either of you shop online brick and mortar? Do you care more? I don't buy anything online. I love requisite online. Yeah I forgot. I really try to buy brick and mortar really. Our communities yeah well. I enjoy it. and touching things in talking to the person that owns the store. Hey, wait a minute I. Didn't ask you about your personal. A little more catastrophic I feel like I feel like. Talking sweaters I feel like especially online marketplace is like really eroding. MIDDLE CLASS OF AMERICAN I. Agree with is just terrible. Yeah, I so agree with that I try to buy local. Try to brick and mortar. Try to buy local love. It love it. Okay, so I can I can ask you dream collaboration. ZANDER, but you've already had quite a few amazing. Collaborations either one of you if a baron if you were a career musician, all of a sudden, who would you want to collaborate with? I mean you get a chance to do a song with somebody? Who would it be well I? Mean I know for sure. I Want John Paul Jones in that band. Nice, yeah, one hundred percent. Listeners who don't Jam Paul. Jones's bassist arranger every led Zeppelin like non drum non guitar non vocal every instrument. You ever heard John Paul. Jones was the one play he was crushing keys the whatever whenever? He's the guy. Plan I love so. Yeah, definitely him. I'm a big Stevie Ray Vaughan fan I just I think. The stuff that he did was just. I think we really law. Something we I think signing is best. Common. We went down. A wormhole wants me and my wife She's a big John Mayer Fan Yeah I'm. Really, not paying much attention. She's like no, no, no, you gotta give them. And then that led us to. See. All right well listen. You want to take issue. So, we were both mesmerized good. I'm glad I'm glad you brought that to the table when she. Then I think I'm a drums guy right? So you giving me three collaborations now because your third one? I'm not I'm just. Putting the band. I'm totally messing it. Dave. Dave! I loved Asia's. Seems like a nice guy. He has an yeah. He just seems like a nice and. Also had this like I. Mean I'm popular opinion being a really think the foo fighters of the last great rock band. Why is that on popular? I think you're right I think that's an accurate statement. Is that but I? Mean that's a very accurate. Any as good as he is as a front man. I live several times and everybody's heard. The story played with a broken foot rash, but when you watch him, play the drums. It's like yeah, yeah, yeah, SURE HOLY COW! So strong voice to he's. Right, frontman, great songwriter tone, and everything is just amazing all right, so if you were a musician baron, what instrument would you play the drums? The DRUDGE DOT? I flunked tinkered around. I'm not like. Hey, it's never too late. Man You can, and music is therapeutic, says what it is for drum set. Your kids are going to destroy it and have fun will tell you up all night, and this is crazy therapy. Put on my headphones go into. Go rent a studio already. Have the drum kit or you got to do is bring this for you. And I just good for you know nine. Don't care what you think. I don't care what they heard. That's good. How often do you do that? Probably not as much as I used to, you should do that. That's a major and Zander. If you weren't a career musician, what would you be? I would be sitting on the beach. But if you had to work. This out, okay, this is already happening. So. This is my dream job. I can't wait. It's changed a little bit. Now I got the family I could probably get them on board with this. All WanNa. Do is by about I think I need six feet I might need eight feet wide. Space on Venice Boardwalk. Okay, all I need is that in. An ice machine like shave ice. And Just. Get A boombox. I'm just GONNA put on Bob Marley and I'm just going to make snow cones all day. Long I love and make. What is it a thousand percent profit on every snow cone, and I'm just GONNA set their shorts sandals chillan. GEANT. Come pay above we bullshit like we are right now. These are the questions that come up so like. Wow! I thought I asked Raspberry. This is Raspberry Raspberry Blue Yeah I. Did you know that? Isn't it weird that raspberries actually blue I did not know that that'll be fifty cents. All right, I gotta ask you both this have to limit you. You cannot give me a dissertation on this question, right? I gotta go. I gotta go pick up here. We got. I don't want to go to the mall. Okay, okay, the last song or band that you listen to that just like get you going. Most recent artists bands song that you've listened to you like Oh man, I love this band. This person, this recent thing some something that's floating your boat how? Well, I can't give it a like Oh my God. You guys got to hear these guys like it's transformative for you. Let me say that you're not working with as a musician that you're not working with so if it was Stevie Ray Vaughan. Then, that would be a solid answer, right? Sure we'll listen the last deep dive. I got into, honestly was John Mayer. Because I had closed I, shut down to love. John's does. A lot in. Yeah, unfortunately. I don't WanNa. Be Aged. Doubt but I'm like out there doing this other. A musician so you recognize all of the intricacies and tools. They're using like. Oh, yeah, I can. I can reverse engineer that like right now. And I I found that I had underestimated. He's he's. Very talented. He just went and Song months ago and As far as singing and playing at the same time in jumping around ten. You know what? He's actually now as a frontman. Yeah, he's he's authentic. He's he's a nice guy up there. I know I get it I used to be whatever. Let's play some music Savak types so really really enjoy getting turned on his stuff. That's good. heard a song for the first time last night. Just 'cause I was listening to the satellite radio and they said remember that one song they were talking about husbands and wives that stay together in the music business, which is rare. And then the detail I yeah about that. The we've. Never heard of them, know anyway timeout and. As I was in the car I at the Stop Light. I typed in the we I heard the song. It's just a it's just a a guy and a girl, singing harmonies, and I was lying. Some is two minute song, and I was like. Okay, that's pretty great I love that you know. Perfect. So. I'll I'll give you a give you two Recent artist and mine isn't necessarily as much musician musical kind of thing I really dig Lizzo. Lizzo NOLA loves Lizzo here's. Here's why I dig Lizzo. She. She is who she is. She unapologetic rights. She does not, but yeah, if you look at her, you go, you are not a star. Right yeah. Society Today Society's Culture has done that. Yes, that's what I'm talking about, says you're not a star, and she says Oh yeah I am and here's how and by the way I'm not gonNA. Apologize I'M NOT GONNA. Wear be closed. I know what my body is. I don't care what you think. I'm going to be me and Amadu a flute Solo. Not only am I doing this. I'm also like crazy Florida. But I will tell you the last like real serious deep dive I did I watched I watched a thing on the allman brothers. And when I've always I, mean I'm from the Midwest. So like the allman brothers are like heavy rotation even to this day like. Go to the mid West. You're gonNA hear you know. Sooner eleven coming right here, but I really went down the wormhole and really got into like Gregg Allman and Because the way that went down Greg almonds like immortalized, but I mean Dwayne. ALLMAN got a crazy store sure and. Blues background musician like he a lot of people. They said that they called him like the greatest, White Blues vocalist ever. And when you listen to him, you like aw! And that bans got a crazy story. What happened to the allman brothers after Dwayne dies from wherever right die sorry is just unreal. Amazing documentaries on Amazon primed both. Great love it yeah. Gentlemen. This has been an awesome works got back and we're going to drill you about these coast. We want to find out the truth we'd. We know it's more than just pizza. Bruce and Jon Bon Jovi. Mail. You summed it up pretty well, then, of course you've got Goumba I'm have Goumba. Versus! Go W. B. in New Jersey. Don't forget though he's also long island. Long Island. When people say Elton or billy. I say shut up. Don't ever talk. You have to ask you know so my girlfriend redoing. We're on the way out, but it will tell you this I. I love to annoy my girlfriend. WHO's also from long? Island and so I refer I refer to. I refer to Billy Joel as the American. Elton John She saw. I like them both. They're both amazing songwriters and performers, but you know, of course, my affinity for for billy. Anyway I'm a fan story. Zander Smith thank you for driving over the hill to get over here from the west side. No, thank you. Thank me for driving back over the hill. Cow. Well thank you for both here and back. Thank you bearing graph for orchestrating this? Even though you're not technically music, you still are orchestrating your ass. I love it. Thank you so much for connecting the DOTS Davison. Saying so you are no and I. Really do believe that whole schtick about sales. This is the career musician podcast with your host, no Matt. Your value is not determined by the GIG learn more by listening to the career musician podcast streaming everywhere. Hi I'm Katherine, would studio owner engineer producer and you're listening to the career musician podcast with my old pal nomad. Hi! I'm producer Eric and you're listening to the career musician podcast with my buddy nomad. Hi, everyone! This is Brian Spawn owner of spawn drums and simtek symbols. You're listening to nomad the career musician words of wisdom here folks so missing up. Just no mad nowhere man. owns. No. On an Uber. Tom. Hey. This is no host and creator of the Career Musician podcast, and I am thoroughly stoked to be an official member of the Pantheon podcast network. Pantheon podcast network is the first of its kind as an all music based podcast collective. Please be sure to check us out at Pantheon PODCAST DOT COM for more INFO.

Zander Smith Los Angeles Phoenix Zander Johnny Marr Herb Alpert California UCLA. Van Halen Sammy Hagar youtube Arizona WanNa Robert Smith Detroit US Missouri
#129 You Are Ok (One Year Later)

The 8123 Podcast

28:43 min | 10 months ago

#129 You Are Ok (One Year Later)

"The other night after the show a second to some some girls that were friends and they wanted to start a podcast and they were asking me how we do it how we get it out there. How how we re and you know thankfully I was able to tell them about anchor. Which if we would have had. When I started out this would have been way way easier and how much easier it has now gotten super easy. you know so anchor is by far the easiest way to make a podcast It gives you everything you need on one place. So you don't have to get pro tools or any fancy recording quit or anything And you can literally make podcast and edited on your phone right. They're free it's free. It's free so it gives you all the creation tools you need to edit it to make it sound good which you know if we didn't have a background in courting you know. I it it it just makes it so easy I mean. We've we've recorded parts of podcast literally into my phone and then posted uploaded in some hotel room somewhere So anchor Gives you all those tools that you need all on your phone for free and the hardest part they will distribute it for you? They'll they'll get it to spotify apple podcast. Google podcast many more Which took us a long time to figure out how to get up there and they handle all that for you for free and you can make money off your podcast with Manti advertising And Cool. Yeah it doesn't matter if ten people own who listen to podcast or hundreds of thousands so yeah Download the anchor APP or go to anchor DOT FM to get started and start your own podcast. Or if you're ready to have a podcast make it way easier on yourself and we love and we appreciate it so Yeah thank you anchor onto the show. Hello and welcome. Hi Eddie twenty-three podcasts video video well maybe not for everyone but but video for for for us. We're looking at other well. Which which is nice. I mean it makes it easier. Yeah normally this way and I'm looking at an organ I have over here and I've gotten used to it now since we've done a few days but this was easier. Today is a special episode podcast. Because it's you're Okay Week. the The one year anniversary of the record We kind of do a little bit of a deep dive back thinking about the record. One year later And then towards the end will call jared Ken Can get their take on a couple of questions that we got from the interwebs In we didn't bother to call John 'cause he is Just got a new speaker setup at his house I Figure that maybe he's working on our next album our next album and what could be like one of our greatest songs ever so I I don't. I don't WanNa call an interrupt that for podcast. You didn't WanNa make him think about a year a year ago. Yeah he's in the fucking it up in the moment. Yeah so that's that's about it Thank you guys for the support over the past year and the I dunno it's You guys have embraced these these songs and made them like. We talked about the episode. You know songs that will be in the set list forever and that's all you can hope for when when you're making an a an album so I figure right now. The message of the album in title probably is More more important here than than than ever early Willa. We'll we'll happened episode but first here's a message from a sponsor. There's so many places now to listen to music and podcasts that yes like paid through all these different APPS now to pick what you're GONNA listen to. But now on spotify favorite podcasts. Off My favorite. Yes and music to known you could get it all in one place. He has modified. Yeah you can. You can listen to fair. Park has on spotify without even having a premium account so dumb of APP so that free. Free free to lose your favorite podcasts. Free this one yes. They have every type of podcasts. You could want follow all your favorite podcast so you don't miss an episode it'll be in your feed premium users. Mike me me too. I download episodes that way when I'm on a plane airplane or any shower in the car on a road trip. I HAVEN'T PODCASTS. Already downloaded it. I can listen to You can share the episodes on your instagram. That's cool she's cool. This is what I'm listening to. And then you can send me some button and go Joe. This is a New York. Sweet as podcast. Yeah so if you haven't done already dumb of the spotify APP and search the eighty-one twenty-three podcasts. And follow us on Your Library Tab. And it'll it'll it'll be they're also make to follow us Senior miss an episode. Do It. I'm going to do it so you're k. He's been out for one year. It's crazy I feel like it's gone by in sanely fast. I was about to say the exact opposite really thinking back to a year ago. Seems like so long The New York show like very very many years ago very busy year. Yeah Yeah we've done a lot but I Yeah I guess I I just I just think about. I feel like people haven't had the album product all that long. Yeah but yesterday when we did the did the playthrough through and I I listen to the album in full for the first time in over a year it was fun. Yeah it's good. It's it's really really good album. I was I was. I was surprised not surprised because I remember like definitely feeling Berry that it was a strong album but then not listening to the after a more than a year and then going back I was like fuck like one sunset so good. Yeah I mean it feels to me like the record like everything. Kinda fits in a good spot and the track listing is good and we. We had a we when we showed tim it. Timmy album first time. I mean We always have the classic after forever. Halloween what he said. We always bring that up as like. Oh no I remember. This was time after we showed it to him and he was like just is pumped as he ran with like the last few Could then he was talking about how he felt? Like the record has lakes like it. It's one of those ones like like forever we met later on. I think people are gonNA appreciate more as it as it sits in. I just like going through all the twitter twitter been just talking to people. That's kind of felt like where like a lot of people are all my God. I love this are wanting to play the song and yes. I feel like there's going to be in three years. This could be potentially one of those records at people calling their favorites. You know I I I look back on can wear a head. Space was going into it. And you know we we definitely. I don't think we felt all that prepared We will for US though. No but we felt like we barely had enough songs to make. The album of a bunch of them didn't have Melodies vocals on him or anything and then songs became things that we couldn't have even imagined. You know. I guess I mean for this record. I think it goes. It goes on but both ways on something like None without you listen to the demo and then you listened to the court like the exact same them you know. There's not much different but then I mean when was the last time we were in the studio and made like like broken parts or one sense at like we just didn't have enough songs so we sat there and for like on one sunset. It was like someone had modest mouse and then someone said like Joe. What would Johnny Marr? Play? Jared started playing this riff and then it made a whole song as fast as pot. Like just super-quick and like the end of the song. How kind of the bridge goes into the last chorus. That's something that we've tried to do for as long as going to ban like say like all the killers will end on like some big epic thing. We just never have done it right in. I feel like that's just like needing to finish a song. It kind of just throwing things together barebones and just kind of throwing shit at the wall. That's how ending of that song kind of came together and not trying to do that. We ended up doing this thing. We've tried to do forever and you know I think looking back at it a year later you know. I think the hope is with any album. Obviously you want the entire album to like stick and people to appreciate it for a long time to come which is something. That's kind of out of your control. You don't really know how how that's going to shake out for a while but I think you always just really hope that there's a couple songs that you know are going to be in the set forever totally and known without you. One hundred percent is like the song we have to play in a in a show right right now which is like always the the goal is like A. How can we make you know before is like probably a like an a. m. Prettier D- Her Diet Soda Samantha? And we beat that with bad behavior and black butterflies. Men Again. None without you even with the there is Kinda like nostalgia factor of like the older songs and a new one can come in and just feeling. Yeah when when we go into no number that you in the chorus the Course jobs out. It's mind-blowing every single time Ev. Every single time. Yeah and it's such. It's such a no brainer trick. But we never have done that like that going into like it just it. Just you need to sing it. You know like like even if you kind of know this long. You're going to be like yeah. Yeah is built for. It was talking about When we're making a wreck like when we're actually making the album you have. You're working on so many songs it's like. Okay it's what you're saying but You know okay now. We have to Pete that one because that one that was going to be on the album. But you want to beat that one. It's kind of what you're saying with with the live stuff not not every record you get that though. Yeah no not like I dunno like black and white. There's not like a half to play song on that brass. Maybe right girl if whatever but yeah yeah but even that we don't do it all the time on a pretty. I mean since we've played that song. I don't think that one's left the SAT. That's what you're saying. Yeah now without you. Is that for this record for sure. Yeah I mean I I feel like that's something I'm very happy with and you know there's there's other Other you know songs. I think like Is that the news will be in the set for a long time in a song like heaven. Something really adds a different feel that we don't have and other other songs and it's just like that. That's kind of what you're hoping is to do. We make an album that better catalog of of of what we can do as a show you know and even like like Flowers on the grave. Which I you know. I don't think we'll end every show that 'cause you know we have. We have other songs. Great Enders too but whenever we WANNA do that thing that trick we've got it now like we we. We have that feeling. I kept thinking about as listening to US night. Did you know that was like how? How cool is it going to be when we don't play it for a while and then we just decide some random Chicago show? Where like fuck it. Let's play tonight so cool and like for people who know that song. That's going to be something important for that. Like I think like Jimmy World Goodbye Sky. Harbor go and do that and end the set like that would be something I would love to see. You're not GonNa do it all the time so it's GonNa be it's GonNa that will be like a special saw or like something like a Mars is will be more of a typical ending. Kinda like saying if people you know be happy about but yeah doing something like power will be. We'll be cool to throw in just randomly and then when we get on our rebel stage again like we play. Some festival will open with her. I I was thinking about that as plans. I couldn't go anywhere else in a set and open with it. Yeah I was thinking about that I it it would. It would be fun. It'd be cool. I mean like you you could put it somewhere else you could put in the middle you know it would definitely take people to different different spot in their mind. Might be hard to get them to come back around. You can do like. Maybe you do that. And then you go into like a like a chill part of a set. We do like four like strip. Yeah Mike kind of people a moment and then you come back with you. I mean the other thing that would be an option. It's like you could open with like half of it up until the bridge and you could come back and and with you know. Yeah that'd be. That's kind of a great idea. Monica Monica Cool. Yeah I figure. Let's call. We're going to take some questions from people on twitter now. The first one is what were the best moments. And what were the worst moments during the the writing process During the writing I think I think basically one of the things that we did that that helped and hurt a couple of times Both like back and forth was having such strict criteria on how we wanted the songs to go like Having the strings involved in having and having things like that I think Trying to remember a specific instance when that when that occurred. But just like trying to Make the songs fit. Altogether was Was a little bit of a challenge. Remember a few few times after we had like things like numb and we had the ideas for slip the news. Kinda going which at the flea a moment. Where were that occurred? But yeah I mean it was. There is definitely a lot of stuff. of ideas that may be sounded Similar to something that we would've done on American candy or although lonely that was just it. It just didn't feel like exciting so that was hard to like. Feel like we had to find something that was so different than we had ever done before. Yeah totally I remember. Slip the news we finished. I think I even because we knew we all like that and it was a leftover kind of we've talked about a bunch but the black butterflies hard right and that was like one of the first things we did and I remember finishing on always being like okay. We'll that bar pretty high like it's going to be tough to beat that. Yeah yeah good thing exactly. That's that's kind of what I met by both like just having the songs be certain style like when when we finished that when I was like man. This is so cool. This is in a new direction at like. It feels it feels so exciting and then. I was like Shit. What what else do we have in that lane? You know like And I think at the at the initial stages that was just a challenge I think like Numb came pretty close after that. And that's when I started feeling like okay we have. We have a lot of different things that like fit in this In this new style. Yeah sure the next question is Were there any other contenders as the first single from the album? Or was it always numb habit? My best have it. Yeah Yeah my Miss Habit. We went through that. That was difficult decision. You're definitely pat. You are definitely a habit guy. A force I was there for you. Yeah for for for a bit. Yeah I mean it was. It was kind of like we we. We always get down to like two song and it's just like oh either either way could be good or or or bad. Yeah and we spent like a couple like yeah. We spend all that time talking about why each one could be better than the other and then we leave ourselves. Nowhere closer usually. It's just like we gotta pick one. Yeah I mean I think I think our booking agent helped with that a little bit Mike Marquee was like it's your seventh album like I know. Number is a little crazy but you got to like throw down. It's ass and he's GonNa think yeah. I remember that like all right. Let's phone brand. Yeah exactly this is a good one. What is your least favorite song on the album? Boy At least favorite song which is a. It's a hard thing you don't WanNa offend anybody. That that's their their their favorite song and give them a bad taste. But you know we're answering the hard hitting Questions on a podcast. I mean Do that's tough because I mean we played what two of them live. At least women played. I feel all over one sunset so I'm a journalist Sh this is hard. I'd say maybe all over I don't I don't really have a good reason. I just don't I really don't have a good reason if I have to pick one like like but I mean if I had to okay so you have all your friends in one row if just eliminate one of them like you'd have to. I'd have to just choose the one who I haven't seen in a while right like you had to pick me right. You am I to say I already know. Sharia you can do it. I'm going for evermore. Okay Wow Sorry. But barring there's nothing is it's not just cousteau honestly would have been better with some drums. It would have been sick with drums. No everything be better with drums and bass on it changed you guys see. That Travis Barker added Drums Acoustic Song the other day. He video his board. And there's Acoustic Song you just added Syndromes Janice House. I'm I might get the same thing to a fair to say it's never too late. If you're really ordering now you can just GonNa win. Throw drums up on everything insane on it to drum parts like let's be real. He probably overplayed a little bit. No actually is very simple really. Yeah all right all right. What song almost didn't make it on the album. Broken parts who is probably the closest right broken parts? Real real struggle is like feel like we. We got really close to finishing that when a couple of times and we were just like we get hung up on. Is this good enough or we need a better vocal melody or factual five just like wasn't there. It didn't come together. It's like the very very last minute now. That one was a close. No go yeah. It was Kinda hard find the balance between the electronic things making it feel like a band that the same same time and it was like we think we. We always take one step too far in both ways. Yeah totally yeah. Twenty turning what we what we change to make it and I don't remember I. I think we went back to an earlier version of it. And we're like Oh like what that will rethinking by by overthinking in China to to add at all this this stuff on. It wasn't the the rift it. Kinda reminded all of us. U2 that like the conforms yeah. There's a point like well it's in. It's in the refrain right. It's referring to the core of the band and it was like we were kind of like not lost but we just didn't have like a reference was so funny that we ended up bus. U2 is a reference because it ended up like it is art. But it's not like the song isn't really that at all but it I remember it. Kinda push us through in that way where we're just. It was just one of those things where you're stuck banging your head against the wall. You need that. Want something to happen. And then I think when when we actually put the real strings on it I think having that real element change the dea from like Behr electonic he to having that natural. Feel and yeah. Yeah that's the first thing you hear it too. Yeah I think that was a big change. 'cause are originally. The intro was tar ref and it felt like a pop song. I don't really think of modern Mendez soon. Yeah for some one of those like kind of like it was totally not our what we would do to start a song and then once we added that in because I remember using the the Called coldplay album the veto veto wherever as a reference for that because that was kind of whether they blended they were doing strings and stuff on that and they were doing like really cold it off. Yeah that's funny. Coldplay man play coldplay. Do you to lean big and Travis Barker climbing over an acoustic all the references get. I can't wait to listen to all the I'll I'll I'll send you a link. We got this. Yeah just blast out. In the checks coal suite banks glad to see you guys are alive man out over here my are later but thank you for listening to the eighty. Twenty through podcast. You are okay edition. We'll be back in a couple of days but the new episode.

spotify twitter US jared Ken Travis Barker Joe Google Mike kind Eddie Johnny Marr tim apple Monica Monica Cool John coldplay Chicago Mike sanely New York
The Ocean Blues David Schelzel and the glory days of Sire Records

The Rhino Podcast

43:22 min | 1 year ago

The Ocean Blues David Schelzel and the glory days of Sire Records

"Ladies and gentlemen records retired plate spinners and millennials who want to impress their parents with record collections. Welcome to the Rhino cast. PODCAST brought brought to you by Rhino records get ready for new releases detracts and conversations with your favorite artists and bands and balloons for the kiddies. And now your host with the most which may have and Dennis the menace on this episode of the Rhino podcast executive producer. John you speaks with David shells the ocean blue Hey Hey rich hey. Dennis Happy New Year Happy New Year. Here we are in twenty twenty and you know there's great debate out there about whether this is the naked or the new decades starts next next year either way we hope you had a happy and healthy holiday season with your friends and family. Yeah did did you by any chance rich. Did you get any gifts. That have the Rhino Rhino label on them. I feel like I get gifts from Rhino all the time. What that leads to a you? Are you implying that we're rhino insiders. We are happy to announce a brand new rhino program called Rhino insider and Dennis. You may ask. What is Rhino insider? A rich what is is right. Insider glad you asked. Rhino insider is our new loyalty program for music fans in the United States. And the District of Columbia Legalese. It's it's free to join and you earn points partaking in activities and connecting with us. So then you can use your points to redeem for rewards. So here's how you earn points. You engage gauge with Rhino on social media. Tell us what kind of music you love. READ ARTICLES ON RHINO DOT COM. And of course. Our favorite listened to Rhino podcasts. I WATCH VIDEOS MAKE PURCHASES ON RHINO DOT com. And you get points for all of this which then you can redeem for cool Rhino Swag and discounts you can get you turntables. Vinyl box sets exclusive content and discounts on music at the rhinos store and much more. And here's a very cool thing. The first one hundred rhino insiders to earn fifteen thousand points win woodstock back to the garden five. LP payback's said WHOA. Cool Dennis I think that you and I are both pretty sure that most of the people listening to this are already doing a lot of these things that they can earn points joints Bhai so we encourage you all out there to sign up and get credit for him and claim your loot. Because you're already doing it anyway if you're if you're obsessed with right. Oh this is a no brainer. So so Dennis you may ask. How does one become around? I do ask that you go. RHINO INSIDER DOT COM and click the become a rhino insider button. You'll get an email asking you to confirm your email address and once that's done you can start earning points so again join. RAIDO INSIDER AT RHINO INSIDER DOT com today on the Rhino podcast executive producer. John Hughes got to sit down with David shells from the ocean blue and discuss discuss the band's career arc their early albums on sire the albums that came after that. And what they're up to today. Did you know Seymour Stein. Love the band so much. He gave them with three album deal and they were teenagers. Nineteen eighty-eight that must have been so exciting. Can you imagine being a young musician. You've got your band hand for your high school friends and you get signed to maybe the coolest label of the eighties and the record went right on club MTV with the One and only downtown Julie Brown being a fan and then hit number two on the alternative charts their first single and their first three albums were on sire. And that's why we have this podcast today and their new album is called kings and Queens knaves and thieves and that I mean the people who don't know this band it's GonNa blow them away because the music was so of its time and yet timeless. It's one of those great bands that maybe maybe flew under your radar. But you're going to really enjoy listening to this music because I guarantee you it's going to sound familiar. Let's go to John Hewson. Here's conversation with the Ocean Blue Banjo in August. I know who you are David. Why don't you tell everybody listening who you're mark? I'm David shells while the singer and songwriter for the ocean blue so the ocean blue comes out of Hershey Pennsylvania in while while we would know it in the late eighties. But what did you guys start there so we met when we were in junior high high school middle school in we started making making music together pretty early on but really didn't play out or do anything publicly until we were late in high school and that would have been and you know. Eighty six eighty seven. Was it possible to do that back then. I mean it's crazy if you think about kids in high school now starting a band and playing out well. It was crazy Z.. Then too I mean we could not play in in a lot of clubs when we were underage knows that we could. There were a lot of tricks you know we we couldn't we got sequestered into the dressing room you know. We couldn't go out in areas where they're serving alcohol so it was a little tricky and we really wanted to play all age clubs and there weren't that many so. When does sire records enter under the picture for you guys? After we had been sort of being serious as a band we got ourselves a manager in New York. He's a guy that had ties to the area. We're from South L. Central Pennsylvania. We started working on some demos of our songs and we have been playing out for about a year which we really hadn't done up to that point in time I'm some of us. Were still in high school. Few of US had just graduated. I think but we did this. These demos of our of our early songs and our managers started to to shop those around who is managing at the time guy named Peter Friedman. Yeah really interesting guy you know as the years have gone by. I have more and more appreciation for him in what he did for us he sadly died about fifteen years ago and but a great manager really loved our band totally supported us and Made a lot of things happen for us. He was a real key to our success and he was young he had just moved to New York. He had a lot of young friends in the music. Business a guy who worked at spam. I Danny Keaton. who was very instrumental? Peterborough Danny to see US play in Philadelphia opening up for friends ends of cars in the innocence mission. But Danny really liked us. And he's like I want to sign those guys to to a developmental deal and we'll work together and shop the band stuff brown. And so. That's what happened Peter Danny and then Danny's boss Deirdra oh here at spam my and our lawyer shopped the demo tapes. Around and Seymour was immediately interested Seymour. Stein from sire records. Yeah but it's interesting you could have ended up on. SBK has they ended up. Ah having their own label in the early nineties like Jesus Jones and things. Yeah they did they did thankfully it was before that really came about in thank. I should say thankfully I mean sire was where we wanted to be the I. Why is that while it was the absolute coolest label in the eighties? For for America Seymour was signing gene super interesting bands bands from England that we loved but American bands people who were making great records and were or being played on college radio. The new wave punk rock stuff of the day. And so you know when I looked at my collection of music I mean half of it easy was on fire records. I remember you know. Just you're talking earlier about our reissues on. Vinyl Sire was really important for us to use the sire imprint. Because I have that memory as a teenager getting out my Aztec camera record echoing the Bunyamin the Smith's record and there was that Sire logo and to be on that label was was really was our goal fire and so we were ecstatic when Seymour expressed interest and there were a lot of other labels. To why Kook can you curious I sure can. I've got a Clive Davis Story. If you WANNA love story course so one. One of the band's we really liked at the time was bang called the Church and the Church had recently signed with Ariza interest was trying to branch out into alternative. Turn it if music or whatever. It was the music that we were making and that the church was was one of their signings and the in our guy that signed them was really interested in the ocean blue. And he's like you know I think you guys just be great are labels really going in this direction. Yeah we're more of an RB label historically but you know we. We want to be here now too. So they set up a private private showcase for us for Clive. Davis in New York rented out a rehearsal studio space. I remember kiss was rehearsing next door. Things got to meet Gene Simmons as he was on the pay phone. We set up in this very dark small rehearsal. Space and sat around for about half hour. Waiting for Clive. Davis Davis to just kind of show up and he arrives by Limo. Completely silent. Walks into the room sits down and looks at us with expectation. We're standing up there so we we play. We play a song in the I chord my string breaks and I'm so nervous I don't know what to do. And so he muddle through that song long nervously. And you know it's Clive Davis sitting like you know where you are for me. It's like right there and you're playing a senior nineteen At if that was YAU's probably eighteen. Do you have any idea who he was Not Like I do today but I you know I kind of knew is the president of this label. And he's legend and stuff. I don't remember if this is true but it felt like he was wearing sunglasses. That's true but you know he didn't he wasn't like hey guys how's it going and sat down and and you know expertise and we played than we played we played to size myron offer for secondly played between something and nothing and mature something. Nothing finished he got up he. He sort of nodded his head and he left it was it was like Oh that was good. He stayed for both trying to put a we. We did get an offer from them I mean and we got an offer from. RCA Warner Brothers. Interestingly enough as well as Seymour Ins Sire Columbia and maybe a few others. I can't remember those those I can remember a little bidding war was does it was. We were really really fortunate. Was Cash bidding war or was it more what you guys wanted control. That's a great question. I mean involved both but what was really important for us was to find a home a label that would support us through not just one record but multiple records and that's really where Seymour was smart. He didn't offer us the most money but he offered us a three firm deal right so if we would sign with Him we knew we had at least three records with fire. And you know most bands in those days where one or maybe two and so that was extraordinary and plenty of money to make a great record. I mean it seems like an obscene amount of money. Now when I think about it John Porter Yeah I mean Smith's yes well in. That was the great thing about signing with Seymour because he had in his artists. I've had relationships with all these great producers. It was Seymour suggestion that we go to London and we work with an English producer. Because we'd been so influenced by English bands. And when he suggested John Porter we nearly Plots the word I'll let you we're ecstatic super cool in just the fact that John would listen to this stuff and then he ended up liking it and wanting to work with extraordinary. How much did you learn from him? Being being in the studio so much I mean people that work with him tend to come away with like. Oh now I know how the studio works absolutely. That was true. No I mean we were so so green. Going into that record never really had a major studio experience. John was one of the kindest nicest people I've ever met really I am kind of producer But also like an an educator to like a good teacher would be or a mentor. And so you know. We talked a lot about how how guitars are recorded. These the first guy that ever showed me how to do multi tracking guitars and Manning Acoustics. And how you can use a distorted electric for a really beautiful wonderful sound. That's not necessarily like hard rock. You know we talked a lot about the recordings he did for the Smith. We are working in the same studio where how soon is now is recorded. I mean I played in the same aim amps some of the same amps. Johnny used you know talked about this charming man and you know that was just I mean. Even if we weren't making our own record that would have I've been worth the price this you say you the UK to record record this with the UK producer brings up something interesting. You guys really got mistaken for British band when you first came out a lot right. Oh Yeah and did that both you or does that bug you. It used to release too. Yeah I I I. I don't even know why anymore I guess when we started. I really wanted to to be known for who we were in being unique and for where we are from we were very unique. You had some pride in Hershey because your videos and everything right. That's true. I think it was just more. We wanted our own identity. Okay now and I think frankly most of the bands we love would say the same thing but now it doesn't bother for me if you think about. Music is such a universal thing. I mean you don't like music because of where it's from you like it because you like it and maybe where it's from his part of. Why are you like it so yeah I mean our influences were were around the world particularly England? Yeah so the album comes out between something and and nothing gets some play on MTV one hundred twenty minutes at that point probably right Yup not quite alternative nation yet and it gets to number two on the modern rock charts charts. You guys were sailing. How is the reception that back? Then what do you remember this win. The laugh tour happened or it was before for so before we did the left tour uh-huh which was yeah? Tell us about the tour. Yeah so that was so sire put together a big tour with basically three acts that were releasing records that year that was nineteen ninety. Our record came out. I think eighty nine so as the mighty lemon drops and the ocean blue and John. Wesley harding was our first big tour tour tour buses big venues and that sort of thing before that though in the fall we did our own headlining tour and it was on. That tour were are between something and nothing the thing and then later drifting falling were breaking as singles on modern rock chart and we were getting airplay one twenty minutes. I can remember. We were at a hotel in Miami in. They had told us the only your video is going to be on one twenty minutes tonight and so we we turned it on in. How soon is now was was playing like this one of my favorite songs and I was like and the next song was drifting falling psycho? I felt like it was extraordinary Kendall moment where he actually said your name like ocean blue. Yeah exactly so. That headline tour is happening. And you guys are doing well. And you get on this last tour. What the laugh tour was like college campuses and I remember that right? There were a lot. Yeah college campuses. We were reminiscing about that. I think when we played San Diego and San Francisco that mall no San Diego. It was was a campus there. Yeah I would say about a third. Almost half of that tour was on college campuses which was great because that's really where our fans were in college college and high school and of course we were that age too so it really felt like a good place to play and then you know small theaters clubs kind of thing. So what was the road like for the ocean blue for a bunch of eighteen nineteen year olds on a college tour. I you know I confess. I didn't like it all that much. It was really cool. Oh for a couple of weeks and then it got really hard was. It wasn't so much that it was homesick. But it just really felt like I was on the campaign trail where I was on a military campaign. You know it I mean you know what I mean. It's a little bit like that year. You know you play a show. You're done you get on the bus you sleep. You wake up in the next city you do it all over again it becomes becomes king become really repetitive. And so it was a little little tough honestly but along with that it was wonderful to because people were buying our records records. We were playing for crowds that were super enthusiastic and excited to see us. They pay you to travel using for free right. Yeah that part of it was Israeli side. The first album does well. Then you kind of take the reins for the second album's ruling right you producer yourself. How first questions? How did you convince the record company? Let you produce the your second record yourself seymour anymore. And Howie Klein the GM Were really cool about giving bands artistic freedom. I mean I think they would try hi to prevent you from driving off a cliff with what you wanted to do but seymour was always like no. The artists knows more than anybody how they should sound and we did work with a great engineer. Actually two engineers with great recording engineer. Integrate mixing engineer but production. We did you know there was definitely a certain sound. I wanted that record to have. I wanted to have a mood in the atmosphere. And you know he really respected that and gave us a lot of freedom. I I was when I think about got it now. It's extraordinary. Is it fair to say that the COCTEAU twins were a bigger influence on that record or my projecting. No it's fair to say I in just the expanded expanded. I mean after we did the first record. I really started getting I discovered and start getting into just the whole four eighty catalog so cocteau twins for sure but You know the the project moon the melodies Dead can dance This mortal coil and just the art the vibe the whole atmosphere and space. Yes I mean maybe I don't know if that's dream hopper what it is but that sound and of course nobody's like the COCTEAU twins they're they're thing unto themselves and they're beautiful and I don't I don't I don't think we sound anything like them. But that element of space and atmosphere and haunting beauty. I really wanted to go after that. There's as a rule Robin Guthrie affects pedals. Stacked on top of each other. Sound that we're absolutely you know that's there. I mean there were the you know my my guitar. Heroes are Robin of course but before him the edge and we'll sergeant and Johnny Marr and particularly the engine will sergeant. I mean lots of reverb are lots of big sounds not flashy solos so much and those atmospheres I was really into and when I heard Robbins work in that that time. I was transfixed transfixed burn. Aw Bring You're not going to remember this but we met in nineteen ninety-three at peabody's down under in Cleveland. Ohio and I was backstage and I asked you about this record and then I told you my my favorite of the three that were at that time and you told me Yeah. This one almost broke up the band and I remember you saying that. Is that an accurate quote. Or is that how you're feeling the rhythm and sound for surly. Sarukhan yeah yeah it. Did I think I was probably more strong willed on that one than any other record the guys that I started the bandwidth and Steve Steve in particular are keyboard players ex player. Steve Steve Lau right. I mean we're all best friends growing up and I think on the first record. There was a lot of collaboration. I would bring a song to the ban but we would work many things out in rehearsal and poppies basement. Basically Bob's at Bob's house in but on the second record I really demo up most of that on my own on my four track and brought it guys and said this is the way it's going to be and I think that you know as I think about it now very naturally probably created some friction in Steve was also getting into. I mean you think about the early nineties rave stuff mad chest. Yeah exactly in. Steve was really into that and then shortly after that electronic music which I totally dig. But it wasn't like what I wanted. The ocean blue to be so I think we had more of these artistic nick tensions within the band and making that record and you know listen that there's no sacks on it right. Some of the keyboards are stuff. That I did or rob did our drummer so I think you know there was. There was some tension there but it ended up being bigger record than the first record. Yeah I think that's what will you would know. Yeah I mean and I feel like both those records I think they eclipsed the third record that we did in terms of sales. Yeah DOC dream A Dan you have ballerina out of control that gets a lot of MTV he play So and Sara Lee and the title track and even Mercury. You had work in three singles now and you can. To a critical mass has been casting saw It and then we hit between the rhythm and sound is that were cash registers started a little dollar sign started appearing in record company because pupils. Yeah I think the goal with that record though was to really sort of see if you could we could break beyond this modern run right in so sublime was the a big single off that we did a big budget video in Iceland which took it to top forty up top forty radio we had regular. MTV Airplane on just one twenty minutes. But I think we are. There were a lot of cross-currents starting to happen within the music business at that point and certainly within the genre that we were plugged into the modern rock thing. I mean you were talking earlier today about Nirvana's record and and how modern rock kind of became mainstream and shifted to more of Seattle sound than say maybe a UK sound and so beneath rhythm and sound is. It's not a sort of grungy angry record. It's a pop record it. It's not just worst you've But it's interesting we're talking nirvana breaks breaks and all of a sudden all these bands that have been you know college rock using air quotes all of a sudden we're all over MTV rem. And you know. I'm I'm blanking thinking on other examples right now but you guys should have been the beneficiary of that as well and it didn't quite happen. Is it because you think it's too poppy of record and not as angsty. I I have no idea why music is mysterious thing in why things happen. Why things don't you know? There's not often a correlation between quality and success and and I'm not saying that we were really quality and didn't have success. I don't mean that so much. But it's mysterious. I mean if you look at rem I think rem has always been probably more of a rock band band that could that could kind of shift more to what was happening in the nineties. The ocean blue a little bit more subtle a little bit more poppy in atmospheric. Yeah I just don't I don't think that was a record that was you know right for the Times. Well let's talk about your fan base. What how would you describe your fan base if you had to? I think we have some amazing fans really passionate really dedicated. And I'd say this having just played a show last night a bunch of them here in Los Angeles and and Tetris Patrick just great. I mean it was overwhelming and it's really touching to talk with people before after the show where like you hear how much your music has meant to them and so we have a very dedicated fan base. And it's it's really deepen that sense and it's not but it's also really wide so we have fans all over the world But but we can't necessarily pay play for you know several thousand people in every city in the world but I think because of our years on sire in the tremendous amount of of support we had from the label and all the radio success the MTV stuff. There's a Lotta people who know who we are surprising number. It's always shocked me just to put a pin in in the years when you look back. Are you kind of amazed that you are part of this Kinda fraternity absolutely. I mean it's crazy right. It is and it's frankly wrinkly a privilege you hear a lot of artists talk about horror stories with their particularly major label record experiences. We don't have those horror stories. I mean I I might sound like a fan boy sitting here at Warner but I mean we were really well treated in really well supported Seymour gave us a tremendous amount of artistic control and respect Howie. Klein was amazing in helping spearhead the promotions Great Radio uh-huh in product management. So I really look on that as a tremendous privilege. More to your question I will forever be. I mean into be on the same label as so many bands. That are the most important bands to me as a as a fan of music. Yeah I wouldn't trade it for anything John The last sire release was the peace of mind. EP which is now available digitally for Vancouver. It's okay for the first time in. I don't know since it was released right. And if you haven't listened to it I would encourage everybody to go because it's a great cover of Smith. There is a light that never goes out that you guys still covered coverage Robert last night. Yeah but also a really great beside call Sea of green now. Am I right in assuming that that's all you in. What sense all me is that just did you on Sea of green playing or my wrong? I didn't play drums well. It's almost like a home demo of use stacking up. It kind of is Guitar Front because that song is mostly. I mean. It's a big wall of guitar sound. Yeah Yeah thank you you have this great experience on Sire and then your fourth record things come to kind of a head and you I believe in you go to mercury. You say you know horror stories through well. That's not entirely true. Yeah I mean it. It was very sad to leave sire. I in retrospect I wish we had stayed although I don't think it would have necessarily change the trajectory of where we're going and what happened in the music. What was the standoff enough money? Yeah money in what we were going to do on the fourth record. I think I really wanted to take the band in a different direction. At that point I was really into guitars and wanted a guitar record. It's really started getting into probably British rock bands of the sixties and Seventies. And you know wanted a record that sounded like the kinks or something right but yeah Seymour was we couldn't work things out in so we laughed and we went to polygram mercury and had a great and our guide there. He was super supportive. And the president of the label. Danny Goldberg I think you know scientist. He was great. Those guys were great. They gave us a huge of our biggest budget to make record to date and we worked with an American producer. who was who was some kind of the Anti John Porter? He wasn't like wasn't like a kind shepherding shepherding He was more of a challenging postmodern producer. And he's brilliant producer right but it was a different experience and I think you know we needed a bit of a kick in the butt to make different kind of record and for me. It's one of my favorite records. It sounds I think it sounds very ocean blue. A lot of people think it's getting hard it gets unfairly tagged like your response to grunge but listen to slide a precise you know. Listen to whenever you're around when you you know. I think people have at this bad perception of this record. Well yeah thanks I mean I. It's I'm really proud of in. You know like you say we. We still play several songs off of it. Slide is the one we riposte ways and means we play a lot. I think it sounds like the ocean blue but yeah that was a hard record to make. It took a long time. We worked with Dennis the producer in Nashville and Oxford Mississippi and then England for a while we mixed it there and there was a longer period of time between beneath rhythm and sound and the peace and light EP and then when that came out MHM In so we have lost a little momentum by the time the record came out a lot of the people had signed us at that label had lost their job in that label. Didn't know who we were or either. I mean everyone here. At Warner Brothers. who were working the record? They all knew who we were. They knew we had these hits and on the on the radio and on on MTV and so it was a different set folks at polygram and the record business was falling apart. They didn't even pony up for video. Did they know that there there was a video. We're also to do in the last pulled the plug on it so we never did a video for that record And so after see the ocean blue you guys kind of take a break while we started working on a new record which became Davy Jones. Lock right and when it became apparent that things are really falling. Apart in the late nineties in mercury really wasn't interested in in doing the record. They would have done it but it was not looking like a smart thing to do. We negotiated our way out of that deal. Oh so you did not get dropped. You guys know okay. I mean it was. It was a mutual parting of the ways. I had a year to where I was really trying to figure out. Do I really want to try to go out. And get another major label deal or not and I was turning thirty and now I WANNA go to Grad School. So that's what I did. So what did you do. What did you went to law so right up going to law school? Yeah so spent years doing that. But my first year law school we got contacted from an Indie label a guy named skippy. who had a record label called March records and he had worked with Peter R. A. R. Nar guy at Polygram and he was a fan and he's like man you know? I know you guys work on this record. Davy Jones's locker. I'd like to put it out and I think we even had put it together and we're starting to release. It just wouldn't have online at that point. I don't know maybe mailing list or something. And he's like I want to put that on my label and I want to book you guys some shows I thought okay. Yeah and so we started. We started playing out and we released that stuff with him independently and it was actually kind of successful and then we thought Oh. I got inspired to work on another record which was waterworks. Ed Ronnie really started writing a lot of stuff that I thought was great. And I'm like wow you know I don't have the time to like finish all all the stuff said waterworks came out and it's kind of half David Heff ed record right. After Davy Jones but Davy Jones's really is the lost mercury polygram records. Uh Waterworks comes out you guys start touring again you end up in Peru places says what's going on in South America yeah full. The extraordinary thing is yeah. We you know we would get these offers from time to time to play different parts of the World Europe or Japan or Australia or something and and then this offer started coming in from South America in Peru in particular Peter. Our drummer was like you know plied applied really liked to go too much really cool and and you know the promoters cal. Will you guys come down here and play one show and then we'll take you around the country and it was it. It was like well. You know the worst case scenario paid vacation right so we go down there in discover. I mean particularly the first time there was like the Beatles it was just insane gene and You know so. We ended up playing for people in Lima That were like probably three times as enthusiastic as the crowd you saw in Los Angeles and of course those guys were superintendent. I mean really like you. Know storming the van as we're coming into the venue and plane show and they know every word every word and after the show is people signing me things to or handing me things to sign. And I'm seeing I'm seeing all these little bootleg cassettes and CDs of our records and you know realizing while we have our legit falling here. That's really just social. Media was starting in all of a sudden. You're starting to you see people connecting with you from South American from Mexico and so yeah we have. We have a really huge part of our fan base in central and South America. So you you mentioned Paraguay that brings us to the new record which is titled. The new record is kings and Queens knaves and there's a song called Paraguay my love guess. Which is I'm guessing inspired from your trips down there it is? Yeah uh so. Tell us about the new record. I think it sounds like a classwork. It could have been your fourth record. Oh Wow thanks thanks. Yeah so the new record in the record we did before it to ultra marine our records we've done entirely on our own. Didn't work with producers outside producers or engineers or studios for that matter these records we've done in my home Studio Peterson Studio at home studio and you know I write a song and I work it up in my studio and start sharing it with the guys is and we. We put the record together. That way the the advantages I can work on it whenever I want and rework it till it's really. They're the disadvantages manages. It takes a long time record that way because we're not sequestering ourselves away for weeks or months to do it I can get it done. We're working on it. Bits at a time But you also have another job that I don't think people know I do yeah. You're an intellectual property lawyer. Yeah which is an awesome thing for an artist to be. Is it not. Yeah I mean I learned a lot about the law in about intellectual property in particular went from being an artist and so you know from the time we signed our first deal with Warner brothers. You know figuring out what the contract means figuring out the whole concept of copyright and trademark is is just really fascinated me like this ownership you have in the intangible and for me it's always been like more of an organic connection to a song as a writer but then I realized the whole record business is built around copyright law. So yeah I got really into that and I went to law school. Frankly just kind of study that in figure it out and then it became a real cool practical thing for me to do to. Our people scared when they find out what you do. I hope not. I'm not a very scary guy but that's amazing. So you guys are touring now in could you imagined didn't that he would be doing this thirty years later. No no no. I thought I'd I thought that I would quit when I was thirty veteran. Do this anymore. But I don't know when you love music and you make music you. It's a part of you. I realized just doesn't go away and as long as I'm not making a complete fool of myself and John You told me if I am okay well then then yeah. I think I'll continue to do it. And I thank you for being with us today. David and pleasure giant. Now if if you have not gotten your copies of the classic Sire Ocean Blue Albums you can get them on ocean blue dot com and the new records on there too and everything's on on spotify your favorite streaming service and when these guys come to your town please go see them because you will not be disappointed as a great show. And it's not for everyone I think thank you have to have a certain taste level. How's that okay all right? Thanks Dave thank you John. Well Rich I think that that conversation precision confirms the fact that if you were not into the ocean blues music it's time to discover it in a major way. I was love hearing from the people that created the music music because it gives you their thoughts when they were creating it when they were writing recording and I love having that inside viewpoint and that David shells will gave us great great interview by Executive Producer. John Hughes Happy New Year folks. Thanks so much for tuning in and make sure to check out right now. INSIDER DOT COM. Thanks very much for tuning in. Don't forget to listen and subscribe on I tunes so you don't miss the next Rhino podcast executive producer for Rhino Entertainment. John Hughes News produced for Rhino Entertainment by pop colts and Richmond. Promotions all rights reserved.

the Times America Seymour producer MTV David John Dennis Seymour Stein United States Rhino England executive producer John Hughes MTV John Porter New York Paraguay UK Johnny Marr
S1:E22  The Cranberries

Soundrise Podcast

35:55 min | 4 months ago

S1:E22 The Cranberries

"You're listening to sunrise Rice podcast show hosted by Alex in Serbia and Vlada in Poland each week we cover different artists tour band and engage in an open and spontaneous debate and discussion about specific parts of their discography. Our goal is to expand their musical horizons and cover. A great range of artists and styles I know some patron Patriot Dot com slash stanway sport, and social media at sound race spot. Hello everyone. Welcome to another episode of sound Rice podcast. So today we have another special episode. A last time we ask you to choose one of two bands, Metallica and the cranberries, and it was a tie. So we decided to do both and today we're going to talk about the cranberries. So I'll Alex. how do you feel about our today's band? Good morning to you another morning episode. Feeling I'm feeling pretty good because I've never actually listened to this bent and it was a pleasant surprise, a heft to be honest and. just to better. They're not active anymore due due to tragic incident. Mata, can you tell us about that? Yes. So Only a great tragedy struck this band back in two thousand and eighteen. It's still very fresh dolores or reardon, the singer, and basically the main. Songwriter of the band was found dead in a hotel room in London and the cause of that the cause of death was said to be drowning. So another horrible tragedy in in the rock and roll history and after listening to these songs of last couple of days. I feel even more A. More, struck by this horrible tragedy and. I can feel what a big loss this was for the world of music in general so To all the fans of the cranberries. we can feel your pain to certain extent. This was an amazing singer, amazing songwriter and yesterday was her birthday. So we dedicate this call episode to her primarily and to the cranberries. Fans. Oh. I. Didn't know that it's whisker birthday yesterday so that that makes it even better and I definitely feel the pain while I'm not a cranberries fan yet but I can definitely see why they are so sad and why they miss her. So BLERTA. can you tell us about the history of this bent out they? Developed and came to the scene. All right. So The cranberries were founded in island. In the place called Limerick. And they were founded around eighty nine ninety. But it wasn't until they found their singer Dolores or reardon that they really got it going. So she joined the band soon after it was founded by. The Hogan brothers. Mike Kogan no. Hogan and Fergal lawler Laurel. Sorry lawler was the fourth member of the band. She wasn't the original singer interestingly enough, but she joined the band soon after its inception. So this is the lineup at never changed from this moment forward, it never changed and the band had its first major success three years later with the first record that we will be talking about everybody else is doing it. So why can't we know? This band is probably known to almost everyone who has any interest in music primarily due to their huge hit Zombie back in the mid nineties nineteen, ninety four I remember as a child I was ten years old eleven years old. This son was everywhere. This song was so huge especially in conjunction in conjunction with the video. It was pretty much on the same level as smells like teen spirit that came a bit earlier. Yes it was you. You just can't imagine. Alex. it was everywhere everybody knew the song. You would see several times a day on the television and to be fair as a kid I was kinda irritated by mainly because it was overplayed. So after some time, I couldn't stand it anymore but now with a fresh set of years as an adult. I really really enjoy the sun which will be touching upon later on. So the ban had a very successful illustrious career from that moment forward released. Several records. went to the short creators between two thousand and three in two, thousand and nine. Came back. But unfortunately they career as we said, was tragically interrupted by. The death of Dolores reardon. And again, we dedicate episode to her. So without any further ado, let's move along to the first record of the day. The first album everybody else is doing it. So why can't we came out in nineteen ninety-three? So at the height of GRUNGE craze or at the end of the grunge craze depending on how you look at it The cranberries isn't alternative band came up with this rather melodic records. So Alex, what are your thoughts on this record? Great into introduction. Thanks for that I thought this record. Sorry was a great debut album I. Think they sound a competitive and pretty much like will will put machine. You know I thought it. This band. This record story had a lot of catchy songs here. That could stand the wrong ground also, very interesting postbank elements especially, with Song Dreams as Post Drum. But all the love South, all the love songs I think most of them are pretty much. It's a lot but interpreted the. Non Cliche Way I would say All of them are I, don't know I really enjoyed them and the yes it was rather melodic and. Some states. Somewhere between the positive and the negative, I would say because the latter record sounded. More dark wood we'll get. We'll get into that. I don't really know what Song here is which song here is kind of. The best because the record is pretty much consistent but I do have some standouts and Yeah absolutely dolores was here the star. So No. No doubt about that. And I. I was really kind of impressed because as you said, a lot of this was. In the the finishing stages of grunge, and possibly the beginning of Brit's pop in this this record didn't really sound like either of those of those styles lot. What do you think? True and what really reminded me of was the smiths interestingly enough and now. I've just read this record was actually produced by the smiths. Producer. Stephen Street. So that may not be a coincidence but also. The Guitar. Work here really reminds me of Johnny Marr and the rhythm section to however I. Think this is very distinguishable from the smiths mainly due to dolores or reardon and her vocal style. So before I make my own statements about it, I would like to ask you what did you think about Dolores in her singing and how important it is for the spanned and to this particular record? Absolutely crucial I. Wouldn't be able to imagine this this band without her in the lineup I think that her vocals were. You know the main thing here and I may sound harsh but the music even though it's pretty good. It kind of support for vocals. It's kind of meant to be her support because she is the star here, and that's also the case with with the other records it. We're GONNA talk about. So I pretty much raised her as a vocalist and She Truly Unique you those kind of reminds me of some folk singers like I dunno grace slick. So That's interesting but. Ranges is really fascinating. Yes and and you know that's the thing that really struck me here at a type I was really impressed by upon the. I. Listen because to be fair the songs are really good on this first record. But? There wasn't any song that really blew me away I. Just really enjoyed it very much even but it was her vocals curve styled. It's so unique and especially loved her axe and her very thick Irish accent that she sings with because there's a lot of Irish bands. We don't really hear that accent so much you know. For example you too. I mean, you hear it here and there, but it's not. So prominent in in Bono's singing voice. But here we dolores. You immediately know that she's Irish right right upon hearing her and then. Kerr. Vocal style is so unique. people especially pay notice to it because of Zombie that chorus, but we'll get to that later. But throughout this record. I just. Really enjoyed it and I totally fell in love with vocals. So I think that's a big big factor for this album and for this band. Think, it adds a lot to the songs adds a certain kind of poignancy, a certain kind of. Certain kind of. Resonance that really affects listener to. Some good tracks here that I would single out the last track put me down. For example, he's is track with these things really come to the forefront. But linger was a massive hit. Apparently I don't know to me. This is not one of the better tracks on the record. It's a good. Competent track I like I like the way the band incorporates shrinks into their sound. But. Honestly I, prefer the tracks it sound a bit darker or. Sunday was a really good track for for instance, and pretty I loved pretty because it's about. You know. Positively regarding ones look acceptance of your look. The idea that. There's more to being pretty than. Typical conventions. So some great tracks. But nothing that really hits me hard to be honest. But still a very good incompetent record. So maybe we could. Give. Our ratings I would say to me this is seven. So very good record very enjoyable and loved her vocals. What about you Alex? Okay. Fair enough. For me I would give it a seven point five. It's May grow with may grow eventually to an eight and standout trek here is you know we agreed on the fact that it does have stand tracks but out pick. Detract called how? All right and and my standard track would be I. Think put down the last track I really enjoy we down. Put me down. Put me down. Great. So let's move on to the second album. The big. One right no needs to argue so Under. How did you feel going from the debut to this album? What has changed with the band. What do you think? Okay. So the obvious. Differences that. The obvious difference is that this album is longer it's like fifty minutes fifty minutes long I? Think. It's definitely is darker. It features the the the Song Zombie, which to be honest I. Don't think is the best trek here. Not just because of the overplaying but I think that this records pretty much stacked with good songs. I I'm not really sure about the lyrical content here because some of it reminds me of some tragic incidents in the past. But on the other hand, other songs, remind me some personal struggle. So it wasn't really easy to. Understand the lyrics here by the you know you have this Ode to my family, the first, Shrek you have Zombie. which is think about. The war and then you have other tracks definite layment and no need to argue just more personal. Did you have the same Christian letter? Oh. Yeah. For sure I mean I I really enjoy the lyrics have to say especially from this album forward. I. Liked the lyrics and the first one but I think here they're more. Straightforward and they are more political for sure. They're more politically charged especially Zombie. which is about the troubles in Northern Ireland. So she was inspired by that time she was inspired to ride Zombie after a terrorist attack by IRA with two kids were killed. So that's what really inspired her to write this song, and at that time people were a bit surprised especially after the initial hits from the previous record like linger. And Dreams which remorse they can have them more of a poppy vibe compared to this. Now, this is a very dark antiwar song. It's it's certainly about island Northern Ireland, but it could also be applied to other situations i. think at that time unfortunately, there was a war going on in in our former homeland Yugoslavia and. It could definitely relate to that as well in my head know when I listened to it. Just the fact how senseless the violences in how some people are willing. To do these things to even go as far as killing kids are. Putting kids in harm's way and I think as as such. This song is really resonant in really hits home for me at least and that's why I am wild. The record has other good songs which I will get to in a second I. Think this is the highlight for me and while it's overplayed, I haven't heard it in a while. I could kind of listen to it with fresh years in a paid more attention to lyrics. Because when it first came out, my English was basically almost non existent. So I didn't really understand the song I could feel it sentiment but now it really hits home for me as, for other tracks here. So, many to choose from a really consistent record and I think a notch above the previous one. The that I also loved is the icicle melts. And it's another song. it's another song about. A murder of child. So, it's definitely something that. Made a huge impression on Dolores and. You know sometimes they miss son's like these in rock music you know when? It's obviously you know I mean. I may take risks saying this, but I think it takes a woman to write a song like this in almost feel this sort of Compassion and sympathy that is kind of an absent from from men like they're capable of it. But hear me out. Certainly male songwriting as a capable of writing on such issues. But you can tell this is a woman writing and I know. This might sound sexist in any way so I apologize. But to me this sounds like. The way she writes about is so perfect. You can really it's so poignant it so much emotion. Yes it's. You can feel that compassion from the songs and Just, amazing. The icicle melts and there there is another song that I will get to when we talk about the next record where I think she also captured. So perfectly this suffering of a child and I just never heard that in any other. Records. You know anyone describe it so well. So guys if you have any songs that talk about similar topics. please bring bring them to our attention. So we can compare because honesty when it comes to this kind of subject matter I never heard anything like this. Okay so Alexander how about you? What do you say about this one? Yes, I pretty much agree with you. the only thing where I can't really agree on as Song Zombie because. Yes, it's overplayed I will say though that I remember playing it with my i. when I was just starting out with day splaying because it has this cool baseline. It's pretty much easy for beginners. So guys you if you want to pick up a bass guitar. Make sure to practice. You're playing on this song. It's. It's really fun. And the yet. Pretty much considered pretty much a consistent record. what I found shocking is. The professional ratings on Wikipedia like rolling stone. Gave it two point, five stars and. what else? The enemy a gave them Get four out of ten. So that's really shocking but I think this out was pretty much at the opposite. Yeah I, think that's a very low rating. It would be interesting to to read that review to see what the reviewer thought. While these records are not perfect anti-measure. On this one, there are few standout tracks that really deserve higher rating than two point five so. Look. That's an interesting topic because. We, kind of got into reviewing albums now and giving ratings and it's extremely hard. You know I think. People tend to focus on flaws too much or what they perceive as flaws, and sometimes they disregard the effort and the skill of the artist and. I think that there's so much stuff that's underrated or since too harshly, it almost feels like people need things to be perfect in order to work and I just feel that that's a huge problem especially when it comes to music reviews because a lot of good records go unnoticed. To low ratings and Such a spoiled way of thinking. Yeah but I mean the other hand, it's a very subjective thing. You know when you give out the rating or When you give your impressions of a certain record. Records I gave some low rate things here on our show, and I'm sure that some of these records mean the world to somebody else. And but I always want to make sure that at least. I can show that I, do appreciate the effort and the skill involved. The skill invested into making a record even if I don't like it like with corn I know that they're actually pretty good musicians. I just don't like their style I think some of the songs were repetitive and so on. So many times have you gone back to certain albums in kind of thoughts? Hey I should have given them a different rating be it's a low rating gore a high rating. well, in our case not really because. To be fair. Defend not particularly impressed by the record I don't tend to return to it. But there were times in the past where I would listen to something especially when I was younger and I would think Kate's like, okay it's nothing special and then few years later I. would revisit the record and it will be blown away because of having a fresh perspective and seeing things differently. Or having a better understanding of what's Song you know. So there's that. So sometimes, it's really worth revisiting records that you may have not been. Super impressed by. Akeso speaking of ratings and reviews. Let's get to to our own ratings about this album. No need to argue. So, in my opinion, this is an eight out of ten and my favorite track is. allegory would definitely meant. Oh, interesting. Okay. What is it about that track that? Made you. Consider the standout it's I think the combination of music and the lyrics. While the need to mention the vocals but? Usually, I'm not super president in music, but in this case I thought it was it was pretty good. All right my opinion it's very hard. So I already said it Zombie might be the best one, but I don't WanNa be too boring. So I'll add one more track to it. I think it's it's Zombie and The. Title tracks are the title track. No need to argue the last track I was really blown away such a beautiful end of the record beautiful ballads, her vocals just amazing so But as pointed out, there's other really great tracks here like empty twenty, one, twenty one is really cool because she talks about this transition into adulthood where you realize that some of your dreams will only stay just that your dreams you know. So lots of great lyrical content I like her writing style. The way she expresses personal experiences the way she she's so introspective and relatable at the same time I. Really Love. My final rating is eight and I would say zombies the best track after all. Okay. And moving onto nineteen ninety-one. The record is called. Buried the hatchet now. In my personal opinion, this is a big one. This is the album, the that I enjoyed the most and with this required to be extremely difficult to pick a standout track because I think it was consistent right from the from the get go from the first all the way to the last track There's a small detail about the cranberries kind of my personal impression. I prefer them in their acoustic arrangements without the distorted guitar and. In this record like yesterday I was on my way home cycling and I I I was listening to the district Kurds. Bear in mind guys, I didn't cause any trouble because I was listening to music while right here is. I was I was thinking fashion. It was concentrated enough. That's this record was a really good. Companion while driving actually well cycling. So yes, a great record different the best set of the three. I I'm I'm not sure if it's the best to be honest. Have to say though that when I put it on after the I, do it I academy negative impression because everything seemed to slick by comparison. But then as they went way went on listening to it he got better and better and it's really consistent might even more consistent than the previous two I'll give you that but I'm not really sure if it's better than the second album mainly due to the fact that the second album had a couple of really big songs and this one has them too but I'm not quite sure it's if they're on the same level. But again what I really liked about it. Are Some of the lyrics and the topics that she covers here. The child abuse. So another hard topic, the song is Fi fi five zero. And we all know that. Ireland is a Catholic country that there's a lot of abuse going on in the Catholic. Church. So I guess that's a prominent topic there but I'm not sure if that's what she was inspired by but I think that it really the song. Does a great job of. Expressing that sentiment you know she's so direct here. She's so direct and that's again what I was talking about previously saying how I never heard anyone speak about these things so directly and so emotionally. Like, you can feel her anger and her. Helplessness when you listen to this song. Over, what's going on with children over people who? Who? Who abused children in such disgusting horrible way, and again, these sounds may not be easy to listen to because they are so visceral in the way they convey these emotions. So that's definitely one of the standout tracks for me but also many other good tracks. The opening animal instinct is very catchy very poppy. Then you have songs like the deal with relationships like shattered a desperate Andy's song about probably about a friend who? Who is stuck in a bad Boring relationship been who is too afraid to embrace more freedom. So I like the way she covers these personal topics from Curl Life I. It's very refreshing to hear something like that. That kind of songwriting. What did you think of the album cover here? What I thought it was a UP. Characteristic that's interesting. Because this is such, a popular album cover must have seen it thousands of times. This is the first time actually listened to the record. Yeah that kind of sums up her writing style to write this. Basically, a nude person in a massive I staring at them. So thing that kind of sums up what she's all about. You know she's Baring her soul on the record and she she's talking about things that bother her things that. Make her feel sad, angry. Heartbroken and I think that's the biggest value of this band that kind of songwriting. More. So than there I dunno instrumental skill or anything else yeah. The Guitar Work is here pretty good especially when they use the famous chorus effect that I really like which is kind of reminiscent of the nineties and also the GRUNGE and post. PUNK, Butts. Her as a vocalist and songwriter here she was just absolutely. Crucial to this band. Okay. So what are your highlights here? K I just stated the the album cover which was really cool I think it's was the photo was probably taking the monument valley in the US, which is one of my top destinations. On my bucket list. One. Day I may visited Butts when it comes to the tracks the first wreck was a good animal instinct. Asada checks promises just my imagination Delilah. So A. Consistent Record and Yeah don't have much to add here. So shall we go to the ratings now you have anything else to add. Yeah I just want to point out this record does sound quite different. And some respects that gets more polished and produced. And that might be a turnoff for some listeners especially if you like their early style. But as they said, while I, I I kind of thought of it negatively but then once. The record set in I really enjoy the songwriting and I could really relate to a lot of songs in one way or another. So if you're one of those people just try to get through that feeling how something is amiss. But other than that it's actually very well produced record and really liked the arrangements and I think it's good when the band grows and tries new things and it's not a massive departure from their earlier originals style. So it's perfectly fine. Okay. So final ratings for me, this is another eight. And the standout. Track. The Standard Track for me is Let me think. Well I'd go with the. Fee Fife Oh. Okay. My slightly higher. So I'll go with eight point five. And my favorite trek here is the fifth straight, just my imagination. So blood. Just, summed up all three records we picked. So what is your final words and? I think that both of us will agree on that. The world will definitely miss this banned from now on. Yeah for sure and it's such a huge tragedy such a talented songwriter, an amazing singer with a very special voice I think. So, she will be missed for sure. Before, we wrap up this episode I just want to say that this band was. Chosen by David and Kelly are their patrons. So thank you so much. We really enjoy listening to the cranberries we knew about before but this was a nice way. To discover them a huge out to all our patriots, you guys are the best. Thank you so much for keeping as going. So huge shout to. To Nanna Peggy Stephan, Kelly, Young Co and Yana. Asha Stephanie and David Thank you so much guys. Okay. So Alexander any final thoughts? Yes I was I was glad that I could. Listen to this to this great band Thanks our take in. Thanks to our patients for suggesting this man. If you guys would like to support our show, please join our Patriot community for as little as one dollar per month that would mean the world to us and check out our social media. The handle is sound way spud. So the next time all. The best write a review in. Then you can share it with the world in any social media platform, and then your friends see it and you can share and discover new shows together. This is steph instigator of Padre of Day podcast review. Day Andy from inspired money and I'm arial of your buds podcast collective and cashbox. We're here to tell you everything you need to. Know about poverty, which is on the eighth of every month of every year of every century of every, you get it. We are posting podcast reviews as part of Hashtag Padres podcast review day because podcasters worked their butts off and deserve to know how much they've impacted your lives and you can do that through reviews. Even one star feels surprising would doesn't you know? That people are at least listen and don't be a passive podcast listener writer review until your favorite Creator what you love about their podcast or about a specific episodes and to participate, you just need to do one review and we'll see you every eighth of the month. Todd Day because podcasters deserve to hear it Hashtag Pod Day P. O. D. R. E. D. A. Y..

Dolores reardon Alex Alexander Limerick Metallica Hogan Andy Fergal lawler Laurel sunrise Rice Mata Mike Kogan London IRA Stephen Street Bono Northern Ireland Johnny Marr Todd Day
Charming Men: The Smiths vs. The Cure

Rivals: Music's Greatest Feuds

52:24 min | 2 months ago

Charming Men: The Smiths vs. The Cure

"Hey this is steve from the show. Rivals music feuds. I wanna talk to you about something important. I have a new book coming out. September twenty ninth in. It's not about beefs unless you consider radio heads fight against a writer's block rivalry it's called. This isn't happening. And it's about the struggles that radiohead went through to make their landmark two thousand album. Kid a had a lot of fun delving into the history of this brilliant band exploring the history meaning and significance of an all time classic record if you like rivals. I think you'll like my book again. It's called this isn't happening in the comes out. September twenty ninth. Okay now back to the show on september seventeenth two thousand nine twenty four year old my trees. Richardson disappeared without a trace. In the woods. Near malibu california and was never seen alive again. I'm katherine towns. Host of the podcast. Helen gone. We're going to try to find out what really happened to my trees. Richardson school of humans and iheartradio present. Helen gone season three. Listen to helen. Gone on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get. Your podcasts revels a production of iheartradio. Hello everyone and welcome to rivals the show about music. Beefs and feuds and long simmering resentments between musicians. I'm steve and i'm jordan and today we're take a look at the feud between morrissey of the smiths and robert smith of the cure. The rivalry means a lot to people because both of these bands spoke to those of us who felt alienated and lonely in our teens which as hardcore music fans is probably most of us we bonded with water both of these bands and a really special way. And we'll that's true that you could easily enjoy both. I know that everybody had their favorite. I think this revelry significant because it's not just a case of two bands exist in the same lane being unwittingly pitted against each other as rivals. The lead singers of these bands actually hated each other. i mean i forget oasis versus blur. This is the original battle of british pop rock bands warring with each other in the press and in spite of their reputations as these like mopey goth rockers. These guys were actually really funny when they were insulting each other. Oh yeah they were gallagher brothers level me and i was never able to figure out how real it was though mean i know they were competitive on some levels of battling out for subsection of punk late era. New wave sound With especially with their biting social commentary. But i also think that smith especially morrissey have a touch of the david crosby where they loved. Just playing up their misanthrope he by saying really outrageously awful things about people in the press for attention and headlines and you know i it makes me wonder if do they even mean it. I mean they both admitted as much morrissey once said. I lie a lot. It's really useful. And robert. Smith said i lie a lot especially in interviews so in my gut i feel like that's gotta be at play at some level in this too. Yeah i mean. I think that's true. I'm sure there was some exaggeration going on here. But i also feel like there was some genuine dislike and i think sent for more see in the nineteen eighties being seen as this poet and true artist and robert smith being depicted as melodramatic more adolescent guy in investing to see like this shift over the past several decades where i feel like in ways smith now has the level of respect that morrissey used to have. Of course that's due. Mostly the more see saying many awful things and self sabotaging his reputation. Yeah that's that's definitely a major factor. I to me talking about these bands. It almost makes me uncomfortable in the way because it conjures up these memories of such a weird time in my life personally. All that like angsty adolescent stuff. I'm sure other people feel that way. Too and i almost wonder if that sensation had an adverse effect on the reputation of the cure in particular because first time almost embarrassment that you liked because it was so linked to this painful awkward adolescent period that we all went through but ultimately she said i think that the cure benefited from and now we look back on them fondly because the music was always there for us during this crucial time and the cure of received the recognition. They deserve they were inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame and twenty nineteen. And what's more they survived the watch morrissey descend into a wing parody of himself. So that's a win. Yeah you mentioned the cure getting into the rock and roll hall of fame and the smiths are not in the rock and roll hall of fame. Which i think is a major crime. They deserve to be in there. But you know. I'm sure if you ask see about this he would say he doesn't care or he would be claimed that he doesn't care. But i like to think that this is something that robert smith can lord over him if they ever been to each other on like the post punk senior citizens circuit. But we're getting ahead of ourselves. There's so much to explore here so without further ado. Let's get into this mess so important to begin with a very crucial fact. And that's that steven. Patrick morrissey hates an awful lot of stuff. Yeah he needs everything he really does. I mean i just want to take a quick moment to demonstrate this point. He hates me. Roller coasters rain. Cold weather dance music. He's called rave music refuge for the mentally deficient and describe long hair as an impeachable offense which should be punishable by death. Yes rational he. He hates the music of stevie wonder which i think might be a first in human history with the who hates me. Wonder i got to speculate. It's maybe because stevie wonder's name is steven and steven. Patrick morrissey hates his birth name. Apparently reminds him of steve austin from the tv series. The six million dollar man we. She also hates. He doesn't like the name. Steve i know yeah you got you got some people saying. That's it's getting personal. He hates kate. Bush saying the nicest thing i can say about her is that she's unbearable. That voice such trash. He hates bob. Geldof calling him a nauseating character. He hates so many people. The list is to to even read over here quite tellingly. His first solo lp after the smiths disbanded was called viva hate and he's never denied being. You know too seriously misanthropic saying early interview. I hate most people. And i don't want to. It's an awful way to be but the human gives me no comfort. Oh my god and to illustrate this point when he smelled meat being cooked when he was performing at coachella. Two thousand nine he famously said i could smell burning flesh. I hope to god. It's human so. This is the level of the person we're dealing with. And he's either an olympian level. Misanthrope or grey day. Outrageous quote machine His lyrics would suggest a combination of the two so as far as his conflict with robert smith goes it starts really at the beginning of morris's career. It's nineteen eighty-four is giving an interview with the magazine. The face and the reporter asked this question. If i put you in a room with robert smith marquis smith of the fall in a loaded smith and wesson. Who would bite the bullet first now before we get to morris his answer here. I think it's clear from the construction of this question that the idea is to name a bunch of people named smith right because morrissey isn't a band called the smiths. It's not really about robert. Smith or the cure particularly. I mean it's not known yet really morrissey feels about that bad. It's really just a jokey question to ask more. See where you're setting the ball on the tee for him to say something outrageous and of course morrissey can never resist debate. Here as he ever turn the other cheek morrissey. I don't think he's ever turned down tune ity to slake someone off absolutely not Which makes them a terrible person but it makes perfect for this show. So i guess i have to think morrisey for that. But boris he says this may be like the worst possible answer from a humanist perspective but like it's a very funny answer he says i'd line them up so that one bullet would penetrate them simultaneously at any rate. It's rather curious that he began wearing beads at the emergence of the smiths. This has morrissey saying of robert smith and he's been photographed with hours. Of course this is a reference to the fact that early in his career morrissey would come on stage holding daffodils. So there's the implication that robert smith is somehow ripping him off and he says i expect quite supportive what we do. But i've never liked the cure not even the caterpillar. yeah exactly up. Curious like why he singled out the caterpillar as like it being amazing. The doesn't even like that song like i. I don't think of that as necessarily being like the most popular cure song or the most accessible cure song but like the smiths song. Yeah i couldn't figure right. It's kind of weird. But at any rate the point is is that morrissey would murder robert smith if given the opportunity and he thinks that he's ripping them off so that is what has been established in this interview. And this gets back to robert smith who who fired back in kind He said morrissey so depressing. If he doesn't off- himself soon. I probably will. Yes beautiful winston churchill level insult right. They're very very good Years later when he's looking back on the the morrissey feud Robert smith also. Said you know i would have expected at the time. Him being a non meat eating vegetarian. Pacifists sorta guy to say. I choose to shoot myself or choose to shoot no one. But he said i'd line them all up and shoot them all. When i was told that at the time i kind of took umbrage. I thought that's fucking nice. And then he drops a c. bomb. Because he's robert smith i it seemed like he was genuinely pretty hurt. By this whole exchange. I mean even said it was unnecessary. I'd never said or done anything tomorrow. See in the. According to robert smith at least at that point never even been in the same room together. Yeah i'm gonna tip my hand here as being more sympathetic. Generally to robert smith and i think i'm probably a bigger cure fan than i am a fan of the smiths even though i love both bands but it really is amazing to me that robert smith generally comes off as relatively normal and level headed in his interviews. Which you wouldn't necessarily expect necessarily if you just listen to his music or like you see him onstage wearing all the makeup. He always seems miserable in his music. But then when he's talking to reporters he seems a pretty normal guy. Yeah exactly he's he's funny and tedious sounds reasonable whereas with morrissey the more interviews. He's done in his career. The crazier more irrational he becomes. It's like he's already pretty melodramatic in his lyrics. But like he just is so awful like the more. He talks so in terms of their personal dispositions. I feel like that's like a defining difference between these guys rubbers claiming later years that he was confused by there is even a comparison between the cure and the smiths There's nothing that links morrissey in the cure in my mind as years go by. It's very easy to think. We were from the same generation. But we're not and he's right. I mean the cure recorded their first album. Nineteen seventy eight. And the swiss release their self titled debut in one thousand nine hundred four which is a different mini generation. In in a way. And i think that the smith stuff sounded maybe early cure albums but by the time the smith came around they were doing sorta more synth based moody darker the head on the door type stuff. That really didn't sound very similar to the smiths at all to me. At least again i. I love both bands to me. It is natural to compare them. I understand that the cure started earlier. They are really part of that. Post punk generation that really emerged after the sex pistols and the clash in the late seventies. But i think the reason that they group together is that the same kind of person loves both bands. Like if you love the smith you probably love the cure and vice versa. And they both have. I think a very kind of quintessentially like alternative rock vibe to them you know again even though the cure started really come into their own until the nineteen eighties with those albums that you mentioned head on the door. Obviously kiss me kiss me. And then i think hitting their combination like their peak with disintegration in one thousand nine thousand nine. What i think is interesting about these bands in terms of how they're perceived critically is that. I think that the smiths for years had this reputation as being a smarter band They were the band that i think critics tended to rate higher than the cure. The queen is dead as a record that much more likely to see near the top of like greatest albums of all times list than you are disintegration for instance even though if given the choice i would take disintegration personally. Thousand percent over the queen is dead. The strength of the smiths is singles. I think they're singles. Collections are excellent. And they have so many songs that i would say are just like perfect songs. There is a light that never goes out hand in glove. How soon is now. I mean there's there's a so many wonderful singles that they have. Whereas i look at the cure as being more of an album band like they have several albums at hold together as statements whereas again i think the smiths you have the queen is dead and then their other albums to me a little spotty. It's much more about singles. Think the cure. You have to give them credit for their longevity. You're they were before the smiths and they were around after the smiths and this is another thing that gets overshadowed the cure. Maybe i'm wrong about this. But to me they were much more popular band. Especially in america like get their peak. Want the cure playing arenas basically like by the time of disintegration. I don't think the smith's ever got to that kind of level at least here in the united states. I wonder if that worked against them. Becoming almost more of us like populist favourite. i'm sure morrissey could throw that back in their face in a lotta ways to. I always thought that the smith seem like was for a more discerning music fan. They always seem more literate. They tackled social issues. Meat is murder the cleanest debt in ways. I don't think the cure ever really did. I think robert. Smith was mostly writing about himself. And i think that in some ways is one of the great strengths. Because we need to describing how he's feeling some often that resonates with all of us depending on what we're going through in our lives. But i think also you could argue that. Robert smith seemed a lot more like navel-gazing self-obsessed to and i think that was The fact that they didn't really look outward quite as much as the smiths i think. Ding them definitely. At the time you know in in Fatter era england especially when there was sort of a lot to rail against that was always fascinating to me the the sort of the political element of their music. I just wonder to what degree robert smith internalized the critical conversation around both bands. Because this is something. I'm sure he would never admit to personally but again like by the end of the eighties. The cure like had like a legitimate pop hit with love song love song. I believe it was like a top five. Hit just for them and of course that sounds been covered by so many artists. Since then i mean it was One of the adele records which. I'm sure bought robert smith ten houses. You know just a ton of money. I'm sure from that cover. But again i feel like for a long time. People just took the smiths more seriously. Also digging the cure for being again. This is kind of like adolescent angsty navel-gazing band and the others an interview. That robert smith gave in one thousand nine thousand nine. I think it pretty much at the height of the curious popularity where he took a shot at morrissey says he's a precious miserable bastard. He's all the things people. Think i am and i think that's a very telling quote because i'm sure our smith felt like oh people are you know they had this caricature me that i'm dislike the sad bastard guy and that's preventing some people from you know giving me my do as like a great songwriter. Like people talking about more being a great songwriter. But like i. I'm a great songwriter. To and i asked will write my own music too. But i don't get that kind of a love from critics. They don't look attuned smith. They look at me as just like this miserable guy but it's like what about this other guy like he's just as miserable as me if not more so right. I mean robert. Smith incredible guitarist producer in wrote all the cures music. And i agree with that. And also i think there's a case of maybe like disliked someone because you see elements of yourself and that you don't like about yourself so maybe there was some of that too. It's like no no no i. I'm not that bad. Tim look at him. He's even worse than me. So yeah i could see it being your way as well being like no come on like this is more see actually is a miserable bastard more but also maybe some of it just was he worried it did hit too close to home. He did see elements of himself that he didn't like so these two ended up continuing to snipe at each other. Even after the smiths broke up. And i lose to this earlier. I mean the smiths window of time like really. Isn't that big. I mean they were basically a force in british music for about five years in the mid nineteen eighty s by the end of the eighties finished johnny marr. Who is a genus guitar player. And feel like he doesn't get as much credit as he deserves in that morrissey marr songwriting partnership just like the wonderful music that he wrote for the songs. By the way we have to do a morrissey versus mar- yes owed at some point. That'll be amazing. But anyway like this broke up. Morrissey robert smith continue to take shots at each other. This great interview. I feel like a pretty famous quote. Where a robert smith was talking about. How morrissey is this animal rights activists and how that runs counter to just how awful he is. Human beings cares more about animals that he does about human beings. Says is a great quote says. Moore's he says not to eat meat then. I'm going to eat meat. That's how much. I hate morris. Possibly my favorite quote of this whole thing. That's great and then morris of course shoots back. He said robert. Smith is a fat clown with makeup weeping over qatar. Like i feel like the robert smith. Quilt is like a little more self aware. He's almost like making fun of himself. Little bit for how much like. I'm just reacting against anything that he does just because this guy annoys me whereas morris he is just like being directly insulting of like you know he's calling. I'm fat you. We saying his weeping over guitar and of course he has a shoot back. There was an interview that he did ran this time with the magazine zone zero nine where he was talking about his status as a godfather of and he doesn't really like that distinction he says i'm tired of being known as dumi. Goth casualty the press Trae me as gloom and doom singer particularly morrissey. That man is a professional complainer. Just going back to what i was saying before. I think this idea. I think that annoyed him that he was caricatured. In this way. I don't think morrissey was to the same degree at that time. I think that you know morrissey definitely was known as this mopey artists. But i feel like his songwriting partnership with johnny marr. I think people certainly critics. They treated that with a degree of seriousness. Almost like lightning them to like lennon. Mccartney you know like the linda mccartney of their era that. I don't think they did that with robert smith. I don't feel like he got the credit that he deserved as a songwriter. At that time because of the cure head of very distinct image. But you know if you look at their albums he's writing all these great songs and as great as the smiths ours. A singles act. I should mention. I mean standing on a beach. The their compilation of their eighty singles. That's like a defining document of like early alternative rock. I mean he wrote a great singles too. So i think he just felt like hey recognize my talent. Don't just look at the makeup in like crazy hair. Like i am producing great material at this time my favorite robert smith story from this period and i it might not be true but i choose to believe in having trouble source in the quotes for this but Robert smith said. I remember running into morrissey at a halloween party or something. I want to punch him on the arm and he just closed his eyes and started crying at seeing that. I mean i miss imagining a scenario. Where like morrissey would go to anyone's halloween right. Yeah and woody jessica already. Just be robert smith. Of course not. I could see. Robert smith going to halloween party. I mean like morrissey more see would never go to a halloween party. That's the only reason. I doubt this story because i'm trying to imagine a scenario like who's holding a halloween party who it'd be friends with both of these guys and get them both to show up and make a mistake of inviting the. Yeah i mean is that like You know. I'm just trying to give like prominent eighty stars sting. Having this party is like bano. Or george michael. You know who would be having that party. Says that's the only reason. I doubt that story otherwise. I'm like you i would rather believe it than disbelieve it so this oil brings us to one thousand nine hundred one and the smith at this point are done passed on into legend and morrissey as a hit number one on the british charts. His debut album viva hate. She has incredible songs. Everyday is like sunday and suede head. He's gearing up to and his second solo disc. Kill uncle with an interview with the enemy. Which is actually another thing. He hates forgot to mention that earlier. And he takes a stab at the cures. Disintegration nineteen eighty-nine their masterpiece. I it's one of my favorite albums of all time. I think as their definitive album one of the best albums of the eighties. I think it's better than any single smith's record. I mean love songs. You mentioned pictures of you homesick. Which i think might be my favorite cure song ever lullaby fascination street brilliant album morrissey as one might expect doesn't feel this way he describes the curious seminal record as absolutely vile and adds the cure a new dimension to the word crap which is a great quote. Yes the poll quote. It's very insulting. But i like robert smith's response because i actually think his response was funnier than even that great quote because he was told about more sees opinion of his inauguration. Robert smith says at least we've added a new dimension and crap not built a career. He was much aware in his in his insults back. That's totally right. Exactly just you know he's kind of being self deprecating but yeah he's able to twist it and get it back more see like morrissey gimme a break disintegration. Brilliant record at a very influential record too. I mean there's so many types of music whether it's dream pop even like like soundcloud rappers have like sampled cure songs. I mean corn has covered cure songs. Their influence really extends beyond just this old rock lane in the same is true also of morrissey he's also had a very wide influence but syndication a masterful record our hand. We'll be right back with more rivals. Ooh hey this is steve from the show rivals. Music's biggest feuds. I wanna talk to you about something important. I have a new book coming out. September twenty ninth and it's not about beefs unless you consider radio heads fight against a writer's block a rivalry. It's called this isn't happening and it's about the struggles that radio had went through to make their landmark two thousand album kid a i let a fun delving into the history of this brilliant band exploring the history meaning and significance of an classic record if you like rivals. I think you'll like my book again. It's called this isn't happening in the comes out. September twenty-ninth okay. Now back to the show support for this. Podcast comes from microsoft teams. Now there are more ways to be team with microsoft teams. Bring everyone together in one space with a new virtual room. Collaborate live drawing sharing and building ideas with everyone on the same page. And make sure more of your team has seen and heard with up to forty nine people on screen once. Learn more about all the newest teams features at microsoft dot com slash teams. So is interesting me. That robert smith logs way more insults than morrissey in all this back and forth. And maybe because he's been asked about a lot more and he should have been on the defensive. In this whole beef morrison's verbal assaults. I think are a lot more potent. But smith definitely has the frequency In november nineteen ninety-three. He's interviewed by spin magazine. And the robert smith interview titled called happily ever after which still makes me laugh and he goes after morrissey again. Saying i have never liked morrissey and i still don't. I think it's hilarious. Actually what things have heard about him. And what he's really like and his public persona so different such an actor calling him a poser and rolling stone too long after he says you know i'd rather have our fans than his are cure. Fans are generally quiet well-spoken and friendly and not pretentious in the slightest that reflects on the nature of the cure. And he's kind of right. I mean especially when you watch interviews with morrissey even like pre all the right wing stuff like in the early in the early eighties. He's kind of frightening. You feel like he could turn on you. There's something very i. i don't know. I always get kind of freaked out watching his old interviews whereas robert smith gentleness there that like you know you wanna give a hug or something to and i. I feel that extends to case. It's not obvious. I'm more of a cure. Jonah smith guy. I feel like that extends to their fans to. I don't know there's something about being more sensitive. Maybe about up cheer fans. I don't know well again. I feel like there is a quite a bit of overlap here and i think that you know if you like. The cure is a very high likelihood that you like the smiths. And if you like dismiss. I think there's a likelihood that you like the cure the differences that i. I just think that there's more care fans period because the cured again like we're talk about just like america by itself. I think they were much bigger in america because like by the end of the eighty s Like i said before they were having like genuine pop. It's not just like alternative rock heads but like they were played on top forty radio and you know it makes sense that adele ended up covering a cure song because the cure really. We're like a pop band in a way that i don't think the smiths were. I think they were more so in england than here but here they were always more of a cult band and the cure isn't often described as a populist band but i think in this dynamic anyway they are the more populist group. They are the band that you just had a wide repeal and as we were saying earlier i think in a way because of the politics of the time that made the cure less cool than the smiths dismiss always had that hip outsider status that the cure was never going to have of course as those indie pollock's matter less and less as we get farther and farther away from the eighties and nineties. I think that coincides with the cures reputation getting better. And maybe the smiths diminishing a little bit but of course that's also do the fact that morrissey starting in the early nineties takes a very bizarre left turn toward being basically a right right-wing lunatic and that evolution begins. I can one thousand nine hundred. Like he was performing at this music festival in england and he put a union jack around himself and of course we think about the who flying a union. Jack in the nineteen sixties. And i think back then it was this idea of just being proud to be from england and which is that we also see in the kinks at that time writing specifically about england in the face of america just being such a big cultural force in the world but by the early nineties like the symbolism of like a union jacket a changed quite a bit really kinda turn into this like symbol of nationalism in england and i just wonder like to what degree you know more see. You did a great job of this earlier in the episode. Talking about all the things that he hates. The man is an elitist and it seems like his elitism is really starting to take an ugly turn at this time where it's not just like a funny like you know misanthropic like i'm giving fun quotes in an interview. It's an actually sort of leaking into his worldview where he actually does think he's better than other people. Yeah was like pre brit pop and in that era as you said it would definitely have more right wing. Connotations and at this festival is performing at there was apparently a large skinhead contingent there and it was felt that it was sort of signaling these nationalist extremist groups and at the time the enemy had a headline with picture morrissey on stage at that festival flying the flag or flirting with disaster So it definitely got noticed at that time and in fact morrissey was so pissed off by that headline. He refused to talk to the enemy for like a decade or something so Yeah this was something. That started early on in the nineties. And it's interesting to me that for all their differences. Robert smith never went in on morrissey for his controversial statements or any sort of out their political views which became much much much more pronounced as the decade went on but that was interesting given their feud that he'd never went there. I mean i think robert smith was smart enough to know that like morris's owning stuff. It's like what do i need to say. He's making a fool of himself so you know just let him continue to make a fool of himself at this point we're used to morrissey you know all the terrible quote said he's had over the years and we're going to get into some of those later in this episode. I think people are used to it by now. But i really feel like there was maybe a sense of portrayal started to come in to play with fans in the nineties that morrissey was at his best associated with the underdog The music of like alienated people people on the outside and to embrace the sort of ideology. It's strange but at the same time if you think of him as an elitist it does have a weird kind of twisted sense of logic to it. Yeah we'll get more than later too but especially we're betrayal. I think is definitely the perfect wanted. It's been hard for a lot of fans who looked to him as somebody for solis when they felt alone and isolated and sort of oppressed in the eighties. I think it's been really hard to rationalize. The music came from that person to the public statements that he says now. Back in two thousand and four The cure and morrissey faced off in the charts again. They both have back to back. Releases of morris's you are the corey In may and the cure how to their self titled album the following month. And i guess it's probably fair to say at this point. Both of their relevance said really faded significantly kind of began a slide into more. I'm not gonna call him stall jax but they definitely didn't have the same Critical and cultural potency. that they once did But robert smith is being interviewed for a new album and he's still took the opportunity to slag off morrissey just for old time sake in an interview with entertainment weekly said morrissey was constantly saying horrible things about the cure in the end they kind of snapped and started retaliating and it turned into some kind of petty feud. I've never liked anything. He's done musically. But don't have any kind of strong feelings of animosity towards him as a person. Because i've never met him that halloween stories fake so his music sucks but he sure i can't say for sure but you know i've ever met him and i probably never will because i actually do hate his guts. There was i guess. Official like peace accord between these guys that began in twenty nineteen more gave an interview where he was sounding on a wide range of issues including his very problematic. I guess political points of view but also ended up talking about robert smith and more see was like actually. I think weirdly conciliatory in this context. He said i said some terrible things about him. Thirty five years ago but i didn't mean them as being very grange hill. Which is a british like teen soap opera. It's great when you can blame everything on terrific syndrome. So is that is that an apology door regret is in there. I suppose but the toronto thing at the end is is definitely count. That legally is an apology. I don't know about us see. I just feel like an apology. Means accepting responsibility. For what you've done. And i feel like he did not accept responsibility at the end. But we're talking about morrissey here so this is as close as as we're gonna get to an apology and of course. Robert smith has to respond and he gave an interview to the enemy where he says it was slightly. Odd as i haven't really had it at the forefront of my consciousness over the last twenty or thirty years. I don't know even at the time. I never quite understood what the problem was. It's far from important right now. Which i love that response. Because it's very like walter shop. Check in the big lebowski saying coming. Here i dude dude. Which by the way robert smith. Who look we both love. He's being disingenuous here because he's basically saying like i haven't even thought about this thirty years. Meanwhile we've just listed several quotes of him slagging off morrissey that were well within that you know twenty to thirty year window. So i mean look maybe he only thought about it when journalists asked him about it but he certainly never backed away from taking a shot at morrissey when he had the opportunity but again you know it's clear that like when you get beyond the insults that robert smith it seems like he was genuinely going back to that nineteen eighty-four interview where morrissey said that he would shoot him and marquis smith. It was interview that he did with the guardian where he says. i felt. It was unfair that he would shoot me. If you ask him again he might choose the shoot himself rather than me or whoever else it was still cares. Cares that moore is. It's like i don't care. I haven't thought about in thirty years but i also remember this interview where he said that he would shoot me. You know so again. Be a little disingenuous there but i appreciate the calmer than you. Are you know defense there. I think that's always a good thing like we're like well like you're like you care. I'd never even cared at all like So i'm clearly the winner here. This all begs the question. Did marquee smith ever respond. And the marquis. Smith is an even bigger misanthrope than morrissey so he would like get a like a machine gun at like mo them slow down if you ask marty smith so maybe robert smith is being a little more generous at this stage. Because we've said morris becoming something of a pariah due to a string of really increasingly controversial quotes about race and immigration and the metoo movement In the last fifteen years morris he's transformed at the basically a one man assault on political correctness and again. It's interesting. The robert smith came to him for that but again like you said he was just such an easy target and for while it was tempting to try to write off everything morrissey said as really being like intentionally provocative attention but as time went on it really got harder and harder to ignore like is he being deliberately provocative is he being a pro wrestler villain or is it a case of big mouth strikes again you know. I mean his his Misanthropic tendencies curdled into these really reprehensible beliefs. And we won't go too deep into this because that's a whole other episode of morrissey versus everyone who isn't morrissey but it's worth noting because i think it really impacted the smith's reputation in a way that's relevant to the The smith versus cure argument. And you know. In the early days morrissey was as paragon of left-wing ideology was anti thatcher with margaret on the guillotine. He was anti market. Queen is dead now uncompromising attitude towards animal rights meat is murder. He was really explicit in his hatred of blue blooded establishment and control of songs like the headmaster ritual When asked how he'd feel if somebody murdered margaret thatcher in the eighties he replied. Obviously i'd marry that person so you know he's definitely wings. You can come in. This era and the songs are all about the downtrodden lonely outsiders mexico and an extra from the. You're the corey takes takes on white privilege. It seems if you're rich and you're white you'll be all right. I just don't see why this should be so it's crazy when you contrast like those early songs with like that two thousand seven interview that he did with the enemy where i feel like that was like him really doing the demand. Oh yes that was when I think ended up suing them for that too it just. It's really confusing for like this first generation irish catholic immigrant speaking out so strongly against what he saw has really lax immigration policies in the uk says. Although i don't have anything against people from other countries the higher the influx into the more the british identity disappears you walk through knightsbridge and In london any bland day of the week. You won't hear an english accent England is a memory now the gates are flooded and anybody can have access to england. Join him and he ended up taking the enemy to court for libel saying that the quotes were taken out of context and he got an apology from the magazine but then a couple of years later in twenty ten. He doesn't interview with the guardian weekend magazine and he referred to chinese people as a sub species and this is in response to the treatment of animals horrendous. Absolutely yeah and it keeps going. I mean he said awful things about london's mayor sadique khan saying that he can't talk properly some quotes and he He reportedly responded to the terrorist attack in his hometown of manchester in two thousand seventeen by criticizing immigration despite the fact that the perpetrator wasn't an immigrant so it had nothing to do with that all he reportedly said that berlin had become quote the rape capital of the world due to its open borders really bad and whenever people would ask him if he's a racist he's quoted as saying variations on the word racist meaningless now. Everyone ultimately prefers their own race. Does this make everyone racist Yeah you know once you say everyone ultimately prefers their own race like you're pretty much like down the slippery slope. It just gets worse after that you know. He's like better brexit supporter. you know. he's been a vocal critic of me too. And i just feel like all this stuff now as you were saying earlier. It's just like hurt the reputation of the smiths. Because if you love the smiths not only because they a great music because you thought they signified something about being an alienated outsider that this was going to be music. That's like spoke for you as someone who doesn't feel comfortable in the mainstream of society. You know you looked at morrissey as a hero looked at. You looked at him as someone who's going to stand up for you and and and people like you see him do this. He'll turn that he's done in the last fifteen years or twenty years or so even if in his mind he feels like well. I'm just reacting to. What i feel is like sort of stifling political correctness and i'm being provocative being interesting even at that is what is at play here. It just takes away what he wants. Signified people and it just makes his song seem phony and i think with an artist morrissey authenticity is so important. You know but it's like you can't listen to those records without hearing these quotes in your head and it just plays against. I think what those records originally meant to people. Yeah absolutely and you know. I mean very famously has a huge following in the latin american community because his songs speak to that sense of other nece as they try to leave their home behind and try to simulate new american culture so. I'm sure that the the abrupt face specifically on the issue of immigration really hurtful to a lot of them. There are some really interesting interviews out there with Latin american morrissey fans speaking. About how how. They're coming to terms with with these things that he says and it is very hurtful and you know in england there have been some stores that sock records anymore and subway posters in I think in the uk were taken down for some of his new albums too so there's been increasing blowback as a statement of gotten More and more extreme concur with this is the cures reputation receiving kind of a shot in the arm. And the two thousand ten's and for years. We said earlier. The cure sort of seen as dumi self serious melodramatic teenage band and the fact that they were a commercial success much bigger than the smiths in the us sorbo liability because like we said made in this cheap populace act in the eyes of many tastes makers especially when compared with the smith. Sort of like cool wit. It's really incredible and the enemy in december of two thousand names the most influential artist of all time. The smith logged in at number ten. The cured in place at all when enemy brank the fifty greatest artists of all time in two thousand to the smiths edged out the beatles for the number one spot and the cared appear at all. That's just crazy to me. I think it makes more sense for british music magazine to do that because the smiths clearly just met more in england than they met in the united states but to not even put the cure on the lists at all is a so crazy to me when again you look at the length of their career which goes from like the late seventies until like the mid nineties as far as them being like a really relevant hit making band. That's a twenty year run which is impressive for any band but if you look at again like the quality of their catalog again having multiple albums that i think are really excellent. It shows how much they were under appreciated. I have to think too that. You know the disposition. Robert smith versus morrissey. I just feel like that's become so much clearer. Now in the last twenty years and we were talking about this earlier. About how if you want a caricature rod smith as just like this miserable sad bastard type that really falls apart when you see interviews with him or you read interviews where i i just generally find him to be a very self aware funny. Smart guy and i was thinking about that moment when The cure were inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame in two thousand nineteen. There was that viral video of robert smith being interviewed on the red carpet before going into the theater. Did you see that video. It's hilarious like this is very excited. Woman interviewing robert smith in and she asks like. Are you as excited as i am to be here tonight. Robert smith just kind of looks at her and says well. It doesn't look like it is very low key like almost like david type disposition and it's hilarious and it just shows again like he seems like a guy who knows who he is. He's comfortable with this place in like music history and music culture and you mentioned self serious as being a tag that was put on the cure. He actually doesn't seem to take himself that seriously. No i don't even get misanthrope vibes from him. Necessarily i get somebody who just doesn't want to deal with all the sort of bullshit that goes along with having to be like you know playing arenas and stuff like that. The older it gets the more i just see. He said a low key guy so before we go to the case for each side we have to answer the looming question. That's been in the air since the start of this episode which is who would win in an actual fight between them. You got morrissey or rock sad clown. What do you think you know. Neither one of them seem like they're in great shape. I mean i guess more see is probably like a bit better shape than robert smith. You know i just see them circling each other and saying mean things to each other without actually throwing a punch and then at some point and wandering off. It's hard for me to imagine them actually coming to physical blows away what do you think do you think they could actually land punch on each other. I could see maybe one coming from robert smith. I can see him having a sadistic streak. But i could see you know morrissey just down to welcome the sweet relief of death. That's where i'm at. We're gonna take a quick break to get a word from our sponsor for we get to more rivals. I'm shonda rhimes grey's anatomy or any of my tv shows. Then you know. I love to tell a good story. Well now there's sean blend audio we've partnered iheartradio to launch a slate of great podcasts. You listen to the first four right now. Katie's crib permanente. Go ask allie and you down. We've so much more coming your way. We can't wait to hear at all. Welcome to shawn land. Audio was all the new. Sean dillon audio shows on apple podcasts. You know exactly where you were. When the golden state killer was arrested you still pay for cable to get lifetime your moderator on the zodiac killer separated you're basically a seasoned detective endurance search of a new challenge. Enter solve the hit. Podcast that puts you at the center of the investigation. Each week on solve. You will entangle a case that has pushed detectives to their limits. Solve is like no other murder. Mr podcast piece together. Evidence from interogations crime scenes and testimony to track down killers. Hiding psyched solve returns with new episodes on november sixteenth. The radio apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your guests one crime four suspects can you solve it okay. We've reached the part of our episode. We give the pro side at each part of the rivalry. Let's talk about the smiths. I one of the greatest singles bands of all time. As far as i'm concerned i mean few bands have as many just like perfect pop songs as the smith sue and to this earlier we haven't really talked about johnny marr in this episode. I think that he is a really crucial part. Of what makes the magical at say that. Like if you don't want to listen to dismiss because you find morrissey so annoying. Don't forget that johnny marr is a big part of that band it. They're still worth listening to even if you find the lead singer irritating just because of his wonderful qatar playing it must be said about morrissey as obnoxious as he can be he really is pretty brilliant lyricist and i think in his prime he is like one of the great british pop rock lyricists of all time And it's a shame that that talent gets overshadowed by some of this other stuff but yeah i mean wonderful song titles to i mean. He could title song as well as anybody. Oh yeah he's one of the few musicians whose lyrics work on the you get almost as much out of them on the page poetry so witty and insightful. He took the ordinary and dramatized such a way. That was just so relatable characters that are just steeped in insecurity and shame. No one expresses loneliness and angst like morrissey. I mean they were. It was funny. It was sad it was angry is defeated. It was defiant. I mean often all on the same song unparalleled lyricist and we've settled for the episode. It's pretty much accepted that. The smith most in quotes important band. But it's insane. How prolific they were just for their five year. Streak i think a lot of ways it's the hendrix effect. They never got to be middle aged and make their bad clapton albums. Never made old sock as much as they prefer the cure for the song. By song comparison of their peak eras. The smiths might have an edge. I think the smiths peaks were maybe higher. Do you think. That's i. Although i do prefer i think the cures catalog overall more. So yeah i mean i think the hendrix comparison is apt or like the velvet underground or big star any of these bands that have a short life but everything they put was more or less essential and that seems to be true of the smiths. I i don't think that their albums from that period are as good as the cure albums with maybe with the exception of the queen is dead but to me again as a singles band there and definitely one of the best singles bands of their era. And really i think of all time like i there in that conversation if we go over to the cure side again a longer career a deeper catalog and i think they have like a wider range of influence. I mean going back to that list that you were talking about earlier. How the smiths were ranked higher than the cure. A cure wasn't even on that list of most influential british fans. But if you look at the people that have covered cure songs. It's like everyone from adele to corn to lil peep. They've either covered cure songs or they. They've sampled them. I think that speaks to the cures again. More populist appeal they were abandoned. Sold more records in the smiths. They had like bigger hits. At least the all certainly here. In america and i think they continue to speak to outsiders. Maybe even more than the smith do. Also you know as we've reiterated time and again in episode. Robert smith is just a more likable person than morrissey cheer for him. In a way that. I don't morrissey yeah i agree. I mean so much of what. The smith seem so attached to their place in time. And maybe some of that is because the sort of directly tackling social issues if more lyrics talked to being an awkward angsty orrin kid of certain aaron culture. I think the cure songs are what being an angsty teen felt like. You know with those epic mood pieces like homesick. Like just the songs are just a static like just like heaven and then these deep dark lows like that that three minute opening part too homesick with that mournful piano parliament the the cure masters of the three minute instrumental intro. Just want to say like oh disintegrate that just affects and i think the cure sound so much more unique than the smiths. I kinda feel about the smiths. The same way that i do about blur and sometimes even the kinks is that. It's not for me. I can appreciate it. Academically and the melodies are always gorgeous but the lyrics again seem so tied to specific time place in culture and obviously it can relate to the loneliness and alien which is one of the reasons why morrissey has such a strong following in latin american community. words are obviously able to speak to more than just those who grew up in northern england in the recession of the late seventies and the right wing thatcher era of the eighties. But there's something about you know morrissey in his prime he had this. Chiseled good looking face great haircut pompadour and he was sort of like the idealized outsider that we all kinda wanted to be and robert smith with this sort of scraggly hair and his off putting kind of bizarre makeup and kind of hunched shoulders. He was almost more. How i think he seemed like one of us. He seemed like one of the shy awkward kids. You know i think of classrooms famous essay about billy. Joel about how. I billy joel can never be cool. Because whenever he looks at billy joel he sees himself. I think that's how. I think about robert smith when look at him. I just relate to to him so much. I just see myself in so many ways. And maybe that's why he's my favorite of the two so we look at these two bands together. Look i like both bands. I think most people like both bands. And i liked that they. Hey i don't think that. This reverie actually impedes on anyone's enjoyment of band it's not like a waste versus blur where people felt compelled to take aside. You know if you like one band you probably like the other. And i think the disliked that they had actually enhances our love of the smiths and the cure. Because there's all this great fodder you know. They were slagging each other and they did it in a really funny entertaining way. Yeah i can't think of any case where you know. We're if any smith's fans we're we're staunch anti vice versa. I don't really. I can't really think many examples of that really happening like you said the debate was all about which one of the band's was better than the other and i think more of an iconic cultural force but i think the music of the cure is going to continue to endure and probably prove to be more influential of the two bands going to argue. But maybe i'm just biased. I'm a former cure. Kid well steve to die by your side is we pick apart. Rivalries would be the most heavenly way to die. Would you say it's just like heaven. Yes yes i would well now that we got the pun out of the way. I think it's time to bid goodbye. Thank you for listening to this episode of rivals. We'll be back with more beeps and feuds and long simmering resentments next week. Rivals is a production of iheartradio. The executive producers are shontae tone and noel brown supervising producers taylor coin and trysted mcneil the producers. Joel hats that. I'm jordan run talk. I'm steven hyden. If you like what you heard. Please subscribe and leave us a review for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. I'm shonda rhimes watch grey's anatomy or any of my tv shows the you know. I love to tell a good story. Well now there's sean blend audio. We've partnered iheartradio launch a slate of great podcasts. You listen the first four right now. Katie's crib permanente. Go ask allie and you down and we have so much more coming your way. We can't wait to hear it. All welcome to shawn land. Audio was an all the new. Sean dillon audio shows on apple podcasts. On september seventeenth two thousand nine twenty four year old. My trees richardson disappeared. Without a trace in the woods near malibu california and was never seen alive again i'm katherine townsend host of the podcast telling gone. We're going to try to find out what really happened to my trace. Richardson school of humans. And i heart radio present. Helen gone season three. Listen to helen. Gone on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

morrissey robert smith smith Robert smith morris Patrick morrissey Smith robert marquis smith smiths england steven two thousand nine twenty four katherine towns Richardson school of humans an gallagher brothers johnny marr six million dollar steve Helen
Hit Parade: Lost and Lonely Edition

Slate's Culture Gabfest

1:26:20 hr | 1 year ago

Hit Parade: Lost and Lonely Edition

"We have a big favor to ask one of our advertisers is conducting a survey and we would be grateful for your help answering a few of their questions questions it will take less than ten minutes of your time and your participation helps our show Goto slate studied dot com to complete the short survey now that's sleet study dot com thank you this episode of Hip Parade is sponsored by Hyatt centric Hyatt centric hotels put you at the heart of the action connecting you to the local food culture and of course music check out the hot spots hidden gems and local sounds in cities from Miami to Milan Boston to Bangor and everywhere in between if you're ready for an exciting off the beaten path adventure get started with Hyatt's centric book your stay now at Hyatt centric dot com welcome to hit parade a podcast of Pop Chart History from slate magazine about the hits from Coast to coast I'm Chris Melinda Chart analysts pop critic and writer of slates wise the song number number one series on today's show last month's edition of Hit parade took us back three decades to the fall of one thousand nine hundred eighty nine nine in this episode we're going to stay at the exact same moment in pop chart history you may recall in that early fall of eighty nine the song topping the billboard hot one hundred was the first single from Janet Jackson's new album rhythm nation called Miss you much but in the middle of its four week run at number one right behind miss you much was a rather unlikely number two smash by a band that could not have sounded much different from Janet Jackson where Miss You much was exuberant danceable and romantic the song in the runner-up slot was moody introverted self deprecating and in its own way also very romantic in fact that number two hit was literally called Love Song The cure abandoned from the town of Crawley England had turned post punk and Goth off culture into stadium packing rock and even in this moment chart conquering pop but they were not alone in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine just weeks earlier in the dog days of summer a trio from Northampton England called love and rockets had reached the top three on the US charts plan a catcher sexy somewhat spooky Kooky Goth pop song called so a lot that same summer in US dance clubs a group of former punks turned goths turned synth rockers from Manchester called new order were commanding ending the floor with pulsating music aggressive baselines and email lyrics and near the end of nineteen eighty nine debuting on the hot one hundred was the new single from a banned from Basilan England like the cure depeche mode had turned Dumi angsty and dramatic a new wave music into stadium packing rock just one year prior in fact they'd sold out the Rose Bowl and this new depeche depeche mode hit had the provocatively sacrilegious title Personal Jesus all of these hits were not only penetrating the pop charts they they were also commanding billboards newest Chart Modern Rock tracks which chronicle the music that used to be the province of American College Radio but was was rapidly moving from the left of the dial to the center the cure depeche mode new order these bans were modern rock kings this in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and eighty nine and so was another morose and rather arch young man the former frontman of the Manchester Chester band the smiths who went by a single name Morrissey the nineteen eighties were already strong for British pop in the US the first half of the decade led led by pompadour new romantic bands had even been dubbed the second British invasion ah but there was a major difference between the more decadent new wave that stormed the charts in the first half of the nineteen eighteen eighty s and the darker rock toward the end of the decade the music got heavier the lyrics gloomier and yet yet even these gloomy late eighties British rock bands were at route producing irresistible pop music that was waiting to break doc whether played on Jangling guitars or thundering guitars or icy synthesizers these songs went from seemingly uncommercial to music for the masses not only in England but but eventually in America these were the moody rockers who helped turn new wave into alternative before grunge Asia before industrial before electronic today on hit parade we chart the breakthrough of the sub-genre that's been called everything from mope rock to Goth Rock to sad bastard music the moment when this melodic melancholia began turning platinum in the United States it has been set that the British are a more self deprecating people then we Americans are but three decades ago on the billboard billboard charts if I may paraphrase Morrissey the so-called Pope of Mope Heaven knows we were all miserable now and that's where your hit parade marches today the week ending October twenty first in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine when the cures love song reached an improbable number two on billboard's hot one hundred marking a new pop the peak for doing dark and Gothic British alternative rock on the American shots in this episode of Hip Parade is sponsored by Hyatt centric tune into somewhere new with Hiatt centric hotels hotels that put you at the heart of the action connecting you to your cities food culture sure and of course music from Miami to Milan and everywhere in between Hyatt centric hotels point you toward the hidden gems hotspots and local sounds your destination has to offer enjoy choice amenities and playful details that uniquely capture the the spirit of each city helping you get a feel for the neighborhood before you even set foot out the door if you're ready for an exciting off the the beaten path adventure get started with Hiatt centric when you start here you can discover well everywhere explore their hotels hells around the world at high centric dot COM okay very as trying to cheer us up so go ahead but aunts most sad bastard music suv I care in the movie high fidelity released in two thousand when Jack Black's record store clerk character barry complains about sad bastard music. He's just been confronted by some Sullen Indie rock by Scottish Band Belle and Sebastian but when British author Nick Hornby I invoked the term in his book High Fidelity in Nineteen Ninety five he he could just as easily have been talking about any number of bans from the United Kingdom over the prior two decades this facetious officious term has been applied to several gloomy when and melodramatic UK rock bands of the late twentieth century the fact is there is no one term for the British alternative rock that crossed over in America in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s and nineteen ninety s some call it Goth South Rock but not all of it is terribly Gothic some use mope rock which besides being snarky belies how bright bright and catchy much of this music actually is these bans on I'm not even unified by their primary instruments some of the leading lights of UK Alternative Rock in this period were fundamentally Qatar rock bands while others almost exclusively favored the synthesize some even converted themselves from Guitar Combos into Synth pop acts and with a dark et. Let's just save this and you'll have to trust me as a generation xer of a certain age if you went to high school and college when I did and you liked one of these bands you probably liked them all maybe you're the class nerd or the one at school with Black Nail Polish or eyeliner no matter what your gender maybe you were jock but also secretly Ema Emma and this was the music you played in the sanctity of your Bedroo- or Walkman especially if you were an American team in the eighties or early nineties and you loved these bands their relative lack of popularity at the time was the point point of call it what you will these bands all fell under the rubric of what Rock Critics and of the music industry called very broadly post punk because no matter what the prior prior emergence of Punk a much louder angrier music made all of this dark rock possibly and he emergence of punk in the mid nineteen seventies in both America America and England was a seminal event but it was particularly seismic across the United Kingdom the emergence emergence of the sex pistols in one thousand nine hundred seventy six inspired numerous would be musicians including in provincial areas outside outside of London members of two of the groups we will discuss in this episode new order and the smiths were present at the pistols legendary June nineteen seventy-six show at Manchester's Lesser Free Trade Hall a Gig where fewer than fifty people were in the audience but seemingly half of them formed bands but the band who would eventually lead the Post punk and Goth rock movements were not only wedded to the sound of punk virtually all would owe a stylistic debt to such legendary classic rockers as has the iconoclastic David Bowie and the stylistically a bold Glam Rock Combo Roxy music soul the bands of post punk would combine punks angular and economy with the theatricality and moutainous of Glam and art rock to be sure early on the bands that formed in the sex pistols wake sounded more like puck joy division were a quartet of Manchester natives men Cunanan's in British dish parlance they formed after seeing that sex pistols gig in one thousand nine hundred seventy six joy division's subversive satirical Caracul banned me was taken from the Nazis name for their Sexual Slavery Department at their formation in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven seven joy division's clipped punk energy made them sound at first like most British bands formed in the Pistons Wake but they were also paying attention to other contemporaries who were broadening the boundaries of punk like Susie and the Banshee the London group fronted by Susan Janet Bali Aka Su Su had the energy of punk but from the start layered in tribal drumming and sinister vocals that would anticipate the sound of Gothic rock decades later pitchfork magazine would write quote without Susie Sue uh-huh Goth might never have taken root unquote inspired in part by susie joy division sound evolved becoming becoming more distinctive and spookier concern the two performers were especially vital to the sound of joy division and would cast a long shadow bassist Peter Hook who played his base as if it were a lead guitar and vocalist Ian Curtis who began singing in a foreboding baritone both of these sounds intensive base and gloomy vocals would become core elements of post punk and Golf Goth Rock and by nineteen seventy eight and seventy nine these gothic elements began cropping up on other British rox rocks angles lag thou house a quartet from North Hampton tune named after the iconic early twentieth century German Art School Helped Define Goth Rock in the popular imagination their single Bela Lugosi's dead in the late summer of Nineteen seventy-nine would serve as a skeletal blueprint for the entire hire goth subculture flashing ahead for years just before bow house broke up the group would perform an immortal version of their classic in the Nineteen eighty-three Vampire movie the hunger foul L. House would prove deeply influential despite lasting just a few years but another pro goth band emerging in this period would have far greater longevity Robert Smith a young guitarist and songwriter from Crawley had been playing in bands with schoolmates since the early seventies by Nineteen seventy-six inspired by the emergence of the sex pistols and by early post punks like Susie Sue Smith joined a group who called themselves malice and eventually the easy cure the self effacing but quietly assertive Smith never intended to sink but he wound up with the task when a string of vocalists fell out of the group he would later tell Musician magazine quote I hated my voice but I didn't hate it more than I hated everyone else's force unquote quote Smith shorten the band's name from easy cure to the cure and they began performing a tight brand of post punk that matched joy division in its minor key Moody's particularly on killing an hour a lyrical adaptation of the Philisophical novel the Stranger by Albert Camus this single whose provocative title Robert Smith would take pains to explain was a literary reference not not a racist manifesto nonetheless helped establish the cures repulsive enigmatic sound but like enjoy division the cure in this phase were punk as much as postponing even more than on killing an Arab on boys don't cry Robert Smith began to define the cures lyrical outlook he conveyed passion passion by shrouding it in expressions of remorse regret and self recrimination Smith's voice in particular sounded founded morose even when he was singing romantic lovelorn lyrics as catchy as boys don't cry was dirge like post punk from the likes of the cure joy division and bow house was was not chart music at the end of the seventies not even in their native England it would take until the dawn of the eighties for one one of these bands to score an actual UK top forty hit and by that time that band had reached a sad in conclusion love will tear us apart would prove a blueprint reprint for all of modern and alternative rock in the decade to calm the song reached number thirteen on the UK charts in the summer of one thousand nine hundred eighty and even made the lower rungs of the American dance charts it was a down tempo dance track for depressives depressives a gloriously sad song saddest of all was that when it crested on the charts it's vocalist was was gone in the spring of nineteen eighty singer Ian Curtis just days before joy division was set to begin and a tour of America that threatened to make the compelling but clinically depressed frontman a star died by his own hand in his flat in Cheshire Curtis was twenty three years of age love will tear us apart became an elegy for joy division itself but remarkably the remaining meaning members chose to carry on the band's Guitarist Bernard Sumner would step forward as their vocalist and by nineteen eighty one the former joy division became new order they would soon evolve away from the more punk derived sound of joy division and find greater commercial success but their their contemporaries in post-punk were if anything getting darker when the cure finally broke into the UK top forty in nineteen eighty it was with the brooding rumblings rumbling single a forest Robert Smith had determined that full on Gothic rock was the core of the cures sound sound but his pop instincts meant that even the cures darkest singles were swoon and just in Charlotte sometimes a nineteen eighty one single that preceded the cures darkest album yet pornography Agassi was dreamlike and desperate and it scraped the middle rungs of the British charts by this time the cure joined a wave of bands fully embracing the Gulf Persona Robert Smith changed his look to a mask of white makeup dark dark lipstick and eyeliner and a shock of spiky spidery hair he had befriended susie sue of Suzanne the ban shoes choose who also embraced the spiky-haired Goth look and as for the ban she's recordings even as the tempos were faster astor they became ever more golf in their ghoulish spellbound reached number twenty two in the UK in one thousand nine hundred eighty one goth music was gradually becoming more commercial two you straight suzy albums kaleidoscope and Juju went top ten in the UK in one thousand nine hundred eighty and eighty one and the cures unremittingly committing lead dark pornography made the top ten as well in nineteen eighty two that's when Robert Smith chose to make the first major major stylistic turn of his career it it is hard to overstate what a sharp turn the song let's go to bed was for the cure in one thousand nine hundred eighty eighty two the band's label fiction records warned Robert Smith that it might alienate his golf fans but Smith himself off felt he needed it for his own sanity after the gloom of albums like pornography what was remarkable wasn't just it was a straight ahead three minute pop song after all boys don't cry had already been a form of punk pop as far far back as one thousand nine hundred seventy nine let's go to bed was also the most cheerful synth pop Robert Smith had ever produced I well almost Smith maintained his droll do me persona captured in lyrics like well I don't care if you don't and I don't want it if you don't all embedded in a cheeky dance song about sex in the UK let's go to bed was only a modest hit reaching number forty four in late one thousand nine hundred eighty two but in America it quietly quietly began the cures breakthrough Robert Smith had picked a promising moment to go pop for the first time since the nineteen nineteen sixties British bands were doing unusually well on the US charts but the bands of this second British invasion we're far more accessible than Robert Smith even at his catching thanks to the nine thousand nine hundred eighty one launch of MTV by Nineteen eighty-three three the US airwaves and the billboard hot one hundred were awash in British synth pop but the preferred stream strain was so called new romantic music exemplified by the glamorous and stylistically confident durant durant like golf new romantic music was also a descendant of both seventies punk and the Glam rock of bands like Roxy Music and like the goths these MTV friendly bands piled on the makeup and piled up their hair but the new romantic bands leaned on the Glam side of the post punk equation and they made their music more overtly Lee danceable such as Kaj agoos top five nine thousand nine hundred eighty three hip to shop some new romantic bands even openly emulated the sound of American pop and R and b most especially the soulful culture club fronted by the willfully androgynous Boy George compared with Duran Duran Culture Club and Kasha Goo Goo the cure even at their most pop were still a bit dour for u s top forty airplay in nineteen eighty three and eight four Bu- America boasted not only dozens of college radio stations nations which would play more adventurous music our coastal cities also hosted major market commercial new wave stations. I Like K Rock in Los Angeles W. L. I. R. in Long Island New York and Boston's W. F. X. on these stations let's go to bed was a smash while these stations did not report to billboard's hot one hundred at the time making songs like let's go to bed in eligible to chart they made the cure stars to generation of urban and especially especially suburban middle class teenagers having shook off his early Goth blog Robert Smith continued to produce pop songs talks that fused the cures dark droll profile with more playful lyrics like nineteen eighty three's the love cats the signs and more danceable beats like in the UK. Both of these were sizable hits. The walk reached the top ten love cats what's the top fifteen in America both were among the most played songs on new wave radio stations in one thousand nine hundred three and and the cure were not the only post-punk at edging closer to dance music at this time in nineteen eighty three the re-christened new order issued their album power corruption and lies a seminal blend of rock instruments and electronic rhythms the album was anchored by the groundbreaking electro dance single blue Monday day which would go on to sell three million copies as a twelve inch single and remains reportedly the biggest selling twelve inch of all time New Order and the cure were initially guitar ktar based bands who evolved towards synthesizers and dance beats but around the same time a different British group job was evolving in the other direction they would remain devoted to since for their entire career but unlike the goth bands they started off much more sprightly before getting dark ed named for a French magazine whose title roughly translates to fast fashion depeche mode went through several incarnations in the late seventies in the week of punk before discarding being most of their traditional instruments in favor of synthesizers just can't get enough their first UK top ten hit it was written by then bandleader Vince Clarke in a bouncy new wave style even as vocalist Dave Geoghan I'm saying in a teutonic Croon that would have worked just as well on a goth wreck I just can't get enough was a number eight. UK Hit in nineteen eighty one and in the US us even made number twenty six on billboard's club play chart but it wouldn't be essentially the last single of its kind for depeche mode not only their most cheerful pop dimissed hit ever but the last single written by the restless restless Vince Clarke he would leave depeche mode after only one album nineteen eighty one's speak and spell and he went onto form several synth pop acts over the next decade including the assembly and erasure his very first band after Depeche Mode Yazoo Zoo known as yes in the US scored an immediate hit in the spring of nineteen eighty two with only you this left Depeche Mode to forge ahead without Clark and they tapped keyboardist and guitarist Martin Gore to take over the Songwriting Gore proved a diverse flexible rexel songwriter with a much darker lyrical bent even on seemingly upbeat singles like the nine thousand nine hundred eighty three hit get get the balance right throbbing dance beats were paired with cynical lyrics by the time of the nineteen eighty four album some great reward Martin Gore had come into into his own as Depeche modes leader penning songs about everything from romantic betrayal to God's very existence chew do on the unnervingly Catchy Master and Servant Consensual Sado Masochism by Nineteen eighty-four Depeche mode had become college and New Wave Radio Radio Staples in America that year alone. La's K rock listed four songs by the band among its top one hundred for the ear sitting alongside Depeche mode on K. rocks playlists year also with multiple hits was a newer band causing causing a sensation with alternative rock fans on both sides of the Atlantic they would round out the sound eighties UK rough not only by largely rejected synthesizers might call them the opposite of Depeche mode but also by taking lyrical Nolan Kolia to new heights of brandy also in every way the smiths were the ultimate it banned for young people damone a cruel world led by one Steven Patrick Morrissey and impassioned men Cunene of Irish heritage who proclaimed himself both celibate and an ardent vegetarian. The smiths were defined not only by Morris's verbose this knowingly pretentious lyrics but by their ace guitarist Johnny Marr was arguably the most influential British guitarist of his era his distinctive style of Chiming Ming Guitar was widely imitated at a time in the mid one thousand nine hundred ninety s when American Indie Rock was led by by r e m a band we discussed in a prior hit parade episode who were defined by the Jhangvi playing of guitarist Peter Buck the Smiths Johnny Marr became in essence essence the British answer to Rem with a Jangle that fused sixties rock and eighties post punk and paired with Morris's arch witty and often self flagellating lyrics in the UK the smiths were consistent hit makers scoring eighteen top forty hits between nineteen eighteen eighty three and one thousand nine hundred eighty six all on the British Independent label rough trade in America the smiths never scored scored a hot one hundred hit but to listeners of college and alternative stations the Smiths were acknowledged rock heroes within then their first year how soon is now paired a Johnny Marr Tremolo Guitar riff topped by electric staps with what might be more seized most most impassioned vocal originally issued as a b side in one thousand nine hundred eighty four how soon is now quickly became the smiths most played song on American alternative radio ranking just outside the top twenty of k rock's top songs of nineteen eighty-four remarkable in the peak year for new romantic synth pop what how soon is now lacked in electronics electronics it more than made up in atmosphere and it would later be covered by more than a dozen artists by nineteen in eighty five all of the pieces were in place for the black clad bands of UK Goth indie and Post punk to break wider lider in America but it would take a few capitalists to bring these groups up from the underground the first arrived in the summer of eighty five when one of these bands finally belatedly went top forty people are people was a single single from Depeche modes nineteen eighty-four album some great reward the song took more than a year to break in America but when it did it broke beyond college and Alternative Radio Martin Gore's lament against racism and war crossed crossed over to top forty pop stations peaking at number thirteen on the hot one hundred in August of Nineteen eighty-five Casey Z.. CASOM counted it down once a week with eighteen forty and you know how your favorite songs are doing across the US like the first American hit for for the English band with a French name Schmo they climbed four notches to thirteen with people but DM's top forty forty crossover proved a fluke it would be their last American pop hit for nearly five years moreover it seem to have no coattails despite the fact that other bands of Depeche Moods generation were now producing some of their most accessible assessable material to date got the cures nineteen eighty five album the head on the door split the difference between the Band's Pop melodies and Robert Smith's gloomy lyrics what's it dominated college radio and reached number fifty nine on the billboard album chart higher than any cure studio album today's its lead single inbetween days a soaring love song about feeling too old to fall in love topped alternative turn it of Radio playlists and it was quickly followed by the cure is most infectious dance song to date the percolating minimalist and Moody close to me never within a month of close to me's release Robert Smith's friend Susie sue produced what would be regarded as the band she's most irresistible same cities in dust maintained suzy's edgy goth persona but packaged in skittering club it not only scraped the top twenty in the UK but reached number seventeen on the US club play Chart Suzy's biggest biggest American dance single to date this episode of Hit Parade is sponsored by how to raise a parent a new podcast from dairy pure in collaboration with slate studios dairy pure believes that the world would be a better place if we reconnected to what's pure and innocent in ourselves and and each other that's what how to raise a parent is all about learn how to shift your perspective I didn't like the way I said that let me take third bullet again that's what how to raise a parent is all about learn how to shift your perspective as a parent to reconnect with the imagination origination and openness that comes so naturally to kits join host Mallory Kasdan as she talks to parents and experts about what makes kids so fearless creative and good at making friends and what we as adults can learn from them the podcast explores the fun messy confusing and delightful aspects of being a parent through personal stories and broader insights from relevant experts. Make sure to listen and subscribe to how to raise a parent wherever you get your podcasts by nineteen eighty six none of these British post punk bands had managed to score a gold album in America let alone platinum even though to the nation's black-clad Goth Kids Robert Smith and Susie sue were already icons what the scene needed was a bigger showbiz oh Biz connection perhaps connection to a Hollywood movie and filmmaker John Hughes had just the thing John Fuse was the poet laureate of eighties teams in the mid eighties he directed or produced three consecutive -secutive films with his actress News Molly Ringwald that defined highschool for generation X. All three were infused with Music Nineteen Nineteen eighty-four is sixteen candles featured new romantic songs by the likes of Spandau Ballet and cash agoo and one thousand nine hundred five's the breakfast the club has generated a number one hit simple minds don't you forget about me for nineteen eighty six's pretty in pink named for for this psychedelic first Song Hughes went further curate eating a a soundtrack album that played like an altar rock mixed it would do for eighties post-punk what the Saturday night fever soundtrack had had done for seventy s disco fueled by its biggest single full orchestral maneuvers darks if you leave a love song that has become a radio perennial the pretty in pink soundtrack reached the top five on the billboard album chart in the spring of eighty six that made it not only the most successful soundtrack to John Hughes News Movie But the biggest American chart success most of the acts on the album would have MD's lovelorn track a number four hit in the spring of eighty-six was joined on the album by much edgier material from the likes of Echo and the bunny the smiths and order shellshocked new orders latest hybrid of all truck and the club music made its debut on pretty in pink and reached number fourteen on Billboard's club chucked new orders fourth straight top twenty US dance single after blue Monday confusion and the perfect kiss pretty in pink was well-timed for new order as they were finally starting to break on the US charts they're low life album had cracked the billboard album chart just a few months earlier but the band that couldn't have timed pretty in pink any better was the smiths. Yeah I like how soon is now please please please let me get what I want was originally a nineteen eighty-four beside that took on a life of its own this gentle drum Lewis yearning ballot with Mandolin by Johnny Marr and assigning vocal from Morrissey was a favourite of John Hughes he even placed an instrumental version version of the song in his other nineteen eighty six film Ferris Buehler's Day off appearing as the last track on pretty in pink please please as please let me get what I want was many Americans introduction to the smiths and the band was ready to capitalize on their higher your profile with their most accomplished album the queen is dead landed in June nineteen eighty-six just weeks after the pretty in pink soundtrack peaked on the album chart it would wind up the smiths most acclaimed album and spent the rest of the year on the billboard album chart though it generated no American top forty hits the Queen is dead topped many nine thousand nine hundred eighty six critics polls and dominated college and Alternative Radio playlists with songs that would become alter rock standards like there is a light that never goes out the boy with the thorn in his side and one of Morrison's most self referential hits bigmouth strikes again that big map would get Morrissey into trouble more than once for the rest of his career and it essentially led to his band not surviving on one thousand nine hundred eighty s at various as times the willful frontman feuded with guitarist Johnny Marr bassist Andy Walk and Drummer Mike Joyce and tensions would eventually eventually lead mar to quit the band in nineteen eighty seven the queen is dead would be the last studio album the smiths would issue while still together in their final year they would issue a few more classic singles including gas and panic and in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven before mar quit the smiths recorded one final studio album strange ways here we come led off by the MTV favorite grow friend in a coma but by the time strange ways arrived in the fall of nineteen eighty-seven the smiths were no no more though they would end up with an impressive roster of UK hits the what if question that still dogs the smiths to this day is if they had remained intact just a bit longer could they have become U. S. superstars they missed America's embrace of British Post post-punk by only a year or so it fell to the other bands of that generation to break America for UK Mope Rock in the final years of the nineteen eighty s and there was plenty of going to go around remember depeche mode had started off their career in the early eighties with Bouncy synth pop and even after their songs got lyrically edgier in the mid eighties under under bandleader Martin Gore they were still catchy enough to be the first band to score a top forty hit but starting in nineteen eighteen eighty six wendy m titled Their New Album Black Celebration Gore provided singer Dave Song with lyrics that were both sensual unsual and ominous and the music had an industrial thraw by nineteen eighty-seven Depeche mode had eliminated most traces of their earlier techno pop sound perversely this made them bigger than ever especially on music for the masses there eighty seven album whose title was both both accurate and ironic accurate because it became depeche moods first US top forty album peaking at number thirty thirty five and ironic because to them music for the masses meant digital dirges with hooks tracks like I never let me down again sounded like high school anthems for the end of days new order to were refining their sound nineteen eighty-six is Bizarre Love Triangle combined relentless dance beats and Romantically confused deceptively melancholy lyrics it would become new orders sleeper hip hip a top five. US Club Song in one thousand nine hundred eighty six a highlight on their one thousand nine hundred eighty seven compilation substance and elite looming looming pop radio staple years later it would even scrape the hot one hundred in one thousand nine hundred ninety five nearly a decade after it I came out to this day. Bizarre Love Triangle remains new orders most played radio song despite never reaching the top forty in either the US or the UK bizarre indeed but it was a bonus track on the substance collection that gave new order its first ever American top forty forty hit and again as with depeche mode going darker worked for new order true faith a Dumi dance anthem awesome with allusions to drug addiction and quote a childhood. I lost replaced by fear on quote peaked at number thirty two you in December of nineteen eighty-seven even the former members there's of bow house were beginning to find favour on the US airwaves love and rockets atro- that spun off from the Goth Band in Nineteen eighty-five after its break-up produced a headier and Punchy your form of post punk in late nineteen eighty-seven there and thematic stomach fist pumping no new tale to tell found favor on American rock stations alongside the likes of Bruce Springsteen and Air Smith the song peaked at a remarkable number eighteen on billboard's album chart now but no uk post-punk alter rock band in the late eighties seemed to possess more promise or potential then then the cure even as band members cycled in and out of the lineup including on again off again and on again bassist Simon Gallup up and guitarist plural later Pearl Thompson Robert Smith remained the fixture the leader and the guiding force and his songs kept getting strong in early nineteen eighty-seven the cures first collection of singles standing on the beach quietly went gold in America ACA nearly a year after its release despite peaking on the billboard album chart at number forty eight in short even without a a top forty hit the cures secret army of US fans was growing three months after standing on a beach went gold the band issued its most ambitious album to date the double LP kissed me and Kiss Me Kiss me eighteen new songs all penned by Robert Smith who apparently had not lost his playful sense of him to this point the cure had scored virtually no hot one hundred hits to prior singles had bubbled under the chart chart and in one thousand nine hundred and five's inbetween days had spent a solitary week at number ninety nine but with why can't I be you the logjam began to break the horn inflected aren beef flavored and slightly lewd single broke into the middle of the hot one one hundred peaking at number fifty four in the summer of eighty seven that set up the cure for at last their top forty breakthrough just like heaven remains Robert. Smith's most acclaimed composition hailed by both rolling stone and Pitchfork magazine's as one of the greatest songs of the nineteen nineteen eighties a track that builds one instrument at a time has no lyrics for nearly a minute and deploys its title only wants at the very end this is the cures archetypal popson romantic but mournful giddy and loved one on the hot one hundred just like heaven reached number forty making it just barely the curious i American top forty hit reaching its peak the first week of January nineteen eighty eight by nineteen eighty-eight it was obvious alternative rock was serious business in the United States magazines like C M J trouser press and the Gavin report had been tracking. US College hits for most of the last decade and on MTV shows like the cutting edge and one hundred and twenty minutes have been showcasing indie leaning videos for several years the glossy surface of the popped machine lies the underground comic sparred in one hundred twenty minutes two hours into the future of new music every Sunday night at midnight eastern nine Pacific here on MTV while alternative rock was still no threat to the likes of Michael Jackson Madonna and Bruce Springsteen it could no longer be regarded as merely a poor relation to mainstream pop music if major rock acts like springsteen could have their own own album rock chart and dance acts like Madonna had a club play chart bands like the cure depeche mode and new order deserved a better yardstick of their growing cultural influence later that year billboard finally obliged the point the billboard modern rock tracks chart launched in September nineteen eighty eight it's very first week the number one song was by Post Punk and Goth rock doc veteran susie and the band she's there hit peekaboo topped a chart that featured and click variety of college radio favorites and all talk radio demigods from big audio dynamite to ten thousand maniacs information society to the Sugar Cubes Patti Patti Smith to the PSYCHEDELIC furs with with this chart launch billboard announced that Mass Market Alternative Culture was opened for business in essence as I often say music charts our feedback loops they reflect popularity not only in the music business but back to the music business which which then makes that music more popular from the day it launched the modern rock tracks chart affirmed not only that alternative rock was bigger than ever but that a lot of it came with a British accent this Brit rock to Germany would come to a head in nineteen eighty nine one by one each of the godfathers of UK Hey post-punk would score bigger hits than they had ever seen in America before new order got the ball rolling in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight new order spent several months on the island impose ib soaking up the burgeoning acid house and techno scenes and recording what became their most experimental club oriented oriented album they called it technique the first single fine time debuted on the modern rock chart in January nineteen eighteen eighty nine and flew into the top three remarkable for such a cutting edge track far from the rudiments of rock at the US dance clubs find time rose to number two becoming new orders biggest hit to date a few months later the follow up single round and round did even better rising to number one on the club play chart and number six at modern rock At a time when new orders hometown of Manchester Life was emerging as the center of rave culture and transforming into mad chester. The album was transmitting a SIMILAC ACLU of that scene to a suburban American audience new orders fellow Mancunians the smiths were already broken up by one thousand nine hundred eighty nine but their former lead singer had launched a solo career just in time to exploit the U S Modern Rock Boom Morris's first couple of Solo singles issued in Nineteen eighty-eight missed the launch of the modern rock chart by mere months but when last of the famous famous international playboy arrived in early eighty nine mas was welcomed onto the chart like cain playboys peaked at number three three in the spring of eighty nine and he

United Kingdom America smiths US New Order Robert Smith Martin Gore UK Alternative Rock Vince Clarke Robert Smith Nick Hornby Johnny Marr Sebastian Patti Patti Smith Los Angeles MTV Susie sue John Hughes Qatar
The Avalanches Explain Their New Album, 'We Will Always Love You'

World Cafe

32:53 min | Last week

The Avalanches Explain Their New Album, 'We Will Always Love You'

"This message comes from. Npr sponsor nerdwallet. They bring together the smartest credit cards mortgage lenders and more so you can compare and shop all in one place for all your money. Questions turned to the nerds. Nerdwallet dot com. This is world cafe. I'm marina doris when the avalanches. I grabbed people's ears back in the year. Two thousand they did it with a song that sounded like nothing else that song frontier psychiatrist along with all of the songs on their debut album. Since i left you was intricately. Assembled collage of tons of samples. The album was critically adored and gained the avalanches scores of fans and then it took sixteen years for them to release another record. 2016 also sample heavy wildflower thankfully. It didn't take nearly as long for their third album to arrive. And this time they mixed their beloved sampling style with a bevy of guest. Vocalists and much more live instrumentation. Today i talked to robbie chater and tony de blasio of the avalanches about their new approach their love of sampling and why this album came so much quicker than their last. But i the title track from that new album. Here is a bit of the avalanches featuring vocals from blood orange. We will always love you draped. What's my life gun when minds in the corner and stories intolerant. Not to think about this This is world cafe. You just heard we will always love you from the avalanches that song featured blood orange also got a keen ear. You may have caught a sample of the rochas ham and song and there we will always love. You is the title track from the avalanches new album today. I am joined by the avalanches robbie antonio here with me. Welcome to the world cafe. Hey thank you. Thank you so First of all. Could i have each of you introduce yourself so your full names so we know whose voice is whose tony easter. I am sorry to blasi from melbourne australia. That was fantastic. Turn a thank you from alvin. You know you finish this album during lockdown and in australia melbourne lockdowns were pretty intense. So how did that affect the completion of this record. it was. I mean we will mostly done. We must have gun. Probably the last fifteen central something. We finished when after lockdown began but it was more just the feeling of the city shutting down fables quite distressing for people with our unemployment uncertainty in the family. It's made it look down very very ashia and then it was trying to finish a record. Release it during lockdown which was very challenging volatile pressing plants closed down and all that kind bottom we got most of the rko don Before we just feel are different in any ever ever. It was really really tough for everybody really uncertain for everybody in really hot for the city. Yeah i mean that was meant. It was men's come at in. it wasn't meant to be like you know we had. We will always love you to track. You just played came out in january and then we had running red lights and then it was going to be the album off to that so we did have scheduled in time for your twenty two twenty twenty least. We really did well. I think we can make an exception and authority on my next year's best of even though this has been a year that's been sort of defined by isolation for a lot of people. This album is sort of the opposite of that. You brought in so many guests for this record. I'm just going to list off a few of them here. Blood orange m gmt. Johnny marr leeann bridges. Perry farrell tricky. Jamie execs karen. Oh kurt vile rivers cuomo pink foo mick jones. That's not even all of them. You've had guests on your albums before but this feels like a whole new level. So why did you want to bring in so many different voices. Robbie start to say little off never actually heard a lot of costa. It would be a good one. What was the question again. But why did you bring in so many different voices. I mean. I guess we didn't plan to just rolling and then it kept growing and growing. The the plan was tony. In iowa collaborated andrew. We just thought let's just get going to just make five songs. I think when we began. Connie i just put add some help with something and it was almost to wave tricking. Getting assholes going look. We don't have to make now the fifth. They need sample odyssey. We can just make a bunch of songs. Put them out quickly so that was how we do it. Of course bang out off. It ended up being this long johnny over twenty-five recco but when we began it just begin with rivers cuomo annum defense. He was the other earliest. And then um we just got on a roll and people just seem to really connect with what what we were trying to express. We feel very fortunate right. And i should mention And we're going to get into this in a bit but between your first alvin your second album. There was a sixteen year break. This one was much shorter. We'll talk about that in a second Robbie maybe you can answer this guidance. Do you give somebody when they're going to join in on a track with the avalanches. It's an from robie. The overall like we we had for personal reasons crystallize very clear. Same that we wanted to explore on this record and we did that because our previous wanted taken six needs so we are brought we need. We need a focus before we begin. We cannot get lost in the wilderness for sixty music and mike king executives is record was making. It was much to search for what it was and it for this album. We were very very clear about what we wanted to express. It was almost like a single for so we had internally likes some shade with tony. And i just tried to summarize how i was feeling at the beginning of the process and then we ended up sharing those nights. We've every guest. Who interested in being a part of this record and then it's kind of very much on a case by case basis like some people are very open and they like what should we try. What what do you want to do. You have any lyrics. They've they want lyrics. They want melodies. They want back and forth. I want to be in the same room. Someone defense for example. He was very much. I love the feeling it later with me and that was so people people very different. And that's what's beautiful for us because we've only ever worked with each other before so and start start stocking small studios with thousands of records in that how we've might music in the past so this was a fascinating process frost to see how they were. So what was that sort of short thesis statement. You would give people about what i do for this holiday. Really we talked about we were interested in are on mortality. A think we were a little older and reflecting back on law actually doing here on this planet. how precious life is. We're interested in exploring notions of what happens to us when we saw Life after death also looking in woods to what the essence of as people. What are we all made a out of. You know. Because i have my identity in the road which is a bunch of live australian musician citric cetera. But beyond that. I feel like we're all set much move asked and we wanted to explore that la that boston's who are we really beyond our identities in what connects us all and then in parallel to that will be interested in era journey is sampled by musicians and we often sample music from site thirties or forties in the long since passed away so the foam is dealing with russians of Time memory ghosts and yeah with summoning spirits when we sample very very old music. The oldest audience begin to tie together in amman. And then perhaps we would find a sample like the the roaches sample that you mentioned earlier and it. It just says beautifully. We will always love you in. That almost seemed to sum up everything. We were exploring. So that's what was a jumping off point and then we started with jarvis from there so let's use running red lights as an example could hear that next You have pink foo and rivers cuomo of weezer on this song. So how did this. Collaboration come together. Maybe as a more concrete example you can explain how this one came together tony This was the first one so it was. This was a. I think so. This was the connor test. The best example and our dark think we'd really got too much involved with the notes yet to rivers so i think it was more more him just expressing How he feels and so. Hey we gave him the song to listen to. And then hey kind of sent us back. Three different sets of Lyrics which were just like full line lyrics and he said you know which one do you want. And then we daryl amazing so we can. We just have them all so he went fine. Okay you can have have the most so they all ended up working themselves into the song and that you know that was such a great experience it was like the almost not catalyst but it was. It was like let's keep doing this. This is good like this is amazing. Woke eyelid lift kit reaching out to do this okay. Well let's listen to running red lights. This is avalanches on cafe out. Those brian fung the avalanches running red lights featuring guests rivers cuervo and pink foo that is from the avalanches new album. We will always love you to really appreciate this album. I think it's important that we look at your whole body of work. I'm talking to tony. And ravi of the avalanches right now. Let's go back in time to your debut album from the year. Two thousand since. I left you one of the things that define. That album was the massive amount of sampling. But he did so. I'm going to ask each of you. This where does your fascination with sampling. Begin tony why. Don't you go. I i go into sampling Only off the kind of after that. I was like this is a real cool. Waves towing starts like when you can't play guitar very well and how play anything super well gravel as cool bits of people's music so i was inspired me to get into sampling. So what was it for you. Where did you first get bitten by that bug on the is tony and we will both friends in high school and you know it's almost like a date need to express ourselves or something through music. Tiny segui will just like kind of bad Plight in the garage of my house and you know we could play instruments like just but feel Proficient and so then it was like through hearing some early be go to donald records. there was a known david boon my luck in the goes record. Dial all that kinda stuff And thinking oh maybe we can do this. How do i make this music. And it was like was we'd been missing around with on a full track. Type record was dissimilar process to me so it was more just kind any inside need to express and then just finding a way to do it and i love that and i. I love to do that in whatever made him. They're working in. It's just like they've got something inside that they need to get out. And i just figure out a way. Yeah i know mick. Jones makes an appearance on this album. And when i was sort of thinking about all this audio dynamite. I think was the first time i ever became conscious of sampling because in the globe he samples. Should i stay. Should i go. And i was a kid my car on a tape before i ever heard. Should i stay. Or should i go and then when i was like wait. Where did that sound come from. I know that from a different thing. And i was like that was the first time i realized sampling existed. I one term that people use for the kind of sampling. That you guys do on your first. Two albums is plunder phonics You really are. You're digging through vinyl recordings to find these individual samples and putting together like a collage. I would imagine it's a really work intensive way of creating. i've never done it. Why does it appeal to you that way like. Why does that sort of technique appeal to you. I think it's like was exactly what you mentioned. described beautifully about hearing that sound from a clash record on a big audio dynamite record. Let my mind was just fascinated with it and the white ties with time and white plays with memory and you know and we will also. I think it was because you know. A straighter is very geographically. Isolated from the rest of the world so and we'll making outpost album since i left you pre internet in our trapped. The world was far away. Place you know we in melbourne is at the bottom of From anywhere and we could walter this junk stores and fine days records these very easy to find records. They want ray. Records are just literally john. Kennedy was a really beautiful protests of time. This junk into something new and also what what we imagined world much download skype australia's very has very. I don't know how to destroy culture. He about we certainly dreamed of other worlds in other places and it was a way to to conjure that up for cells. I think. I'm speaking to robbie and tony of the avalanches today on world cafe. We're going to hear frontier psychiatrist. Which was the biggest hit from. Since i left you and i was wondering you know. There's there's a ton of samples in here including Canadian comedy duo wayne and shuster. If you could guess maybe know a number but how many samples did you use in this one song. It gets confusing. Because you know all the drums a little samples and they'll be hi. Hats and symbol might be from the record of that record. So if you wouldn't really go into detail like outlaw bass notes or whatever. We'll chop from different records because literally we did not play any instruments on this first albums are on the new album with a real guitar over a sample but on on twenty psychologist shock. Horror on fantastic every little base notice. We've found from some old record or something you know so if you want to go to that ridiculously detail. There will be hundreds and hundreds of little samples. The main groups like four five samples flipping in and out from each other and then this probably eighty to thirty different spoken word. A record chopped up in different ways to provide the the wacky vocal samples. And yes something like that. Okay so listen carefully and see how many you can count right now. It's frontier psychiatrist. Avalanches unrolled cafe. That boy needs therapy. Thanks amassing. That boy needs therapeutic psychosomatic. That's going on the couch. waterside me. you're not you're crazy nicole. granada lead. That boy needs therapy going to kill you. That boy needs therapy. Frantic split have not count free bread. That needs better. He was lying a sheep also teeth frontier psychiatrist from the avalanche debut album. Since i left you came out in the year two thousand. That song was very successful. I mean i remember you. This band in melbourne australia. I was watching that on. Tv in canada it was on mtv. It was a big thing. So how did things change for you as a bandit. After that song in that album became so popular tony of was going to say stuff got real like it just felt like everything had been kind of fun and games until point like the me. It definitely changed as far as a just a fun thing anymore. I mean it was still fun but it became something a more than that. Yeah probably would. If i agree i agree with that. It was like we were. It was w reason why that record has so many samples. Never really anyone listen to you know it was like it was just a thing we made and we were just having the tom val odds in the previous to that travelling around australia playing in pubs and clubs we would just crazy kids. You know and. I don't really built for like being on a remember having been in germany. A huge on sports stadium and having to accept. Mtv or something in just like just thinking what we just kind of as paper win really built for. That a wasn't ready for it. We were very young. And it was all baraga wyoming. I thing in an interview that you did with an emmy a little while ago. Robbie you said that four years after that album came out your girlfriend of the time told you have people thought visit classic record but you just heard all the stuff you could have done better. I won't listen to that album now. You know in twenty twenty. What do you hear on to me. I really enjoy listening to it. Did listening party on twitter earlier. This year was the first time in forever. I've actually listened to any listen to it in real time with people online and it was really enjoyable and i just had. It just feels like it feels extremely positive. It feels joyous mid streaming with Joy of creativity look can hear us being so excited even just with the actual process of making music. That way you. I get what people at what people enjoy. You know i get i get it a this world cafe. I'm ready to speaking with the avalanches today. Your second album wildflower didn't come out until two thousand sixteen. You're working on it for a lot of that time. In between you've mentioned that you were documenting and sort of categorizing every sample in getting a little bogged down in the details. But what else was going on. During that time. What was sixteen years. This is a pretty long time what what's going on. And we didn't start as we mentioned with was carnival. Overwhelming and becton records relational tiny ously online. So it kind was still coming out on a different life in america and into three and then i would want tour so when you really get home in settled Dozen four or something. And then kind of dusted cells often gan out a soundtrack work and then it was just on personal journeys like i have history with addiction. A few years i mean wallflowers kind of almost dominant but did fall back into that and that slowed things down Tony was travelling age. Hangs well well. We did leave life as well. Better was like and to be honest. I feel like that that we can't let the pressure get to a little bit of like as years went by. Since i left you did become start to become a classic record. And like you said before that roby's girlfriend at the time said you realize this is classic record and just as the these built-up there was a lot of pressure luck. We really started to feel that pressure and just as paper. We weren't prepared for that With had a deal with that pressure and took until we kind of released the baggage event minds that we're able to release the white of expectation and times. We thought we weren't going to make it but we did it and isn't that amazing. It doesn't even matter what happens. Like yeah what a journey. We've been on at sixteen years of so much crazy stuff and we did it like we just felt like superheroes it honestly. The lord of the rings bronco fan was just crazy quiz. Where you like this. Not wise royal was was full on. Yeah that's a lovely. Why it's lovely hearing tiny. Speak about that because it reminds me. It's almost like we had to grow enough of his people to get to a point. We could release it what we could finish it without caring what anyone thought. I'm speaking with. The avalanche is unrolled. Cafe day you know. I want to play a clip from wildflower. But i was wondering if maybe you could help me choose one because i was wondering if there was a deep musical fine that you made during that process one of the clips you had in that catalog of samples were you knew like from the beginning that you're like this has to fit into this album somehow and maybe we can hear on the record. Is there something that jumps out at you like that. I guess the shandra sample subways on a lovely story. She might distributor since she was twelve or thirteen and her dad was a famous new york artist. She's like i wanna make a record of called the transportation. Ap actually and had four headphones about transport in one of the sons was called. Subways in we found the strect quoting Junk stole some way. And that almost summed up the spirit of like people making records at home. Not giving a damn what anybody else thought not giving a damn they could play instruments not giving a damn about the proper way to make a record and her her energy in just this beautiful spirit just kept divide the tests in her voice and she obviously was incredibly counted. As and so. That's probably one of my favorites then was less. Logging will pop on it was it was really cool turning this record purse which was kind of punk funk recording to pop discouraging and that was exactly. But let's listen to a bit of subways borough. That was subways from the avalanches that from their album wild flower. I'm speaking with ravi. Tony of the about their new album. We will always love you the cover of your new album. We will always love you. It's a photo of a woman's face. And i was wondering if one of you could describe it. Maybe for people who haven't seen it yet. I guess she she's peering out at you with beautiful eyes and it's almost like you'd onshore. She's underwater or fits the transmission on half tuned in tv or something like that or almost like she's the transmission from the other side right like it's like a half suit ghost or something and it's a. It's a photo of injury Who was carl. Sagan's partner and i heard that you originally wanted her voice on the album and you ended up with the photo for the cover. Could you walk us through that of it. Probably a yeah So her her story ankle stories incredibly beautiful story and probably about halfway through making this record. We came across that story and they were put in charge of the voyager golden record project And anybody who wants to have a look on and look for their love story. It's readily incredibly beautiful story. They fell in love while. Welcome paul and his record of the sounds of of planet earth. They were going to send to space. Yeah though gonna send out into space and they did and it was attached to the voyager spacecraft. Traveling out there now and it's disrupt what's being designed to last two billion knees and They you know this bite on their and chuck berry while sounds in different human languages and it was designed case Intelligent life if it comes across at one day and i can learn a little bit about us in an for while. What if i recall my brain waves in hop eight and we put them on the record as well. So maybe the saudi who finds his record bundy's advanced enough to learn about out out biology in the day before she was about to have her Scans and had a recorded for the carl sagan spontaneously That full in love while making the record and she tells us beautiful story about how forever now. The sound of a young woman's hot madly in love will be floating out there in the cost long after planet earth. He's no more when i heard that story. I nearly died on like a blister dan. That is so beautiful and then we began some correspondence and we will have a conversation with her in the studio just about her story and her law in use her voice as interludes on the album. The that recording session was cancelled at the last minute and we never found out. Why didn't even need to know why i was. Just very grateful. Historian existed in the first place in vain so inspiring to us and and they now as we were finishing the album. lockdown was heating and we will still could not find a cover of Just to end and ask if she minds using a photo for the cover in She said yes and so Like a beautiful full circle where she was still part of the project in iraq director. Jonathan sawada ran the photo through a spectograph where it's turned into sound back into image again. So that's that's the transmission you see on the cover. Now the the the golden voyager record and there's parts on this album. I believe the last track is The binary code message Transmitting human dna and earthly biochemicals. There seems to be like a space theme here. And i was wondering what it is about sending these messages things like the golden voyager record things like those binary code messages to some civilization. What is it that fascinates you so much about that. I think it's just an extension of what we do. I mean spreads what we were exploring on this whole record like sample by style. So what is the essence of sampling. What is capturing the sound of someone's voice from maybe an old on a record eight years ago you know it's like almost something spirits and then you thinking like we'll sampling old wrinkled and turn it into a new song and that energy flows out there again. So what potted the process luck with. Just a small part of that flaw in this the listener then someone the new broadcast it on the radio. It's just like these flows so it got us thinking about energy in what we're all night at the beginning. Also the radio Everyday from planet earth is still flooding out there and spicer. We're constantly sitting at these beautiful forces in the energy and and just the paramedic net as well. Yeah and lock I love that whole year of earth is maybe just like a straighter is. It's like dan in the bottom. You know in the middle of norway but there is something else that it's like transmitting to them and trying to get to that bigger audience and imagining what what that would be like not audiences shows or anything like i'm fascinated with the idea of space and intelligent life and things like that. There has to be something out. There are a love that whole idea of just kind of like open open arms to Those other universe. yeah to the universe. Yeah i wanna play another song from the new album. One more it feels appropriate it is called interstellar love featuring leon bridges. What can you tell us about this track before. We hear it on grateful. These track exists because when we submitted the demo to the record label that will like. You're never going to be clear that sample fucking alan parsons project sample and yeah i actually was probably a little naive on and about how in some parts of the world it's such. It was such a big hit the originals the so that's part of the story that would gripe limp. We've cut the sample cleared and then of course some big out a whip on was fantastic in The fact that he was. Just i'll just happened in one day with him so it was it was very. It was very lucky. It was just a gift to walk into the studio with someone at the beginning of the day. You have nothing at the end of the day you have someone like that was quite an experience for me because normally homes contain he is jacob. Okay let's listen to interstellar lov avalanches on Start show. That was the avalanches featuring leon bridges was interstellar love from their new album. We will always love you. My guests today have been ravi antonio the avalanches. Thank you so much. It's been so great talking to you. Thank you thank you for having me. Thanks so much i was. Yeah it was great. It was great chat. thank you. i'm rena doris. Thanks for listening to world. Cafe from npr.

tony rivers cuomo marina doris australia robbie chater tony de blasio Robbie robbie antonio tony easter blasi ashia Johnny marr leeann kurt vile rivers cuomo melbourne brian fung david boon Perry farrell mick jones mike king robie
Episode 44: Time Cop Dental Assistant

Working Interferences Dental Podcast for Dentists

1:06:57 hr | 2 years ago

Episode 44: Time Cop Dental Assistant

"Working interferences is intended for mature audiences since the hosts never grew up, someone needs to be the adult. Welcome to working interferences with Josh and Lintz the dental advice, podcasts for the average dentist. Here is Josh links. What is up? Welcome to the working interferences hot guest dental advice show. I am Joshua Austin, and I am last Timmerman. Lance permit us from moment to take a victory lap. I would say, okay, let's revel in some glory. Okay. Oh, okay. Yeah, we had Michael freaking apple on the show we did. Yeah. How cool is that? It was great. I had a great time. He's a super nice guy. Super. Awesome. Not my super cool and super down to earth the exact opposite of what I was expecting. Really having taken this aesthetic advantage course at NYU already knew what to expect. He surprisingly is normal for someone with his lifestyle and his his gig. You could totally understand if he had a different attitude, but he's not. He's so cool. Tell me about that course, is it? Is it prep stuff? Is it okay? So it's it's kinda like, I, I started at l. v. I, I did my first ascetic case LV I live hands on and it's kind of the same idea. I think at the time when I started, I believe Larry Rosenthal and they'll Dickerson had started it and then just the the commute and everything from New York to Vegas, Larry just said, I'm going to do my own gig. So it's the same idea. There's going to be lectures and everything, and then it's gonna be live hands on with a patient. What's cool about them when I went to LV I had I had to fly my own patient out there. What they've done is they'll they'll provide. A patient for you and you get the chance to design the case. We'll talk about it the deck part, but then you'll do a live patient thing and prep, and you will walk away having actually done a case with the two weekend deal. You do it a month apart. So there's enough time for the lab to do their thing, and then you come back to New York, more didactic stuff. And now at the second visit, your your seeding the case, instead of just prepping the case, it's it's awesome, and it was health Pathak. You did. It felt Pathak ace, I audited because I had already been the air gap bastard that I am. I thought, well already know how to do this. I'll just watch and I immediately wished I had a pay us wanna grab a ham piece because you want to do it your way. And so I believe it was felt Pathak Jason Kim's lab is the the group that was doing the lab work for everybody and they were on site to help with any any lab thing you might need. And here's great. That's awesome. Wha-wha-what odd me the most sort of direct wax up, you know, like in the mouth on the fly. I think that's. Impressive. And probably a skill set that I don't have to rely on a lab tech in a wax up, like just nice. I sort of, you know. And I think probably most of us, I'm sure there's a point at which you do enough of these cases were where where you can probably get away with that as as a good friend who may talk about later in the show once said y'all just mad because I can shoot from the hip and plays I every time. There's a little bit of that with apple, but because he's actually skilled all this. Well, this is the thing. He any arrogance to APPA it displays or exerts whatever d. he he owns that he is it. He deserves it so for sure, but I really do get a whole lot of that off of our. Did you not at all? That's just saying that if it had been that way, I totally would understood, but he wasn't so awesome. He, he's just awesome. I, I saw scoped him out pretty good online, and I asked you a question if you days later, do you remember that question was don't so head? I say, can you 'cause you're you're, you're tighter with him than I ever will be you at least know him a little bit. Yeah, I said, can you ask a question for me. Ask him where he gets his clinical jackets, and you said, can you send me a screen shot? So I went to his Instagram, and I found a couple of screen shots of him wearing a cool looking, you know, not your typical white coat. Right? And your typical? Yeah, it was. It was zipper, and it kind of had a cool call or. Yeah. But you know, sort of a hip version of a white coat, not like a long sort of, you know, below the dick type of. Lab coat. It was like down to the waist. And so you asked him a new cinemas pictures. He got his web coats. I did. Do you remember what he told you? It was like boots. Anneli. Your something, Bruno, coochie Nellie there you go. Now I thought to myself that doesn't sound like Cherokee or figs? Right? Like I'm not. I'm not. You know, this isn't. This is cover all yes. Isn't a. This isn't a. This isn't a a maker of scrubs and and medical wear. So I googled Bruno coochie Nellie, and I get over two mins. Coats jackets, and now I could not find a jacket just like his right. All custom made all the jackets that are sort of up now are kind of top coats, so they're sorta coats, but the cheapest one. Uh-huh. The cheapest one. Four thousand nine hundred ninety five dollars. Uh-huh. The most expensive one seventy six hundred ninety five dollars. I mean if you're gonna go go all the way up parent when yeah. I mean, I found a t shirt was five hundred dollars. Yeah. No, we're talking completely different level here. So I kinda went hunting for a for a white jacket that. Because you've said that you're case acceptance rate went up when you it goes up and you wear white jacket, it seems that way. Yeah. So I looked around now in crown shit on my point a little bit. Oh, but I found a super cool Lululemon y jacket. It's like a windbreaker super thin, and that's what I don't. I don't like that like non material it that just like I just sweat like a beast in that. San Antonio, your, yeah. Yeah. Warm rates. So I found a Lou. Anybody wants to go check the Lulu website. You can find it. Let me see if I can find the one that I got. They don't have a ton of white jackets. And this was like by far the best one, it's called the Lululemon men's active jacket and it comes in white, and I got it today, and I wore it today and I think it looks good. It's it's, it's, it's, it's it's a white coat, but it's hip and it. It looks good and it it. It has a hood, but the hoods zips up into the collar which I have currently done, not going to break this weird of white coat with a hood on it is weird. It's waterproof. So I think that sort of helps, but it's very thin and so it's it's a breathe -able. So it's no Bruno coochie Nellie Lance, right. Well, who is, but it's a, I think it's a good facsimile of kind of what what he was wearing. All right. Have you ever worn your because you have a more traditional like, oh, yeah. Do you ever worn that? Why Cohen? Nothing on it or niece it I have yet to do that like a Winnie the Pooh situation kind of deal, not yet, but tomorrow's Wednesday. So maybe tomorrow be the day? Maybe. Lance. Well, this is an advice show. It is when he answer our listeners questions, we answer questions. We find on all those neat little dental, Facebook groups, most of which between the two of us, most of us, we've been kicked out of most of excel. Yeah, I have a couple of Goto that I will not jeopardize and I'm not gonna mention them here. But I was kicked out of another one a couple of weeks ago. Apparently unbeknownst to me. By jackass who wears a stupid hat. So I'll let you in for whatever. Whatever he wants from that. We answer questions from read it. We strive to help Denison dental team members with their own unique brand of advice. So please, we need your questions. They are the sustenance week crave. You can submit your questions to working interferences at gmail.com. No, we don't want just any question. Do we Lance? Nope. We don't want a bunch of questions like what's the best white clinical coat because we all know that Cinelli. White clinical code ever. Price of over five thousand dollars. How could you imagine if you got bleach on that? Like, I mean, obviously he doesn't do that, but. Any little speck of me polyvinyl or anything on that. God. Oh, my somebody. We want the tough questions into questions at Gordon christianson and Michael APPA cannot answer. You ready time, your world rocked plants? I think so sock it to me. From a listener into our Email address. Do you're working in a Francis? I've reached out to several different groups to no avail, but I need some advice I live in. I life in east Texas, and I went to the dentist the other day with a toothache needing it, pulled the dentist seem to take a long time to get this done, and it even seemed like he was working on teeth other than the one I needed pulled when he finished up. He had worked on pretty much every tooth in my head. My question is this. Aren't doctors and dentists supposed to get some sort of consent before they do work on a patient. Thanks for your help meth doubt in Marshall. I don't even know where to begin here. Lance, this show is the gift that keeps on giving. Lizzy is just when you think it's over. It comes back like Hermes. Like Hermes. So listen, I'm looking at the Email address at this is from an I can't confirm or deny that this is actually the patient. I don't know this. Take this for what it's worth. Okay. When I first saw the post and I maybe for people who don't know, maybe we should brief a little bit. I, what do you think? Should we give some history of this? I don't know. It would be a good idea just so for just for context, there's a dentist here in Texas who I do not know. I've never met him. He's in east Texas. His name is Kenny will stand. He's a different guy. Kenny more to the beat of his own drummer over with that is that is that appropriate? Is that correct to say that offensive to drummers. Might be might be in this case, you'll pert might be really pissed off. It's not tell him. Okay. Journey is that it is rush, rush. Okay. Yeah. Sorry. Sorry, I'm not. I'm not fifty five. I'm not either Kenny. Has a pinch hit for these bigger steady cases. They all have a very typical homework being lots of decay, moderate amount of period, Donald Z's. And I would say more than a Scotia I don't know if that's a technical term. I think it's Greek. Yeah, more than it's great to me. Northern, this whole thing is Greek to me when you talk about this guy more than a Scotia. I would say a moderate to sometimes severe amount of crowding. Right? Yeah, it appears. Yeah, and I guess he just preps the shit out of everything I don't. I don't really know because photos are never part of of the case breeds station. I think at one point I think I saw one and it's just looked like a teepee. Yeah. Yeah, so so aggressive, aggressive preparation to get. I would assume some semblance of something that will draw. And there are extractions in politics and whatnot involved in some of it looks okay. Although I do find in Craig harder is mentioned several times shouts to Craig. Prio always in focus post op photos. Never in focus like like, you know, through camera was out of batteries. SD card was full, whatever, whatever, like, oh, second second pictures with an iphone. I pictures with the clinical camera, whatever. Just stuff like that. But all I think. All of us have cases that maybe we wouldn't necessarily be super proud of or where we have to make compromises that we don't particularly like wouldn't show it and academy, but the sort of. Brazenness. I was gonna say browsers, but I don't think that's right. It might be craziness of of the attitude and the imperiousness about it is sort of, I think, what rubs a lot of people the wrong way? Well, I think what rubs if there's constructive criticism can be kind of hard to take at times, but still a lot of times the the advice that I've seen a Facebook has been fairly constructive criticism, not just well at this point it's just all bashing, but at the originally, there was just some solid advice being given. He's not coming for advice. No. Even one of those posts he says, look, we're just here for as no discussion on. I can't remember the words, but it basically, I just want here for praise. We, we all have case cases that we like we gave into the patient and we did something that we know doesn't sort of meet our philosophies or whatever. And we just sort of embarrassingly do it and move on about line. So we don't post on it. He's proud of what he's doing and I don't, you know, I don't know what he's promising. I'm not in the opportunity so I don't know what he's promising longevity. I don't know if it was being offered ever. I don't know. You know, I know a lot of things because the pictures that get posted don't reveal a lot. But they do sort of tug at heartstrings because they help these sort always have these reveals of the new smile and people crying someone's always there to video record it, and then it gets passed onto the east Texas news and yada, yada, yada. And next thing you know, it's viral post in viral video and all of that. And it's coming from a place of quite frankly bullshit. Right? It's it's, it's just not. It's not the kind of dentistry that I would that I would want to practice. I think he's leaving patients worse off than they were before. I think you would agree with that. Absolutely. I mean, the the whole do no harm. I think a lot of what he's got going is borderline harm. I would sit more than borderline. Oh, yeah. I'm just trying to be right. And if it is a doubt on some cases, I get it not every patient is going to do. Comprehensive interdisciplinary care, get it. I blew that every day. My office believe me for sure on. But there's also just sort of an attitude that goes with this that I think is is what draws the most ire and recently and and I'm gonna leave out all this sort of bullshit social stuff that happened with whatever. And that's been talked about before and. This is a, that's not for this discussion. But for this discussion, I is a recent case that he did where the patient came in for extraction of a back to, and he did a bunch of work that wasn't consented on and I still to this, I still don't really know what because I haven't seen a good post op picture. I have seen a preoccupied and it does look like. You know it and it was all in. So it had to have just been drunk composite. But he did a bunch of drunk deposits that were discussed with the patient. They weren't consented on. I don't know if he charged or what, or if this is something worked out before with this guy's family or I, I don't know any of those details, but when I got the impression it was no charge so that justifies it in his mind to a certain degree. But that's not. I mean, four consent is so important. That's not. I mean that. It's just such a. Even if it's carry us to structure to take a hippie and remove a part of somebody's body without them telling you it's okay as some sort of weird surprise like you detail their car for them or something like this isn't the angle in the legal Rome. This is called battery. Absolutely. You did not consent. You did something to their body without permission. Absolutely. You know, I there, there's a great post out video of him welling up and crying and all that kind of stuff. And it's emotional in. It's great. Man is this the sketch and I get that he didn't charge in an and I love that. He, I, I love were his heart was at and wanting to help this guy out and whatnot. Right, right. But I think we would agree that that's a cool thing to do. Very cool, sue and keep doing that. You know what your communities better when you do that stuff. All of us, you know, all of us any any little thing you do could could could really help somebody and and who knows, you know, I, I hesitate to get all all the sort of hyperbole about, oh, we change lives every day, whatever. Like, right. Yeah. Maybe that's true in in a small percentage here and there. But I really do think for for small something you can really affect somebody's confidence, whatever all that stuff. Great. God, you can't sneak it up on them. This isn't this isn't what's that? What's that show would chip and Joanna Gaines fixer upper, this isn't fix. This isn't mouth fixer upper where you do the reveal at the end. You know, this isn't traces. Verbally didn't break in someone's house. This is the trading spaces. Like I'm going to crack into your house and you're not home, and you're gonna come home like yet, you may love the design pretty still creepy that you procam to their house. Like now, I would be happy to let Joanna Gaines break into my house. I think she said, delightful woman, I find her incredibly attractive. I don't know what the hell she's doing without blonde knucklehead. He must be just key must have high. I mean, he just must have. He can so much heat. He must have the biggest of the big dick energy. I, I don't know. He doesn't. He swallows. He doesn't seem like that good of a carpenter to me because I never actually see him doing any work. It's always somebody else. It's always like, yeah, we can do this and this. He takes a few swings of a hammer and then it cuts in. It's like, yeah, I'm sure somebody else came in and did the rest of this. So don't even know if he's of that. And I think I remember reading. He's not even a certified contractor. You know, there's there. We got to Texas State board that needs to investigate a dental issue happening in Marshall of stuff happening consent. I think we've got. I don't know who the contractor board is or whatever, but they somebody might need a drop in a Waco and check in on chip and just see what's happening because maybe I, yeah, it's weird. You got to get your license buddy. You can't just break into someone's house and rip out there wallpaper in and put a tile back splash like, great, it's cool, and I'm a lot of times they'll probably like it, but that's also an invasion of privacy and white, not right and legal thing to do. I, there was some discussions on some of the groups about what to, you know, if someone should report this and all that and man, I, I don't like that. I don't wanna be that guy because it comes around, you know what goes around, comes around in that respect. And if you start dropping dimes on people, you know, Cinches get stitches lances as we know we explain if you like that. It's going to come back to haunt you. But I also see the other side of McMahon. The state board would love to know this. I'm actually kinda surprised. No one's brought it to their attention. Well, he's let's just say, and I don't. That's not really. This isn't discussion for this particular question. Let's not pretend that he's never had a run in with the state board. Put that. Okay. But I don't wanna be the one to read. I don't wanna. I don't wanna go into the departed. In rasping this guy out and just to find out that there's a rat Fink on my team or whatever. Yeah, it's a tough look for my guy though to do work without consent, and I'm not. I don't even want to like I don't get written consent for every filling or sealant or class five composite that I do. I'm not going to sit here and pretend that I've at least had a discussion with the patient while we're going to do, and they've agreed right, and they Dave for it and or are going to pay for it. They've had a treatment plan presented its outline every single tooth, and I'm going to touch on them. Exactly. That's my concern. Yeah, same. Does it make a difference? This sort of viral crying video at the end. Does that does that make a difference? Does that? Does that change your opinion? Does that make it better? Is it better to ask for forgiveness than permission. Not in this, is this for me? No, but there seemed to be a lot of cheerleaders in in fans on Facebook, but late for Dennis, though, that's the thing. Yeah, I, I think they were. It was so hard to keep track of some of those comments. I was reading. We're, we're screen shots from. His personal page or something. So I don't think people understand our responsibility. No, no, I I would agree in so I would I would almost just throw their throw their opinion into garbage because all they see all these sees the emotion. They don't understand the sort of entanglements that that were under. And. He may be the nicest guy in the world. I, I honestly don't know. I've never met him. I never even had an interaction with him. All I know is from the sort of this all night persona. And I, I think I mentioned it earlier our our good friend Wade who is in a CD member published in a CD journal. I would say one of the more talented dentists in the United States. Would you agree with that totally on a percent? Very talented guy, honest guy, hard working guy, good family guy, all that wage wage. A great guy, Wade had a conversation with him and. I believe that Kennedy said something to the effect of you're just mad because you have to measure five times. In line it something I you, you're just angry because you have to line everything out and measure again and again, and again, and I can shoot from the hip and hit the bullseye every time. And it was. Oh, my. Yeah, it'd be freaking kidding me. That sort of attitude is just, yeah. Yeah. Well, ignorance is getting closer and closer to the sun man, rough rough. Tough. Look for my guy, Kenny. Here's what I would say. Who asked this quite hundred? Remember method Marshall. It makes me pick. It's probably not the patient, although we all know. It was definitely something smoked out if a mountain dew can. When you look at this guy's picture, there's no other way, right? Oh, yeah, this type of decay. So meth meth out Marshall, I doubt is probably the real patient, although it'd be great if it was. What can you do. File a claim with the Texas State board gets a reasonable ING. Even though you've got a service and even though you may love your smile, I do feel that your constitutional rights were impinged upon and you're right as a patient to consent to and know what treatment is being done on you. How does the guy just lay there for however long then took? Well, maybe method of banks not pay attention to what's happening. I mean, I can't imagine you're drilling on a front. I was gonna say on it. Yes, spinning on it too. That's literally an entire mouth away from the tooth. It's I'm came in for, you're not like, what do you think he's doing? Knitting something. Apparently man. Yeah, it's just weird. How many times have you had a patient that ask you? Are you working on the right tooth that happens, but relatively frequently? I mean, I'm not going to say like all the time, but. Once said, Horder maybe? Yeah, they can't tell from the block or whatever. If you're on the right tooth and they'll bring it up and that's your in the same quadrant, they're just like, man, I just can't tell your kid told her, you're at. Yeah, this is. Yeah, I'm taking out number whatever fifteen or to whatever it is he's working on like number six or number eleven, the patients not like, what are you doing? I strange. Fairy straight crazy, crazy crazy. Maybe this is the patient that Email. Right? So I'm not confessed something to you. Let's hear, okay. I've never consumed methamphetamine, have you? I have yet to consume. Okay, so I don't know what the feeling. Is there some other illegal substances I can tell you exactly what the feelings are. This particular one I'm going to have to. Admit some some flying blind on this buddy. I've totally. I just isn't it like speed, it's yet it's a stimulant right at speed, so more in tuned. You'd be focused on what's happening. I think we'll still less. It's not a depressant. No. Weird. That was the first thing I thought I would is what point does that guy speak up and say you're working on different dude. I came in for the upper writer upper left and you are working on our front tooth on the other side of where I'm having an issue. What are you doing. Very finish in took. It's got it. They've taken a long time, you know, it's it's no longer than a breaking extraction exactly. Do multi units of big carriers class fives that would assume to be not so happy gum tissue and packing cord. And let's let me what, what are the odds. So let me ask you this Vegas odds. Okay. Is there cord in Kenny wellstone's office? Is there an inch of cord. I have my doubts I would say seventy two one. Seventy to one odds. Let's seven hundred something like that. So that would mean if you bet one hundred bucks, you'd win seven thousand. Okay. If there was court in his office. Yeah, I and floss doesn't count. Suture. Does ultra pack court, right? I don't think there's a inch of ultra pet coordinate office. Yeah, I, I would concur. Oh, god. I just wish my brain would let me be that. Browsers. That's what we're gonna call this now win someone's like real cocksure and confident. They're just like they sleep super well. They know they did the right thing on everything. We're going to call that being like Brazzaville's. I wish I was that browsers of myself. I really, I, I have zero of that, and I'm so envious. This, countless sleep like a freaking baby. I guess. I mean, it's nice. Yeah, that's a world. I don't live in the. I do not either. I absolutely do not either question to from listener Austin, not me this. Their first name is awesome. Okay. Awesome. Asked associate working with a great doc who's going to retire in the next six years and sell to me. I love working at the office and the staff are great. However, the senior assistant has been telling every patient I recommend an Occlusive guard to that. They don't need one after I leave the room. What's the best way to handle this? I can't follow the Seattle protocol since I am an associate and she does so many other beneficial things at the office. I'm hesitant to follow lenses, typical advice. Thanks for the sage wisdom Austin, and he gives us a song suggestion actually, PS song suggestion looking too closely by Fink. Do you know this fan? I don't. I don't know this ban either, so I'm gonna look that up so I wouldn't think so. He recommends a Nygaard. And assistant pop said after he's out and says. You don't really need. Yeah, that that's it's unfortunate being the associate you, you almost have your almost powerless. Like even if you do commanded them to obey the, you know you're not the boss. So there's that. That's pretty damn tough. It sounds like they're just needs to be a kind of a an education. Talk to her time, find out why she thinks that's not necessary. You might be able to educate her and then she'll get on board. Do you remember back to the future part two part two? I do. So back to the future part to end, it always goes back to back to the future with me. I believe there's a scene at the end where. The the DeLorean is in the air in it's trying to like. Drop a ladder down for mardi to climb up and it gets struck by lightning in disappears. And then he just standing there and some field wherever in hill valley outside hill valley, wherever and a car pulls up and a guy cars. Like, are you mardi MC fly? I've got a letter for you in this letter has been there since like the seventies, right, or since the seventeen hundreds or whatever since he old west, that'd be eighteen hundreds and it's a letter from doc who sent him a letter, knowing that he was going to be there. So whatever FedEx office or whatever is this letter sitting there since the eighteen hundreds. And so it's like, oh, like they could tell the future. They knew that mardi MC fly was going to be at this place at this time. So I think you could real Mark. You could do a real mardi MC fly here. And so he goes said, not. You need a night guard. You're grinding clenching, some imaging, your teeth. You got to get you into CR, got a. Signal to deprogramming your lateral terrified muscles suggests your elevators. See your condal all that stuff. Right. And after I leave here lady's gonna come in here and she's going to tell you you don't need this card. You got to watch out. She's not. She's not your friend, she she's, she's she's a time cop and she's been following me from room to room telling every patient that I told me that she she, she quantum leaps into the room. And so I'm just telling you what she is you. You have to, you have to just stab her in the heart and chill quantum leap out. That's you. Just tell them that every patient that you recommend this night too. I think pretty soon. She's gonna get after like two or three patients trying to stab her in the heart with a procedures or rusty scraper. He, I think at some point she's going to maybe stop shitting on your diagnosis. I'm thinking after the first stabbing attempt. Maybe she might think it's just gonna take one. Fool me once shame on me. Foaming twice, shame, money. I think it's going to do. I think people tried to stab or thinking jeeze time cop. Have you ever seen him movie time cop with John Claude van Damme? I have not. Okay. You Looper you got to see Tom com Tom com from like nineteen Ninety-three. So it's, it's, it's Joan Covent down at his faith. Finest is accent is very thick. He is acting is very bad, but his moves taekwondo. Jujitsu. Brazilian Moi, tie. Or very, very good vary as one scene where he does these splits on the counter top and shoots a cartoon of men. I can't. I can't do John club any longer. You gotta see time Cup, and you know who stars in time cop. Don't. I'm gonna see how big of a child of the eighties. You are Lance? Okay. The actress, Mia, Sara. Oh my God from first Bieler from fares. Bueller. Stay off. I'm out of you ants. But like I mean, Mia, Sara and I smoke smoking hot now, imagine her four and a half years older. Even even hotter, right? She's just she's throwing her fastest fastball in time cop, solid movie, right. All right. Have you ever seen a John Claude van Johnson have not? What is this? I think it was like. Fiber. No Claude van Damme pretends to be. I think himself, but he, he wasn't. He was pretending to be an actor. He's really a spy, and there were a couple of times he refers to time cop and he says Looper was was a rip off of time cop to Tom Cobb blows time cop blows Looper away, like not even son even close. All right. I'm Sean Sean clock. It's so funny. It's totally does not take himself seriously, and it's just funny as hell. So it's, yeah, I'm in the leash Rashad. Isn't it interesting. Oh, yeah, that's right. Yes. She's got some distance these days. Yeah. Now the residuals from the Cosby show her out. She's better. Rashida sergei. Felicia. Out. Here's what I think you really need to do make the dams system tonight guard. Do you have a night guard. No, because I'm wearing my Moses appliance because of my snoring. Okay. Same thing. I I any appliance. I order for somebody on make one for myself just because I want to know I have five different sleep apnea appliances. I have a few different night guards just because I wanted to know what they feel like. I want to know what to tell people in. I recently after going to spear a few weeks ago or a couple of months ago, I ordered three new night guards all according to spear protocol. Okay. Ordered a full, arch flat plain in central relation. It's great, very nice. I feel good in the morning with it feels great. I, I ordered an anterior by playing which is just a six to eleven, and it's, you know, just basically allows me to slide all over the place, right? New interferences anywhere back teeth. Really nice to really like it feel good in the morning when I wake up. Actually can feel myself, like sort of my CR CEO deviation is smaller after I wear it made myself a man tubular anterior by plane, which is the same thing, but on twenty two through twenty seven then I can wear during the day I couldn't. I couldn't record a podcast with it and hold the full conversation, but I can talk with it in. It's not too obvious. So when I'm prepping a big case or something like that, I throw that thing in and go prep and actually my, I'm not clinch down. My jaw feels pretty good. I've been won over to the world of nyc guards after this. Like I don't think you can screw. I mean, I guess you could screw somebody up if you just didn't know what you're doing and blatantly did something wrong and didn't put any attention into it. But I think for the most part, I don't think anybody up the night guard make your make that one main assistant night guard. I guarantee you she's going to like it. Yeah, I'd almost guarantee she's going to like it and then you wonder over. It's it's sort of the idea of. You know, always have one. I've heard this before from from practice coaches and whatnot, always have one team member like an invisible line or something like that. Oh, yeah. Then you just bring him in like, you know, when they asked what the trays are like, or whatever you just say, hey, you know, Nancy, come in here and tell them all about how great your vigilant experiences. And then they can go to answer honestly. So I think this is one of those kind of deals seriously maker knocker what's it? Gonna cost. You ninety bucks. You know, it's not gonna cost you that much. Tell you want her to wear it. He or she feels afterwards. I think she's gonna feel really good. Problem solved? I think so. I think that sound advice. Same when I dabbled in jumped into sleep apnea ever. We got screened the, we all got an age I score and made the appliance. So people knew how felt in. Yeah, it's a good. That's great advice. Who was it that said that they hit made a flashy, oh, clients. Oh. Oral arts guy from. Yeah. Maybe maybe that to, you know, to make both. Interesting. All right. So I actually think that's good advice. I really do. I actually I think you're going to be good. I think if you make your assistant a night guard, I think she's going to be fine. You ready for a Reddit question. Of course. Sometimes they're amazing, and sometimes they're just kind of off the wall. Today's a little bit more of the off the wall variety I would say, okay, so I want your take on this land because I have some strong feelings on this. And my hunch is you do too. So this is a Reddit user, Thurston Rooney, great fan. Especially because we know some people who are very thirsty. What agree Thursday Rooney writes, my new dentist took eighteen rays without a thyroid guard. Well, I die. I went to the dentist yesterday to get my teeth check because it's been two or so years since I had insurance, they put the lead apron on believe the thyroid guard at first, but then decided to take off a thyroid guard. I'm not sure how big of an issue this is considering I haven't had guards in the past, but also never had this me xrays at once. I've never had cancer and actually did not indicate an abscess or a tumor, but I do have a history of breast cancer on my mother's side from my grandmother. I also have p. c. o. s. which puts me at risk for some cancers, how much risk is there. I want to trust their judgment, but I feel silly for not insisting what would be the reasoning for taking it off? Would it be a big deal to call and if not, what questions comments would be were saying. Are they going to die? I'm going to start with the die part and probably not, but we're all gonna die yet. Rogan die. You know, I live. My life is similar laundry. It's better to be safe than sorry. So I would start prepping for the end if I were thirsty Rudy, never a better time than now. Right. Get make sure you have a will, make sure the living will because radiation poisoning seems like a bitch of a way to go. Not the way I wanna go. Not the way I wanna go. I wanna go. What was it? What was the job that I said? I wanted blood. Blowjob contest I want. I don't know to be in paled by a railroad tie thrown by a tornado that happens just outside the blue jug tests that I'm judging. I think that's the way I wanna die. I don't know. Okay. On top seems it seems sort of final destination ish, but you know, you never know a little bit. Yeah. Get your fares in order to Rooney because I think I think rob, I, I would. I would. I would empty in liquidate all all my assets. I would make the check payable to Lance Timmerman. Yes, DM DMZ Tukwila Washington. That's right. Rhino four, six, five. Should I get anywhere close to nine. Okay. Yeah, just liquidate everything. I would. I would not call the office. No, I would not ask them any questions. Uh-huh. Here's why mad on x. rays. Okay. Do you have digital x rays? I do. Then none of it freaking matters. Now, here's the one thing. I don't know if this dentist has digital x rays or not, but if they do seriously people stop worrying about it, it's nothing you get more radiation from being outside for fifteen minutes. Then you do from a full mouth series of digital rate graphs. Now I did. I wouldn't go into a CBC every day on somebody. Right. That doesn't make sense. And yeah, I could see that being a problem, but for freaking f- Amax every five years. F. down, general public, you're not. I, I don't know why all of the sudden everyone is so afraid of x-rays. Yeah, it's gotten worse as as the years have gone on it. It used to come up occasionally. Now it's like all the time and striving crazy. Do you have a thyroid collar on your apron? I don't think we do. I don't even know if I do. I don't even know none of matters. The better thing to do is tell us person that there is a camp of people that believe if you wear lead apron at all, you're doubling your exposure because it's bouncing in reflecting back in and a lot of the sales reps for comb beams and xrays stuff they they decline. The lead apron is science on that. I believe there is it's it's, it's like all the other things in in dentistry. You fifty percent believe it. Fifty percent say it's Bonk so I don't. Not too militaristic with a lead apron. We use it. We use it. And I think honestly, if so, if you're in the chair getting by wings. Are you putting it on you. No, I don't know. It doesn't matter seriously. Does digital rated gross now everybody's got destroyed graphs, it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter. It's nothing like I to myself once a month and I would not put these on. I would not put one on and I'm definitely not like rooting around a fund the one with frigging thyroid collar. Right, right. How many people in your career have you seen that event thyroid cancer. Not one. I've seen a couple. Have you not one single one of them came from, oh, I got an FM x five years ago. None of them. None of them. It's. It's this, this fight on rays. It seems to be that I'm finding it more and more like everyday, like. X Ray. So often, I'm like, well, do you live underground? Are you a mole person. Because if so, then that's fine. I'm fine with that. Like, I'm fine. If you have said. I going to live radiation free lifestyle and going to take to the underground. I will only emerge once a year for a new set of rations and to get medical and dental checkup. And then after back underground. Right, right. But you walk outside for hours a day, you know, if you're exercising outside, if you go to a park, if you go to baseball games, go to Seahawks game, you'll beat the shit outta Cowboys. A little bit. So stop freaking warring, like all those, you're not asking those questions about that. You're not when you're on an airplane, you're not asking south west about how much radiation you're getting. It's a hell of a lot more than max. Oh, yeah. So tired of the questions. And this kind of seeing this kinda shit online just didn't fury hits me, am I gonna die? Come on really. If you thought you were going to die, why did you let it get to the point that you're having to ask the internet afterwards? Right, right. Have some take some responsibility or did it would be like if I went to your house and you're like, oh yeah, I'm just gonna. Put you in this team. So it's all right. No, it's cool. Cool one. And then like me not asking until later like, oh, yeah, it was guillotine about ideas. I'm gonna kill me if you had, if you had an inclination that it was going to kill you, why wouldn't you voice it up that? So my biggest concern is how you worded this stupid question. You obviously don't think you're going to die because you wouldn't be if you really thought you're gonna be dying, you would go to the emergency room. You be going somewhere else. Read it. Exactly to make your job a little bit easier. I really wanted to drop enough ball on that. I know I know my God. So there's only seven responses here in most. I liked the first one you're going to die, but not from this. Exactly. Fine in my state, we aren't required to use any lead shields at all for adults anymore. When I get ready to graphs, I don't wear one. I don't know what state that is, but I love it and I wanna move there tomorrow. Some smart shit. The let shield isn't doing anything. It's such a small non radiation. You are fine. If you really want the lead show with thyroid collar, then you should wear it every day. Anytime you should wear it. Any time you go? The airport should wear it. Anytime you go to watch the Seahawks the Cowboys you should wear it. Thurston Rini responded few good to know like like all now you're really relieved, right, right. It was really worried before. Now I can rest easy because deep pity on Reddit said I was going to be okay, thanks for sharing. There'd be different standards across states. Yeah, there are. Some states are smarter than others. DVD state is obviously smarter. Exactly Jeremy. PR eighty two don't over think it. You're fine. Thyroid cars aren't even required in many areas due to very low risk associated dental x rays, especially with the advent of digital rated graphs that have greatly lowered radiation exposure way to go. Jeremy die. Lacerated route who's an Ortho resident says a patient's mom in my residency program demanded that the patient receive a Pano with a thyroid collar on. You can imagine how that looked. I guess they're saying tough. Look for the mom. I don't know. Background on the thirsty. Let's check your, let's chickens. Thirsty rone's all about. What is. So they're just recently posted something in ENT j.. Which is, I guess, a Myers Briggs test reference has personality testing. So I'm immediately out on this person because all that's bullshit. Yep, doctors are read it. If the tiniest piece of glass got into a person's calf, how long would it take till it travel to the heart lungs. I don't know if there's throne. A really long time. My God, so obviously good. Obviously doing rain damage. We is hypochondriac. Obviously we have just a full. Laming hypoc on little bit little bit Christ almighty. K. more. That's awesome. Stepped on a nail. Well, when will travel to my brain. Hopefully fast because I don't think. They do have a couple of posts in a suburb called depression help. Oh, well, just something about seeing therapist, which I think is really good. You need a therapist if these like that's the thought is I have little pieces scrap, something win. Is it going to travel to my heart or brain? If that's the thought that you have right away. The that is, you need to talk to your therapist about that. If you're, I'm getting an f. Amax when am I going to die because of it, you need to talk to therapist. Yeah, that would be probably a start. What is be PD. Borderline personality disorder. So couple posted. So there's obviously like some history of some of some I would. I would probably say hiring Zayed's. I'd probably say some depression. I, it seems to me like that's sort of the root cause of this. Interesting. I just think that's a really weird setting to be on to live your life in that setting of like, this thing happened to me how quickly is it? Gonna kill me. Yeah, that's just a a world that I'm glad I don't live in it. Wow, that you seems like a real being germaphobe. It just seems like a really shitty way to live through life. Yeah, yeah. I mean, I just man. I don't know. I'm glad I don't go through life that way. I'm glad that that I'm not glad I d I have other defaults that I go to in other times from production, you know, in post op issues and things like that. Like I have kind of some. Some, I would say, I don't know issues or thoughts of of managed immediately gets, you know, whatever. I don't even know how to say it, but you know, I tend to be more on the negative side when it comes to that kind of stuff. But this kind of stuff of like how he's gonna kill me, how what level of mortal danger am I n. Men that's shit way to live life really is dear God. Well, I think that's going to be about it for today. Okay. It was apple song last time, obviously. Yeah, who's was it was my turn. This is yours. Are you going to? Yeah. Well, I'm gonna let you think about what you're gonna do. Okay. So real quick shared this with your friends listeners. That's how we grow this show. If you enjoy what you're hearing there, you probably have some demented friend that would enjoy his well on word of mouth. Referrals is the greatest compliment that we can receive, I believe is, is the old adage so pass it on. We do very well in the ratings and have done very well which the app episode at great. So so we only do that with you guys telling each other, telling your friends and telling the people you work with towing to school with all that about the show. So that's that's great. Raider view us hit us up on itunes. That's where you're listening. What's your favorite number? Lance? I'm a big fan of five metoo so maybe click five stars. I think that'd be great. Feel free to do that on any app that you're listening to us on Spotify, Stitcher, Google podcasts, pod being flick through flick, five stars hit us up on the web at WWW dot working interferences dot com. Hit us up on all of the social shits Facebook working Frances Jackson lands Twitter at winter. Francis Instagram at which is I can be found on Instagram at Josh will Austin devious landscape. We've found on Instagram at DR Timmerman de MD. Now we had a question that suggested a song, or are you gonna go without even tell them to f- right off if I hadn't actually thought about one for this week, I would have gone for it but actually put a little bit of thought in this one. Okay. So for Austin, check out that song by Fink. I don't remember what it's called. Let me go back, check it. We're not gonna play that at the end, but go check this bad boy out looking too closely by think thinkest from Saint Ives Cornwall England. So he actually right in your deal. So you might wanna check this guy out land. Checking them out seems seems like you're deal. So I don't wanna. I don't wanna shit on Austin here, but Lance Lynn was good shit on you. Two girls, one Cup style full on not pick your song. So sorry buddy, but it is what it is. So when I say, well, are you familiar with the term supergroup? You know what? A super group would be. Thirty eight special supergroup right. Super. So generally speaking of something like a temple of the dog or the traveling will berries or the damn, what was the one that the guy from stone temple pilots formed velvet revolver, obviously, oh, no velvet revolver area. That's like kind of some some big dudes sort of an all star team, right? Exactly. People that were successful because I was looking at a list of super groups, and there are a lot of super groups that qualified apparently because they were in groups before, but they weren't really successful groups before, so I wouldn't consider that list group one, but things like like temple dog. I mean, you got people from Pearl Jam yet people from Soundgarden and you got them all put together into a successful and they were. I think the dog was a one off but still supergroup. So I went to see a concert on Friday night, and I went and saw Johnny marr who was a guitarist originally with the Smiths and he was his guitar. Style was was from Mike. This charming man. Or big mouth strikes again. Style. There was a poll awhile back. He was the fourth most influential guitarist in England according to the new music express or something like that. He, he then left the Smiths. They were only together for five years. He left to be part of the pretenders for an album, and then he went, you know, the he was on the one album or two albums went, and they were known for the beaten generation. Then there's a group from is Washington that relocated to Portland but called modest mouse. So I know modest mouse. So the song dashboard. Album. Great, great band, so super hot when I was in dental school, like two thousand two, four. Okay. Big modest mouse fan. I mean, even there's a show that my my family likes to watch called charmed in the theme song. Oh, I don't foreign buddy, don't don't. You think? I don't know. Don't you don't know. Others. You don't know. I know it's a listen Llano. That's the only one that counts. No man. There was there was some stone. Foxes shared Dory, Holly homes rose. McGowan k-league Kuok. Oh, let's this isn't like twenty seven Yankees have vision on this hot visually high Hollywood gene, and the funny thing. So the the theme song, the opening song was actually loves bit love covering the Smiths. Okay. Now. I don't do that. He did it anyway. So so distinctive guitar stuff. Well, in nineteen ninety ninety one, there's a band that Johnny marr was in a supergroup because Neil Tennant seeing a little ditty from pets. He was Dr Who right? Neil Tennant. He may have been at one point, but. David tennant. The pet shop boys in West End girls. Eighties and Bernard Sumner the senior lead singer of new order. And the three of them actually really Johnny. Marin Bernard Sumner, but did a couple of songs the former band called electron EQ. And that was a supergroup because of they were so popular from their in their own rights when they're other groups. And so the the song chose was getting away with it. All right. I am beyond lost early on. Hold on. Let me let me write some not. I feel like a knack Hala just just just explained CR Demy is one hundred twenty eight points of simultaneous contact supposed to your retreated position of the mandible win Bobo ball. Let Terry go docs is elevator muscles contract. Okay, so what's the name of the song? Let me write this down. I'm serious getting away with it by electron ick. She's so he was played solo Friday night and he's he did sing that song. I saw that you went to someone's concert that I had never heard of before, and I thought this is totally on brand for Lance because you are stoked out. If your mind before it. I literally thought it was a homeless guy. Seattle is like corner. I'm gonna be interested to hear this because you had me charmed of mainly just because I have a list of Milano love, and the rest of this was sort of a convoluted mess. Almost like you tried to explain all five seasons of the wire and under thirty seconds. So I'm gonna be tried to peel back the layers of the onion this try to see exactly what you're talking about, but this is getting away with it by electron ick. That's right. And there are supergroup formed of members of another supergroup fulltime like super group. They all form together to we'll their deadly sword. Johnny marr and Bernard Sumner make 'electronic. All right. I'm, I'm glad that part's over. So for Lance Timmerman, this is a very confused. Joshua Austin piece. King is just suit, get wet. Pool, sing. Two. Getting. See. That makes me it feels. What. Away. Good. I gave up falling in. I guess. Kid. So you know, and it's. K. through mud. So just suggest that. Try to that is less repress.

Nellie Lance Facebook Kenny wellstone DR Timmerman de MD Joshua Austin Fink apple Reddit Marshall Bruno Texas Thurston Rooney Francis Instagram Michael APPA Texas State board Josh Smiths Pathak Jason Kim NYU Johnny marr
Episode #49: Direct Connections - Jonny Mopar (Part 1)

Talking Mopars

59:57 min | 4 months ago

Episode #49: Direct Connections - Jonny Mopar (Part 1)

"Welcome to episode number forty nine in another installment of direct connections returning to the show to talk mo parts with me for the third time as our friend. Johnny Mo par when Johnny. Nighthawk Mo- parts. We have a good time and sometimes we get a little amped up. So know that there is some colorful language in this episode that may be unsuitable for younger listeners or those sensitive to bad words. So without further ado if are. You are in the right place. Don't go anywhere. You're tuned into the best moment theseus driven podcast on planet Earth and I'm your host Chris Albrecht better known as the Mope one hundred and this is talking, Mo- pars direct connections. and. You're listening to talking. With the car hunter, your direct mention all things. Ladies and gentlemen. Once again for direct connections, we have our friend Johnny moped. This is the third time Johnny's been on the show Johnny. It's always a pleasure to have you on the show buddy how you doing. I'm doing really good Chris and yourself. I'm doing great man. You know just hanging in there we got wildfires all over the west coast right now. So air quality is poor but in the in the studio here we're doing. Okay. So Perfect for an episode of talking mopus direct connections with Johnny Marr once again. Now. Johnny you and I were just talking off air about. The Ram chargers and something unique about him that I didn't know about. Tell us kappa. So. Probably, about eleven years ago when I bought my duster I'm trying Oh. This guy was he reclaimed bumpers and he was up in the high desert area down here in southern California. Anyway I took my roadrunner bumpers, Mike Cornet Bumpers, and my seventy to charge to him to get recruit and then. Long Story. Short we be assing he added duster there. That was just a shell. I won't get into that story. We'll save that for another time, but I bought this dust off of them. But something else he and he had a lot of cool stuff. He had like himmy roadrunners, GT axes like this guy had. The bomb stuff the good stuff right because if I desert. I think it was A. That was Palmdale. Yeah. Somewhere around there. But Yeah. He had a lot of cool stuff tons and tons of stuff in a lot of restored cars really Nice high-dollar stuff. Yeah. He had a three forty Barracuda formula s you would have liked. Nice. Yeah, and it over in the corner he had He had ramp charger now. I think I don't remember it correctly. 'cause I thought it was a seventy nine and this ramp charger is a pop top. They call them pop top Ram charges but they're called half doors called pillar Louis basically the door frame instead of going all the way round the door glass it's it's not there is no frame around the door glass it that top half basically the top of the door frame and the back portion that it almost looks like somebody did it out of their garage, they cut it off of the door and then welded into the roof of the removable top for the Ram chargers. So. Basically, when you pull the top off of these things, it looks like a convertible it just has the windshield, the little wing window, and then there is no door frame around it just wide open all the way through the truck. So it's pretty cool. Yeah. He was telling me how rare these things were and. I thought man I was like, wow, I've never seen one. It was a pretty cool. Pretty cool thing to see and then. You know when we talk we've come up with a couple of Trivia things and I thought man that's a cool thing to talk about I had thought of it. So I wrote down in my phone and then I, think last time we talked we were Talking about doing the tin grills or are maybe we're talking about trucks I don't know what it was but I I was thinking, okay i WanNa talk about this next time we talk. And then this Guy Patrick grissom. He posted a seventy nine dodge ram charger but the thing was a two will drive like dropped really low and it had no doorframes and I thought Oh. Because I had never seen one of these trucks in real life other than this one, the guy got the dust from. and. I never seen one even on. Until this guy posted his. So of course I hit them up like. GotTa tell me about these things because I was thinking. Low production they do it certain years or whatever because I had thought it was seventy nine that I had seen and then seeing his which was a seventy nine and then I went online and I was trying to look at pictures and you see some with seventy three grills seventy, two, seventy, three grills you know it's kind of all over the map but you know how easy it is for those trucks to swap grills around on you kind of have whatever you want you know. So I. Hit him up and he he claims he's not much of an expert on them but this guy knows way more than I do and I think he had three of them. So he knows quite a bit but he was telling me that they made those trucks. It was a seventy four only and it was from January. to May is the only time they made those trucks. So if you see one, that's got a grill other than a seventy, four grill, it's it's been re grilled basically. Pretty Awesome truck and the reason I wanted to talk about details. We talked Last time you were talking about how wide the MO- par you know genre is you know from turbo four cylinders, two cars from the fifties and the Max Wedges, and you know you wanna hit on every one of these of subculture John Genres of Mo- par and. I think the dodgers are. The dodge trucks are probably one of the. Most unappreciated trucks as far as the general population you know as far as people out there like see tends. F one, hundred's they got really popular even even the sweat lines it seems like the swap lines have gotten really popular, I mean. In my day, those were the ugly ducklings. Nobody will touch swept line. You could get those trucks all day long for a hundred bucks or less you know and. The Tin, the tin grills, they just still haven't really come into the spotlight in my opinion. You know. I mean there's definitely a subculture out there where you know you and I are on. The Tin Grill Group in it's like these guys are all core and they love the trucks of course. But as far as the general public, it's still has yet to. The light has yet to be shown on them but. So anyway I thought. How cool. Would it be to talk about the TIN grills Story so offered. 'em Talk about that ramp charger. Rare nece. Get into my, power wagon. Yeah, you know the thing about dodge trucks. That I've come to realize that. Compared to Chevys and fords the production numbers were just so much lower and I think that has a lot to do with it because. I mean for every. Ten F one hundreds or F. One fifties or you know Chevy see or s tens. You know UC one, dodge you know as far as ten grills and even the plastic grills Would you say that called the first Jen's? Yeah. Would you say that? Are you saying that today like? For every ten see tends you see see one ten grill in today's time. Yeah. I would be I would actually bet on if you looked at the production numbers for, let's just say. The nineteen seventies from at least ten girls it would be seventy to eighty I. think if you compare that to the Chevy production numbers or even the Ford production numbers I bet you. They were I mean tens of loans maybe even hundreds of thousands less so. I mean. I think it has a lot to do with availability to be honest. I. It's hard to say because I think you're probably right because just when you look at the muscle cars themselves, I mean I made so much fewer Mo- parts than Chevys and fords general but I mean. It I and I definitely agree with you today if you even see a ten grill, like you'll see ten see tans and another F one, another tenth f one hundreds before you see another ten grill, you know but as a kid dude, I could tell you. Like, you couldn't drive a block without seeing a tint grill part somewhere somebody's driveway or in front of the House and I mean I would say, probably you're older school guys you know like my age and older probably remember them. But yeah, like my GRANDPA had one my my neighbors, my friends parents had one. And yet they were do they were everywhere but I'll tell you like when I started really getting into Mo- pars and carrying like I never really got into the numbers, the rare stuff, per se I. Never I just never had one and I never expected to Ford one because they were already starting to go up in value. In the nineties. They were already there always always out of reach. It's like the more money I made the more expensive they got I could could never really get to him. You know for but I distinctly remember driving through Riverside one day and seeing a spirit of seventy six tin grow. So. It was it was cool. So I knew the truck I knew they existed and I thought Oh man that is cool. But did this truck was A landscapers truck and this truck was put through the ringer like two or three times I. Mean it was hammered. There was not a straight panel on his truck all the way around it it was just. Dented Dean bent scraped I mean it was hammered and that is very typical. What I remember as a kid to like dodge trucks were worked trucks nobody nobody drove them because it was like, Hey, I mean there was probably a few guys but. Most of them were like I bought this truck to put to work nobody bottom to you know make them look pretty and lower or you know. Maybe raise them. You know it they just. Yeah there there was few customisations that I remember as a kid they were all work trucks. And I think that carried through all the way through the nineties and stuff. So you know maybe in the nineties started seeing guys. Kind of retro like that's cool. Let me fix it up. You know but. The. One big problem. I've seen in ten girl community and everybody who owns one can attest to this, and that's that the aftermarket support just isn't there and that's Why I believe that the production numbers were just so astronomically higher for Ford's and Chevy's that that is one of the reasons why is because so many people have those trucks versus Tim grills or other dodge trucks that you know the demand for the parts just wasn't there. But yeah, you know eventually they caught back on at least with. People that are outside the Mo- parsing are starting to get into the Mope Pars just because of the trucks, I've seen plenty of people that they're I mo par is a truck which I think is cool and you know swept lines they've been getting really popular on the show circuit and I think tim grills are next When you look at communities of see ten enthusiasts, they're huge and you know I've been on the ten girl page for Gosh. Two or three I think three years now. But I've I've been watching that grow like crazy and I'm like. We're onto something here is pretty cool. So. Yeah, I think it. All it needs is like a chip foods or akin dig it or like I would love to see the Martin Brothers do attend grill man I mean I like I like the way they built car so. Slammed truck with big wheels talked and everything with maybe like a hell of finit. Be Perfect. You know you're talking about builders and stuff. 'cause I've thought the ring brothers because they did that. The MC I think it was a javelin. They did the Javelin with the hell cat in it and it opened a lot of people's eyes to those. AMC's unfortunately those are even harder to find parts for for Then ten girls you know what I mean. Definitely. But I think I think I'll go ahead. I was GonNa say I think you're onto something there I think that if more. Influential builders start getting their hands on these trucks and because a lot of those guys are just you know they're fabricators. So it doesn't matter what's available in the aftermarket they'll make it. So I think it's just it's just GonNa take one of those guys to build an off the wall tin grill to really blow everything up and to that I'll say, hey, everybody out there get your ten girls now because as soon as as soon as that seen blows, the prices are going to go right up. So absolutely I'm glad I got mine hold onto it. Yeah. I think I think the pivot point for the the sweat line was gas monkey garage did that one you know they screwed it up within ls motor but you know and I'm sure that pissed off a Lotta guys but No Right. Do I don't know if he was sponsored back then? It doesn't seem that long ago, but it was quite a while ago and I. It seems to me like just thinking back then prior to that. Swept Lines were still not very mainstream are very popular nobody build them over the top you know then that happened and. Now. You started seeing swept lines pop up all over the place. It's like, yeah there are very unique truck you know and they really stand out in a car show. You're not going to have ten swept lines lined up next to each other. You're probably going to be the only one. You know maybe there'll be another one that's bone or something you know. Well now that holly offers the swap kits for the ten grills for modern, Hemingway's that to me you know. That says a lot about how the aftermarket is looking at those trucks I. Think they're testing the water. So if anybody's interested in that swap, go out by those mount kits because as soon as we show them that there is a demand more parts are gonNA come out. So that's looking forward to. It I don't know how everybody else comes down on this. But like I'm kind of an old school guy like for me. Be bodies are really coveted to me and I I like the old motors, those cars like it's got to be a big block. It's gotta stay old school I can't. I. Can't have a modern him in that I. IF I had an e body, I would tolerate a modern himmy in that more than I would a be body. So it's just that's just me. But when it comes to trucks man like they were, they were never like you're not going to. Get a truck with him in it or six pack in it. It's like that cars that trucks coveted and you can't do that modern or customization stuff. It's like, no, it's for me. It's sort of my release for customisations. It's like mad blank canvas when it comes to a grill like there is no sacrilege you can't. You can't do anything to them and screw it up everything you're going to do to it is GonNa make it more awesome more bad, ass. And like the more custom, you make it the better so I if I had the money I, I would. I would totally put you know I. Don't know if I'd put be able to afford health but. Pretty Nice you know. But. I would put a modern him in a drive train or that drive train into an old tin grill like no problem I wouldn't have any trouble doing that. Yeah I know exactly where you're coming from when you talk about be bodies. Why but I of feel the same way I would feel weird if I had like. I don't know sixty nine superbeing like I'm going to put a modern Hemi in I would be weird about it. I mean, that's still do it. Don't get me wrong but. There is that idea of Gosh. It would be cool to have four, forty six pack in it or something but you know I said on a podcast or two ago. I forget exactly what I said it, but I talked about doing. A modern iteration of a twelve. With a modern Hemi but the six pack fuel injection. Yeah I thought that would be pretty cool but. You know if if I had that would be for a car that wasn't numbers matching or was so far away from the original that a nowy restoration on it would kind of be out of the out of the picture. So I get crazy with something then but you know I wouldn't butcher a relay twelve with. Now Modern Hemi or anything like that. But I get exactly you're saying with the trucks. Trucks always seemed that way you know with sport trucks and like if you look at any of the Take Hot rod magazine from the will say late seventies, early eighties and take truck in magazine from the late seventies, early eighties, and you will see the stark differences between the two types of enthusiasts that build those vehicles the trucks it seems like it's always been. An open, like you're saying open canvas and it was the same thing with vans, you know I had to sneak vans in there somehow. But like look at advance, and you know the interesting thing about vans and I'll say this and we'll get back to girls is that the more I research the transfrom back then the more I realized, they were trying to blend two different worlds because they got a lot of the custom truck stuff like the crazy paying jobs and things like that, and they blended it with the performance aspect of the muscle car stuff because a lot of the criticism that vans were taking were that while they're not hot rods, vans, people were still building the you know the three ATM or some of them even came with a big blocks, which is cool but. It's it's definitely interesting to see because when I look at the late seventies or the mid to late seventies and I, look at some of the trucks from back then they were kind of wild. You know when people customizing him so That's all I'll say about bands for now we'll get our later. So Nice. So tell us Johnny tell us about your first ten grill your first foray into ten grills alright. Well, it goes back to the beginning So you know, I, told you the story of my, my sixty eight charger. Yes. You know and how spotted it I spotted it riding the school bus in seeing the car Ra-, flying over a Knoll, right Well I spotted this power wagon. The same way it wasn't as hidden as the charger was, and it was closer to the street than the charger was, but it was in some guy's backyard and this guy was right on this main road that the school bus drove down. So writing on the school bus and I could see the truck plain as day and it looks cool. You know the thing is lifted. It's got tires on it four by four short bed and it's like man that things. Awesome. So And obviously, this is close to where my parents live. So I graduate high school in one thousand nine, hundred ninety I'm still living with my parents and I'm driving by that truck all the time you know and it's just like I. Know There's a lot of guys that will relate to this. It's like a freaking worm that gets implanted in your brain and it just like every time you drive by it's there and it just eats at you eats at you it eats at you and eventually like I can't take it anymore. Even, if the Guy Slams the door on my face and says, no, at least you know right I can move on with life you know and leave this behind me so. So the truck was really cool looking in I thought man, it'd be cool to have a truck. And of course, it's got to be a dodge. So a knock on the door one day. So this was. Probably, around nine hundred, ninety, one probably about a year after high school I knock on the door and ask if it's for sale and The truck had obviously been sitting there few years because I've seen it riding the school bus you know. I was driving to high school when I was seventeen or sixteen. So there's the school bus. was. A sophomore than when I was a junior I was driving a senior driving or at least halfway through the junior year but So it'd been sitting long time. Nothing's been happening to the truck. So I. You know it's not like they're driving it and there's probably something wrong with it. So I knock on the door and I, think it was an uncle's or something like that and they had a check and then I come back later you know a few days later. Yeah, he'll sell it but he wants three hundred Bucks Berm Mike Burger on the price firm. This is one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one, three, hundred bucks worth. Money. You could buy a house with three hundred bucks. Chris. Just. Kidding. So so yeah. So three hundred bucks. I can't even remember how I got this thing home I think either my dad helped me through chain around drug at home because it was it was a few miles to three miles from my parents house. Maybe my buddy helped me I. Just I don't remember it's been so long ago you know. But you know and I didn't. Coming up with three hundred bucks back. Then was way harder than it is. Now you know. So it took me a while to have the the money to do it. So? anyways. Drag this thing home and pulled it apart. You know motor dust. I I I had my friend of mine. His parents had some rental properties and he's like, Hey, we should all get together and house together so like. Two other friends and myself we ran this house and I'm like I got to be able to bring my sixty eight charger over to work on it and and the truck the truck was in the driveway I'm working on it and the car was in the garage. Working on it here and there. I put this motor together. And I had bought a used four barrel intake manifold thought command. This is cool. You know I don't remember what I paid for like forty bucks or twenty bucks something. But somebody had unfortunately for me somebody had it was on a racing motor and somebody had decked the are or surface the heads and change the angle of the heads to the blog. And then they cut the intake manifold to match right but. You know who knows who did it and when. When I bought this thing at a swap me it was like. Nobody there's no information on it. I. Didn't know there was any problem with the intake manifold or those angles had been changed. So I put this thing on the top of my motor that I just spent all this money rebuilding. Go to fire it up. It sounds bitch and for a few seconds and it's like this things running like crap man I mean. I'm like what the hell and each the more throttle you give. It just sounds more and more sick. You know it it would idle but since you give throttle sounded awesome for second and then. My what the hell man couldn't couldn't understand it. You know you're going through everything the carburetor, the distributor, the plugs like. What the Hell's wrong with this thing. and. I think I tried to start it again it just wouldn't start anymore it will wouldn't run. Shit. So I think I just To the fact that I'm going to have to pull this motor part like something went wrong inside the engine and. First thing I did was I put a pan under it to drain the oil and the oil was coming out like water I mean it was so thin and you could just smell the gas you know. I'm like aw dude. How how do you get gas in the crank as you know? So Pull carb police intake, and then you can see 'cause it's a small block. It's got the I had like Felpro type gaskets on it. You could see the impressions were the intake with squishing against the head on the top of the gasket and on the bottom nothing like they were just it was so loose that gas it was all wet with gas gas was down by the lifters I mean it was just. It was bad and pulled the motor backout polit- apart. And, all the Pistons just had like all these melted lines on them, where the friction of the gasoline between the cylinders, a piston had just melted into the Piston. So it ruins, the Pistons. Cylinders were still good. You know. So luckily, all my machine work was okay. So had to buy new set of Pistons and rings and I had to start all over on it which when you're broke and you're just starting off, you're not making very much money. That's that's a hell of a lesson to learn you know. But. Anyway I put a four fifty, five, lift three, forty cam in it. You know purple. Shaft, Cam. I love those camps. Those cams are great for the street and I don't think I've ever heard. About the purple cams to be on now. I. Love that thing when I fired that thing up after I fixed everything I'll man it sounded like a freak top fuel car the headers were just you know hanging below the truck and I didn't have exhaust yet but the things just cackling like crazy. Man. That's pretty awesome. It's a relatively small cam you know compared to. Some of the bigger camps out there But yeah that that truck ran real good. It ran heart. So that little eighteen put in some work for me. Over the years. How long did you have? I think I had that truck. It was probably around eight years or so eight or nine years. Yeah. It went. Went through quite a bit with that truck clearly, it was on the outer ring of the circle and fortunately unfortunate. Well, you know back then. Dude. I mean, even though three hundred bucks was a lot of money back then it was just. Dodge trucks were way more worthless back then than the art today Shush. Don't say sorry. For All those guys shopping. That's good. That's bad. So how many ten girls have you had? So I had that one I had my seventy nine which I was taking to the track and playing with. was that the purple one that was the other purple on. ME AND I. Ones if got. Okay. So. I. Had you the Power Wagon when I? Pulled the motor out the first time I had jammed at all plum crazy purple. Purple on this thing because I, I just really love that color. and. Yeah it was pretty is pretty cool because it was like, do you stand out in power wagon plum crazy purple power wagon. It's like. Everybody. Knows who you are. It I I had jammed. I. Got the motor running in it stuff than primary the whole truck and then later on me and my buddy, we just were out there like outside you know bugs flying all over the place and just ch- painting the thing. Plum crazy purple. Wasn't a great paint job, but it's still for me. It was it was perfect for what I was doing 'cause it was just a thrasher truck. anyways you know. So you had a power wagon in Yahoo. Wheel. Drive that you took to the track. Yes, and then I had. had the seventy six which my buddy. Used to be my buddy, Dennis is truck and then I bought it and then he bought it back and then I bought it back and now he's got it now. and then I have the power wagon I have now, which is seventy, nine, four by four. And the parts truck we won't count but four or five, and then I had a seventy. Six Six six or seven at the verticals in the grill. side markers are turn signals and I sold that to my friends and Denmark. So in. Yeah Yeah. I have some friends from Denmark. They're they're huge gear heads. So the Andersons, yeah, Fleming and Charlotte. So they're in grill in Denmark right now. There's A Johnny Mo partition grill, but there's also my buddy at black had a seventy three I think long bed. To wheel drive with a four hundred in it they bought that truck to. So they have there's others at least ten out there. I've you know that's one thing I'll say about talking parts I get a lot of messages from people in other countries and the Mo par followings in those other countries. I mean they're just as loyal as here. It's pretty cool. Yeah, I didn't. I. Didn't realize it. I? Didn't especially Australia is. There really huge about Mo- parts because they have all those crazy Mo- party. You don't see in the states that we didn't get. So yeah, that's pretty cool I. Wanna I WANNA dive deeper more into that stuff Yeah I mean I think you're GONNA be. You start getting on. Yeah. Hit all these genres I mean you're GonNa, you got a lifetime supply of shows I think between the crazy and stuff that they got down down under a hand you know Brazil, they have those are easy chargers that are like. A bodies, but they have like subtle. Hints of the charger like the window in the back and the the grill's on those things they're off I could find a way to import one of those chargers to the United States. I would absolutely love to do that. I just don't know how to go about it have to look into it because they're just so cool. I. I saw one I was like what in the hell is that and then I'm like charger what the? And? You know they have so many variations of models that they have in other parts of the world is just it's crazy. So I can't wait to dive into that because I really know nothing about him I. Know I mean a little bit but right it's i. just think it's pretty cool that they carried a lot of that. You know sixty, seven through sixty, nine, a body like Dart specifically body style through like the late seventies or the yet delay seventies, which is crazy to me like the one of saw was a seventy six and I was like Gosh that you know. If You show that to somebody that really wasn't too into the MO- par world and he said Oh, there's a sixty nine dodge dart it's customized they probably won't even question you. How similar they are. So they're pretty cool but back to your ten grills. So you sold a couple to some guys in Denmark or yes. All Yours and your buddy sold his. You've posted pictures of the two wheel drive the purple in that you took to the track I wanNA know I wanna know more about that. Oh. Okay Well I had. I think I was on Classic car trader I think is where that when popped up and it was just a bone stock stock high but it was a short bed one hundred out in. Think it's called Anza. Anza out here. So it's it's sort of like out in the hills. You know a little it's very rural that is so I I go out there I think the truck was. The Guy was asking like twelve hundred bucks in a had. Seven inch rims are six and a half inch rims on it. So there are a little wider you know, and then it had dog dish hubcaps on it. The rooms were painted silver. It was a very grandpa looking truck, but it had a rack on it. So again, the somebody was using this truck to work with. So. I drive out there and I offered the Guy Thousand box and Bought it for thousand bucks. Drove a bag. My buddy was just like, what are you? What are you doing this fucking thing you know? Oh. Sorry. For that bomb you'd have to. I try not to cuss so much too but I just keep. My tongue, every episode. Trust me. Guys, who is if he saw what edited out of my podcast when I'm by myself? I. Should I should have put together a blooper reel I think that'd be funny because I say some. Stuff. PODCAST is really an hour long, but it had to cut it down to a half hour sometimes that actually does have sometimes I'll be talking about project of the week and I'll be like talking good about it, and then I'll just go off on this. Go you know what? Actually this is a piece of Shit I don't even know. What am I doing here? So back off and I just delete that and I go back and I'm like now we can't be that hard on these cars. But. Hey. With that ten grow what it wasn't purple when you got it. Now. I was Brown. Okay. It was Brown and had missing trim on it and even back then you couldn't. They had so many variations of the trim on those trucks. It's not like you could go to the bone yard. If you did, you would find one that didn't have your tram. It had the other trim. You know. So I just took all the trim off of it and ground all the rivets off of it other studs or whatever and. Yeah, I remember I had I think this was. Around two thousand. Well I should back up. I. Got My Buddy John John Jones who used to own general mayhem before me right And he dropped the truck for me. So he did the axel flip in the back and he had cut the springs upfront. You know he he actually lowered or he shortened the lower control arms to get the wheels straight. So it was fine as long as trump truck was going straight, but it really did screw up the geometry when that truck going around the corner. Forget it was it was sketchy. So I never I never would go fast cornering. Straight. But my buddy. Got Me into drag racing down there at qualcomm in San. Diego and I just bought a oa-to quad cab dodge. You big truck Bohemia and. I was like, well, you know I'll take that I and it went like. It was eleven seconds in the eight which is. Crazy slow. But even doing that like my first time racing, you know you're all nervous and like jittery and stuff and. And then I started bringing a truck out not play with the truck and I would. Do little tweaks to it's like all right. Let me ditch the the front bumper to get it lighter and get rid of the sway bar up front. Let me you know I took the. took the rear tire out at one point but I think it did better with the tire in extra weight in the back you know. Put Drag shocks on it competition engineering adjustable shocks like ninety tens upfront. Seven seven, thirty in the back. But yeah, the truck was it was a three sixty with three teen heads on it. So the thing was like a torque monster. So out of the whole like this truck with just torque up I, mean the shocks being loose upfront and squatting in the back the thing would just come out of the whole like it was crazy fast you know it was very intimidating. It looked way more wicked than it was, and then it would just you know sixty foot flat fall flat on its face because the heads we just had small ports you know eighteen. So but I had a lot of fun with that and that that at qualcomm it was just mostly streetcars there was some race cars but mostly streetcars. So you can you have a good time and you kind of start to figure out pretty quick like who's in your ballpark and then you guys Kinda Kinda Congregate Start Hey man you wanna race you know. So like grandma grudge racing type stuff. Yeah. Yeah and I don't. Think. I might have told the story online or facebook but. Yeah, there was one day I was there and there was this guy with the swept line and he had a four forty in it. and. I asked if he wanted to race in, he's like he's like, no, he didn't. WanNa raise me because he was so intimidated by how my truck my truck would launch. It looked freaking crazy. You know the the left would lift up. It didn't the tired income off the ground, but you could just see the front left corner of the truck is just like in the sky you know in the right rear corner, the trucks just squatting and the When I had the spare tire under the bed. There's like this long stud you know there's that strap that goes underneath the spare tire and there's a stud goes through it, and then that Stud because a truck was so low, it would hit the ground in throw sparks. So it just looked it looked crazy. You know. So you wouldn't raise me and then his mom was there is he was a young guy. Of, course, I was younger back then too. But some his mom comes by and she's like, that's my son in that that White Dodge truck. You guys should race and I go I I asked him to race. I go. That'd be pretty cool. She's like, yeah, that'd be cool to dodgers is going down the track and I'm like, yeah tell them all racism if he wants to do it so she had to twist his arm to get him to race me to on the ground balls and get out there. Right? So we get out there and I was pretty I was cutting pretty good lights back. Then especially there it's like when you have just general public people out there they cut terrible lights you know and. I think with intimidation he was a little intimidated and nervous, but I dropped a perfect light. So I treat them big time. Right and I get like I'd say at least half a truck length on him before he he finally. Is Moving so. About Sixty foot or so I'm done you know my I have no top end. No more horsepower thing was making like three hundred horse. So it was just it was all out of the hole, and then after that, it was just you're just cruising to the finish line. You know it sounds good but it's just not making tons of power. Well, his four forty you know he's just starting to come in come alive now and then he's just bull pulling me in. So we get to the finish line and I take him by like a bumper I mean it is it is a sliver I beat him so. It was like we get back and I'm like, yeah. Everybody's high fiving you and stuff and it was it was pretty awesome is pretty epic. And then because it was a close race, you know and. He wanted a rematch and I said, yeah, sure. I'll rematch you and then of course now he knew because now he knew how fast his truck was compared to mine. He knew he was faster than me he left him. He he left yellow. He did you hit a much better light the second time around, and then he just he he beat me by like offender. So yeah well, that's came on. You may have changed that Kid's life right there. May he might still be racing going? You know one time this guy called me out. He's on the top fuel circuit now. Imagine I'm on his mom going up to him like don't be such a pussy get out there. Okay. Drive for you right right and then he loses and he's like mom I told. You. Met You force him to go back out. He's like leave on the last night. Low Right Now. That is funny. So that truck was your first vehicle that you were taken to the track aside from your own but that was the that was what Gotcha drag racing. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Cool. Yeah. It was just a street race stuff you know like the Friday night you know Test and tune or street legal street racing dachshunds. QUALCOMM was it a legit tracker is something they set up on the weekends or? Not that I'm trying to envision it in my head. It it used to be the the San Diego chargers used to play football there. It's like a really old football stadium. I. Think they were long gone. They moved I. Think. I don't know if they went to different stadium in San Diego and then before they left San Diego. But and I WANNA say the Padres were the baseball team played there as well. But they would do all kinds it was. It was just like a place. You do a lot of events at. And they would set up the parking lot On the side of their of the on the side of the stadium basically. So you're erasing the the main street in front of it is called Friars road you were racing towards road and. The shutdown area you'd actually kinda going uphill towards that road. So it's kind of Nice to slow you down, but the track sucked. It was not like a know type thing y'know totally know prep. Totally. So. I I talk about my roadrunner, how it ran. When I ran my roadrunner there it would run an eight six in the eight. and. Then when I took the car to Qualcomm, didn't do any changes to Iran eight one. Second. Yeah, you were saying something about. Yeah. Tell tells you the difference between the track quality? I mean, my car had problems with hooking up. anyways but. Definitely the track was a big factor interesting but but yeah so. Back, to the power wagon. So Let's see. I've got the motor. I painted plum crazy purple. Is just like. One of those things it's like a one of those life trucks you know it kind of teaches you about life I guess. I. Remember. Driving one day and I lost the brakes on that truck like this is the old school woes that we used to go through way back in the day it doesn't like new cars have these kinds of issues like people don't drive. They don't put their their lives in the hands of their vehicles are or maybe they do. But the vehicles are just so much more safer nowadays than back then you know but I remember driving this thing. and. Coming up to an intersection and there's like three cars stacked up you know to the light. And I'm hitting the brakes and there is nothing there it's. Breaks are gone and I'm you know I'm probably at least doing like fifty or fifty five or so I'm like holy crap I mean it scares the crap out of you and you have zero breaks and there's a stopped car in front of you. So I'm like pumping pumping and it's starting to slow a little bit but it's not the brakes are not grabbing. So I had to throw the truck into the ditch I went into a ditch and through Bob wire fence scratch the whole side of the truck you know but and then. You know had to clean my shorts and. Basically. Lymph the thing home at like twenty miles an hour. So you know I couldn't get into too much trouble I can stopped thing or peel off the road if I had to. then there was another time, the breaks were good. But this was destruc- was drum brakes all the way around and. Good so Good. It did okay. But there, there was this. In this kind of segues into my buddies truck, my buddy, my good friend Eric, he had bought seventy four power wagon and it was like black primer. So the trucks were like very similar to each other. His was lifted. He had a big old like dukes of Hazzard push bar on the front of his truck. You know this big battering ram looking thing but We were going we're going to this party out in the Wonga. It was sort of like a it's like a big open area you know and my other buddy todd had the idea of like, let's let's set up some volleyball nets between the two trucks. So he like built these. Two by fours whatever sticking out of the bed. So the truck and put a volleyball net between them was. Kinda cool. But those guys were already there. I was meeting up with them and I never been out there before and it's like the roads are very hilly and wind -I in stuff you know. Some driving through there and not thinking anything of it because I've never other than losing the brakes and never had any problems with stopping the truck you know. Going through there and you're having to work the brakes, hit corners and hills all that. There's a jeep in front of me. And These guys were like just sort of. Seeing you know out for a Sunday drive type of thing, and they're going down this hill and I'm coming in behind him and I'm like I'm hitting the brakes and the brakes went through total brake fade. They were just they were engaging i. feel it my foot on the pedal and I could feel the pressure you know but the truck was not. And I mean I'm like Holy Shit. I wasn't even tailgating, but they were going so slow and it was to that moment where you just like. I'm going to hit them like we're GONNA touch. It's GonNa be impact. Right. The Guy looks at his rear view mirror and sees me and then floors it. Actually got out of my way. And I was like Oh God. Who've and so after that, I slowed down, slowed way down they ended up going to the same party. Like they came over because we had the truck set up. Playing volleyball and stuff and they came over. Hey we you were behind us coming down the hill where we're in the jeep. Almost, sorry I was not trying to tailgates you or anything and they're like, no, we figured you probably had brake fade or something and we figured he'd get on get the hell out of your way. So. I was pretty A. Pretty funny. But Yeah we. We would screw around we would my buddies and I 'cause. Where we're at now it's It's more populated now than it was in the ninety s, it was more rural back. Then it's SORTA rural now, but it's way rural back then. So we would you know load up with beer and stuff like that. Go out to the hills and go four by and you know do stupid stuff. And I remember with that three, Forty Cam in that truck. We were hauling just. I Mean Fun Way Fund and came over the crest of this hill and the truck was so big like so high when you're kind of going up and over, you can't see over the hood I have no idea what's on the other side To. Come up over the other side and there was a a Rut that had opened up and it was sort of like you go up and down. So the from the rain disrupt had developed and it was huge and the left front tyre just fell into it and I remember I'm holding the steering wheel and the steering wheel just. It just spun in my hands like eight eight Yankee there's no stopping it. You know it's like holy. Crap. The truck. Comes to. Arrest. The left the left rear tire. 'cause a truck is like this left retires completely off the ground by you know. Six inches to a foot. I'm like Oh. Gosh. How do we? How do we get out of here right? I should say the trucks of four by four. So, one of the problems with my truck was leaked oil really bad I don't remember if it was the pan or the rare main. Oil and right where it would drip down it would hit the front driveshaft to the front differential and it would the oil would wash out the grease out of the bearings and it would tear up the joint. So I got tired. I changed it a couple of times and it's like man it's wiping it out so fast I just left it out. So I basically had this lifted truck that was two wheel drive. So here we are stuck. In the left rear tire off the ground, you know, no four wheel drive like what are we going to do? So. I'm in the truck you know we get out we're looking at it and right we're all going to get into the truck and put some weight on that side, and then I'm GonNa, Punch it, and try to get out. And my buddy todd had climbed up that tire and he was standing on 'cause the easiest way to get in the bed of the truck was up the tires, right? On the rim instead on top of the tire, and then you go over the bed. So he's standing on the tire and he said. Whatever you do don't punch it. But all I heard was punch it. So he's standing on this tire. Boom I punch it, he goes fly. Other Buddies Scott is like WHOA WHOA stop. Like what? You. You just launch todd that way you know just kill Todd. You talk you'll todd. He's all pissed off. Lane in the dirt now you know. Slight. Sorry. Man I thought you said Pudgy I say don't punch it. So. So that was one of the nights. Bent the rims. So we're we're we're driving back like cocoon you know. All the way home. Some other night we We got flat tires out there and. And it was crazy 'cause a truck was pretty loud and I think it probably the collector gaskets probably blew out on it and I just drove it anyways and We get these flat tires and limped the trunk the truck home. We get home in like on a say half hour to an hour later something like that. Some guys knocking on my buddies store, right? Like what the hell so we go outside in this is there with a freaking thing it was a shotgun and he's got his wife and he's got his his daughter. and. He's like Oh you guys doing out there on my property. The Hell? On like. No we were we we're just four buying and got a flat tax. So he had the tire was so you know it was flat and it was it would leave on the dirt ground like it would kind of this trail you know. So it was obvious where you could just follow that and it took you all the way to the truck which was in next to my buddy's house. So. It was like Holy Shit this guy got a frigging shotgun he's threatening us. And he's like you guys still off my property blah. Blah Blah you know my I didn't know at the time but my buddy, he had a gun he had a gun in his like his back and he was like. He said Dude if he if he pulled up on that shotgun, I was gonNA shoot his ass home. You never did he always kept it kind of like pointed to aside you know and then it turns out my buddy todd knew the girl like to high school together and he was like, Oh, I don't remember her name, but you know are you Is that you such and such and she's like, yeah, and you know and it's like. He's like look I know your daughter and I'm not. We're not screwing around. We're not stealing stuff or you know whatever we're just out four buying the guy finally calmed down but I think he was a tweaker I think he was like on something and is just like super paranoid that you know people are coming through their property in the truck was so loud. So I was probably really far from his house, but it sounded much closer because the truck was so loud and then you're out in the hills like sound carries pretty far out there you now. So that was A. That was a crazy night. How about all the Times you knocked on doors to buy cars united shock and pulled. Out some fun trying to kill my buddy todd, you know. Yeah I exactly. Only. God. That's crazy man. So yeah let's let's. Out of those out of those ten girls when you took to the track when you went in with which was. Which one did you like more? All man that's a tough question because I they were. We're talking to apart. Wow. You know. I I can't I can't answer that. Honestly they are. I had so much fun with both trucks at opposite ends of the spectrum. Is. Totally, different experiences, and then you know with of the power wagon, my age really young and we were doing stupid stuff like I said, you know we were we'd get drunk and go out there who we would drink and go out into the hills and just go thrash on the truck you know and have a good time. And The the drag racing with you know with the lowered one was just. A whole different kind of fun you know. So I was older when I did that. So it's like. If you would reverse them I'd probably wouldn't appreciate them as much. You know. So I don't know. I I would probably say. If I had to pick. If you force me, I'm going to go with the power wagon. Yeah, probably. Yeah. It's probably more fun more more epic. You know sounds like it. Yeah Yeah so I'll get right into the the big story. Yes. Okay. I was going to ask you about this, but I wanted you to lead us there. So go ahead. Yeah I think we're there I think we're there now it's time. Thanks for joining Johnny Moped Night Today on the show for part one part two will be out next week. So be on the lookout for that I. Know I left you at a cliffhanger. The next story is crazy I can't wait for you guys to hear that. So tune in next week, it's always a great time talking motorcars with Johnny as usual I did want address a couple of things before we go on Friday just before Johnny I started recording I dropped a post on the Mo- par Hunter facebook page giving. Listeners a chance to drop a question or comment in the comments section of the post, an Johnny and I would address it on the show. Well, we had to and one was posted while we were actually recording and the other came shortly after we wrapped up. So I wanted to let the two guys who dropped US ally. Not The questions will be answered on part two of this installment of direct connections. Next week, I'll be answering Michael Irwin's questioned by myself since it came in after Johnny and I rapped up and Josh. was addressed on the show, but I found a more definitive answer after we recorded. So I'll talk about that during the rap of as well before we shut her down this week I wanted to let you guys know that the next round voting for the build mope our project is here and this time around we are voting on who will be building the four, hundred, twenty six. Cubic inch stroke third-generation Hemi for the Nineteen Sixty, eight, dodge DART superstock modern Hemi Trivia car. The hemi pages is calling the dark pack. Some of the best engine builders in the game are amongst this rounds choices and they are errington performance Amex. B. S. racing engines, Opel, engineering, Hughes Engines, and Prestige Motor Sports. So be sure to head on over to build Mo- part DOT com. And, vote today there you have it. My friends another episode of talking mopeds direct connections is in the books for more information about this podcast or subscribe to the show please visit talking Mo-, parts, DOT COM, and don't forget. You can send me your stories, questions, comments, complaints, suggestions, and everything else on your mobile addicted mind to Chris at Talking Milpark Dot Com or leave me A. Voice message on my voice mailbox at two zero, nine, twenty, eight. Mo Par to hear yourself on the show before we go I want to tell you about a great way to help support this show, and that's by picking up some merchants talking low parts, Merck shop not only are you going to get some cool swag but you're also helping me out to keep this show running. Like to help support the show jump on over to talking Mo- PARTS DOT COM and head on over to the store and click visit the shop that's it my friends until we talk again for part two with Johnny moped Bar I am your host Chris. Albrecht and that was talking Mo- pars direct connections Thank you for listening to talking. Your direct connection to all things. Until next time remember no more par left behind.

Johnny Mo todd dodge Chris Albrecht qualcomm Pistons Johnny Mo Denmark Johnny moped dodgers Chevy United States Johnny Marr Palmdale California Guy Patrick grissom Mike Cornet Bumpers San Diego
ITS Home Edition: Finneas

Inside the Studio

34:47 min | 3 months ago

ITS Home Edition: Finneas

"At American Public University we believe that higher education can unlock higher purpose. So we offer two hundred modern programs for those who want to make a difference and we believe education must adapt to students needs. That's why we've made it accessible through online classes and flexible with monthly program starts American Public University Within reach without limits learn more at American public you dot com. DENVER palmeri host of a new podcast from the recount. All just something about her. After we're going on five presidential campaigns I thought women could achieve the same success as men if they played by the rules Ben twenty-six happened in my podcast just something about her I'll talk with women CEO's athletes. And more. So together, we can create our own. Listen to just something about her on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Welcome de inside the studio presented by Iheartradio on your host. Joe. Lee. Okay. So if anybody is the ultimate guest for the home edition of the show, which is all about letting you know how the pandemic impacted the lives of artists and how it's affecting the way they make music. Hit is got to be finishes after all he and his sister Billie eyelash made her album when we all fall asleep, where do we go literally in his bedroom and that is one of the most important and most successful albums of like the last ten years but it's not just the whole idea of staying home in staying creative that. Has a lot to tell us about right now he's recent. Cingo what they'll say about us is a real reflection of this moment during racial justice protest marches. In Los Angeles, this summer he imagined himself explaining what was going on to someone laying in a hospital bed fighting covert as he tells are quarantine correspondent Jordan Ron Tog he's optimism is being aware of the bad stuff that's happening around you and making a choice to stay positive. Finish also has a lot to say about taking Sedova who approach to writing a James Bond theme. Working on Billy's second album and working on his own. So. If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to check out the iheartradio podcast that Jordan hosts, which is called rivals music's greatest feuds, and which is available wherever you get your podcasts. Over one, my name is Jordan runtaugh but enough about me, my guest today is won multiple grammys court in the bond theme enacted on a hit TV show and he did it all before turning twenty three. You probably know him for his collaborations with a sister Billie Irish he's also overseeing hits, JP sacks Ash selena Gomez toe blow unhealthy to name but a few. Last fall he dropped a solo EP blood harmony, and now he has a new single called what they'll say about us the song is his way of processing the tumult of twenty twenty a year unlike any other I'm so happy to welcome Fini's. Fears how are you? I'm good. It's It's been raining Ash Las Angeles Unaware where you're calling me from but Just, it looks like your blood harmony cover. Really. I wish it was that pretty it's just this kind of smokey grey, very depressing sort of alarming but like we've been indoors or people have been comparing the weather to like blade runner like all the orange skies bladerunner and my girlfriend was like I don't think I've ever seen later. Let's watch blade runner. So we watched we like on Friday. We had nothing to do we just marathon like both bladerunner movies the first one, and then the one that came out and twenty seventeen sequel they're so good. They are so good but I definitely, I can imagine living in it right now probably like inhibits your ability to enjoy them to some extent you're like. It's too bad. The future isn't that cool like we have like we have all the pollution and like not any flying cars somebody dropped the ball on that I, know the first blade runner takes place in twenty nineteen in there like flying around and We're not rocking that yet. So back to the future to also let us down when back to the future to took place in in well, two, thousand, ten or something or fifteen fifteen. Yeah, we blew it I know man, it's actually kind of sweet because it just means that people were very optimistic. SEATTLE. That'd be like if we were like Oh, the example be if we were like, yeah, we will have stopped climate change by two thousand and twenty two like I wish we were that That's kind of where I want to start with you I mean this year must be so insane for you for so many reasons I mean you go from sweeping the Grammy's performing at the Oscars to like six weeks later being confined here home I mean, what was what was that adjustment like I was like whiplash? It was super weird I mean you know on one hand I think like I feel very privileged to have had a a very enjoyable I two months of the year before everything kind of collapsed in on itself. The lucky thing is that in if I'm lucky enough to live this long twenty years from now, I will be like looking back at two thousand and twenty nine I'll be like, yeah, that was a weird period. But obviously, like these, these seminal moments in my life also took place that year and aren't I lucky I don't think I'll I'll remember only the terrible things which obviously, there are so many terrible things to remember. So yeah, I feel very lucky and and you know what? On a another very selfish level like at least we had been touring the world for three years straight when everything came to a halt I? Think if we were only just starting, it'd be very devastating at least we know what it's like and we know what we have to look forward to in you know a year or so time when you know maybe it's safe to go play arenas again. But yeah, I mean it's it sucks. We we love touring. We love traveling. It's it's one of our favorite things in the world. So it's pretty torturous to not get to. The show I asked you know when you're in lockdown house house working from home been affected your creative process must be different but I imagine for you it's probably not the biggest change in the world. No, it's been. I. Mean like to be totally honest it's been. Like, in terms of like making billy's second album making my first album, it's been awesome like I know that's kind of crazy to say but like there's no way we'd be writing and recording as much this year otherwise. So I'm trying to look at it like I'm kind of trying to look at it like we have this thing that no artist ever gets basically here's the deal every artist. makes a first album, and then if it's successful, they tour it into oblivion, and then there's somehow expected to like have made album to in that time, which is just kind of crazy. I mean our version of that was that we made the James Bond Song onto her but it's like we have this crazy luxury of like having this amount of time off after the first album that I think. Almost. No artist gets anymore. So I'm kind of like I'm playing mind games with myself where I'm like as soon as there is a vaccine and everything can start up again like you're you're never gonna get a break ever again because everyone's going to be trying to make up for two years within the span of like six months. Oh I'm kind of like pretending this is like some short-term. Forced hiatus or something where we're just like we have to make this record record and I'm really enjoying making it I'm loving all the songs were writing and it's really fun productive. That's good. I feel like I know people on both sides of that. They're the like I I'm just really it or it's like I can barely get out of bed please don't make me do an anti it's it's. It's Day by day I should remind you that earlier in this call I admitted to watching both. On Friday and I also. That same day I watched like an hour and a half behind the scenes of the social network, and also I watched an episode of the boys. So it was like you know there there are days where I am super prolific and there are days where I watched like three movies but you've got to prime the pump I guess Evan Flow. Yeah. Well, tell me about your new song what they'll say about us it seems. A lot of hope in that song, which is not something. We get a lot of this year you know. That's definitely what I was aiming for. I think I think I. Mean there are other songs that may never see the light of day that I wrote during this that are just dirges just like bleak this you know that's kind of the Mo and I think the reason I felt so proud of the song was I I wrote it during the black lives matter protests in June and I was like going to them and it was like. It was like the only thing that I could justify going out and doing I still haven't been out to eat at a restaurant or anything it just seems to be responsible see my family my parents are in their sixty s whatever but I was like you know what I have to go to these protests any, and if if that jeopardizes my health I'll you know all quarantine for two weeks whatever I'll I'll take the hit because these are important. And ready to go to protest I feel really hopeful gone to marches my whole life in La. We've marched against the Iraq war and went to the women's march in the march for our lives in two thousand, eighteen in Boston and they marches make me feel really good because you're like marching on the street with all these people who agree with you and. I think the Internet at its best is like this empathy machine where we see people are suffering and we feel bad for them even though we don't know them and it's worse it's like device of division where you're just seeing everybody that disagrees us about everything and you're just like Oh. My God how do I disagree? So fundamentally with this person that otherwise Isn't that different than I? Am We grew up in the same place you know it's kind of crazy. So anyway, protect me really good and I'd come home and I've sort of started this thing this this kind of hopeful peace. But at the same time I was following Amanda. Clues, who's the wife of Nick were dear of who at the time was. Dying of covert in the hospital dying of you know whatever they call it complications due to cove it where his lungs had been obliterated by the virus, and so I was like singing kind of in the vein of like maybe maybe he's going to be okay and like wouldn't that be great and if you're the the the loved one of a person who was lying in a hospital bed and you were kind of explaining all the protests and everything you know what you might say and so that was kind of the the nut of that song and then everything beyond that was sort of like trying to be as self aware of it as possible I find I find some songs that are like optimistic to be. Sort of hard to take. So there's like a line in the second. That's like if I say a cliche because I mean and I think that's like the whole kind of nature of of a song like that is like you are saying this thing that might seem a little bit foolhardy or a little bit like blind, but it's like I think I think. To be often mystic is to be aware of negative things that are happening and to be like, you know what? I'm still going to be hopeful and I'm still going to root for us. I have not yet resorted to nihilism, which is the next the next day the twenty twenty, one everyone treats twenty twenty like it's this bad year I'm like twenty twenty. One. The nihilist year that's like the year we're all just like never mind it's never going to go away and you performed the DNC in August i. mean that must be an incredible thing to to lend your voice to you know it was a we saw it as a good opportunity to throw weight. You Know I. Think this is a really important election and Thing anybody who doesn't think this is an important election is is privileged not paying much attention and we were just like we'd love to make whatever small amount of difference we can try to make would be useful. I. Think we were just like the option of looking back at this period and having done nothing is like very grim to me. So you balanced with all this going being so where What's going on the world? How do you? How do you find a good work life balance in the midst of all that I know that sounds like a very sort of trite question but I think it's something a lot of people are dealing with. It's super hard. I've liked put those like APP limits on my phone of like the instagram twitter social media like screen time limits where your phone just. Kinda like shuts you out and I that's a struggle. You know I think I think it's really challenging the thing that I I try to remind myself in my specific case my work is the thing that brings me fulfillment right? Right wrongs producing them. That makes me feel really good looking at the news cycle although I think it is important. It doesn't make me feel good at all my job. And I haven't even tweeted this. But like you know how on twitter, there's the categories in the APP of like Kovic Related Sports entertainment right so I don't know if you've checked maybe yours is different but the fun tab on her there's a fun section it has one thing right house and it's like and it's not even that fun. The thing is like let me pull it up. It's like bizarre. Isn't even fun here. I'm opening it really quick. Okay. So the fun tab, it's like three three things and one of them is just imagine explaining these things from twenty twenty, two people living in nine and I'm like that's not fun. That's not fun at still dark anyway. So I just try to get off the APPS as much as I can because the stuff that brings me joy is like going on walks with my friends and hanging out my girlfriend and stuff I can do safely that feels very like connected social media even though it's important does not make me feel very good. Anyone, who makes goes I know I think the issue is that it is a little bit like a nicotine addiction where it gives you some dopamine go on you see some likes, you see some Nice crimes and so you're like, wow, like I'm I am loved valued, and then it's like you just spiral off into like looking at terrible articles but whole west coast burning down. So it's it's a tricky balance right? You don't WanNa turn a blind eye to problems, but you also don't want to ruin your own life by observing. Instructive to look at something negative happening in the world on your twitter unless you're then going to like do something about it right I try to look at it that way I can I can indulge in this weird habit of looking at terrible news as long as I've been playing on instilling some form of chain. At American Public University, we believe that everyone should have access to a great education. It's not a privilege reserved for the few and we believe higher education must come with lower tuition because when more doors open more lives, change the American public university within reach without limits online classes start every month learn more at American public you dot com. Hey there it's mango part genius founder of mental floss like many of you I'm one of the twenty one million people that have picked up gardening in the past six months. That's why I'm hosting the brand new podcast humans growing stuff brought you by Iheartmedia and your friends at Miracle Grow. It'll be the most human podcast about plants you'll ever listen to. I've actually been thinking about that a lot. How like in this groundhog? Day? These plants are tangible measure of time I, love that you're thinking about to their proof of life. We're all being held hostage in these plans are like their the markings on the door frame that show that time is passing. They're continuing to live and probably somehow showing us how to as well as we would slow down enough to pay attention. I'm not quite there yet. Listen to humans growing stuff on the iheartradio APP, apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Earning if. You're working on. So many things right now does what they'll say about us that there's a full length l. p. on the way coming from soon. There's definitely it's on the way I mean I'm I'm working on it all the time it was sort of like If I had to answer I would imagine that that's on we'll play a role in the album I don't think the album is far enough away that would not fit on the album. I think it'll be there but I didn't WanNa like announce a record or release date with that song because I felt like I wanted to just let that song exist because I really believe in that song and I, think like You announce a single with a record. It's like are like Oh my God like there's a record coming and also I'M Done with a record I'm like working on the songs all the time, but I have lots of work to do. So fascinated by the unusual thousand-year records, you know like lit matches, a snare dentist's drill or like an Australian crosswalk beep in bad guy what is your process for incorporating those? Do you have an arsenal of cool sounds and tape loops that you draw from or did you hear a sound in your head? You know you want and you start experimenting with what's around you totally both it just depends on the situation I'm always looking for inspiration right? I think one of the issues with. You know the more music you make is the more you the things you think you've covered and anything re inspires me is really exciting. You know it's like this is a weird example but like so so walked sound like the song with the matchsticks like that song is like a secord and an F. Chord in a minor chord and like those are cords that like I have written some of these songs. With. Chords that they are. They do not carry inspiration for me anymore and you'd chuck the matchsticks in there and it's very cool and inspiring to me and I think that's like that's what I'm always going for just like something to re-inspire. Have you ever heard of pink Floyd's household objects project? Yeah. I thought that was a really cool project I haven't done it but I thought it was like really smart yeah. Because I think that was followed dark side of the moon to. So it's almost like a similar position where okay we we did what we set out to do a thousand times over beyond the wildest dreams and then finding inspiration in the in the every day it's fascinating. I was joking with my dad because I'm I'm really proud of the second album working on with billy. Talking my dad and I was like, but I'm like we supposed to do this every time like, are we supposed to make like a really good album like over and over like it's so hard but you know It's about reinspired yourself and it's about growing as a person like it's a funny thing that people level this criticism of life. My favorite artists have changed because it's like what the what on Earth could they expect you to do as an artist I mean it's a funny criticism that people. Yeah. I don't really understand I mean listen to every Beatles album post nineteen, sixty four and it sounds completely different than the one before it. Yeah I know they're so different I do understand that if you are a fan of a record that doesn't mean that you're going to be fan of someone else's record if it's a very different record, but it's like that's how. Music is supposed to work like you kind of have to make music for yourself, and then whoever likes it will like it. God. If I were always trying to cater to like one listener like I wouldn't made like half the songs I'm proud of because I would've just been like second guessing member like, Oh, my God, they're not going to like this. So I think it's a it's a double edged sword because. We're all. Like very indebted to whoever listens to our music, and that's why we have a career but it's also like I. Think of this in terms of like food in a certain way if I only ever eight stuff I already like I'd never try anything new. That's great and it's like I. Feel like that's that's the best and you go to a new restaurant and you try some thing like I have no idea how that's going to be an you try to amazing and I think that's what I always aimed to do as a musician and it's like. Give someone something they didn't even know they wanted and I assume being your position. Now having one, you know all the grammys, you have all sorts of choices open to you that you might not have before you have a wall of Mellow Trans or a string section or you know whatever you want do you have any desire to vastly expand your sonic pal? Anyway did you feel like you have everything you need with your laptop and GIC Protons? So I spent a considerable amount of money this year on like instruments and microphones that I couldn't afford before and I. Think you know what? I would say to like any young listener whose like I record my own vocals on a microphone called. Chandler read now which I really like my my buddy yesterday was like I got a new microphone I. Think you should get a chandler read. He was like I was get an the the T. l. m. one or three and I was like well, that's that makes fine and he was like, didn't you record all of Billy's album on that Mike and I was like, yeah, like it's a great night guys like I'm just telling you even better. But it doesn't matter and I was like, no, it absolutely doesn't matter. It's just it's a very selfish purchase, right? It's like I enjoy it. But yes in the last several months I've I've acquired really sort of more mostly before covid but I've acquired really nice Mike's and some cool Vincent's and stuff and to be honest I don't know how to feel about this. But I still like largely amusing like Bilton software on my computer because it's fast and I'm usually looking for. Speed, but it is really fun and again it's like it's the inspiration that I'm looking for. I'm not like a super like analog versus digital like convert think digital sounds pretty great. I have a couple since I have this thing called an ace tone. You know I a that, and it inspires me a lot and you know in making an a second album making mountain my own first album like I'm I love being reinspired by things and approaching things in a different way. So. That's kind of like that would be my like encouragement to people in terms of like what they invest money on with years. You know like wait until your uninspired by something and then and then get something new to re-inspire you and re excite you that'd be my my advice you superstitious at all you go back to the bedroom at your parents house to do the vocals just to get the sound of that room I. Am I am not at all superstitious or sentimental. I like throw away or give away anything I. Don't know man people like sentimentality like rule like their whole lives and I get it. But like I've never felt that way the only devices I keep and I keep them largely because I just know how quickly they're gonNA seem crazy. Is I keep all of my computers like I have like my my first computer and my second computer because they don't take that much space and also I just know that like in thirty years. Nuts we're just going to be like, what is this like actress? Yeah I'm not I'm not superstitious. People are so funny about the bedroom man like I gotta go back there and. You know. My. My Mom sleeps in there now like it's not my I have a different house but the only thing that's in that bedroom that I would maybe record as my grandad's old beat up piano his upright is in there. So I might someday, maybe I'll be like I gotTa have that Cloudy Upright Sound again but it's kind of is kind of an Asinine hypothetical question if you were growing up in the sixties in purely analog era where people went to like gold, Star, Abby road or whatever to cut. Records do you think you'd still be involved with production like how do you think your career? It'd be different if you didn't have tools that you have no op top right now such a good question man You know I think I. Think I am so a product of the period of time where I was born in what was accessible to me. You know if I were born with the same rain and the same appetites, the same interests I'm sure I would be involved in music in some capacity, but the level of innovation. I've been able to be a part of have no idea if that would be available to me or be achievable to me, I mean I think I kind of everybody right? Like Bill. Gates had access to that computer mainframe. It is college and whatever you know he's a very smart dude. But like he had access, you know if you if you take away his access no matter how smart he was he wouldn't have been able to learn the way that he learned it. So I think there would have been amazing things about growing. Up in the sixties or so many amazing musicians back then and Polish it it would have been so cool to maybe produce like the Beatles or something but who knows people love like the time machine stuff like as cursed as this period of time may seem to be I. WanNa be right now like I don't even know if I want to be in the future like I just want to be like right now that's the best way to be every. Buddhists, in the world right now is like, yes, listen to this, right. In the moment. What's it like to drive the Volvo xc ninety plug in hybrid? The thrill of a four hundred horsepower t eight twin engine. The, joy of impromptu wrote trump's. And the serenity. Of Electric, power, in pure ego mode. Visit a DMV Volvo retailer today to experience the xc ninety recharge plug in hybrid for yourself. Good Morning. This is Laura Vendor Kim host of the new corner. A podcast where we share strategies for thriving in the new world of work I, just put out a new episode about how to light a fire under your career by making your Mondays matter. The episode was fueled by Nature Valley packed sustained energy bars. Here's a clip from the episode. So. Here's my suggestion if you're working at home these days because of the pandemic use the time on Monday morning that you would have spent commuting. To tackle some big speculative project that you claim you never have time for. Tackling something big and uncertain can light a fire under your career and doing this important but not urgent task. First thing means you start the week with a sense of victory. Brought to you by nature, valley packed sustained energy bars for more tips on how to start. Well, sustain your energy and win the week check out the new corner office. PODCAST available on the iheartradio. APP. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Bond theme on a tour bus I think he said that is unbelievable. I gotta a huge pondered. What was the process like for that? That is? So cool. It was a really cool process. I am also a bond nerd and I have I have always looked at doing a bond theme as like the the Pinnacle of film. Music collaboration. So it was always on my fantasy bucket list of like wouldn't that be unbelievable and you know they were making this this bond movie and we kind of got wind of that not in a secret way. I think it was just like the way that anyone would know that they're making a movie where we like aren't they making? A new bond movie. This summer isn't integrate another and We were just like to our team. Really we'll meet with anyone that'll let us meet with them to try to convince them that we're right to do this. You know. So we met with Barbara Broccoli and we met with mgm what we were given and I think I'm allowed to say this we were given like a scene of the script that was kind of like the cold open. Yeah and So we had that and and that was obviously huge because So important to know what angle you're writing from, and then on a personal no. Because I'm kind of obsessed with bond themes I was like has to be the movie title like all of my favorite bond themes are the movie title like live and let Die Sky Fall Goldfinger like the has to be that was like caveat number one and then to was I I'm pretty Loosey Goosey terms of like what what I'm trying to achieve with goals as a songwriter but with von Song to me, the melody has to be Completely bulletproof. It has to be like a melody because it's going to be interpolated through the whole movie like every bond theme is played by like strings and orchestra in the rest of the movie. So I was like the melody has to be amazing and very bond. So I wrote all of the melodies first and then billion I said about sort of perfecting like what line would go on each melody, which is very atypical. Usually I write melodies and lyrics at the same time because it's much harder to write lyric. I think. When you don't have the melody already Sorry. It's harder when you have a melody because you have to just like it's a little bit like coup like you have to bike just fill in the blanks and this way. So that was it was really challenging thing but it actually from start to finish of that specific song only a couple of. Days although there were there were months of like super stress. What are we gonNA do and Tony Seiler who was our champion believes label interscope who I adore twenties the greatest. He was the one kind of like up to bat for us you know and he would check in with us. Yeah. It was it was a stressful experience, but mainly it was. Just really wanted to write a great song like I love those bombs songs so much. So I'm really proud of the song that's going to be so hard I mean to write something that fits the aesthetic, but also isn't a total cliche to like that's got to be weird isn't. That isn't done before like that hasn't already been done like it was a really satisfying experience. It was also a really phenomenal excuse to work with Hans Zimmer. ooh, and Johnny Marr Johnny Marr. Well, they of are a package deal Johnny was working with on on the whole film and then Stephen Lipson like helped, produce the song with us but it was so cool. You know because billionaire so insular with our own records doesn't really make sense to collaborate with anybody because we're just in a room throwing stuff into a fire and. Seeing. What explodes and I feel like with von thing they're like I'm so glad like if they told me to do a string arrangement, I would have been like, let me try to rip off Hans Zimmer, and if they told me to play guitar, let me try to rip off Johnny Marr. So the fact that I got to just have them be on the record. So sick that great line that hunt Zimmer it was like whenever whenever I get into the studio produced I, find myself wondering can I do it again something? On. His masterclass thing that he's like I I don't know how to do your movie dude he's the. Yeah, every time I every time? Every time in the middle of producing a song I'm like navy. This is the one where I don't know how to like. Maybe. The last song was the last one. I'll ever make good like I don't know man. It's so weird. Your brain is your brain is like the fact that your brain puts up such a fight against like new stuff is just it's crazy. So he's a he's a legend and rightfully so and so nice and so collaborative, and so like there was this one point we were doing versions of production were like you know version one production version to production version three of. Four. And there was this version that billion. I were like this is bad and I was like, wow, I'm GONNA have to call on Zimmer and be like this is bad and we called him and he was like it's bad right and I was like, yeah, and he was like I know. It was like. It was so easy to. I. Wished to have that little ego when I have won as many. Oscars, as he has like, I feel like that's like unbelievable like if you win an Oscar. Feel like your ego must just explode and he's just this like Mellow Nice. Got Like I just saw him. So I would do I would do like anything for him. I feel like I've pledge my allegiance to Hans I gotTa Ask aside from Daniel Craig who's your favorite Bond Oh you know what? I really like seen a film or two of the other of connery and of Brosnan, and I think they're great. But like bond is like Batman like whatever you grow up with. So like I just think of Crag Bond, he's just my guy I think and again like not that the other bonds weren't great I think they were but that's just who plays the. Role in my opinion, you know totally I think that's like the Christian Bale Michael Keaton Val kilmer thing it's like you know Christian. Is My Batman until Robert Pattinson is like unbelievable next year Oh my God I know I can't wait to see that okay well I gotta ask You I've been asking this is my last question for everybody if you could snap your fingers in have everything go back to the way it was in twenty nineteen no Cova vigneault virus no lockdown now quarantine what is the first thing that you would do so like like Gra- like fantasy wake up one day and is just sort of like status quo again freaky Friday style. Yeah. really good question. I mean the things that have struck me are like the things that we take for granted. So I think I would I'd have to say like players show I think just the idea like we played so many shows in twenty nineteen that like we enjoyed them but it was like we were constantly playing shows and I remember being on stage in North Carolina the day before the lockdown started we're really about to go home and stop our her and I remember being like wow this. This might be the last time on stage for a long time and Yeah. That's the sort of you know going out to eat seeing friends and stuff that's all. Wonderful Manusha. But there is just kind of nothing in the world like a stage show. I was a solid answer face. Thank you so much for your time your music. It's been a pleasure. Great talking to you. Thank you. Man is really good talking to you. We hope you enjoyed this episode of inside the studio. Home Edition a production of high heart radio. For more episodes of inside the studio and other shows from I heart radio check out the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. At American Public University we believe higher education is not one-size-fits-all. That's why we offer two hundred modern programs that build on your knowledge and fit your schedule because we believe universities should adapt to the needs of students not the other way around American public university within reach without limits. Online classes start every month. Learn more at American public you DOT com. At American Public University, we believe quality education must be more affordable. That's why as a leader in online higher education, we focus on minimizing costs and maximizing return on learner investment and we believe higher education must be more accessible. So on line programs start every month American public university within reach without limits learn more at American public you dot com.

American Public University Apple Billy Iheartradio James Bond Los Angeles twenty twenty Hans Zimmer Beatles Oscar Billie Irish Fini twitter Jordan runtaugh Johnny Marr Jordan Ash Las Angeles DENVER Joe
Lost and Lonely Edition

Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

1:26:20 hr | 1 year ago

Lost and Lonely Edition

"We have a big favor to ask one of our advertisers is conducting a survey and we would be grateful for your help answering a few of their questions questions it will take less than ten minutes of your time and your participation helps our show Goto slate studied dot com to complete the short survey now that's sleet study dot com thank you this episode of Hip Parade is sponsored by Hyatt centric Hyatt centric hotels put you at the heart of the action connecting you to the local food culture and of course music check out the hot spots hidden gems and local sounds in cities from Miami to Milan Boston to Bangor and everywhere in between if you're ready for an exciting off the beaten path adventure get started with Hyatt's centric book your stay now at Hyatt centric dot com welcome to hit parade a podcast of Pop Chart History from slate magazine about the hits from Coast to coast I'm Chris Melinda Chart analysts pop critic and writer of slates wise the song number number one series on today's show last month's edition of Hit parade took us back three decades to the fall of one thousand nine hundred eighty nine nine in this episode we're going to stay at the exact same moment in pop chart history you may recall in that early fall of eighty nine the song topping the billboard hot one hundred was the first single from Janet Jackson's new album rhythm nation called Miss you much but in the middle of its four week run at number one right behind miss you much was a rather unlikely number two smash by a band that could not have sounded much different from Janet Jackson where Miss You much was exuberant danceable and romantic the song in the runner-up slot was moody introverted self deprecating and in its own way also very romantic in fact that number two hit was literally called Love Song The cure abandoned from the town of Crawley England had turned post punk and Goth off culture into stadium packing rock and even in this moment chart conquering pop but they were not alone in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine just weeks earlier in the dog days of summer a trio from Northampton England called love and rockets had reached the top three on the US charts plan a catcher sexy somewhat spooky Kooky Goth pop song called so a lot that same summer in US dance clubs a group of former punks turned goths turned synth rockers from Manchester called new order were commanding ending the floor with pulsating music aggressive baselines and email lyrics and near the end of nineteen eighty nine debuting on the hot one hundred was the new single from a banned from Basilan England like the cure depeche mode had turned Dumi angsty and dramatic a new wave music into stadium packing rock just one year prior in fact they'd sold out the Rose Bowl and this new depeche pesch mode hit had the provocatively sacrilegious title Personal Jesus all of these hits were not only penetrating the pop charts they they were also commanding billboards newest Chart Modern Rock tracks which chronicle the music that used to be the province of American College Radio but was was rapidly moving from the left of the dial to the center the cure depeche mode new order these bans were modern rock kings this in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and eighty nine and so was another morose and rather arch young man the former frontman of the Manchester Chester band the smiths who went by a single name Morrissey the nineteen eighties were already strong for British pop in the US the first half of the decade led led by pompadour new romantic bands had even been dubbed the second British invasion ah but there was a major difference between the more decadent new wave that stormed the charts in the first half of the nineteen eighteen eighty s and the darker rock toward the end of the decade the music got heavier the lyrics gloomier and yet yet even these gloomy late eighties British rock bands were at route producing irresistible pop music that was waiting to break doc whether played on Jangling guitars or thundering guitars or icy synthesizers these songs went from seemingly uncommercial to music for the masses not only in England but but eventually in America these were the moody rockers who helped turn new wave into alternative before grunge Asia before industrial before electronic today on hit parade we chart the breakthrough of the sub-genre that's been called everything from mope rock to Goth Rock too sad bastard music the moment when this melodic melancholia began turning platinum in the United States it has been set that the British are a more self deprecating people then we Americans are but three decades ago on the billboard billboard charts if I may paraphrase Morrissey the so-called Pope of Mope Heaven knows we were all miserable now and that's where your hit parade marches today the week ending October twenty first in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine when the cures love song reached an improbable number two on billboard's hot one hundred marking a new pop the peak for doing dark and Gothic British alternative rock on the American shots in this episode of Hip Parade is sponsored by Hyatt centric tune into somewhere new with Hiatt centric hotels hotels that put you at the heart of the action connecting you to your cities food culture sure and of course music from Miami to Milan and everywhere in between Hyatt centric hotels point you toward the hidden gems hotspots and local sounds your destination has to offer enjoy choice amenities and playful details that uniquely capture the the spirit of each city helping you get a feel for the neighborhood before you even set foot out the door if you're ready for an exciting off the the beaten path adventure get started with Hiatt centric when you start here you can discover well everywhere explore their hotels hells around the world at high centric dot COM okay buddy as trying to cheer us up so go ahead but aunts most sad bastard music suv I care in the movie high fidelity released in two thousand when Jack Black's record store clerk character barry complains about sad bastard music. He's just been confronted by some Sullen Indie rock by Scottish Band Belle and Sebastian but when British author Nick Hornby I invoked the term in his book High Fidelity in Nineteen Ninety five he he could just as easily have been talking about any number of bans from the United Kingdom over the prior two decades this facetious officious term has been applied to several gloomy when and melodramatic UK rock bands of the late twentieth century the fact is there is no one term for the British alternative rock that crossed over in America in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s and nineteen ninety s some call it Goth South Rock but not all of it is terribly Gothic some use mope rock which besides being snarky belies how bright bright and catchy much of this music actually is these bans on I'm not even unified by their primary instruments some of the leading lights of UK Alternative Rock in this period were fundamentally Qatar rock bands while others almost exclusively favored the synthesize some even converted themselves from Guitar Combos into Synth pop acts and with a dark et. Let's just save this and you'll have to trust me as a generation xer of a certain age if you went to high school and college when I did and you liked one of these bands you probably liked them all maybe you're the class nerd or the one at school with Black Nail Polish or eyeliner no matter what your gender maybe you were jock but also secretly Ema Emma and this was the music you played in the sanctity of your Bedroo- or Walkman especially if you were an American team in the eighties or early nineties and you loved these bands their relative lack of popularity at the time was the point point of call it what you will these bands all fell under the rubric of what Rock Critics and of the music industry called very broadly post punk because no matter what the prior prior emergence of Punk a much louder angrier music made all of this dark rock possibly and he emergence of punk in the mid nineteen seventies in both America America and England was a seminal event but it was particularly seismic across the United Kingdom the emergence emergence of the sex pistols in one thousand nine hundred seventy six inspired numerous would be musicians including in provincial areas outside outside of London members of two of the groups we will discuss in this episode new order and the smiths were present at the pistols legendary June nineteen seventy-six show at Manchester's Lesser Free Trade Hall a Gig where fewer than fifty people were in the audience but seemingly half of them formed bands but the band who would eventually lead the Post punk and Goth rock movements were not only wedded to the sound of punk virtually all would owe a stylistic debt to such legendary classic rockers as has the iconoclastic David Bowie and the stylistically a bold Glam Rock Combo Roxy music soul the bands of post punk would combine punks angular and economy with the theatricality and moutainous of Glam and art rock to be sure early on the bands that formed in the sex pistols wake sounded more like puck joy division were a quartet of Manchester natives men Cunanan's in British dish parlance they formed after seeing that sex pistols gig in one thousand nine hundred seventy six joy division's subversive satirical Caracul banned me was taken from the Nazis name for their Sexual Slavery Department at their formation in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven seven joy division's clipped punk energy made them sound at first like most British bands formed in the Pistons Wake but they were also paying attention to other contemporaries who were broadening the boundaries of punk like Susie and the Banshee the London group fronted by Susan Janet Bali Aka Su Su had the energy of punk but from the start layered in tribal drumming and sinister vocals that would anticipate the sound of Gothic rock decades later pitchfork magazine would write quote without Susie Sue uh-huh Goth might never have taken root unquote inspired in part by susie joy division sound evolved becoming becoming more distinctive and spookier concern the two performers were especially vital to the sound of joy division and would cast a long shadow bassist Peter Hook who played his base as if it were a lead guitar and vocalist Ian Curtis who began singing in a foreboding baritone both of these sounds intensive base and gloomy vocals would become core elements of post punk and Golf Goth Rock and by nineteen seventy eight and seventy nine these gothic elements began cropping up on other British rox rocks angles lag thou house a quartet from North Hampton tune named after the iconic early twentieth century German Art School Helped Define Goth Rock in the popular imagination their single Bela Lugosi's dead in the late summer of Nineteen seventy-nine would serve as a skeletal blueprint for the entire hire goth subculture flashing ahead for years just before bow house broke up the group would perform an immortal version of their classic in the Nineteen eighty-three Vampire movie the hunger foul L. House would prove deeply influential despite lasting just a few years but another pro goth band emerging in this period would have far greater longevity Robert Smith a young guitarist and songwriter from Crawley had been playing in bands with schoolmates since the early seventies by Nineteen seventy-six inspired by the emergence of the sex pistols and by early post punks like Susie Sue Smith joined a group who called themselves malice and eventually the easy cure the self effacing but quietly assertive Smith never intended to sink but he wound up with the task when a string of vocalists fell out of the group he would later tell Musician magazine quote I hated my voice but I didn't hate it more than I hated everyone else's force unquote quote Smith shorten the band's name from easy cure to the cure and they began performing a tight brand of post punk that matched joy division in its minor key Moody's particularly on killing an hour a lyrical adaptation of the Philisophical novel the Stranger by Albert Camus this single whose provocative title Robert Smith would take pains to explain was a literary reference not not a racist manifesto nonetheless helped establish the cures repulsive enigmatic sound but like -joyed vision the cure in this phase were punk as much as postponing even more than on killing an Arab on boys don't cry Robert Smith began to define the cures lyrical outlook he conveyed passion passion by shrouding it in expressions of remorse regret and self recrimination Smith's voice in particular sounded founded morose even when he was singing romantic lovelorn lyrics ask catching as boys don't cry was dirge like post punk from the likes of the cure joy division and bow house was was not chart music at the end of the seventies not even in their native England it would take until the dawn of the eighties for one one of these bands to score an actual UK top forty hit and by that time that band had reached a sad in conclusion love will tear us apart would prove a blueprint reprint for all of modern and alternative rock in the decade to calm the song reached number thirteen on the UK charts in the summer of one thousand nine hundred eighty and even made the lower rungs of the American dance charts it was a down tempo dance track for depressives depressives a gloriously sad song saddest of all was that when it crested on the charts it's vocalist was was gone in the spring of nineteen eighty singer Ian Curtis just days before joy division was set to begin Tor- of America that threatened to make the compelling but clinically depressed frontman a star died by his own hand in his flat in Cheshire Curtis was twenty three years of age love will tear us apart became an elegy for joy division itself but remarkably the remaining meaning members chose to carry on the band's Guitarist Bernard Sumner would step forward as their vocalist and by nineteen eighty one the former joy division became new order they would soon evolve away from the more punk derived sound of joy division and find greater commercial success but their their contemporaries in post-punk were if anything getting darker when the cure finally broke into the UK top forty in nineteen eighty it was with the brooding rumblings rumbling single a forest Robert Smith had determined that full on Gothic rock was the core of the cures sound sound but his pop instincts meant that even the cures darkest singles were swoon and just in Charlotte sometimes a nineteen eighty one single that preceded the cures darkest album yet pornography Agassi was dreamlike and desperate and it scraped the middle rungs of the British charts by this time the cure joined a wave of bands fully embracing the Gulf Persona Robert Smith changed his look to a mask of white makeup dark dark lipstick and eyeliner and a shock of spiky spidery hair he had befriended susie sue of Suzanne the band shoes choose who also embraced the spiky-haired Goth look and as for the ban she's recordings even as the tempos were faster astor they became ever more golf in their ghoulish spellbound reached number twenty two in the UK in one thousand nine hundred eighty one goth music was gradually becoming more commercial two you straight suzy albums kaleidoscope and Juju went top ten in the UK in one thousand nine hundred eighty and eighty one and the cures unremittingly committing lead dark pornography made the top ten as well in nineteen eighty two that's when Robert Smith chose to make the first major major stylistic turn of his career it it is hard to overstate what a sharp turn the song let's go to bed was for the cure in one thousand nine hundred eighty eighty two the band's label fiction records warned Robert Smith that it might alienate his golf fans but Smith himself off felt he needed it for his own sanity after the gloom of albums like pornography what was remarkable wasn't just it was a straight ahead three minute pop song after all boys don't cry had already been a form of punk pop as far far back as one thousand nine hundred seventy nine let's go to bed was also the most cheerful synth pop Robert Smith had ever produced I well almost Smith maintained his droll do me persona captured in lyrics like well I don't care if you don't and I don't want it if you don't all embedded in a cheeky song about sex in the UK let's go to bed was only a modest hit reaching number forty four in late one thousand nine hundred eighty two but in America it quietly quietly began the cures breakthrough Robert Smith had picked a promising moment to go pop for the first time since the nineteen nineteen sixties British bands were doing unusually well on the US charts but the bands of this second British invasion we're far more accessible than Robert Smith even at his catching thanks to the nine thousand nine hundred eighty one launch of MTV by Nineteen eighty-three three the US airwaves and the billboard hot one hundred were awash in British synth pop but the preferred stream strain was so called new romantic music exemplified by the glamorous and stylistically confident durant durant like golf new romantic music was also a descendant of both seventies punk and the Glam rock of bands like Roxy Music and like the goths these MTV friendly bands piled on the makeup and piled up their hair but the new romantic bands leaned on the Glam side of the post punk equation and they made their music more overtly Lee danceable such as Kaj agoos top five nine thousand nine hundred eighty three hip to shop some new romantic bands even openly emulated the sound of American pop and R and b most especially the soulful culture club fronted by the willfully androgynous Boy George compared with Duran Duran Culture Club and Kasha Goo Goo the cure even at their most pop were still a bit dour for u s top forty airplay in nineteen eighty three and eight four Bu- America boasted not only dozens of college radio stations nations which would play more adventurous music our coastal cities also hosted major market commercial new wave stations. I Like K Rock in Los Angeles W. L. I. R. in Long Island New York and Boston's W. F. X. on these stations let's go to bed was a smash while these stations did not report to billboard's hot one hundred at the time making songs like let's go to bed in eligible to chart they made the cure stars to generation of urban and especially especially suburban middle class teenagers having shook off his early Goth blog Robert Smith continued to produce pop songs talks that fused the cures dark droll profile with more playful lyrics like nineteen eighty three's the love cats the signs and more danceable beats like in the UK. Both of these were sizable hits. The walk reached the top ten love cats what's the top fifteen in America both were among the most played songs on new wave radio stations in one thousand nine hundred three and and the cure were not the only post-punk at edging closer to dance music at this time in nineteen eighty three the re-christened new order issued their album power corruption and lies assemble blend of rock instruments and electronic rhythms the album was anchored by the groundbreaking electro dance single blue Monday day which would go on to sell three million copies as a twelve inch single and remains reportedly the biggest selling twelve inch of all time New Order and the cure were initially guitar ktar based bands who evolved towards synthesizers and dance beats but around the same time a different British group job was evolving in the other direction they would remain devoted to since for their entire career but unlike the goth bands they started off much more sprightly before getting dark ed named for a French magazine whose title roughly translates to fast fashion depeche mode went through several incarnations in the late seventies in the week of punk before discarding being most of their traditional instruments in favor of synthesizers just can't get enough their first UK top ten hit it was written by then bandleader Vince Clarke in a bouncy new wave style even as vocalist Dave Geoghan I'm saying in a teutonic Croon that would have worked just as well on a goth wreck I just can't get enough was a number eight. UK Hit in nineteen eighty one and in the US us even made number twenty six on billboard's club play chart but it wouldn't be essentially the last single of its kind for depeche mode not only their most cheerful pop dimissed hit ever but the last single written by the restless restless Vince Clarke he would leave depeche mode after only one album nineteen eighty one's speak and spell and he went onto form several synth pop acts over the next decade including the assembly and erasure his very first band after Depeche Mode Yazoo Zoo known as yes in the US scored an immediate hit in the spring of nineteen eighty two with only you this left Depeche Mode to forge ahead without Clark and they tapped keyboardist and guitarist Martin Gore to take over the Songwriting Gore proved a diverse flexible taxable songwriter with a much darker lyrical bent even on seemingly upbeat singles like the nine thousand nine hundred eighty three hit get get the balance right throbbing dance beats were paired with cynical lyrics by the time of the nineteen eighty four album some great reward Martin Gore had come into into his own as Depeche modes leader penning songs about everything from romantic betrayal to God's very existence chew do on the unnervingly Catchy Master and Servant Consensual Sado Masochism by Nineteen eighty-four Depeche mode had become college and New Wave Radio Radio Staples in America that year alone. La's K rock listed four songs by the band among its top one hundred for the ear sitting alongside Depeche mode on K. rocks playlists year also with multiple hits was a newer band causing causing a sensation with alternative rock fans on both sides of the Atlantic they would round out the sound eighties UK rough not only by largely rejected synthesizers might call them the opposite of Depeche mode but also by taking lyrical Nolan Kolia to new heights of brandy also in every way the smiths were the ultimate it banned for young people damone a cruel world led by one Steven Patrick Morrissey and impassioned men Cunene of Irish heritage who proclaimed himself both celibate and an ardent vegetarian. The smiths were defined not only by Morris's verbose this knowingly pretentious lyrics but by their ace guitarist Johnny Marr was arguably the most influential British guitarist of his era his distinctive style of Chiming Ming Guitar was widely imitated at a time in the mid one thousand nine hundred ninety s when American Indie Rock was led by by r e m a band we discussed in a prior hit parade episode who were defined by the Jhangvi playing of guitarist Peter Buck the Smiths Johnny Marr became in essence essence the British answer to Rem with a Jangle that fused sixties rock and eighties post punk and paired with Morris's arch witty and often self flagellating lyrics in the UK the smiths were consistent hit makers scoring eighteen top forty hits between nineteen eighteen eighty three and one thousand nine hundred eighty six all on the British Independent label rough trade in America the smiths never scored scored a hot one hundred hit but to listeners of college and alternative stations the Smiths were acknowledged rock heroes within then their first year how soon is now paired a Johnny Marr Tremolo Guitar riff topped by searing electric staps with what might be more seized most most impassioned vocal originally issued as a b side in one thousand nine hundred eighty four how soon is now quickly became the smiths most played song on American alternative radio ranking just outside the top twenty of k rock's top songs of nineteen eighty-four remarkable in the peak year for new romantic synth pop what how soon is now lacked in electronics electronics it more than made up in atmosphere and it would later be covered by more than a dozen artists by nineteen in eighty five all of the pieces were in place for the black clad bands of UK Goth indie and Post punk to break wider lider in America but it would take a few capitalists to bring these groups up from the underground the first arrived in the summer of eighty five when one of these bands finally belatedly went top forty people are people was a single single from Depeche modes nineteen eighty-four album some great reward the song took more than a year to break in America but when it did it broke beyond college and Alternative Radio Martin Gore's lament against racism and war crossed crossed over to top forty pop stations peaking at number thirteen on the hot one hundred in August of Nineteen eighty-five Casey Z.. CASOM counted it down once a week with eighteen forty and you know how your favorite songs are doing across the US like the first American hit for for the English band with a French name Schmo they climbed four notches to thirteen with people but DM's top forty forty crossover proved a fluke it would be their last American pop hit for nearly five years moreover it seem to have no coattails despite the fact that other bands of Depeche Moods generation were now producing some of their most accessible assessable material to date got the cures nineteen eighty five album the head on the door split the difference between the Band's Pop melodies and Robert Smith's gloomy lyrics what's it dominated college radio and reached number fifty nine on the billboard album chart higher than any cure studio album today's its lead single inbetween days a soaring love song about feeling too old to fall in love topped alternative turn it of Radio playlists and it was quickly followed by the cure is most infectious dance song to date the percolating minimalist and Moody close to me never within a month of close to me's release Robert Smith's friend Susie sue produced what would be regarded as the band she's most irresistible same cities in dust maintained suzy's edgy goth persona but packaged in a skittering club it not only scraped the top twenty in the UK but reached number seventeen on the US club play Chart Suzy's biggest biggest American dance single to date this episode of Hit Parade is sponsored by how to raise a parent a new podcast from dairy pure in collaboration with slate studios dairy pure believes that the world would be a better place if we reconnected to what's pure and innocent in ourselves and and each other that's what how to raise a parent is all about learn how to shift your perspective I didn't like the way I said that let me take third bullet again that's what how to raise a parent is all about learn how to shift your perspective as a parent to reconnect with the imagination tation and openness that comes so naturally to kits join host Mallory Kasdan as she talks to parents and experts about what makes kids so fearless creative and good at making friends and what we as adults can learn from them the podcast explores the fun messy confusing and delightful aspects of being a parent through personal stories and broader insights from relevant experts. Make sure to listen and subscribe to how to raise a parent wherever you get your podcasts by nineteen eighty six none of these British post punk bands had managed to score a gold album in America let alone platinum even though to the nation's black-clad Goth Kids Robert Smith and Susie sue were already icons what the scene needed was a bigger showbiz oh Biz connection perhaps connection to a Hollywood movie and filmmaker John Hughes had just the thing John Fuse was the poet laureate of eighties teams in the mid eighties he directed or produced three consecutive -secutive films with his actress News Molly Ringwald that defined highschool for generation X. All three were infused with Music Nineteen Nineteen eighty-four is sixteen candles featured new romantic songs by the likes of Spandau Ballet and cash agoo and one thousand nine hundred five's the breakfast the club has generated a number one hit simple minds don't you forget about me for nineteen eighty six's pretty in pink named for for this psychedelic first Song Hughes went further curate eating a a soundtrack album that played like an altar rock mixed it would do for eighties post-punk what the Saturday night fever soundtrack had had done for seventy s disco fueled by its biggest single full orchestral maneuvers darks if you leave a love song that has become a radio perennial the pretty in pink soundtrack reached the top five on the billboard album chart in the spring of eighty six that made it not only the most successful soundtrack to John Hughes News Movie But the biggest American chart success most of the acts on the album would have MD's lovelorn track a number four hit in the spring of eighty-six was joined on the album by much edgier material from the likes of Echo and the bunny the smiths and order shellshocked new orders latest hybrid of all truck and the club music made its debut on pretty in pink and reached number fourteen on Billboard's club chucked new orders fourth straight top twenty US dance single after blue Monday confusion and the perfect kiss pretty in pink was well-timed for new order as they were finally starting to break on the US charts they're low life album had cracked the billboard album chart just a few months earlier but the band that couldn't have timed pretty in pink any better was the smiths. Yeah I like how soon is now please please please let me get what I want was originally a nineteen eighty-four beside that took on a life of its own this gentle drum Lewis yearning ballot with Mandolin by Johnny Marr and assigning vocal from Morrissey was a favourite of John Hughes he even placed an instrumental version version of the song in his other nineteen eighty six film Ferris Buehler's Day off appearing as the last track on pretty in pink please please as please let me get what I want was many Americans introduction to the smiths and the band was ready to capitalize on their higher your profile with their most accomplished album the queen is dead landed in June nineteen eighty-six just weeks after the pretty in pink soundtrack peaked on the album chart it would wind up the smiths most acclaimed album and spent the rest of the year on the billboard album chart though it generated no American top forty hits the Queen is dead topped many nine thousand nine hundred eighty six critics polls and dominated college and Alternative Radio playlists with songs that would become alter rock standards like there is a light that never goes out the boy with the thorn in his side and one of Morrison's most self referential hits bigmouth strikes again that big map would get Morrissey into trouble more than once for the rest of his career and it essentially led to his band not surviving on one thousand nine hundred eighty s at various as times the willful frontman feuded with guitarist Johnny Marr bassist Andy Walk and Drummer Mike Joyce and tensions would eventually centrally lead mar to quit the band in one thousand nine hundred seven the queen is dead would be the last studio album the smiths would issue while still together in their final year they would issue a few more classic singles including pass and panic and in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven before mar quit the smiths recorded one final studio album strange ways here we come led off by the MTV favorite grow friend in a coma but by the time strange ways arrived in the fall of nineteen eighty-seven the smiths were no no more though they would end up with an impressive roster of UK hits the what if question that still dogs the smiths to this day is if they had remained intact just a bit longer could they have become U. S. superstars they missed America's embrace of British Post post-punk by only a year or so it fell to the other bands of that generation to break America for UK Mope Rock in the final years of the nineteen eighty s and there was plenty of going to go around remember depeche mode had started off their career in the early eighties with Bouncy synth pop and even after their songs got lyrically edgier in the mid eighties under under bandleader Martin Gore they were still catchy enough to be the first band to score a top forty hit but starting in nineteen eighteen eighty six wendy m titled Their New Album Black Celebration Gore provided singer Dave Song with lyrics that were both sensual unsual and ominous and the music had an industrial thriving by nineteen eighty-seven Depeche mode had eliminated most traces of their earlier techno pop sound perversely this made them bigger than ever especially on music for the masses there eighty seven album whose title was both both accurate and ironic accurate because it became depeche moods first US top forty album peaking at number thirty thirty five and ironic because to them music for the masses meant digital dirges with hooks tracks like I never let me down again sounded like high school anthems for the end of days new order to were refining their sound nineteen eighty-six is Bizarre Love Triangle combined relentless dance beats and Romantically confused deceptively melancholy lyrics it would become new orders sleeper hip hip a top five. US Club Song in one thousand nine hundred eighty six a highlight on their one thousand nine hundred eighty seven compilation substance and elite looming looming pop radio staple years later it would even scrape the hot one hundred in one thousand nine hundred ninety five nearly a decade after it I came out to this day. Bizarre Love Triangle remains new orders most played radio song despite never reaching the top forty in either the US or the UK bizarre indeed but it was a bonus track on the substance collection that gave new order its first ever American top forty forty hit and again as with depeche mode going darker worked for new order true faith a Dumi dance anthem awesome with allusions to drug addiction and quote a childhood. I lost replaced by fear on quote peaked at number thirty two you in December of nineteen eighty-seven even the former members there's of bow house were beginning to find favour on the US airwaves love and rockets atro- that spun off from the Goth Band in one thousand nine hundred eighty five after its break-up produced a headier and Punchy your form of post punk in late nineteen eighty-seven there and thematic stomach fist pumping no new tale to tell found favor on American rock stations alongside the likes of Bruce Springsteen and Air Smith the song peaked at a remarkable number eighteen on billboard's album chart now but no uk post-punk alter rock band in the late eighties seemed to possess more promise or potential then then the cure even as band members cycled in and out of the lineup including on again off again and on again bassist Simon Gallup up and guitarist plural later Pearl Thompson Robert Smith remained the fixture the leader and the guiding force and his songs kept getting strong in early nineteen eighty-seven the cures first collection of singles standing on the beach quietly went gold in America ACA nearly a year after its release despite peaking on the billboard album chart at number forty eight in short even without a a top forty hit the cures secret army of US fans was growing three months after standing on a beach went gold the band issued its most ambitious album to date the double LP Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss me eighteen new songs all penned by Robert Smith who apparently had not lost his playful sense of him to this point the cure had scored virtually no hot one hundred hits to prior singles had bubbled under the chart chart and in one thousand nine hundred and five's inbetween days had spent a solitary week at number ninety nine but with why can't I be you the logjam began to break the horn inflected aren beef flavored and slightly lewd single broke into the middle of the hot one one hundred peaking at number fifty four in the summer of eighty seven that set up the cure for at last their top forty breakthrough just like heaven remains Robert. Smith's most acclaimed composition hailed by both rolling stone and Pitchfork magazine's as one of the greatest songs of the nineteen nineteen eighties a track that builds one instrument at a time has no lyrics for nearly a minute and deploys its title only wants at the very end this is the cures archetypal popson romantic but mournful giddy and loved one on the hot one hundred just like heaven reached number forty making it just barely the curious i American top forty hit reaching its peak the first week of January nineteen eighty eight by nineteen eighty-eight it was obvious alternative rock was serious business in the United States magazines like C M J trouser press and the Gavin report had been tracking. US College hits for most of the last decade and on MTV shows like the cutting edge and one hundred and twenty minutes have been showcasing indie leaning videos for several years the glossy surface of the popped machine lies the underground comic sparred in one hundred twenty minutes two hours into the future of new music every Sunday night at midnight eastern nine Pacific here on MTV while alternative rock was still no threat to the likes of Michael Jackson Madonna and Bruce Springsteen it could no longer be regarded as merely a poor relation to mainstream pop music if major rock acts like springsteen could have their own own album rock chart and dance acts like Madonna had a club play chart bands like the cure depeche mode and new order deserved a better yardstick of their growing cultural influence later that year billboard finally obliged the point the billboard modern rock tracks chart launched in September nineteen eighty eight it's very first week the number one song was by Post Punk and Goth rock doc veteran susie and the band she's there hit peekaboo topped a chart that featured and click variety of college radio favorites and all talk radio demigods from big audio dynamite to ten thousand maniacs information society to the Sugar Cubes Patti Patti Smith to the PSYCHEDELIC furs with with this chart launch billboard announced that Mass Market Alternative Culture was opened for business in essence as I often say music charts our feedback loops they reflect popularity not only in the music business but back to the music business which which then makes that music more popular from the day it launched the modern rock tracks chart affirmed not only that alternative rock was bigger than ever but that a lot of it came with a British accent this Brit rock to Germany would come to a head in nineteen eighty nine one by one each of the godfathers of UK Hey post-punk would score bigger hits than they had ever seen in America before new order got the ball rolling in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight new order spent several months on the island impose ib soaking up the burgeoning acid house and techno scenes and recording what became their most experimental club oriented oriented album they called it technique the first single fine time debuted on the modern rock chart in January nineteen eighteen eighty nine and flew into the top three remarkable for such a cutting edge track far from the rudiments of rock at the US dance clubs find time rose to number two becoming new orders biggest hit to date a few months later the follow up single round and round did even better rising to number one on the club play chart and number six at modern rock At a time when new orders hometown of Manchester Life was emerging as the center of rave culture and transforming into mad chester. The album was transmitting a SIMILAC ACLU of that scene to a suburban American audience new orders fellow Mancunians the smiths were already broken up by one thousand nine hundred eighty nine but their former lead singer had launched a solo career just in time to exploit the U S Modern Rock Boom Morris's first couple of Solo singles issued in Nineteen eighty-eight missed the launch of the modern rock chart by mere months but when last of the famous famous international playboys arrived in early eighty nine mas was welcomed onto the chart like cain playboys peaked at number three three in the spring of eighty nine

United Kingdom America smiths US New Order Robert Smith Martin Gore UK Alternative Rock Vince Clarke Robert Smith Nick Hornby Johnny Marr Sebastian Patti Patti Smith Los Angeles MTV Susie sue John Hughes Qatar
Radiohead's Ed O'Brien Talks 'Earth,' His New Solo Project As EOB

World Cafe

45:04 min | 9 months ago

Radiohead's Ed O'Brien Talks 'Earth,' His New Solo Project As EOB

"You're listening to World Cafe. I'm Rena Doris if there's one lesson I've taken from the last month or so of president change and self isolation it's that we human beings truly need each other. We've always known that we're social animals. But suddenly being unable to gather together it becomes even more obvious how deeply we crave that human connection. Well working on his debut solo album. Ed O'Brien was inspired by things. Like late night raves at music. Festivals and Brazil's carnival. And in our conversation he talks about those moments of community of understanding of us all being in it together. You may know Ed. O'brien as guitarist for the band radiohead. He's replaying music with his radiohead bandmates. Thom Yorke Jonny Greenwood call and Greenwood Phillips elway since their schooldays through the years some of those members of tried their hands at solo projects. And now it's Ed's turn. His new project goes by the name. E O B. The album is called Earth and we begin by listening to the lead single from the album and one of my favorite tracks of the year. So far this is Shangrila live ETA Brian. Welcome to World Cafe. Thank you thank you having me now. I hear a lot of songs doing this job. Lots of good ones but rarely does a song immediately grabbed me in the first five seconds as soon as Shangri la started the first time I ever heard it. I was hooked. It was so hooky. Well that's great. I mean I like a hook to I mean I. I think that song is yeah. I Yeah I love a hook little bleak. Okay I this is not technical. Language that little bleep loopy noise. Yeah what is that? That's me getting lost on my guitar. Pedals and a looping pedal okay and I. I don't know how it happened. It was one of those. I don't know how a lot of this happened again in Tibet. You you kind of get into musical space and you come out and I was literally four minutes eight. How out I get that loop and and you just get your thankful for it right and then you have to go. Recreate it Yeah but you know thankfully I've recorded it so put it so it's there forever. Good yes okay. So that Song Shangri La Shangri la it can refer to a few different things but you named it for a real place or a real thing at Glastonbury. The Music Festival. So what is Glastonbury? Shangri la for people who haven't been there before. Shangrila is basically the bit of glass in the corner of Glastonbury. That runs all night and it. It's it's it's this incredible space where people have been you know. They spent literally two months setting the sing up. And it's like walking into like a movie set if you like kind of a parallel universe and they'd go all sorts of Clubs Drum and Bass Techno. There's the biggest gay club in and biggest and supposedly best gay club in Europe At that time the happens in there and it's called the New York City download and it's basically you walk in. It's like it's like in New York City Club. And it's this corner of Glastonbury in IT'S SORTA. It runs once. All the bands have gone a played. It sort of like the beating heart and when I'm there four or five in the morning you'll there with e feel that you're there with your tribe with your people with your community right thousands of people and you know it. It isn't just about this place but it's about finding people you know when you when you've everybody everybody has everybody has a year and they come to glassman they all come in. It's a bit of a journey and it's it's sort of about yet. It's about celebrating and finding your people getting to that point. And you've played Glastonbury a few times as a member of radiohead. This is your first solo album and I read this quote that you said Tom. Johnson Phillip are making music. And I'm like the last thing. The world needs is a bleep album from me. What changed your mind. Well I mean the music started. I started writing. This music started happening. And I I literally I started as a sort of you know because I wanted to write but you can write music not release it And then I found the whole thing utterly compelling and bit by stage-by-stage Ego at she when you get to the Demo stagey thing I wanna do a proper album. I want to get and then you go. I won't album to be released so it was It was it was really was led by the music and the music music came. And I'd never had that that sort of that sort of burst of of musical creativity and I think a lot of it is also share time. You know I'm I'm I'm a father. My kids are now sixteen and fourteen but when they were young. I didn't want to be away. From you. Know I had radiohead which took up a lot of time. But I didn't want to be any any any more time away from my kids and my family my wife and I that felt like the most important thing more important than radiohead. You bring up my family and and so I think once the kids got donate sunny. There was space in in my life and and Kinda music fell into that and fill that space. Now I also I also read that there was a primal scream album that maybe had something to do with. Hit The your decision to make music of your own to make solo make solo album. You tell us what that album was. And what was it about it? That kind of inspired you. It was is grey album. Could scream at DELICA and I think it came out in the UK ninety one and it sort of came out. It was one of the great albums of this movement the rave and acid house culture which was a very important part of UK youth and music culture includes now in a it's an it's it became. Edm which is ubiquitous rights worldwide and. The album is first of all. It's very diverse. I love a diverse album but I think it was the first track moving on up and it was his idea of of coming out darkness into the light and I really that for me was was. That was what I latched onto. Is that sort of. It's almost gospel that song. And it's that thing of of of coming from a tough place and then coming to light and I felt was echoed. My feelings about the planet. What's going on the Planet Echo? There are echoes in my own life and other people's lives and I I just latched onto it. It was the first time I this is the kind of music I WANNA make. I'm GONNA play a little clip of that song from primal scream right now. Great no that was from primal scream album scream at delica. I am talking to Ed. O'brien about his new album earth. My name is Marina Delray. This is world cafe the next time. We're going to hear you do share your singing duties with you. Laura marling could you tell us about cloak of the night? Yeah Kaluka the night was I wanted. It closes the record. I wanted the there. Were there elements you know? There's there's this kind of expensive rhythmic element and sort of resilient rave kind of feeling to some some of the songs and but I also like I love folk music and I felt very much in particularly. I spend a lot of time in Wales in Britain. Which is this beautiful old part of the world if you like Celtic. It's very to reduce it for those who don't know. What sort of game of thrones e right and you feel this music and interestingly enough a lot of Where where I go to Wales. Robert Plan has a house owner and Yan him and Jimmy. Page wrote a lot of led Zeppelin. Three and four. Apparently At this house and it's well documented but this music feels like it's old and and I wanted to make something that felt like it this so this this songs of came from that place and it's just a very intimate song With me playing guitar and singing and Laura singing we just. We had an afternoon. She came over to the studio in in Williston in London. And I think we did about four or five times. You know. It's amazing when you play with somebody. These great musicians and I was fortunate I had I played with a number of them on the record that they kind of. Raise your game as well. So Yeah it was it was. It was a real moment. This is cloak of the night. Ed O'Brien unrolled cafe Me Long leave from me clear. This is world cafe. I'm Raina Doris. You just heard cook the night that Ed O'Brien and Laura Marling from Ed O'Brien's new album birth. A lot of people might know you. From your work with radiohead. How did you manage to write and record this solo album? With the demands of being in a band radiohead because I imagine there are quite a few demands. Yeah well I mean what happened. Was I started the writing process and I download and just when I was ready to. I got all my songs. Ready to demos like radiohead time and it was So I had everything ready by about twenty fourteen. The September two thousand fourteen and then then radio had we go into the studio. We make a moon shaped pool. And with the touring cycle that basically takes me. It's kind of like A. It's three and a half years. It's it takes a year and a bit to make an album. Then you got the release. And you got this subsequent touring so it's a matter of fact. But here's the other thing. I'm very very lucky. Because you know radiohead. We've only made two albums in the last ten years when not in the most prolific point of our of our lifetimes in terms of music. I wouldn't have been able to do this fifteen years ago because this needed this needed. Good amount time to accord and also torso. Now everybody's doing stuff and radiohead so there's time to do which is great. Let's go back to that sort of fifteen years ago or or even further like i WanNa talk about when you were playing guitar and radio had all the time. And the first few albums of radiohead put out. They were really guitar. Heavy like more of a rock band like in the Benz. I'm just GONNA play a little clip of that. People can hear it takes. So that's from Ben's radiohead but as people who know the ban. No the sound kind of changed around kid a an easy to play a little clip of that so people can hear it. F. FCC wrong there's a clip of everything in its right place from kit. A that wasn't as guitar focused and I was wondering if you could talk about how you adapted as a guitar player in radiohead as Band's sound evolved. Yes it's it's a good one. She because you know the the the it was a significant shift in around the time of day and and initiate was. We tried the guitar stuff. But we just weren't feeling it and Tom was listening to a lot of Bands and stuff music boards of Canada a of electronic music and square pushing stuff. Like this and this really kind of we recalibrated so initially my thing was like what do I do because Johnny can play keyboards? He's a multi instrumentalists. Can Tom And I was you know it for what it does. Is it forces you to look at your instrument and another way. I always love Sonic Youth and Sonic. Youth never played the guitar in Sylva Traditional Way. You know they might have a screwdriver halfway down the neck and that made a sound a certain sound. So when I what I had to do I had to rethink up of light rather than six strings. This is a bit like if I use this guitar with it guitar pedals. Which essentially sort of make your sound sound different for those. Who Don't know if I can do that. And it's just treated as almost like a sore sound not as like a distorted grungy or whatever sound if is treated like that and then once you once you rethink here. It's like it's like walking into another apparel university sunny. The the options renison. You'll get tired doesn't have to sound like Tom. I did all sorts of without getting tacky. I did all sorts of stuff in With you know modified guitar and so that it it sounded so it didn't sound like a guitar and then I bought Various Guitar pedals and it was great because it was an opportunity in and I think that's familiar. Start thing when when you are in moments of extreme discomfort rather than kind of guerrilla had enough of this okay. How can I be better here? That's the right place to be as an artist. Because it means you're growing you're doing stuff you haven't done before. And that's important Is there a radiohead song? That illustrates sort of where you I went out of your comfort zone where you I experimented with pedals and effects and you're like this is really working. Well Yeah I mean I. It's it's it's pretty out there but it's it's a track on kid. Ako Tree fingers is basically. That's my guitar. Sound and Thomas just sampled bit some sort of arranged it which is great to degrade arrangement. But that's that's that's guitar. We're going to hear a little bit of three fingers right now. There is true fingers from radiohead. I am talking to Ed. O'brien you might know him from radiohead heat now. A Solo album called Earth. Are there things that you get to do on earth ways that you get to stretch out now that you don't really get to do when you're working on radiohead stuff musically? What what's the most exciting part for you musically playing bass? Oh Yeah I love Playing Bass and Colin. Such great baseball But the best part I mean. Singing is singing his. I haven't got to the point when I'm really enjoying it but I'm I'm doing it more and more so I I'm an also just just that kind of freedom to I think the buck stops with me as they say in an and I and for me I had to learn that actually. I know that sounds strange but about halfway through the album. I had to sort of like what's my truth. What do I really feel about rather than serve deferring to flood or the production team? What do I feel an untrusting? Y fell on going. You know what this is right. This is world cafe. I'm Raina Doris speaking to Ed. O'brien so at I'd love if you could take us back to when you were young and tell me about the town that you grew up in okay. So the first ten years of my life I lived in Oxford which is a very very very sort of academic Very traditional place Old Very beautiful and then I moved out to the countryside which is probably the bit. That's most formative. My parents split up. We moved out to to about half an hour outside to this area on the edge of the cotton. Swabs de if have you heard of the cuts world. I've heard of them. I've never been year again. It's very old and I'm sort of five miles from this. This place called the F. Ing ten white horse. Which is this horse from going back to the Bronze Age? That's that's beautiful that That sculpted out of the out the land there and I sort of it was pretty. There wasn't much to do. And I think that's partly and there was a lot of downtime was working full-time She's an osteopath. So you know when I wasn't at school that was not a lot to do and that's when sort of music really really bit. You know I I was at school. I was about fourteen fifteen. My Mom gave me an acoustic guitar for Christmas and I didn't really know how to I didn't really know how to do it and So we're talking about nineteen eighty four sows. The music. I was into a kind of Is Really into the Smith? And he had a guess. I was really into U2. Echina- bunny man rem all the usuals That was kind of And it was my first kind of musical steps will really learning within the band because I was. Tom and Colin were in the year below me at school. Philip was in the air. Buff me but I knew Tom. And call-in we all did. We'll spend a lot time over in the kind of the theater musical department. I did a lot of acting. They were they. They also were in school. Plays and we got to know one another. You did acting sorry I have to stop. What flavor you in? What did you is coming out? What did we do? You know being a British private school. We did loads of Shakespeare so we did twelfth night. I did Julius We did midsummer night's dream. We also did David Copperfield. I was in I was I felt like we. Did you know I listened? A lot of the reason I acted initially was because we were all boy school I was. We used to do with the goal school next door so there was a chance to meet girls so that was We didn't we didn't put on the greatest place they were. You know very traditional enjoyed. I really enjoyed it. I mean they could let my kids just put on Les Mis and it was fantastic and yeah. I know it was really really. It was really amazing and We didn't quite a quite have. I don't think we had that the acting talent. That's a pool that stuff. They missed a pretty high production value. Sort of our honestly I I was I is. I don't know how this all three hours and it was extraordinarily well. I could not believe it so you so you can find each other in school. Can you tell us a little bit about your band on a Friday? Yes Demo floating around on Youtube from nine hundred eighty six. I'm looking at. The settlers are not this at the track list of the the demo here lemming trail fragile friend girl in the purple dress locked. The door I like and in the preamble. The door was pretty good. That was. Let's they're locked the door on for a second song. This is world cafe. I'm speaking to Ed O'Brien on a Friday. It was a great time. You know it was. We called on a Friday because we rehearsed every Friday. I think yeah terrible. It was it was totally for me. I mean when I even from the first rehearsal and we did see on the first rehearsal and I think of the present band only means home with it That will call him. Wasn't joined on bass yet but we did a cover version of the cult. She sells sanctuary. That had just come out. That was the big song. Summer Summer. Eighty five so we did a cover of that and that was easy and Tom could do the rift ban. I could do the strumming g chord in the chorus because I had an acoustic and he had an electric as well So it was it was for me was that it was suddenly kind of as a teenage kid. I was definitely a bit lost You know look. Teenagers are and it was. Suddenly everything went into focus and it became the most important thing in my life and it didn't matter or else was going on. I had this band and it was kind of it was it was my life support system and it was the thing that gave me hope and it was and it was that thing of like well. I think we knew even then as the once schools finish. And you know we'll go to college and wants colleges finished. Let's let's let's give it a go and then that band dino became radio even to huge success and I think it's kind of interesting because eventually you had your own family you had your kids and something else did matter and you were considering leaving the band. Yeah and I hear you got some advice from some other rock and Roll Dad's about that when you're thinking of leaving. Because he wanted to spend more time with your family. What was that advice? And who did you get it from from Neil Finn Crowded House and he's listening claimed fleetwood Mac and Johnny Marr on and they familiar like soft older brothers and and I seen the way that they you know. They got amazing. Kids kids are now grown up. I saw them when they were very little. And I was really struggling with this whole thing. I remember when noon and my daughter who was born in two thousand six came into the tour of America for six weeks and it literally broke. My heart is crying on the way over. You know. Put the shades on in the Hoodie up and light blubbing my eyes out. I didn't WANNA leave them. I had this you know and And I was like going to you know what I think. I think this is time for me and I was in New Zealand. Doing this thing with The single seven worlds collide. Neil brings all these musicians together. Wilco came unless talking just riffing with Joanie and Neon I was just telling them about this and And they they were very sympathetic and they listened but Neil is brilliant. Neil said L- listeners. I WANNA give. You'll kids when they're teenagers are not gonNA thank you for leaving radio to spend more time with them. You may have a point in time. You know as they said they said. Listen when your home your home when your way your way but you know you. We're lucky musicians because you know a lot of men a lot of people mothers and stuff. They leave the house early. They get bat late. And how much time do they really get to spend with their kids whereas you know I might be away for four or five weeks but when I'm I'm really back and I'm you know and so it was just a shift you know? Psa shift in perspective and it was kind of. I think it was probably a bit tied and probably feeding a little bit. Sorry for myself and probably being overly dramatic. I am talking to Ed. O'brien about his new album earth. My Name is brain address. This is World Cafe so in two thousand twelve. I mean you you have this family. That you're working with radiohead all the time. You moved to Brazil What prompted that move just really love of South America particularly Brazil and the kind of the the the the desire to have an extraordinary adventure with my young family. And I I I'm I'm I've lived such a blessed life in terms of of enough. Got The golden ticket. I mean you know this great band. I'm I'm musician. But I felt like I've had all these amazing experiences with radiohead and traveled around the world. And I wanted to have an amazing experience with my family my young family and so I said to the guys I said you know previous. I set back in two thousand seven. I said in two thousand twelve I WANNA take a year out and and and travel a goat South American live with my family and You know and it was it was. It was an amazing experience to be immersed and we weren't living in a big city living very rurally on the edge of the rainforest Metro Atlantic which is in Sao Paulo State. And we were living on the edge of a farm. And you know there's no mobile signal. There's a Wifi signal about twenty minutes down the track and and also Brazil I love. I Love Brazilian music and so I was able to be in that culture and of course rhythm plays a huge part in Brazilian musical culture and that fell again. I wanted him. We were lucky to go to Carnival in Rio and experienced that and I was sort of whatever I'm going to do has to have this element of rhythm and the thing is rhythm. There is lots of people banging stuff and he doesn't have to be like a drum playing a drum kit. It's like people shaking shockers banging on upturned plastic bins. You know all that stuff and that felt that fell that fed itself into the music as well as it was. It was just an extraordinary experience to be in a culture as well. Listen I'm a I'm a British guy and you know you Americans know us. Brits like cutting we can be a little bit uptight right. I come from I come from. I come from Oxford which is a very head place very kind of academic place I needed to be in a country. That was all heart. And that's when you it's like shedding skin. You go to that culture and you sort of just just you just kind of. Melt. It's beautiful so it was a it was a really it has been. We still back on that time as a time of absolutely magic. Say You were intrigued by Brazil or South America for a long time. That's something that how long how long. Well what was it? That that UH South America you know. I'm a big soccer fan. So inevitably the South American football. There's something beautiful the way the Brazilians played. So there's there are always since a kid but when we were making only making when we finished okay compete back in ninety seven. And we were touring. I was in a really really low place which you probably think is crazy because you this ban. May this recco was in a really really really low place and I was suffering from depression and all this stuff and the one music that that kind of cut through. This was Brazilian. And I don't know why and I got this compilation. That had had a lot of the early Bossa Nova stuff in the Tropicalia stuff. Which was this period in the sixties? it started with sort of in the famous Swells you better stand gats all that. And then by the end of the by the end of the sixties you had all these incredible musicians like Josiah ban and Caetano Veloso and awesome tantai's name. They've kind of fused SAMBA. Which is the the sort of the inherent beat on music of Brazil with connaught West Psychedelia Jimi Hendrix and oversee the Beatles and the stones and so that that music really in a way I there was something about it and I. I don't know quite how to analyze it but it really it sort of pulled pulled me in and that's my fascination with Brazil and so my wife Couple of years later we started traveling to Brazil. Me To to the kids when we very young and it was just the culture. There's a lot of love in the air. You know there's a lot there's a lot of it's hard as well and take you. What's going on at the moment but when we were there it was really an an upturn and things were looking good and and Yeah it was e- You don't know isn't it? Some you know we all go places and we don't know why we resonate with someplace. I resonate as well with the southwest of this country. I love being in New Mexico. I don't know why do you do you do. It makes me feel really happy. And these vast you know that the color of youth and the color of the light right. Yeah you know when. Their license plates New Mexico called the land of enchantment which I've always really loved that's good makes a Lotta Sense. Maybe everybody's enchant and I was wondering if you could pick a piece of Brazilian music for us to play right now. So get an idea of what? You're talking about shoo. Why don't we visit? There's a great song by Georgie Ben. And it's called Bob Achieve Bora. Let's take a listen. Nobody sharing nowhere laughing to me. One need a faucet. That's the bad team. I'm speaking to Idaho Brian. This is world cafe. We're GONNA play your song. Brazil next and so you did go to the Carnival Carnival as you say Wolpert. Yes and could you describe that experience of what you felt being at carnival? Yeah I am well. So if the the way that it's structured as you have I six Samba schools and these schools a literally their four thousand five thousand people and they've been practicing all year and they've got they have this long has mile and a half what they call the sambadrome. This kind of road. That's flanked by stands and bleachers along it and they have an hour and a half and these extraordinary huge floats and each summer. School has a theme and they've also got music and you know it's teamed with people. Just look it up on you look it up on Youtube or whatever and you see these. Hundreds of people playing percussion of people dancing. It's extraordinary and it runs through the night so the starts at ten and it finishes at six in the morning and it's the sort of you know when you have to understand about carnival is that it's sort of been setup for Brazilians. It's like the Safety Valve on society. Because in most Brazilians have traditionally of lived really really really hard lives. I mean poverties been huge and and and the carnival is that period of four five days. Is the time literally where anything goes? It's kind of this down tools. Nobody works everybody celebrates so it's a really really important part of the year and I think it's something that everybody looks looks forward to so it feels like this huge outpouring of love. It's like to me was it wasn't too dissimilar. In a way the feeling of the rave culture the that hit Britain an eighteen nine and it was that thing of being together celebrating being a human being on this planet at this time In spite of all the darkness. You know all the challenges. It's like come on tonight. We just GONNA. We're GONNA dance all way through it and I just found the whole thing. I mean me and my wife went. We was just extraordinarily go to bed and he. Now you've still got the you've got the boom boom condom pulse of of SAMBA. Which runs a certain BPM? And it's just I'd never experienced anything like it's like this huge outpouring of light and love and totally intoxicating. Just just uttley magic. He couldn't help but notice. Brazil inspired by the carnival. Shangrila inspired by Glastonbury a rave culture. These are places where you're surrounded by thousands or hundreds of thousands of people. I think for some people that would be kind of an anxiety provoking thing but you seem to find a lot of joy there and I was wondering Aside from the rhythm and music what is it about these big crowds huge gatherings that are inspiring to you? That's really interesting. Never ever thought about that. I think it's you know Olympic. Don't get me wrong. I'm not a fan of huge crowds. Either but I think it's. It's that thing when people become sort of Ino. We become like an organism. If you like of many parts in there sort of what the music get music can kind of get people into a hypnotic state and I think it's I think it's Madonna whether it's the huge crowds but I think it's the element of you can turn round to someone you've never met in your life and you can have a meaningful look or meaningful conversation or a small. Gino those times when you when you know that you are in the midst of something and it's bigger than you. It's bigger than you know and I think that's what that's kind of what it's about it's about it's about connection. That's what it's about and I think that for me is the biggest thing about this record and what I'm what I'm seeking is is the the reminder of these these places reminder how we are all connected we are connected with one another. We are connected with our planet and the problem with modern. Living is an particular urban living is we are all so disconnected from one another. And that's not. Our Fall is just the way that things are imposed on us in the structure in the form of our lives but actually fundamentally deep down. We're all connected and I think that's the that's the thing that I I long for. That's the thing is. Is that that deep memory that knowing that we are we're gonNA play a bit of that song now so people can hear what How that all inspired you? This is Brazil from Ed O'Brien's solo album girth took. That was Brazil from Ed O'Brien's new solo album earth. I'm Raina DERAs talking to add here on world cafe. I read that the working title for this album was the pale. Blue Dot a reference to something scientists. Carl Sagan wrote but a photo of the earth taken from space where the earth looks like eight tiny little pixel a pill dot. What is the significance of the pill? Blue Dot to you. Ed I think that Foto and those words are increasingly Pertinent to the Times that we're living in and I it was this perspective of the Earth. What he says basically this is your. This is our home. This is what we call home every war. That's been full. You know every I employ people who are interested. Read these words because it feels so at the moment in this time of Oughta craziness and and and you know we're in a climate emergency And and the way that we sort of as a planet we we sort of get embroiled in the detail and actually there's a bigger perspective and if an if we can I'm for me. It feels like if we can get that big perspective. That's when we can start healing the planet and ourselves and it's interesting one of the people that I was fortunate to to me along the way and he's become a a a friend is is the astronaut. Mike Massimino. Who is he went on the space shuttle twice? He was the guy that fixed the the Hubble and he talks about a lot of astronauts. Talk about this. This thing called the overview effect of the planet that you get into orbit and you look down and you go. Oh my God. This planet is so beautiful. It's so precious. It's a jewel. It's a blue jewel and that was another thing. I'm that's how I feel about this plan on a think met. We're all waking up to this this precious thing this thing that we've taken for granted for particular the last two hundred years within we can mine it. We can do whatever we want with entreated we can treat it like you know the sees like a trash can or whatever the no ECON and actually where really really important part of the history of humanity because we can. We can literally become extinct. If we carry on light we are all we recognize the beauty and blessedness that we have with this and and treat her all her animals and plants and everything with respect for me that that perspective what. Carl Sagan says in those in those those worlds is a few words is just just the most pertinent and beautiful words an an APP for out front for this time and it just it resonated and I wanted to call the album the Pale blue dot but I think the Sagan estate understandably pretty tight on this stuff and I think there's a film coming out with Reese Witherspoon cooled the Pale blue dot. There's all this stuff. I thought this is lovely little secret. I had this kind of this little gem that you discover well the great thing is that lots of people reading this and seeing that photon and having the same response that I had to those words and voter. I think it's interesting because so much of your album. is about community. There's the idea of like the rave at Shangri la the kind of all in Brazil. What what is that connection to you between the experience at a rave or a carnival to the idea of earth or or the dot about is about connection. Because those places. You suddenly feel reconnected with one. Another with your fellow human beings and I know there'll be people listening to this and they go. He is just a bloody hippie Ina and I've done it before my in my past but you know it's a funny thing I as a musician in I've been doing this very very fortunately for about I don't know nitty thirty years. It feels more important. It feels more important musician now than any time in the last thirty years. Because I you know that thing of bringing people together and that's you know before I didn't really think that you know I was just giggle. Whatever actually it feels particularly times of division where people have been more polarized and sides of being drawn music or musician. Amazing thing that it can bring people together and people can have shed experiences and that feels a really important and powerful thing at the moment absolutely I mean I know personally having been to festivals and looking around and seeing people around you reacting to music together as a unit it can be very very powerful thing. It's something that I've gone home with more than a few notes in my phone saying maybe music will save us. No I totally INA. And it's funny thing you come away from this and you feel reconnected. And it's only the daily grind of life that's slights you'd starts to it. It gets you so within a month. You're like what happened. I can't remember how I felt there right. And Yeah I mean that's and that that's why these things are really important because they're a reminder of how we actually are. I think that's the natural state that Sun Natural. You know. Stay of being human being on this planet adver GonNa Finish up by playing one of your new tracks one that ties into that space. The That you said was inspired by your friend who was an astronaut Do you want to quickly. Is there anything else? You'd like to say about mass before he played I I mean I. It was a response some. It I was. I was telling Mike we did a show last week and he was saying and I told him about this he said we went to. I'd met him On After radiohead show because his daughter had given him a copy of in rainbows. Take up space and I said you know you meet lots of famous musicians but you never me an astronaut right and and so became friendly and then about five years ago the kids who are a little too halftime took them to the local. Max To watch this this NASA film that they made on the Imax. Cool Tom Hubble and it was when they recommissioned the space shuttle to do one final trip to fix the space telescope Hubble Space Telescope. And we're watching. An Mike's that masters in Mass Amina on what? Oh my God. That's Mike I know that guy and it was extraordinary. I mean there was that connection with him but even more so. This film is so extraordinary. Because you get a sense of you because it's it's the cameras following him and he's fixing. The telescope is as their orbiting around the earth. And I came out there now afternoon. This song came out and it was because it again looking. I felt this looking down on this. Most beautiful thing this planet it the color of Eh. Something quite magical about it and you feel it and I found it so powerful in this song sort of came out. So it's a it's it's it's a song from space looking down upon the earth and the beauty of it. This is mass from Ed. O'brien you just heard mass from Ed. O'brien his new album earth. Ed Thank you so much for coming by the cafe today and talking to me about this. We'll thank you so much for what wonderful questions. I've really enjoyed it. Thank you. It's been such a pleasure. Thank you for the record and take care. Thank you you too. I'm rain address. We'll be back in a moment on world cafe.

Ed O'Brien World Cafe the Times radiohead Brazil Tom Hubble Glastonbury Song Shangri La Shangri la Mike Massimino Laura marling Raina Doris Wales Youtube New York City Europe Georgie Ben Oxford Johnny Marr Rena Doris Bass Techno
New Romantic with Dylan Jones, White Riot, Idles, Fleet Foxes

Bigmouth

1:02:30 hr | 3 months ago

New Romantic with Dylan Jones, White Riot, Idles, Fleet Foxes

"Hi, this is Cara Swisher and I wanNA, talk to you about my new podcast for the New York Times called sway. If you WANNA, know what people who hold power in our world are really all about need to hear how they answer the tough questions and that is my specialty, and although it might get messy as it always does it's also going to be really fun. You can get swayed wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes are available Mondays and Thursdays. Aw. Welcome to big mouth the pop culture podcast that seeks the truth things that really matter music films on tally. I'm sean pattern over there is under Harrison Andrew. How are you? Alright thank you sean. Keeping busy keeping the bull from the dog must've speaking ask I don't really imagine that you lounge around ever. Anyway. Always busy, we try not to talk about the non masks in rock because they're stupid. But can we just say a cheery hip hip for Johnny Marr who seen on twitter in his mask? This S I'm holding of policies of zero skin Johnny Morris Johnny. Moore is my lodestone on the person that I just you know I tend to ask myself what with Johnny do each just tends to be right about things. So hats off to Johnny and she'll know gallagher show. So playing gallagher show also van Morrissey with Secretary. And Victor Masks APPs innately go away now. Anyway, we must is on the show this week I'll today's big mouth. Wake me up. Before you Pogo we've got a double helping of Punk, as idols released their third album ultra mono and remount Joe. Talbot. Is Back to resume smorgasbord of injustice corruption, power, toxic masculinity, and Love Fuck you love he'd class what will in pokes think of this and to continue off the Rebecca's documentary white riots exploring the Rock Against Racism Movement of the late Nineteen Seventies, national fronts and far right politics are on the rise water rights side banged a London lefties ball's going to do about it and Kinda get mcclatch. Tom Robinson still pulse an x Ray. specs on board spoiler yes. They can all that parallels. For today we even need to ask Plus Fox News the night Sadr Oregon the pumpkin spice laser in the books that you called visit and fleet foxes just put out a surprise equinox album shore as in the beach not as ensure Jan, what is lockdown confinement New York and being in your thirties don't front man for this project Soul Fox Robin Peck mauled shown WHO's on a panel to discuss these masses off I. Guess for tens to big math after a long absence Travis Elba is a writer author and cultural commentator whose books include the bus we loved history of the master the long player by she's a tribute to vote. And Walk in the park a love letter to public parks ray for them. He's also broadcast a screenwriter regular cultural event host looks like he comes straight out of an episode of the avengers and I try. To big mouth. La. End You. Looking. I'm saying you is. One of those where he gray is good or is he bad? Star of one of the EPS who. Have Glittering Hollywood career obviously. You've been writing about see lands about Sealand the Mike, Coronation in the North Sea tell us more. While I mean seond is this the fascinating a second world will foot out in the Thames estuary this role, the man Cap Essex family claimed starting out in the up as a pirate radio station, the the families fleeting you left my brain. Now analysts did of members from the Radio Caroline to take over and instead of coup exists. This quasar I autonomous national out in the tens astronauts disputed status. Is a new book out about very thorough. But by by an American writer, he sees seon does kind of emblem of slightly. So the possible him little man against this big state. fascinating oddity. It outside dog history as well. It was. A coup by some of its Dutch and German. He's still claiming the kingdom. And have civilizations with the fall right and so and. Early. Cyber rebel a platform black clad American internet libertarians has as. Good. Really. Fascinating story in the book is is Approximately two in in places. Here. Rather wrote about some families about businesses I mean them their money's in Kach Ling. Old on the point that I made in the review is that it is wrong the like these curious settlements were made in sort of Cam, the island where people could called out pioneers style. The rodents homestead these on these unwanted industrial wastelands of Essex unseal seems kind of larger than life. Instead. Of of that. Yes this is very much. Your wheelhouse isn't it the psycho geography the location we get bit pop culture in as well. Yeah. I mean I think. My ambit- you've written, is it three books about maps and you've been in fact to maps during the last few months travel has been restricted incentives. What's the lure of that then? I mean the the lure of map is. The set of cliche thing I say about maps in ways that we we read maps the store in under the representations of reality they're not reality itself. Has Lots of political content in maps as well. We the Britain was this swathe of pink on on old maps, the representing the empire, and historically there are things like the Romans where the interested in maps of their own empire in one bit wasn't as and chilling a similarly in its early pictorial representation, just a map of itself with the sort of. Have is not interested in whole. hippie dragons stuff. You had whereas the mariners. So I think there's an element of. Even Makita, the great created maps, his maps the method of to try and represent essentially a three dimensional universe on a two dimensional map. It warps reality changes in my but originally his maps when will useful and quote unquote more accurate at the time they went down really badly because they didn't have older sort of seen monsters in the national is. Sons later a bit of A. It was only after his death when republished the slightly jazzy format they sort of took off. I, guess it's just a lot of the atlas I've done sue vanishing places with the most recent one partly about these neglected corners with of of the world or things anticipating or or in ruin. So there's a slight. Resonance, in a way with all of their about las twelve oaks and cdot coded climate thinking about what may be considered surplus to requirements. In the way that May, one of the places that I've been writing about recently is this huge Methodist Church in Gary Indiana Carry Indiana was was a steel town. It was created in nineteen, ninety, six by US steel. So Half Plan Hawk on plans at this, we'd topography about it but in its peak in the nineteen sixties, it had a population of one, hundred, seventy, eight, thousand, including, of course, Michael Jackson's Dad. Worked for US steel, but had it was it was somewhere in a lots of great migration from the south but it was. Kind of horrifically segregated city in in in laws respect right in this particular church was a city Universal Methodist Church it's a real minister was trying to. Promote integration. He was one of the full ministers in the tunnel actually objected Saudi, Ron tune screenings of both of the nation because they felt that it would evoke kind of racial tension. This church is huge huge took, but it also had a sexual center was going to have a cafeteria or in a roof garden with the idea was it would be this huge sent through of Gary Indiana but in the end, he sort of got ousted the church. Didn't become as aggressive as could have could have done in in the end dwindled away McCain this the White, family? Church. So you've been really delving into his stuff over the last year. Yeah absolutely. It's as fussing we go for hours Andre Who's our other guest also rejoining us is the editor of Geeky magazine Dillon Jones is an accomplished in lifelong. London got about the face arena at the Sunday Times Day is Eddie magazine. He hasn't done. He's written books on topics as diverse as David Bowie the ipod David Cameron and Wichita Lineman not all about the same time but it might be fair to say that he was born to writes his latest, which is out this week sweet dreams from country to. Style culture the story of the new. Romantics. Is a comprehensive oral history of the world of cancer eyeliner pillbox hats not needing this pressure on unpreferred of teacher sex and I can testify that it is a right riveting read. If were provincial Lincoln days of show again, the capital how Dylan how you doing welcome back I'm doing very well it's great. It's. Great to be here, entry congratulations you'll number one in Elettronica and number two music history on Amazon. It's press week. So the moment has arrived, but you were there. This isn't this is not a Maximov post recession this year at Chelsea School of art and site mountains. You'll hijacking around beat written blitzing billy's what did you write this book right now? Because I think it's a period which has been gotten about if you consider the number of books that have been written by journalists and pulp historians about. Hip Hop. On Jazz any genre of music there's almost nothing about this period and it's also appeared that sort of ridiculed on television it's become there was a period when people used to laugh at the seventies in saying that it was the the decade that tastes got but for the last ten or fifteen years, the ages has become the decade which. I wanted to write two reasons aid because I think. Apart from that period in the sixties between sixty four and sixty eight I think that the period between seventy eight, seventy, nine, eight, hundred, three's probably the greatest period of the British pot single. And secondly, which is something that isn't really explored I. Think it was raining incredible period of humanism. This period is always demonized reductive way is being. Shrill it superior style styling content, it Cetera et Cetera et Cetera, and actually I wanted to try and reclaim to present a case for it not being true. Yeah. I've ridden a thoroughly enjoying it to the extent that it sounds so far away that I find myself asking God did this really happen did people really takeover filthy nowhere nightclubs and? Dress up in ways that would have made why Mar Germany blush it's either with that distance you you do find it quite. Well the other thing is if you look at the simple while the sort of sense us, big electronic the time. I, think it's easy to forget that in fact, fellow keys quoted in the book and saying that. I could make more noise. It's something like could make more noise on a cable. We WanNA, finger than anyone could with three codes. So you did have that sort of punk sensibility that get up and go us of anybody can do anything because I think people forget that the music like any other awful. It's marriage between ambition and ability, and that's where I think a lot of the charm an load, the immediacy of this music comes from. Talk about sweetjames more in a minute. I. Mall Death what I ask you to choose the to set the scene. But we do that we'll have you chosen on why it's the motorbike by craftwork aid because crosswalk the sort of Lodestar in the same way that the sex fit everything in the rock world. Came from the sex pistols inserted in the pace. Everything. In this will really from crosswalk. The modal because it it was. It's it's very reflective of the sort of club scene at the time and it's and it's one of those records with both underground hit and also be commercial eventually, and he's very wry as well as me. It's not just simply stateful praise of the of the model and peacock it's sort of lift the curtain a little bit until has ironic sideways lookouts which supposed invented irony as well. We have not irony until I I think everything off what Ronnie they all pretty much gold of everything. They upset L. have a listen in case you don't know inside out which, of course you do. Okay Bye Bye. Other. Line. Dylan what was your outfit in uniform futures reminded weekend? Where would you be calling in? What would you be sporting a you? You would desperate to different every night and also everybody went to order the clubs over the clubs women to we got trash from Oxfam. We. So to pleading, we will deem up Clinton's with. She will give when you came back from the wolves and we also dead men's closed because obviously that was period when Oxfam shots were just full of suits will in by the recently dead. Quite quite a strange sort of surreal element to this I think a lot of it was that we spent two years. Going to fantastic clubs listening to punk music and my uniform was a pair of jeans some dam shoes, a leather jacket in variety of t shirts, and it became sort of you want me to step out to that and they were. It was a sort of a lack of ambition bound I think that a lot of this is. Wanting something that didn't belong to US and dressing up with very strong part of that. I mean you're a huge ferry funded you have a particular item of clothing. This is my I mean. Look different every I believe you must go to. Probably this is the new Dylan. See now you you're doing the same thing that other people do you're not taking the period series I'm taking it. Seriously because. They'll make them off. That's what I want to. A white dinner jacket and actually I think a white dinner jacket and a black Bowtie. which in the pump trump's to central London in one thousand, nine, hundred, Fifty, eight was quite daring look. But some snare as really interesting point because this world came from Bowie ferry came from those two curry existing sort of glam world's. He's obviously the bigger artists an had more h He was more talented, but ferry had a very particular way of portraying ambition and that's why I think people were fascinated by him because most of the people involved in scene were working class low middle class and ferry painted a very obvious idea of gentrification of being successful but I think it's interesting by the time you reached the mid eighties not only is it very parent the ferries talent is finite but also the world that he was presenting I think a lot of people sorta become aware of it or will perhaps moving in his in. Those worlds anyway, insult that has to be more to culture than this thing I really like, but it's not that you get a very deep dive into every band and it's not just the cold spans under an we got very deep dive on our end day and ABC my personal favorite from the bid on soft sal. You do approach it very much for what you know what the way, the music drives they anti thing. It's not just a bunch of peacocking individuals when you run into some of these people that you would have been Ruben shoulders where blitzer bellies at a distance of foresee years. Did anybody did anybody bridal at bull wants to rewrite history riches to be settled for the various characters might have accidentally built a cocktail on in the days? There were a couple of people who wanted to to settle schools. I mean I wanted to write about that period and so on. rested in their experiences in that period not forty years later here. Is the. Number people won't. But I didn't use any of that because that wasn't relevant. To to the period but what I did enjoy with the source of the fanaticism, the people had. Lots of people in in this book, I've known for very long time. Some of them I haven't seen forty is in some like never met before never met. Martin Friday missile out I was playing away by. A very nice person but also the the way that he espoused his passion at the time and what he was trying to create with ABC with brilliant. He's a really thoughtful guy and he knew exactly what he was doing and it to the extent that if a to me, he's like kind of he's in the framework in that it was because the whole thing is is in his head and he wants to bring it to fruition. He's also really fully event a A. Another thing, a little book is so many fully bits in a particularly amused at the idea of PTO writing the new seriousness. Biz In the book is, when is when David Hepworth is is talking about a strip cartoon they ran on. Yes. Magazine about the humanly and they gave everybody in Philip. He's House that sort of that sort of the same headquarters. All the had. Even his pets had the same. On this kind of touch with with with with with comic genius I think yes I was reading bits. Last night. Going to believe this. Dimly remember this tape, there was a fantastic. The what line is just brilliant Malcolm mccaren guessing fired from his job as a wine taster and is both result you'll does not fit to work in this firm he's smoking foreign cigarettes of. Britain in the seventies completely at all over. But one another thing that really stood out was the accent extent to which. I hated each other spongebob hate to Duran Duran Duran Duran? Valley McCowan says we hated all of them. So there was a there is a great competitiveness in which produces map mess and comic scenes such as Nick Rhodes and the video for Rio saying I hate boats unless that tied on him having cocktails on them. What favorite is is Gary Kemp. He's obviously very, very good on this theory are very. Very funny and he describes the Spandau Duran Duran I made snap poll in somewhere in Europe and that by coming back from some European TV show and that both coming to the recording of abandoned record and they sort of rushed to get that. Both turn up next day in dressed in finery in taxicab etc.. Realize they got a and they realize they see steam walking around the corner with a copy of the Guardian under when they got. That's what we should have done. It does melt down the extent to which all of these bounds understood presentation on understood that your job was to be pop stars first and foremost an part of the public square unto shocking disgrace in the public. Square and also to make records and a hat with jokes cry out in the book is while the standard criticism, the standard sort of inky handed. Harry music press criticism was well, this is just thatcherism in action. Isn't it they just want to get successful and it's purely individualism. The late Stephen Wells go blessed would get quite angry about many things but he would also also looked ram because I went on about Bang unapologetically all the Dole how do you? How do you think that they the sorts of full year old criticism that this was essentially the pop music? How does that stand up? We'll this is something that I actually was. Aware of time because because I was there, I was living in squats, anew. These people going to notice clubs these bands in that sort of infancy and apart from Gary Numan he was announcing out Torey. Everyone involved in the same would have been horrified. If you've called Thatcherite, any pets, they were entrepreneurs all of them incredible in those days if you want to start a group or at a nightclub or fashion label or a magazine, you will you will. But you speak to carry Leibovitch Nate Labor, no Terry Jones or any of the people involved in the formation. The style Preston the is I would have been horrified if you if you do call them. So the two things became conflated and failure I think yeah I know. So basically, everybody this is the issue of the CELEBS is which is the working class world. Reinvent itself. Sweet Dreams, the story that you about sixties out now literally out now on I recommend him enormously, not just blowing smoke Adila is one of the best music books I've read in a very, very long time so. Recommended, enormously, they go absolutely before we continue a small commercial message why not help keep things afloat on the drown yacht that is the big mouth dinghy and pledged to support us. In the crowd funding platform for creative. That's us. It is for the price of a pint. You'll get custody early without efforts pledges the price of two pints, which is a mere ten pounds a month. You'll get all this plus the big mouth mug bearing the timeless motto I like big mouth and I cannot lie the more details, such patching, big mouth, look up our website or follow our social media I not more or saying is biased brightly colored cocktail please with fruit in it. Okay we'RE GONNA go on to music and Shanti, Shanti Man Music for that is what it's called. Bristol's idols have captivated audiences with their epic live performance without the smell of the crowd can the new album stand up on its own recorded merits, his model vintage to give us a taste of the idols and their shout shout world. Race. took. Skin. Don't live every goal in the. Dark. Class War class war. So I had the starts with the track war in which lyrics include. This is the sound of the gun going Bang Bang Travis Not Exactly No. It's interesting hearing Dylan. Talk about the idea of the clash between the headed more about the spat between ideals and fat white family and Sleaford more than I'd actually heard of the music itself. So I came to this album having a few tracks beforehand, I'm I'm not sure what I found the. This somewhat. Limited as I'm I'm I'm a veteran of of GRUNGE ROCK AND I. Enjoyed the Jesus Lizard Bat in back in the day and so on. Daily plays on on this record somewhere I, just I didn't know I found it a bit one note loud quiet sort of pixies thing lyrics I mean. Genuinely, I think there's no way. This is this is a sincerity racket in the innocence, despise noise and very keen to promote. Self righteousness to be honest and I mean I mean I'm I'm Republican saying central proposal would be but Literally in truckload rains in how filled Blue blood veins. I. D-. I just slightly Hall to take seriously in in some respects, right? Yes. This is a band that's built on righteous indignation TM isn't hit and it's very hard for them to seem to actually move out of that particular mindset into anything. But so berating you for not eating enough carrots or whatever the. Of the day again, grounds which in a has it has. A complaint about you know you, you'll say by my race in. A suitable. So I raised my pink and say blankets beautiful. At a decisive who slightly uncomfortable actually that in the same way that the the. Statue going up is unusual that you'll place to stick by in that has been pulled down surely it to be someone from that community to disarm guys they're not not. Kind of annoyed yourself in that way, maybe we'll come on to talk about some of that. When we talk about white riot I, mean also against it stop thing of. The enga the idea in the sense that a political discontent. Has To be expressed in this particular todd. I find. I. Suppose I'm. I find it kind of it's a bit. Like. Shipbuilding, by Robert Wyatt. For Is All the more devastating for being delivered in a in a tune that noten can come Ganda. Sure I'm sure there's you know there's Joy Anger. This Julian in being able to kind of be rapturously angry and listen to good old racket I. Just don't feel in I suppose in the current political situation everything else I think. As I, say you know a the sincerity racket Necessarily adds. Helps the this it's not exactly pulling petrol on on the fire, but it's not exactly a coming down only the advise positions I mean this the model village, which has the line about the Gammons in it as well is not necessarily leading for some grey to perspective and understanding about positions. On the referendum. Yeah Don Jones the new romantic shortly fought against the earliest mundanity of the ordinary guy. Is this your back this album? It's awful. It A joke A. I speak as someone who so kidding J. J. in the North Sea in nineteen eighteen maybe. Enjoy original they had a son cool bold. It yet, it is just just shout he Nelson's Franken. was there a glimmer in anything? These are people who are trying to be sincere. They are trying to rally against bigotry and the things that we don't like power corruption and lies to. What are they doing? Wrong. That says we Li- bigotry I mean. I would? Say The music right I see there are lines like I've got. It has got the best of me. Any poetry that didn't mean is I agree with traffic I mean read songs if if you are talking about critics oh protests. So surely a songs I mean lie shipbuilding's of very good example of something which will live forever. A was a snapshot is a particular time, but also it was beautifully sung beautifully. Arranged has a fantastic melody is classic boxing. Go this. Isn't I mean let's just just nonsense. Andrew I'll come to you Ali suffering because there are live and essentially this is music for the mosh pit and Willis into the recorded version that loses something in the translation. Were also, listening to it probably a thirty years too old I. Think this is the first thing you encounter in five years to jeopardy if your account if this is the first music earned county that says stuff as bad man on show, you know most exciting and sonically it is exciting. It ought to listened to the big room where you're getting clip around here by your fellow get-go is any combs sucked in bear? That's great. That's all part of the formative experience. How ever? I just felt like I've been shot at by somebody on sell me the socialist forty five minutes. Free Walk into the tomorrow. Yes nobody disagrees is what they're saying. Well, there has to be more artistry than just shouting things up around forty five minutes and that track this is the sound of a gun going bang. Reminded me. Was the day today Chris Morris War Goes Bang. It just obituary on the self periodic. It's testament stuff and that's fine in context of your your'e show being shouted at and we're GONNA. Be Talking about white riot laser and I can imagine if they fell through a time hall and then ended up in Victoria Park in Hackney that would fit in perfectly while on the rock against racism show. I found it as a one-to-one listening experience. Hectoring and I think in. we just talked about shipbuilding aisles think about the specials I also think about the dozens of great grind records around now, which addressed the misery of the world with wit and with humor and with a sense that you can do something about it, and this is a doom to raid. Hard work. So I added. Beliefs for the enemy and nineteen seventy. Tonight's at the Camden powerhouse. In nineteen, ninety-two I see to Woodstock Jamie column does not not added a little bit of Leiden Shadl Mess He. Plays Piano and kill them with kindness well, good for Cabbie column. But. I don't think it necessarily it wasn't the the slice of lemon that really made this appropriate until A. Bloody, hated it. One of my big bugbears is it. They have chosen some for men have chosen to have female support acts on the next tool they have chosen that as a gift to womankind I just think. I just let even go there. I just think that being patronised by. Idols may be the last thing on most people's lists but they did find some people who won't be petrified stay. Yeah I find it just so it's red wedge be team isn't it? There was one of those an emmy sets or recco marijuana had this truck I'm trying to find you the bamboos was maybe one of our listeners can help the song was called basing on Britain the main course we see number it was about Thatcher pissing on. Britain this is that. You remember yeah, Yeah Yeah I'm on. Never. mind. The fan base some people will like it thumbs up. Thumbs will see really. I mean, even the family cats keeping the head of multiple Portillo at least had a bit more wit about to us. By. The ear. As easily affect is that leave it lying time for chamber brought him for more guests, GonNa, go with Travis Algebra you and your cats what if you bought him for us today? Put in a track of. The, model village. This diminish sense of ourselves as is clean entering the the the the musical ministry of of British pub clone who were a Birmingham band I encountered in in the nine hundred part of a kind of cluster of interesting a band you'd sort of took things like the radio phonic orchestra and Delete Delay Darvish your legs people that as their role model said, it was it was broadcast that was primed and they were playing and plan they did To albums in late nineteen and then pretty much disappeared. And they'd been some cokes down to out of retirement and never as different projects and this is a. Puzzle. would. Canton released on the go spoke label, which has a similar kind of aesthetic. To task called things of that as well. This is Detroit. Cude the mobile village, which is Leeann these to these incredible old analog since with. Mitch release and Spaghetti Wise holding together when they performed live back in the day but we got Right, let's go to the movies the documentary white riot from award-winning writer director. Rebecca Shaw tells the story of Rock Against Racism the powered response to the rise of National Front in the Mid Seventies in Britain Times about Eric Clapton is telling the music press that email. Powell was right. The time was right to set out an opposing faction. The film is streaming now and bfi five player cousins, cinema and many other platforms. You can rent it for tenor. So what does white riot sound like it sounds like this man? Losses Scary Environment is. Going the way, some of the state and. National Front with, growing. Incredibly. On, phrase pray five. Lists I. Think the guys writer we're against racism in all facets abridged we won't rebel Music Street music music the breaks down people's fear of one another music that knows who the real enemies love music. Patriots. Against Racism was white people finally waking up to. That racist. Gamble. Mungo. Should win white people with black. People January. Together. We were interested in the idea of people being able to express themselves and the expression itself was a political i. Together tonight and forever. Red Zone is the Rock Against Racism Co founder and he's the first character we introduced to in this eight minute documentary. White Rice coast named off the clash Song Travis how does the film break that down and takes us through the formation? OF ROCK AGAINST RACISM is the person who compose the letter. was sent to admitted. Make random me about Clapton's performance in the bombing at the was where Clapton Pretty Much Easy N WORD Powell was right and so the. Reg composed this. With readiness blasi response to embrace it was a photographer and Guy. On the left composed tango we have to we have to form a movement in to cut in the racist poison ow ow to out of music time or who somebody some. Statements David Bowie also A. Sort of arrived Victoria station in done like the Nazi salute and it also. Made some. Described Hitler is the first pop star and. Not. Covering themselves in glory looks at the National Front is on the rise at the lots of. Race attention in Britain at a time. He was discrimination. The film I mean I cheated liked film on levels. I think get quite a lot of red. An unread was one some driving forces of That's fair. Enough ready I think what I liked about. The. Votes of all kinds has lots of kind of ingenious visuals stuff. The direct does Betsy brokers racism at a magazine Temporary Holdings, which I may put on concerts in the idea of consequence well, the mixed round of band. So there'd be black white bands on the same stage together, and this is a time of a punks emerging white riot and was reggae reggae. This could have golden period in the mid Seventies. So Collision Bensahel still pulse and we hit from Mike Riley in the in the film from from steel suppose tight to the stage wherein clocks plan hoods. I think it pays us together the story of their interviews in it, but it's nice to visualize back. We see the pages of the magazine of coming to life until. Ends in Nineteen fifty-nine end in seventy degrees. Vaden's with the Victoria Park Condo's carnival against the. ONL-. Gathering that which is a slightly foreshortened storing away and I mean I. DuNno Rachel's Book condemning blight difference because is this oral history of rock against racism and also Red Wedge I think takes the story but further, an sort of pose the story really not something that redstone himself said in the SPEC with special in a way the arrived of the special to them they sorta full. The job was done when that happens when you actually had no proper multi Rachel bands into. A message of interests min-soon after victorious. So I wondered about the I could see see the in narratives why you'd want to end it a carnival. That's fair enough. Yes. Obviously there will be all sorts of factions and we don't see any infighting which presumably that was. Going on you Dillon Jones. What do you remember about this time? The violence of National Front skinhead seem I can understand why ended with Victoria Paul Gig because that was almost the high coin in some respects at least in terms of being mediated I mean I was at that concert. King from the rally started in Trafalgar. And we walk through the city to the end to Victoria Hawk, which was A. Very, different from what it is today rather gentrified. And it wasn't extraordinary concert but I said this in the am when John Savage is oral history of. Joy. Division that what people really talk about. Is Sense of danger time and under the. Present threat. Of Violence. particularly. If like a lot of people you were speed at the time when. You. Sense danger of Cook. And I. Think I went by myself actually, and so you will constantly soaked of. Fearful that something bad is going to every sort of three or four hundred yards that would be another confrontation with with skinheads basically on the. Fronts on there will be lots of things being thrown violence but lots of shout Shane it was it was kind of extraordinary but that was a real sense. All the unified sense sense of purpose that this was very much a good thing. It was all thing if you talk about big musical events which involve politics. People, talk about concert for Bangladesh they talk about live aid and everything that came off the live aid. But this is an extraordinary thing to put on the time when you think about it is as far as I remember, there was Tom Robinson band that was the clash with Jimmy it'll calls. Other people to x Ray specs open for it. So we see a bit of fat. Of course, scenery and. That's a pretty formidable line-up media would maintain day really was yeah Andrew. We have also talking heads on this program is recited my favorites Alien Culture South Asian Punk, ass what were your thoughts on this documentary I thought. I loved it though. So exciting is such an interesting contrast with the rather hectoring idols album that we just had because this was a sense that it really wants bubbling up from a kind of London that didn't really have long ago. It was the it was actually a little bit of squats and alternative culture, red, saunders, the cottage key mover and Shaker in this whole footage of him was when he was in his like sort of very pre punk alternative fats, I'm aware. Wizard Yuck he has visited London route master, not sort of lost longer of Scots and so on I. Probably really a both exciting and energising also unintentionally funny because there's a lot of that IOT recognized because at the time I was wall eleven I only recognize it from things like not a new spoofs Rhonda with Reddish sounded open saying that what we're by militant entertainment yeah. So the exile couple of. It is fantastic eb is and yet the it is backed up by fantastic music, the site of Gibby Patsy from the clash. Mystery has to be a bit condit's Jimmy the top of the because. It's a creek boneheaded iteration of pump fake. Album Andrew. Day in the life concept album of working cost guy you get sacked. That's the first punk rock concert help. Exists when he moved into the into don't. and. Yet. From this Ada can say that like it was a big step for him sure. His his his background to get into this alternative cultural tens of politics to stand up against raises which. was a very often from a dome. Dalen is I mean you look at the surrounding tabloid press was foaming racist by this time using? A lot bravery here there are all sorts of things I had no idea that. Dentist valid been jailed Wisconsin. Alien Culture they south relation Obama tastic. This it's it's animated by an element of diy an economist element of total self reliance the iphone very energizing the fanzine in particular temporary holding fanzine. Out. Toothpaste she was. Founding name. So. I recommend this heartily for your ten pound rental. Hopefully put together because clearly, there's not a lot of assets there in a bit of film of the Victoria. This a bit of footage of punks rattling around the Kings road but most are there's a loss of footage of horrible demonstrations but it's not a Cornucopia of riches and Rubik's shores don't. Really while. Lodging you know approach is a great merger sounded visual. It's not a wallace flat token head things a toll I'd also WanNa find ready at engaging it was. It shows the degree to which Roger Against Racism was a decentralized organization where you sent in a letter. If you happen to live in, you know as all scam or whatever you sent a letter saying I I'm interested in what in what you're doing I want to be involved. They would you and say you all now Roque Against Racism scowls. GIG ON. These lovely letters from teen saying I. Hate All this racist stuff. So sort of twenty two, pay Anita Badge and I, need to know what to do is really lovely and. Anna every musters Russia's job. But yeah, I just thought it was it was really energizing in. A A very enjoyable. Dylan, in your book, the clash, it Kinda play the role of the people who take it all a bit tea. Seriously they don't have the kind of sense of theater. The the pistols have the other pokes he developed into the Wilder Niro Manzi. Much. Is there under spun up? To this day there was not underscore wasn't the between take it seriously punk and we are here to be kind of urban. Say It's a punk. That's that's a funny passage in in my book that was tells me by rusty Egan Rusty Egan who was in his. And the and the rich kids and was a prominent Dj of the time and and one of the architects of the scenes that in the drama for the clash and he said that the reason he he didn't become the drummer in the clashes because they used to rehearse and then go for coffee or a drink or something, and then judge from Mick Times right so what? The Beatles behind. Rusty, we'll hold on I quite like maybe go. I, quite like. Okay just you just released and they were kind of whistling it down to. Larry's on my brother and his knees trombone magazine said the tickets people in the world either Vegan and you've got. To. Make on the negatives of Gagan side. Every Christie Vega advice versa, who knows being were heartily recommending. With that, you can't see him as well. I'll white riots in your home a. Tough it'll the chain from guests recommendation, and in this case you actually isn't that incident makes a change Dillon Jones what have chosen to plan on the show I'm why Yeah I've chosen? Got To keep on by the chemical brothers goes I went to see the `electronic. At the design museum last week and the chemical brothers could have run threaded. There seem going through the the very large room is is sort of a replica of a nightclub with strobes a they played some video and this song was introduced to me. One of my daughter's a few years ago and it's automatically become one of my favorites. Records and I love it. Took Tape. Finally just briefly time for lie down after all put Rockin Island raving fleet foxes, the folk pop sound at the Pacific northwest release a surprise out in just a week ago he writes Robin Technology is no longer the fresh face twenty. So think that guy was white winter hymnal a nichols now these a cracked tooth and bent thirty four year old aged has aging changed his pastoral we're going to have a listen we're gonNA work out let's listen to this track. Can I believe you? saw. Trump is fleet foxes were very much the flag bearers of the log cabin woodshop. Focus. We have a follow. I tend to. I like to love that stuff at the time. I remember. The COUPLE TAPESTRY IN SAINT LOUIS Festival and I saw with things like Dina veteran John a Nissan and defender of Ben Hall and Fleet Foxes arrives at the tail end of that lately seemed to me today derived the talent of that. Is some are other. was them somewhat responsible for Moncton sums? Encouraging the mole a less nuanced could've? Of the certified CROC can however the Ground Syndrome blame them upwards? Yes. Yes. I I. Mean? I'm not haven't to be honest I hadn't really given the much I. I. Think the Helpless helplessness blues was the lost album that I heard of. There's nothing must be a few years ago now. Full. This one I mean not I'm stuck with DYLAN IN HIS IN HIS FABULOUS BOOK DISCUSSES Price says how? Linda goodland stall signs was a influence on some of the designs of Roxy Music jugs, drummer apparently through the I ching before deciding to join the clash. So UNDIS- has this sort of stall sign element to it doesn Now, the Moon is over was released on the Equinox and the suppress bumps. The candidate said he described it as life preserver in ocean of bad news and I think it's it's certainly. A kind of bomb of an album A. Lot about death on it truck with some blind. which has a litany of departed people and there's another track which says up something along the lines of. A Devil by never wanted to die quite a. suffused we in the party was sort of composed. Partially Lockdown Paseo when he was outgoing first drives in in the cat schools has all of all of that thing I I mean I I tend to find it a bit. Is it slightly FM ROCK? It's slightly wants to be something like Dennis Wilson's Pacific Ocean. Blue this sort of emolient folk sound. But. He is an hour long. So it's definitely lockdown in the sense it's like when it will time has more than something else unseemingly it was recorded. Potter was quoted in the same Steve. Titus swift, her afflict flow album. I'm I think it does all the things that the fleet folks did did well which is you know to the winning to vote rookie tunes of some sensitivity. Jar about to. A Chilean singer whose Do Penetrates it has a sensitivity element to it There's a song he's especially a tribute to jump Ryan Young Man's game might I just found at the bit to? Wanting to please domain I found it didn't it didn't it sort of its deliberately He is a nice thing for you niceness. Are What? slightly. I found it. Didn't have quite enough grit or ridiculous having slagged off it listen. I know. I think I think in the end it just doesn't. Didn't feel that moved by it which should they didn't necessarily have to be. I think it's it's it's very pleasant but it touched my sides in quite white to and I. Could hear the possible in off off affects some late Mumford infants or something. This is your Capucci or your pumpkin spice last night. Months. Kefraya neck. I love them and I love this I mean I remember when all this stuff started happening Iraqi column. Woodsmen who could woodsmen in my will but I. Think this is a fantastic record I. loved it. I loved the the fact that I had an opportunity to listen because 'cause I may rupture done because I haven't this into the fleet foxes for a couple of years. But but as one owner who featherweight which I think is something masterpiece juggling social media. Last night I really. Loved it and I love the beach boys, tropes and s terrific. Yeah. It's something I will play a lot radio enjoyed. Oh good. We've we've talked. I mean, he has very exciting Klay a trademark of a of a particular kind of melodic ticket. He does a curlicue that the nobody else really does and we we had not that track that at the just by county believe you as a lot further on than your your standards Evan Jug band approach of of folk prestige it aggressively natural total heritage comedies even. Started very piney and fresh air. Isn't it? Again going back to my my book a nail nail we're talking about take their acne said old fantasy my world. Is a style He's very good on that and actually I get this a style. But there is something a the I feel that comes across as being honest if that means anything. But the other thing is he writes great chins you can home they're really good tunes on a FA melody well. What wins a hymnal weirdly has become a community choir stabbed. You know like every villages guides choir I was surprised much like this because usually I'd run a mile visit where the machines where at this I. I actually found it very likable very compelling a very much, very much that breath breath fresh air. What did you think shop? Well, again, I'd lump them in with Manfred since over put them over there, not really listened to fleet foxes. Norfolk great deal so I was pleased when I heard it I kind of prove myself wrong that crosby stills, Nash sound that he wants in that. He gets from the Brian Wilson sample on it. That's really suckled but the sample that's phone, the pet sounds billion of Benin billions of four tapes excessive. You remember that. It's really beautifully put together. I think is already beautiful record wanted to listen to it more, and yet I think again, the politeness Soviet the something about that really withdrawn held back, sound the I suddenly in the middle of off. Site Delphi? You know that they're very much two sides of an opposing. Thing. You just wanted a bit of grit in that. You wanted something that's. Mess for, but you know what I mean I think the thing that separates for me is that both the weld of an kind of the welded pros we stills Nash is this something just a bit self-satisfied about it what gets gathered country feeling good about ourselves. Dark I think that's absurd. I were the darkness the self-satisfied that she just falls away into this isn't about people who've died about being lonely all sorts of things I like to but mole. Question you mentioned crosby stills. Nash and the Mumford Sons in the same breath heads lineage I mean not the same. Way where they are. With them for. DHS. Hunting this same a toilet obviously. On. This this is true analysis that I'm not saying. On. A bit of Stephen Stills. That's just yeah and there is something wrong with the Mumford. Sorry. Obsolete. So broadly speaking we like this. Marvelous without it, the end of the show and closing time chatter is that time already travis helper. What's your closing time? Chatter? Will I was in I was intrigued by unusually me some fashion fashion. which is very coveting those an article on the ABC news spectacular basis as well. About waist up closing Lou there's a new set of collection by A. Product a fortified signs that than to that the logo was on sort of thrived. The base of Callixte, which was false and around the neck and says it this whole this whole thing about some memory seem not the company that has a a a show machine by Jeremy. Scott the hands these Dole's instead of motives very nice to the Mari netting even had Dole's of on a winter, but but this thing about said of above the waist fashion book. Kind of zoom thing. Another thing to talk about how when particularly was selling some. So head scarfs done roaring trade because people were. Wearing them so they didn't have to do that hair. I just think this this idea that covid zoo transform in sartorially descend on behalf. I'm a Thai whereas I'm hoping in some respects. That might have spread tonight really but this is a great line in Dylan's book were these Alisson Moya says something it was all about what what you will from the knees Don's. Zoo. Will kind of reverse. Nice affair. Dylan what's your time set? By. All morning Watching the the first presidential, debate judge. For the savage fascinating. And I didn't have much of it using but I think that. Unfortunately Biden has is so bad stuff. And also, he didn't not to to counter the rubbish. That trump would saying with sort of match by Chris Wallace who was dicator. And it was. More. Evident. So I think trump's probably going to win a second term. It was funny. I watch it while it was obsolete. I, just had the highlights on the radio this. Is. It reminded me of a breeze nauman piece another. Chievo video voices, two of each other. Disturbing Andrew chairs up. Can You? Well, I'm also. I'm also Steiner on the fashion install beats, Sean, because of very big biggest i. Give to Fred. Perry. For withdrawing that black and yellow Fred perisher from the US. Because it's been hijacked by the odious a fascist organization the proud boys who intimidates and a attack and violence and have decided that the black and yellow appreciate will be their uniform. Absolutely, no reason to own this. It's all as we all know, the background of Fred Perry, himself is was a very progressive individual and for me Fred Peres Especial Selecta on its on its rock against racism and. I think it's Absolutely. Right Fred Perry to pull the shut in the United States if. People mound about companies, throwing shapes and stances that don't really cost them anything. This is costing Fred Perry, and when you look on social me, you see the usual suspects complain about it said well, I'll never buy again. Good. I don't want you to read and I'm Fred Perry. Whether cards either so isolate them and it may go by Fred Perry in another ideally taste the. Rainbow. Yes. I old time anyway. So Now absolutely obsolete total agreement with that weld on them. My cousin Tom Charter is that Sienna Miller has come out with the quick Bozeman gave her part of his own salary when they were filming twenty one bridges because she couldn't get proper payrise I'm not saying and extortionately she wasn't being paid as much as other people on the set. She didn't know how to fight it. She's come out as really well, but Chadwick Bozeman R.I.P has just he gets better and. Better the more that you hear about this man and the more the more he did it's just this absolute grand gesture beautiful gesture in order to have some pain nutty. It wasn't mentioned at the time. He never talked about she never talked about it and things that come out about the goodness of this person. It's just a really lovely story and it was just good to read that and I was ready. Hoffman by that too. That was my my cousins Time Jessica. Good egg absolutely. The Best I'm not standard the PODCAST. Thank you so much Dylan Jones and Travis L. Breath being part of our mcmath. Thanks guys. Thank you can't spend a wild right these very very soon sweet dreams. The story of the new antics is in orbit trips now and thank you to those this thing home or out and about from me Andrew an producer Alex Reese will see you next week. Only.

Dylan London Britain us Harrison Andrew National Front Dillon Jones Fred Perry writer ABC Tom Robinson Fleet Foxes North Sea Johnny Morris Johnny Trump David Bowie Don Jones Johnny Marr Rock Against Racism Movement Hollywood
Winners and Losers of Free Agency | The Ringer NFL Show

The NFL Show

51:48 min | 1 year ago

Winners and Losers of Free Agency | The Ringer NFL Show

"Hey, guys. Welcome to the ringer podcast network. March madness. This is here and to help you with your bracket. Make sure you listen to one shiny podcast with Marc Titus and Tate. Frazier. Also, be sure to check out the ringers YouTube channel to watch Tate and Titus built their bracket and break down every match of on this election show as well. As Roger Sherman who offers his three Cinderella picks the NCAA tournament you can find those at YouTube dot com slash the ringer. Welcome to the runaround. I felt show. I'm Robert Mays. Join as always by Kevin Clark. Kevin how you doing buddy? I'm doing. Okay. And I thought competition committee recommending proposal for a one year trial to expand bugle plays to ever pass interference roughing the passer unnecessary contact you can review that that is what the competition committee. It's puts. We're gonna do winners and losers of free agency today. Let's talk about that. Because I want to do you think that's a good thing? I I am a little bit worried. I generally support that idea, but I just think that replay might get a little bit out of hand and games. They're gonna take four and a half hours. Maybe I mean, if he's still limit the amount of replays. It's fine. I think if you just keep the system in it's it's fine. I did the one the one thing. I I saw out. There was it. Maybe you only do flags the only review flags and not no no calls, which we think that would make sense. I wouldn't have helped the New Orleans Saints last year. But. Wasn't. What was the idea? What was that person going to be called? That's just up in the booth. And if there's a blatantly wrong, call they can just reverse it in the moment. I believe. I believe I believe it's sky judge. But I also believe we could just take a page from our boss, Bill Simmons. It's called him VP of common sense. Yep. That's just I personally some person just says, hey guys that was passenger fares. All right. So let's dig into this obviously free agency is still technically going cold scientists in Houston today, which I feel like was a pairing that we had even before free kinda like talked about it. Now, the colts only have like seventy million dollars cap space. They're really up against it. I wrote about this this week just about how cap space is just this thing that everyone clamours for. But in reality the teams that usually have a ton of it spend it in horrible ways and in reality, don't spend it. Yeah. Exactly. But for the most part cap space is about flexibility and the colts have maintained there's it's a really good signing. And they recite a couple of guys you'll pay this played well for them last year. I think that that makes a lot of sense. So I don't I'm fine with what they've done, but I didn't Justin Houston's. Good one. I was wondering if he was gonna come in a little bit lower than that. I was hoping the bears would take a look at him as kinda to route their defensive line rotation and also round out there spending. But twelve million dollars is a lot of money. I think he's worth it. But that's a good chunk of change. It's pretty much the Brandon Graham contract you can use as a template. I wasn't sure he'd get that much. Just because his injury history has been a little more checkered sure, but I'm guessing they had seventy five million dollars cap space. And now they have silently loss. They're going to be fine. Yeah. I think they'll be just fine. All right. Let's start with the winners. And I think that the team that sticks out to me here. That's just did a great job of adding talent really over the last twelve calendar months is the Cleveland Browns. Because even though they only had one kind of splash signing with Sheldon Richardson, you take into account the tray that got me ever. And and obviously the Odell Beckham trade. I mean, this is a team you're running out a pulse on the roster. There aren't that many spots. You're like man, they could really get a lot better here, or this is going to be something naked torpedo them. I mean, obviously there. Projection with Baker in year. Two can Corbett come in and play guard Whitney lose lost sight ler who the other safety is going to be. But these are nitpicky things for the most part this team looks pretty damned. Good everywhere. Are they a favorite AFC north? Yes, absolutely jumping to you look at I think one of the teams that we could put my I don't have in my lot my list, but I was considering it Pittsburgh just didn't do much. I mean, they signed Steven Nelson. They signed Mark Barron. But I mean, those aren't any moves that are going to kind of make you stand up and take notice sheriff they need to get better because they have hoax. Well, they also lost and elite receiver whereas the Browns aimed one. That's true that yeah, they lost Antonio Brown. So at Pittsburgh has a lot of issues to me they traded their right? Tackle new Antonio Brown. I still think there are problems with them on defense Baltimore. I'm just concerned about what's going to happen with our Jackson. Their offense is weird and fun, but I have a pretty defined ceiling. Also lost a lot of defensive talent. And getting Earl Thomas is great. It, but they lost pass rushing depth. A lot other things and the Bengals are just the most boring team in the NFL now that the dolphins are just blowing it up and starting over and doing something that I find kind of cool the Bengals are just the team. That's like all right. We can just forget about the Bengals they never do anything worth talking about. Yeah. I first of all I'm a little bit worried that fits Patrick is gonna screw up the tank. You think he's too good? That's what you're going a little too good. I think there was a point out there for a number of people that I keep thinking about was like if you actually wanted to tank you'd sign Bortles or Peterman are truly awful quarterback. Fitzpatrick might just randomly beat the patriots. That's always in there for him. But I feel like the Fitzpatrick we saw last year and just this last gasp of him being decent was in an offense with Mike Evans to Sean Jackson, Chris Godwin OJ Howard at that was coordinated by Todd monkeying. He's not going to be playing with that sort of talent. In imagine imagine thinking that fits Patrick being fits magic is a system. Thing and not just. Nathe instance as a superpower atural entity. Yeah. He's not. It's not a is that a moral the things he does or not explainable by tangible stuff like supporting cast and everything else and coach I think he's going to be decently bad. I think they'll be fine. I also think that if you signed Blake Bortles up it's up and blinking lights. So we are trying to suck. And that's so he's fixed. Oh, he's. Fitzpatrick is a real winning move. Hey, it's is still feel like even if you're going full tank. You kinda have to sell the fan base a little bit at times for ownership to be like. Yeah, I just wanna be as bad as we can possibly be. Who is? Okay, full. Take is tough. Okay. All right. Let's back up who is the best tank quarterback you possibly get. If you had your pick. Everybody's a free agent. You are tanking. You can't let your fan stuff to buy tickets and all that stuff, but you are trying to go one in fifteen you are taking blinked quarterback. How does he think Ryan Fitzpatrick is a good answer because he's going to be at least entertaining at times. But I think that for every four hundred yard game. He's going to have maybe like the two or three of them next season. They're going to be as many four interception games. That's why I think he's the perfect quarterback because your level of badness when you take it in the aggregate is still pretty bad. But there are moments where you're actually enjoying yourself. It's it's interesting question. I think turnover prone quarterback is a big part of this. I would say there's a handful. I would say you could lose some games with Derek Anderson. Who is still in the league somehow? Where is he now on the bills last year? He's gonna bills. Oh my God. That's right. He's started a game. Didn't they started that Monday night game? Yeah. You could you could lose some games. Trevor simian. Who's now the New York Jets? He's a jets backup. Ca probably lose some probably lose some games with Matt Shaab, but you're going you're you wanna be terrible. Well, I don't think your way here. He's people are all better than eighth Peterman. That's true. So Nathan Peterman is the ultimate we want to be bad quarterback. You're still trying to split the difference a little tiny bit all of these players made contributions at one point to the NFL level. Match. It's been like a decade though. The fact that mad shops still getting paid by people as amazing. Two week period. When the raiders drafted Derek Carr and people were pretending like match, I was gonna be the starter that season I was like their sixes and a week. I was there of the day the named Derek Carr starter. And obviously because it's it's the new story there was kind of freak out in the media room when the happened as I told you this it could have been sources, Derek Carr will start and the source what had been me looking at the depth chart. All right. Let's move on to some of the other winners. Here say the safety position. I feel like a huge winner. Especially after you consider what happened last year? I mean, there's an explanation for why the safety market unfolded. Why it did last year? But for it to bounce back to this degree. I'm not sure anyone could have really seen that coming. How about our guy? Landon Collins just getting paid man just getting paid by team that really doesn't seem to have any idea what it's doing and then Djibril peppers being way over valued by the giants. That's true. It's another win for the position some moments of real peppers was like the crown jewel of their whole phone. Honey, badger gets paid the one the ones that are outliers. Eric berry still in the market. He's taking visits, but he is still available. I also think Eric berry that's complicating one just becau- complicated. When just because of concerns about his health. I mean, the guy played how many games over the last couple of years it I can understand. Why teams would be a little bit reticent to throw big money because you see that tyrod Matthew sought to straight healthy seasons. Did you see that sort of heat chart of Earl Thomas, the passing church John talking about I have not? So next stats? Now does sort of heat maps almost like almost like what what NBA teams can do as far as showing where teams shoot from when so and so's in the game or they're playing this defensive local, whatever. And so they showed Earl Thomas on the field and all filled what what what people do against the Seahawks. And what teams do is. Never go deep against Thomas effort. And it's really fascinating to look at teams. Actively avoided. It's not unlike kind of like Dwight Howard used to be where teams would dischord nowhere near him. Because they were scared of what would happen if they if they drove in the lane. So Earl Thomas being healthy. I think changes the face of that defense. Baltimore more than we really think else think they have a secondary in the league. Now, I mean, even with their wet does probably in the conversation. But you swap Earl Thomas with Eric Weddell. And now we're talking about something really serious. Neither their pass. Rush lose a little bit of its teeth when the guys they lost. But me you have the secondary. That's that good. You're probably gonna make up for it Matt castle, by the way, if regent and available to ten oh, that's a good name. That is a good name. His last great moment was what he's put a little bit recently. But he was also one of those guys that was a stopgap starter for a team that drafted quarterback the same year, actually. And he was just throwing pick six left and right in Minnesota, Matt Cassel, Austin Davis, Blaine gabbert, Mike Glennon. In vailable, Sean Manley, Gabbard, probably a good name blank Gabbard. I think you could probably sell pick Shawn Manion was basically replaced by Blake Bortles. Do you think Sean Manion is upset about? I bet Sean many things he's much better than Blake Bortles, probably probably. But it's got like a one, I guess a one year one million dollars contracts. Mcvay he check that's a McVay JR. That's exactly right. It wouldn't Bortles is going to be thrown for four hundred yards a game six games into the year when Jared Goff Scott got Jared Goff gets hurt. The joke is going to be on all of us, all of our Blake Bortles jokes were going to regret them instantly. Gina Smith also available. There you go. All right. Let's move on another winner for me is Cam Newton's bones. I really like what the Panthers did and free agency the reassigned Eric read, they go out and get paradise on a contract that is less than what Mitch Moore, Scott. And I think that Matt Paradis is a better player, and I think signing Jerry Williams and a one year six million dollar deal to be you're right. Tackle is an absolute steel he when he was healthy he played well a couple years ago. And obviously there was limited interests because he was hurt for most of last season you hurt his knee in training camp. And then again in week one. So I can understand why teams a little reticent, but he's a solid player when he's around and for him to get six million bucks on one year and for James to get twice that that's a win. If you the Panthers where where are we on John James because we we spent so much time talking about Trump Brown that we forgot that John James was also being massive wheel. This is what happens with offensive tackles in free agency Juwan James's fine. He's fine. But there are so few competent offensive Wyman in the NFL that when one hits the market that can stand up and getting somebody's way every once in a while he sets the market at the position. It's absolutely ridiculous. It was the same thing. With Nate solar last year. I think teams are willing to overpay at that position in a way, they're not in almost any other position. Just because it's so hard to draft a develop offense of women the teams that do their goal teams like New England. But most teams struggled to do it. And because of that they have to throw money at the problem. Bruce Irvin, very strange Carolina signing, I think that's pretty good though, because they got him for a really cheap deal. Right. It's only four million by John Dante oppo and Bruce Irvin, which if in twenty thirteen if someone had come from the future and say the Panthers have reserved Don tarpaulin the same line. Like, that's nasty an hour. Those are tarnished high picks they've cornered the market on defense. Eric reads. Same day. Eric was the first round pick to. Well. Yeah. I think that they got good value with some guys. I also just like how they're built that offensive line. I think that was a major question coming in for them to kind of get those two guys on the fly. I think that's huge for them. Agree. I agree. What is the ceiling on this Carolina team? I think that's a Cam Newton question. And if he's healthy, then why can't they make the playoffs? I I'm more worried. Some other reports around his injury or kind of weird. I that's always a question though. I mean, especially with shoulders and everything else that stuff can linger. But I think they can be pretty good just because I like what they have on offense. I think the Cam getting hurt last year. They absolutely fell off a cliff, but what nerve Turner has built there. With those skill position players. It's a really fun group. And we talked about that a lot last season. I think that can be the same again. I also think you're gonna see those guys and even more elevated roles now that Devin funchess's gone, and so of camps healthy, I think they can be pretty darn good dude member them month where we had over correct? And just go over the top on our praise of north Turner because we made fun of the higher. Yeah. I mean, I e chrome I mean, it has to happen. No. But then it turned out. He wasn't even that good. No. That Cam got hurt. I'm not putting that coaching staff when your quarterback. Throw the ball downfield anything that's a little bit more problematic than suddenly your coaches bad after being good for the first part of the year. I think they're going to be just fine. If he's healthy. I think they're going to be fine. A greater defense is interesting their secondary's. No a little hot and cold always. But we'll see what happens there. But I think they can be. All right. Can I throw out a winner? Yes. Antonio brown. Antonio Brown and the idea of player power coming to the NFL. Yeah. So I mean, I don't necessarily know integrates you change or anything like that. Because I think there's just very very few people like Antonio Brown. We're going to be able to execute that sort of plan. But the added a lot of new money to his deal without adding years, which is basically spectacular in the context NFL value. And by the way, he tanked his trade stock, and this is not necessarily admirable. But it is if you're going just through still grants of of of of value. He will he tanked the stock so much to the team the got him only gave up a third and fifth round pick. Which means that team will be better if his if his stock was so high that they go one of their first team would be worse. So there's really no downside except the public backlash to Antonio Brown. Is Antonio Brown genius something that we? All right. I. I don't know. I don't know the answer to that. I demand dyed his mustache blond in order for his team to think that he was capable of anything. That's amazing. I just everything about that is incredible to me. I don't know of dying your mustache blond as evidence of genius. Got to be in this case, it my God to be honest with you. I've looked at the mustache it. Didn't look good. I don't are. You saying you like went deep into character. That's what's it seemed like that's what happened right? Like like walking genomics. Yeah. This was this past like two months was Antonio Brown's. I'm not here moment. Yeah. Oh god. I mean, everything about it was great have you ever grown a mustache. No. I've had I've had sort of you know, two week beards. Or whatever I looked pretty good. I think f way I don't think I've ever seen you with a beard. I've had a mustache in the past. Sometimes when I grow my beard, really long just cut most of it off and keep the mustache just for fun. It's enjoyable never blonde though. That's if I want to get traded from the ringer. That's what I'll start up Di mustache blood. They'll get to third round pick me. All right. Another winter for me is Nick foles who here's the thing. When you're the only quarterback on the market, you get twenty two million dollars a year with fifty million dollars guaranteed. I never imagined that he would have that kind of market even with being the only guy. I just never thought that contract was coming. I thought it'd be closer to the case keenum deal from last year, but manned fifty million dollars. Guaranteed for Nick foles the Jaguars really wanted to quarterback. So the justification is that they needed the locker room needed to respect him. So they gave them more money. It's great. Really? So I'm going to do that. I'm going to do that. I want to do that with Bill Simmons. I'm just going to be like, no, I need more respect around here. Please give me fifty million dollars guaranteed. I again would would eighteen million dollars. Not have sufficed it needed to crack twenty s steal away. It was going to happen. If you're paying your quarterback eighteen million dollars. And there's no other quarterback on the roster. I'm pretty sure it's clear. He's the starting quarterback. Maybe I'm wrong about that. I this is this is a great example of a team over thinking to the point of eating themselves. Absolutely. Absolutely. Because who else was paying for Nick foles? I mean assume there was another team probably in the mix, and that's why they had to go that high. But who would it have been, and why would they have been wanting to pay Nick foles twenty twenty million dollars? I just can't imagine that there was enough interest to drive that price to where it got. And you're bidding against yourself. And that's how you get to this point. I have a theory that have been developing over the past six years. I've covered this league. You wanna hear it? Yeah. I'm listening. Absolutely. Nobody knows what they're doing. Yeah. That's what it seems like a special teams that don't have a quarterback there. The teams that know the least what they're doing. And it's not even as if there's some quick out that they have. I mean, this is one of those deals where it's oh, it's a four year deal. But in reality, it's mostly a two year deal. Everything else there's twelve and a half million dollars in dead cap on the Jaguars, Kathy. He gets cut before the twenty twenty one season. You're getting Nick foles age thirty thirty one and thirty two seasons. We know the Jags aren't adverse to paying are spending about a dead money on quarterbacks as evidenced by what Blake Bortles is going to account for on the cap this year. But that's still is just it's a lot of money to give it thirty year old quarterback who hasn't done much outside of a couple of structures in the playoffs. Could they conceivably kept me Jackson, troppo Blee? I think they opened up more than like thirty million dollars. Yeah. Base in one day. They got thirty million dollars. So let's look at I learned cat. I if I were them I'd probably like to have me Jackson. Yeah. I mean, they paid him so much. That's the problem when you spend. What you build your entire team through free agency. Essentially at a certain point all those bills are gonna come to even in this era. And that's what happened. I mean, you can't pay a quarterback twenty two million dollars in also be paying the sticker price for like seven different defensive players. Those those things are not compatible. I mean, that's that's it. I mean, I think the still even though they hit on guys like Jalen Ramsey, some of the defensive guys tell them Smith being one with got paid, right? I'm saying enter knee. That was really the only in-house guy was Ramsey by the time last season was over pretty much everyone else on the defense that is getting significant snaps and then Gakugei, but almost every other guy was making at or near the top of the market at their position. And that was okay when you were not really paying your quarterback very much. But when you have to pay him twenty million dollars that becomes a pro. Maybe they should have hit on like the six straight top five picks. They had or not spend it on a running back who's making seven and a half million dollars this year that also might have helped. Yeah. They still have seventeen million dollars in cap space. I think the Jaguars needed a VP of common sense. It's not Tom Coughlin. Is that what you're saying? It is not Tom Coughlin. All right, one more winner here. Packers fans complain about how the team spent just just the Packers because I like Smith I like sedaris an Preston. Because I think he liked the Smiths. I love the dismiss. Yes morrissey. Johnny marr. Yes. I. Jewish on the contracts themselves as you are. But I do think I just think this way it's a world where CJ Mohsen Cuanto Santer can get what they get. I'm fine with this. Yeah. I think spending on pass rushers is usually a good strategy. But I also think that is a Darius cut like their defensive backs. So I'm they're they're young guys. So they took last year. So I'm saying this is not those guys. I mean, it's not here. Zander's gyros. Zander's gonna be really investing and pass. Rush is good. Yeah. I think that Amos it was a good signing. It was one of my favorites. Afraid see I think that's really good value. When you consider the position, but sixteen and a half million dollars for Zaria Smith is a lot of money. I mean, if it's a four year sixty six million dollar deal twenty million of its guaranteed. So essentially, I guess it's really just a year and a half of guarantees. So you can get out of it pretty quickly, which is nice, but no ten million dollars in dead cap. And if he's cut after the third season, so yeah, I mean, that's a pretty hefty contra. For a guy who's never been a full-time player. You could argue that now that he's getting a chance to be he's going to be even better. But the way they used to in Baltimore last year was very unique. You did a lot of his rushing inside. So it just a lot of projection for him to hit that number. And I'm just not sure he'll ever get there. That's what I'm saying. But both of those guys your defense is undeniably better. If you're making an effort, I think my pet names are related defensive coordinator, by the way, I think so too. If you're making an effort to play the free agency game they got out as cleanly as you can get you already. I mean, you're already of the Roger's deal. You you're gonna have to hitting your traffic's anyway, because the Roger's deal is such a force within the cap, you know, he he got the most guaranteed money in history until again until they've got him in his allowed to pay his running back, and you're going, you know, you have to do that. So you're gonna have to get these sort of contracts that are, you know, upper middle tier money. That's how you spend your money for agency about but you just again, it's gonna come back. Hitting their first second third round picks. Yeah. That's what that's what happened. You look at the New Orleans Saints. Okay. Now that the New Orleans Saints should be a model for anybody's for spending goes. But the reason they're able to give drew Brees as much money as he gets is because they've had some really good drafts not paying Alvin Kamara. They're not paying let Marcus Lattimore they're smart enough to go out and trade for guy like ally apple and just run his rookie contract down. So that's the those are the sort of cheap. Moves you have to make and I'm okay with paying a few middle class guys as well. Yeah. I get board that I definitely can. I just think that's a big contract. I area Smith. I like him. I think he can be really good. And there's a chance now that he's playing, you know, ninety percent of the snaps or whatever that he's even better. There's definitely in the realm of possibility if that happens, then they're not even going to worry about it. But that's a lot of money to spend and it could work out. But I also think we've seen this not workout one hundred different times. So, but yeah, I mean, the Giro Alexandria pick is a good example, by the way. Of them hitting on a guy that make him making their defense better instantly for a really cheap deal. Yeah. All right. Let's get to the losers and let us start with the only place I can think to start. And that is with the New York Giants who are just they're really amazing right now. I mean, everything that's happening over there is entertaining to me because there's just no semblance of a plan. You can go, and you can trade Oto Beckham for picks and say, you know, we're trying to stockpile assets and everything else you can't do that. And then go sign go thirty year old golden Tate's to a contract. That is going to be it has money dead money in the third year and screw up accompay of yours in the process, either be bad or don't be bad. And that's why I really appreciate what the dolphins are doing because they're saying we're leaning into this. And that's what I think you should do and rebuilding on the fly. Like the giants are trying to do. I just I don't think it's going to work and they're just undying commitment. UI manning. It is so admirable me. It's admirable. They. They just manning is Dave Gettleman rider die Peyton Manning got cut by the colts. It's he got cut by the colts. I mean, this is a real thing that happened. He's one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time. And the moment the colts understood that they had a succession plan in place one that was going to work. They said, thank you very much for your services paid manning. They are no longer needed. And then a few years later, they built a statue. And everyone got the fuck over it. It's just an everyone says, well, you know, Andrew luck was sitting there at number one for the colts the giants at the number two pick in the draft last season and five quarterbacks went in the top ten. I mean Sam darnold isn't Andrew luck. When he was a pretty damn good quarterback prospect. I just none of it makes sense to me. Hey, I know what happened in baiting last game. I know that he won a Super Bowl by this goes teething. They know he was a corpse. Having said that. If you put Peyton Manning on the twenty nine hundred giants, they will more games. Yes. Because I think he kind of knows what do, you know? Like, he's so smart. He would just kind of dump off the ball of sake. We make the right to he couldn't what do we think in NFL game? We think he can throw. Like a fifteen yard pass. Sure. You throw fifteen yard pass. Yes. I mean, he's had forty two right now could throw a fifteen yard Ben says for next surgeries. He you know, he's had problems in the past. Having said that either. I manning has does not like throw the ball, you know, pass twenty and his head. Pop. Manning is having plenty of problems in the present. So. Yeah. I mean is there anything else you want to say about that? Or we just kind of resigned to the fact that they're going to be an absolute mess for awhile. And actually just thinking about what Peyton Manning will look like playing two twenty nineteen. What year was that? What was his last season two thousand seventeen twenty one of the Broncos twenty fifteen season two thousand sixteen SuperBowl. God, I can't believe is that long ago. That's crazy. It seems more recent than that. I was sitting in the Levi stadium stands with the sun just beating down watching that game. I was in the main press box. I would now look at look at you. You're just crushing it. All right. We're gonna talk about this a little bit. But one of my other losers is just anyone looking for value at offense tackle, Trent Brown, setting the market and having been the highest paid tackle at history. Trump Brown was he did a good job for the patriots last year. I also think they're ten different factors that led to Trent Brown. Did you see you good for the patriots last year? Did you see the quote that his agent gave to Trump Brown? No. It was it was something to the effect of ten minutes and afraid the is agent called Trent Brown and said we have an offer we cannot refuse which is not a good sign. If you're the team offering. No. The raiders spent money like nNcholas cage last week. It was unbelievable way. They spend money is just the equivalent of buying like a dinosaur skull just because you have the money doesn't mean you need to throw it around like this. But that's where bad teams are at. That's where the raiders are out. That's where the jets are at. I mean, there's really no rhyme or reason to throwing it around like this. But teams do it. Anyway, nNcholas cage is as big spenders slightly dated. Right. I it's probably been some guy came out. Johnny depp. Johnny Johnny Depp. He spent it in as ridiculous of ways them. Yeah. Absolutely. I guess I haven't been up also. Millions of dollars one hundred s Thompson's funeral. Which I mean, I guess you could justify that. I'm not sure you can't I'm on. Just depends depends on your viewpoint. Join I guess nNcholas cage is like buying haunted houses in New Orleans. He bought a lot of crazy shit. I was looking at a list of it like two weeks ago. I don't remember why we live very different lives. I can't remember how I got there. It was like a weird internet horrid stumbled down. And I somehow landed on nNcholas cage is spending habits. This this happens. Sometimes you do a lot of there are a lot of weird places. You get on the internet. I I was just telling Craig I'm reading a book about. London in the eighteen eighties cholera epidemic. It's an incredible book. It's called. Let's call you. Ghost map. It's good my favorite. Kevin Clark media consumption stories was at the Super Bowl when we had to get there. Like six hours early. And you were just who was it was a podcast on a president. Right. Was it ten of us? Reading Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin. It was not a president. So historical figure. You would is listening to Benjamin Franklin audiobook like four hours before the Super Bowl skit and totally locked in. Just like it was like five hours before the game. Just getting lot on. He do. He did a lot of different things. He would have been an incredible football coach. I mean Benjamin Franklin talk about talk about adaptable. Yeah. Who's historical figures who would be the best NFL coach. Join Eisenhower just just from a technical standpoint. You know, ABRAHAM LINCOLN taught himself war tactics in like two weeks. I think. I think. Break over because his break. I mean, a lot of generals a lot of a lot of leaders. I would say George Washington, George Washington was a he wasn't even like you'd even see battle FAI five years because it was all down south. And so like, you know, the Carolinas and stuff, and so he was more just about keeping the army together a good vibes guy. Yeah. He was a players. The army was even being paid. So he was just like keeping the army together. And so he was just a players coaches. The original players coach. That's great. I mean. Yeah. Generals are probably the right answer. I was thinking about off the map. No. I mean, it's George Washington. You look on the other side line before a game and storage Washington. What do you do? And he's claiming everybody else. He's pumping everybody up. Like, oh my God. Dude. More intimidating Bill. Bell checker. George Washington cheat w on the other side even a question. All right without even a close for an upset over the British to look into if like five minutes, there's an unbelievable upset. But so is the first Super Bowl where the patriots beat the Rams. That's what I'm saying. Look into Yorktown in foul him saying that's all right. Sang more losers here. And I think this is pretty clear just the running back position in general. I mean, you look at the deals that not only what lady I'm bell had to settle for compared to what he wanted. But some of the other guys just not getting paid that much at all and on short term deals mean people thought Kevin Coleman was going to get a decent contract for free agency started two years, eight and a half million. It's really just a one year deal, by the way, the quantum Alexander contract looks terrible. If you just consider the years and the total money. But the forty Niners do an excellent job of structuring these things I mean, they have one of the best cap guys in the league. And it's clear they use their cap space, really creatively. I mean Jimmy Garoppolo had that monster contract he signed last season, but thirty seven million dollars of it. Whereas in year one his cap it's over the next three or four years compared to what other quarterbacks are making are really palatable. It's like twenty five twenty six million dollars because of how they structured it. So I know that some of those deals they look like huge money for the Niners. But they get themselves a lot of flexibility with a lot of those contracts where the Niners this year because I just got off of her. So as pod, and we were talking about the niner's a little bit. I see oxygen be good Bill. Simmons is insistent that the Rams are going to regress. I kind of believe it. Yeah. That is kinda can hang over you for a little while. Maybe they all the girly thing is is not going to get much better. I heard a story at the combine where after the game in the in the locker room, they it was kinda like look Spartacus McVeigh was getting up there and just taking every day and every like guy after guy one after the other was like blaming the game on themselves. It seems like they have a very strong culture that I also think that locker that games like that can have a lasting. I almost wrote that story about just how literally like they have a culture of responsibility. That is just almost to a fault. Like Todd Gurley was blaming himself in December over something. I forget what it was. And essentially, they apologize to each other a lot. Everyone feels like they have ownership. I it's there's such a culture of collaboration and of openness about how they build everything that I think that a lot of those guys feel like they have a say in what goes on, and it makes them accountable use away. Right. You're saying that they don't feel that way New England. I don't think that's how that goes. I mean, it seems like Belichick does a pretty good job with it. I mean, I guess not do your job is a pretty strict thing. But it seems like with Brady they talk about what goes on they have weekly meetings which though. Yeah. Tom and Tom gets in the meetings. Nobody else nobody else has any idea. What's going on? That's probably true just like be B here and do this. That's theory on why you know, some of his deputies don't do. Well, when they move on is because they're just so they're in a silo to the point. They don't action understand the other stuff. So going back to the forty Niners. Very. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I think they can be pretty good. I mean, we saw what how did with Nick Mohan's this year. And I think with Garoppolo back. He can be solid. I think that his first few handful of games last season. There was not as much kind of progression in that offense is you would have hoped after an entire off season. But I do think that offensively they're going to be just fine. They have talent it will see if they go get a receiver in the draft. But that line is solid Kittles a star everything else. I also think with Tevin Coleman and jerk McKinnon back, even if they're. Kind of overpaying for both of those guys that they have a lot more pop in their running game. I mean, sure Matt Brita was fine. And they got production out of that spot. But they got a lot better. It just went McKinnon coming back and combing coming in the questions on defense. I mean that is one hundred percent where they need to get a lot better. And I don't know how that's necessarily going to happen outside of the Ford in quantum Zander came in, but they didn't go get a safety. I mean, everyone just assumed they would overpay for real Thomas, and it didn't happen. So you rolling with those guys again, they brought back Jimmy war. Jason Brett is a good low risk signing. But I still feel like the back end of that defense is wanting. So if they don't get production, and they don't draft well in their positions of need on that side of the ball that I think that their ceiling is limited. They are the biggest question Mark for me. Maybe in the NFL because I know what the brand I saw the Browns. Yes, you're after week nine we saw what they looked like. And we know they should be good grapple. Oh goes out in September. With that injury. We don't actually know what the Niners with Garoppolo look like with that team around him. We saw at the end of the season in two thousand sixteen or twenty seventeen but it was kind of strange setup. They were already, you know, pretty much gone at that point. I'm I'm I'm as intrigued to see them as anybody in the league this year. Yeah. From we don't know what they are the Brown was interesting this second overall pick. I know if they go get Nick Bosa with the second overall pick or will they have a defensive line of deformed, deforest Buckner and Nick Bosa. I it might not matter who's playing safety. I mean that is a really good group. And it just seems like he might be too good to pass up. Even if you've already put a lot of draft capital into those spots. And you just traded a second round pick pretty Ford. Yeah. They can really good f-. Wa I think the cabbie. I'm trying to think if there's another team that's kind of as much of a question Mark that has as high as ceiling, and I don't know the answer. I think that you know, could Sam darnold be a lot better than your to the way he was encouraging. But that's still. Sign a holes. Yeah. That their roster. Just I think. I think is going to help a lot. I think you'll help as well. But I still don't think that they have enough. Overall roster talent to be really scary buffalo. No, just because I I know what Josh Allen is. I think and even if he ends up being a little bit better. I'm just not sure he'll ever be that good of quarterback. But yeah, those are probably the only ones everyone a lot of the other teams. They're kind of just known quantities range -ly. I'm strangely. Intrigued by the Jaguars. I just wanna see what they look like I don't necessarily care what the Broncos look like with Joe flacco. No, I definitely don't care. I have no the Broncos. I'm not interested in whatsoever. I think the jet foles conversation is an interesting one just because we underrate sometimes just how important competent at quarterback is the going from bottom of the barrel quarterbacking, I said this last year with the Browns going from bottom of the barrel quarterbacking to just average is the most important kind of improvement. You can make to your entire roster. And there's a chance we were just underrating how bad Blake Bortles was compared to a competent starter like Nick foles. But I also don't how good Nick foles really is. So I think that's definitely that's a complicating factor that I would like to see. But for the most part a lot of these teams we understand what they are. I'm kind of intrigued whether the agreement Packers is sure I think they can be really good. They really really good bears defense mechanism thing. No, I just think that the the game even if they overpaid for a lot of it. They're defensive talent they added pieces this year. I think that their offense is still pretty good. I mean, they they're line is they overpaid for Billy Turner. They probably need to what they only had one starting guard if they stay healthy upfront. I think that their offense can be solved they've young receivers. And there's a chance those guys take step forward in that. I think the biggest question for them is what that offense is going to look like I mean, how much is it going to be that kind of Shanahan inspired play action system. And what does Rogers look like in that scheme because I've wanted to see it for years and now we get to. So if he can kind of pick that up, and it's smooth. Then I think they can be really dangerous. All right. What's anything? Did. You have any other losers that you wanted to go? Yeah. I've one very quickly bovi on bell. You know, just take fourteen point five million dollars last year. You would have done the same deal. Anyway. Sorry, dude. Yeah. The Levy on buffing didn't necessarily work out. But I think we understood that in the moment. Well, you never know. I never I was always of the impression that I I don't know. I thought there was a ten percent chance he had some grand plan to just make it huge. Instead, he's pretty much the same deal. He would've regardless. Yeah. And as a you're older, you can argue that he doesn't have the year of mileage, but he's your older. So yeah, I it's we'll see what happens that jets team is weird. But I think that they might be pretty decent. If Donald gets a lot better. Are there any teams before we get outta here that who's hall you just want to talk about because you thought it was just well done or you thought that it was a little different than what you had expected or you thought that they're much much better than they were a week ago. And you're excited about them anybody I think it's really dangerous to draw any conclusions after free agency because we haven't seen the grade. And if you have a complete team now. I think that changes in a month. And so I think you have a team I think that changes in a month. So I'm holding off. Obviously, the Browns are awesome. I'm really excited to see them. Mike curiosity now with after free agency and trades is what is what is this raiders team? Click. Yeah. I mean, they signed a lot of players but outside of Antonio Brown. I don't know how good any of those players, really. Are Tyrone Williams is fine. But he's a number two receiver. Trump around is fine. But he's not the best tackle in the NFL. Now, he's getting paid like it. So they threw a lot of money around. But I'm not sure how well spent most of that money was with four years forty two million with about twenty million dollars. Twenty one million dollars guaranteed for lamarcus Joyner. So I brought up the raiders to bring up lamarcus Joyner. What why why lamarcus Joyner? I mean, like, I think that's a good example of somebody. You can find fairly cheaply in Marcus Joyner is a fine player flag. I mean, he's a fine player just fi. But his situation is very similar my mind to what happened with Tremaine Johnson last year. He gets franchised by the Rams, the Rams let him go and a team with a lot of money spends way too much of it on lamarcus Joyner. I mean, it's your your team is worse because the Marcus Joyner was there, but that is a huge contract for a guy who is a good safety. But not a great one. Totally agree. I just feel like that's that's that. Right. There is not understanding the modern EPO which are a couple of teams. Yeah. We could probably say are. But okay, they're not surprising. You know, I think that Philly did a good job is Philly. Always does your the league Jackson contract super palatable. They go get they keep Ronald Darby on a one year six and a half million dollar deal. I mean, those are the types of signings that keep them good. And I think that the same is true for New England. I mean going to get Michael Bennett. Obviously is a great move. They haven't overspent on many of these guys. So interesting that they were so hot in the slot receiver market. And that they really wanted a guy like Adam Humphreys, just because it seems like that's kind of a redundant skillset with. Would you went? But I don't know that they know what they're doing more than I do there's I'm Ali obsessed with Formula one because I just think that it's an incredible. I know you are. Who is favorite things about credible competition, that's kind of bleak. If that's one of my favorites strain. I I'm obsessed with with the idea of competition, and that is very very pure competition. If you ever look into it. It's just incredible. And one of the things that teams do is before the first race is they literally keep their top performance a secret closely guarded secret. It's called sandbagging they over fuel or they don't use all their gears, or whatever they don't go there top speed because they think that when you show your top speed and show how good you are essentially teams will game plan and figure out how to how to match you. So you so showing how good you are is a huge mistake. And they're kind of reminded me of the patriots. Where like every team has just sitting around and saying like, oh, we're making these moves making these moves and the patriots are sitting around and just pretending to not do anything except get Michael Bennett. And they don't mash for Adam Humphreys, or maybe they did who knows there. Report is they may be even offered more money, but we don't know the structure of it. And so every single year we do this thing where everybody makes these moves LA. The patriots didn't do anything. They're falling behind every year. We get to November. And turns out the patriots top speed is a lot faster than everybody else. Yeah. That's probably going to be the same thing this year as it often is I mean, it's I'm tired of out. I'm so tired of having to react to how the patriots are playing in the middle of October. Did seems knowing bagging their sandwiches. Mercer mercy like Mercedes. It's every year. It's become a tradition in every year. We all look like idiots one team just that I wanna throw out there before we get out of here that I thought had some did some interesting stuff. I just think he's a smart GM period. I think he doesn't get job. John Robinson is built a really good roster and Tennessee, and I think their biggest problem at this point is I don't know how good their quarterback is. And if he doesn't get much better than a lot of this is for not. But if you look at just the amount of talent they have on both sides of the ball. If they're really good. I mean, they they have plenty of good players on that team and to lose a guard. But then go get Roger Sappho to bring it Adam Humphreys, which is just a skill set. They don't have on that roster. I just think they're really good identifying where they need to get better and finding ways to do it. And if Mario it is not good that none of it matters. But also think that the riots Hannah is smart. I mean, it gives you a really high level backup quarterback gives you another option at the position. He didn't have to pay up. You have to pay that much to get him and the dolphins made a huge on track. Well, aren't they paying aren't they paying five million? Is that what I read the titans are paying him five million? So not a lot of money Ono for. Well. I mean, yeah, it's it's for a veteran guy who's pretty good. That's not that much money. Let me ask you questions you run the twenty nine hundred titans with Ryan tannehill. You're on the twenty nineteen titans with marks merit each for sixteen games. Tell me the difference in wins that mariota gives you versus Tanna with the exact supporting cast. I'm not sure it's an appreciable difference. I agree the one year two million dollars from the titans. So it's a really smart move. So I I would do that every time. So how much is Miami paying? I thought they were paying I think they're paying a lot. The dolphins are the dolphins are paying five million. That's what happened. Yeah. I mean, he's not getting paid very much at all to dolphins. The dolphins are giving him a paid his five million dollar bonus. That's where the five million dollars came from one point eight million dollar cap. It for Ryan, and it was really strong. I mean, if that's just a move to that makes your team better because Mario's SU super injury prone, we know this and to be able to not have the drop off from Marcus mariota to Blaine gabbert, and essentially not have a drop off when your backup comes in that can save your season. And again with a Rosser that's pretty good. I feel I can't compete. I think it's a really good kind of feel safe move. I agree. I like Ryan tannehill. I wish he's solid. I think Ryan Tanna. Hell, I honestly, I know this is strange to say because the money isn't match up. I would have I would love to see Ryan tannehill be like Jared goff's backup because I think with the right coach something cool can happen. But you know, the theory was that Bella check like him quite a bit. Yeah. I it's again, it gives you another option and when you have had placed so many games their backup quarterback. And you also don't know if you want to commit to your backup or to your starting quarterback long-term because Mario such a question, Mark. I just think it's a smart move by a smart GM. I mean their team has been very well built since John Robinson came into the picture. And that continues to be true agree. The dolphins. Are I'm going to watch every dolphins game with bated breath this year. There's they're interesting to me for the first time in Seoul on. I just think that going this route is the right move. I think it's the only move they had to make an they've spent no money in free agency. None they side Dwayne. Allen to like a tiny contract and they're paying their starting quarterback five million dollars. That is what you have to do if you want to actually rebuild this thing. They're going to one hundred twenty million dollars in Couchbase next year. Yeah. I don't I for the longest time. They were the team that frustrated me the most a lot of the moves they would make and this is the opposite of that. Yeah. Good coaching staff. I think I imagined slight some of those it made. Yeah. I I'm talking about the assistance and all that stuff. I don't I have no idea how good of head coach for us would be. But. Knowing how good it off. It's according to channel shaving to be the first time he's ever. I think he'll be fine. I think he'll be fine. I like Patrick Graham. I just I think I think they took a lot of really talented ex patriots guys in and put them in position succeed. All right there, we go ending two thousand nineteen find a way to spend. We're not going to learn how good of a shadow attaches issue. No, we probably are not. And if we do that's a problem. If I'm if we might realize he's good if he's great and they fucking win seven games. We got we got a picture. We got a problem. Hey, chad. Chad dial it back a little bit, buddy. Put it whoever their backup quarterback is who I can't even name at this point of quarterbacks. One is Luke Falk and the other is Jake rutta O J. That's right. That's right. That's right. Yeah. I was kinda hoping they would just roll with one of those guys this year. They're probably going to get rid of rubber Quinn too and down that and there's you're really their starting defensive lineman. If they do that is of the as they're listed right here. No Charles hairs first round pick. But he'll probably start now. But you have Jonathan Woodard who was a street for Asian two thousand seventeen devan Gagio who's a fifth round pick in seventeen and Akeem Spence starting alignment along with happy keeps pets there. So I've heard of somebody. Let's let's do this dolphins. Let's let's take all the way. All right. That's all we got guys. We'll be back next week starting our draft. Previews? We'll be talking with Danny Kelly every week just kind of digging into all things drafted here. Gonna be here before we know it house your house. Big board. I had I'm still building it very early stages of the draft. You're not gonna believe it. You're not gonna believe this. My big board is the exact same as Danny Kelly's. Would they say, hey, drag Kelly? I'd be fall into the same exact comments, and literally everything is the same. All right. That's all we got guys as always thank you so much for during fell show on the ring a podcast network. We'll talk to you soon. Thanks, guys.

NFL Antonio Brown patriots Blake Bortles Nick foles raiders Earl Thomas Jaguars Bill Simmons Sean Jackson Baltimore colts Mark Barron New England Cleveland Browns Trent Brown New Orleans Saints lamarcus Joyner Cam Newton
Going Solo

Never Loved Elvis

50:40 min | 2 months ago

Going Solo

"Logan evening welcome to nothing much. This is never loved. Elvis on kevin making up the flab four. We have to manage little. Mix them greedy fucking huge mix. Tj base the man who knows more solari teams than jim from american pies pizza. I lie and the man who's less rigorous star and more bring pool its involvement and nothing and this is never loved elvis. So what's been grabbing. You is news. This week gents jaakko. Well now. i just thought visible signs. I saw today shocking. News dot baby. Shaq is the most listened to song on youtube with over seven billion views which listeners. Who doesn't know how it goes. I'm going take to sell out today. Just let what does a better. Because he's really scholz catchy so they would just play over and over again. Seven point zero four billion views. That's insane for every person on the planet. If you think about how many times you've heard that from each in your house. I mean that the only could it be at this issue is but then they pink. Fung piggly greater ensued by some bloke reckons. He intended baby shower. Think it was like a nursery rhyme in in any anyway. Sydenham is low money. do you have any. That didn't always stayed in the of the podcast. We play all songs that put on the playlist. All songs that mentioned on the podcast star are now sign out. Miss the just missed. It might be offended if we'd outgrown the on the spot by by debut esi but also. The controversy doesn't and there in an oklahoma prison prison cards will like handcuffing. This forcing them to stand up and play baby shop to the up to two hours yet. Then district attorney said that the repeat japan to song alad emotional straps on the inmates. It will most likely already suffering every parent in the land. Wow how you is hard to know going to current music news by did sit down and watch a good music documentary this week. Which was brian johnson talking. Stay grow ron johnson macy. Dc and to really relaxed chat between the two of them. Lots of good insights. But i haven't read us. Was when dave grow broke his fall off the stage. Show that i. We took broken it fairly early on. I thought that ended the gig but he done to songs. He's lying on the floor. They've said broken ankle. He grabs the microphone. East chatting through it. And say we're gonna play. It's gonna be alright. I might go to hospital first. Etame say go to hospital is what. I'm not leaving after two psalms taking on stage. One of the paramedics has gone home design. Clean place and it lies back. Four hundred she set absolutely no authority dominated broken ankle go his ankle finishes set and then goes toss to do properly alleged thick. Who is the documentary. Like obviously that was high is good because brian johnson's really relaxed twenties. Talk to these guys. These obviously you see the jewelry. George took over from scott right. Yeah yeah and it's just a really nice nature the ball growers. He absolutely knows. We live on the road and connects. Understand so yeah. It's really good. On scott's documentary focus is relatively add. Subscribe to many van newsletters placebos one of them and i had an email through saying black market. Music was twenty is older. Think or gay twenty. Which made me feel very old anyway. Because i remember when that came out quite album quite dark. But they'd they'd done making all somebody's about twenty minutes and by split intellect for youtube videos You know bite sized chunks each and stefan the bicyclists or takes you round. Will these places in london where they require. They recorded it. Turns i recorded over number of locations. Then you've got something from the produce seventy so lockdown footage. So you know it's clear be might very recently and backing vocalists and she does have record from seinfield our house. And that's quite nice spun but a quite like hearing behind safe touch this week about the the listening party timbers here you hear a bit about the album or from the from the people who are involved in the rest of the band of this kid so it could market stories. yeah twenty years old. And the verse. Three verse redoubt him. So i'd recommend that accidentally mine were going to be just simply two things of cheer me up during lockdown on instagram. So don't if you the both visual ones that doesn't really work that well but so check it out. One is kobe wax. I think in is brought up your best. you know as well as it is essentially some making artwork. Sorry big hands of famous cover albums. Yeah so They'll have a perhaps her screaming delicate Cover the can and creamy delicate might have is really nicely done checking out all right chapas caucusing last week which was made out to the noca- completely the onto avi so you Taste here but it's just beer and beer music twice audio and the other one is someone on instagram. Called stuff by mark. Who's an artist sauce making retro posters based on his favorite musicians bassi to the cover for pop-up. Jim jimbo our so. The guy that did that whole counter and of is very eclectic music taste which is quite similar to mine but some of the places. they're phenomenal. That might be erect. True nineteen fifty sci-fi poster have bow as the lead character or he will have pavement. Done in the style of scooby doo. So yeah stuff by mark and be waxed and both on instagram lovely. Thank you sounds good. I regret keith. Okay or know what to do. And that's why we're into fancy pants. Good grief currently consists of rebel wilson on drums bass players kim jong un really singers rich and mainly. Who are we going to add as a leak. Atari ian okay as as something of an indicate unluckily obey showmanship guitarist. Someone who's great to watch some think. Think more eddie van halen breslin peace and audibles. And sometimes they say so. Sore style rather than rob the technical data gilmore from floyd or something like that own. Say some little unhinged. I think that baby brady helps value someone who's happy to get slow down in these play guitar about in the back of the head set fire to it not sort so i ended up with the shortlist of three and those three were robert. Downey junior prince harry and gang. His car go against com. Tangus only gets out this column on league all properly unhinged somebody. You can't help but love to watch is going to be some grateful absence. Banda him matriarch. Imagine of going kind ladies. What was john h base. Yeah yeah because he's going to be angry. Genghis challenge get some leak. It's he's going to be ignored. Isn't a in you know. They're not opened. Pete so i was thinking about league terrorists and what jumps into my mind is bleak stars. I love slash legend. John crescenti easing these qatar. That was joe. Perry from earth smith that look in their real partnership with front man so that right hand man that technicians. They really staff they hold it together when front man gets bit loose but also that that the best might say. I think they a partnership with rich mainly lead in front. You said it's a bit of a cluster. Fuck let's get a partnership the front and this is channeling. i think. yeah. Stephen taught enjoy perry. You can have rich by front dr. Hillary joins me two of them destroying stuff throughout international listeners. And victor hill. I think the rock and roll doctor. He's the ultimate gmtv. And this morning. Dr of twenty years. Yeah yeah you go to a nation what something of an agony uncle as well right. Yeah yeah he still some thrown out there. I think it's a partnership able look good together. Oh yeah i can imagine doing the back to back thing one. I'm playing guitar to sharing. Mike dot hillary and his wife sharing name. And how the two mikes. I'll be very surprised if he doesn't make into the band. But i would care. Usually find some of default wagon vendors abstaining. Anyway i thought about this by the way we need to upstate. Oh now now last week upstate and all the time false indochina germs. Yup the little details. Nothing he's coming on the good stuff well just let them through emphatically thinking of what makes a good guitar is someone who makes everything else. Look good so he'll be the one they're right in the songs but not taking the main lima. That's what the league seniors for someone that puts the chains together. He's a creative force behind everything. Somebody's not taking the limelight. And another way would be if you think about film. It's not the lead man or the lady is the best supporting actor or actress. So i took a quick look down. The list of the people have been nominated for the most oscars for best supporting actor and Second on the bill of all time. The man who had four. Norman oscar nominations for best supporting actor. Jeff bridges the dude jeff. Bridges is that man whose latest jeff bridges in the bubble. The due process register they practice henry will be every night practice. Rome he doesn't get nominated for scrimping around digging us go donations. I can tell you did you. Have you seen route and to twist and all turns out is helps. Bridges is there. I think it'd be fantastic base. How about you. I think i was thinking kind of along the same lines part of the badly from but i was also thinking of guitarist can sometimes try to steal the limelight. A little bit jemaine walking down the front doing solos by genghis khan genghis khan might do not afraid to shy away from control. Also that's why an ideal pot immediately but may may of dubious looking for god when it did initiate overcrowd- made mainly all of powell river band die overshadow intensive dynamic. He is than pays volcanic months. The road onto you like. He's become three times. Chevy clubs unto joined. Yeah audience would enjoy pelleting glass space. Yeah i give me give me mehtab. Yeah i'm okay. We'll we'll take your nomination. They're staying we'll say is going to give stress. I'm adele appears if you're listening. It's not that i would involve you into this month particularly like you got four hundred and eight and everyone in a podcast. Thinking is not always moving. And kim jong hoon all right. So let's take a quick vote in this election back to the episodes. Think if we say out loud when we vote giving is at audio format taking us apple voicing nobody on the show of hands those who wish to vote for genghis khan as lead guitar. Say i i. I hated strays towns. Gingas kahn is lead. Guitarist in cluster. Fuck ages early. It'd be amazing. Look at the president. He's wearing again. You have to say a few. Whoever wilson here poin tech should how to run against genghis in timber. Bill and ted genghis khan can help off. It's to become resistant. That just get onto this story to figure in history intent is out rico just is going straight to amazon is pleased i this i. This is no yeah. We've got two kids. I don't care. the reviews. Were kind re managed care news. I yeah it makes no sense at all boys. Good along those lines and look up to what have come to the cinema. We'll go off this episode. See where we can find it and maybe the forest can do a tim's twitter listen costly for intead. Nothing is on netflix numbers. And if your company just send us a copy sends a copy shoulder okay. So the incomes. Spend some of whom time others lake to ship some manage to allow the side project rather than with a winning formula. Today we're talking about going so low. Some have been great others less. So so Jen's let's open up with the some of the greatest bands will time with lennon. Mccartney ringo and george aqap georgia's for god thinking thomas. The tank engine going solo. Who has been seen great for you. Well actually starting with beatles bad places. And i think looking at satellite like sometimes people people guys i if there's one person in the band who really wants the band the evans four ran beatles four three and a half talented people there but all of that success so as far as you mentioned george harrison as looking at as he his first solo album was called wonderful s where the was very so and he's quacks kleisterlee the waste ways to look you. I took away responsible from from beatles to isis in short. We just we just cover this now. That really shouldn't be normally by successful. Yeah the piece was. Do you think john lennon mccartney most successful decrees and saudi craze and completely different directions showed how amazing they were band but aside individually tardy stacked up forty for folks come down either side of the fence john lennon with imagine and etc. Paul mccartney with is living led by. That's i hope some frozen. Yeah fly voice fan on iran. That stuff. I think it's all about letting isn't it. I mean putin. Britain love him but lenin also he's gonna look inside legend. Yeah through not changing your on that night. That's confirming these things folk song so that when the big bands with where there's lots of characters in them is a bit easier to of necessarily tricky to figure out who had the best. Some of the yeah. Obviously it's going to be put. Whether from john or some insight from seven. Say the ones that. I was thinking along those lines of looking at things like nwa or public enemy and and the fact that all of the mentors have phenomenal careers afterwards. Whether we don't stray or ask you all massively successful in is are you got to bring the tail. I'm a bit like when it comes to solve on all at quite often. I'm not into it. When people break when the prego reserve solo. So i of struggled with this because by with people going solo a five into the bound a fact difficul bolt someone that did the media person of the crops into his guerrillas unite for blood and like death amongst Three hours actually. What was it david days. What was it plastic Borio guerrillas that was like a complete departure from what he was doing. It says so interesting. Thinking about diamond ova. This came back but the question was was along the lines. Of which one would you if you had to Listen to autism desert island forevermore mall which would that be. She told damon album the show. Get all the blood back catalogue. Get little gorillas you get all of the day more african expressways molly and stuff who some breeding interesting stuff often magician completely. Different to the blast off and i love that valda grand cokes and stuff. It was very similar to way presumed before still too good high standards of company has a no no look. I found this a self. It was easy to think of bans the road. Or you know you mentioned. The beatles already bought found it much easier to reflect on your favorite matt with stevie nicks go sorry. Lorenzo van and genesis. Leaving in having a very successful career and phil collins doing site and All of that's different isn't it. Because the age we are like phil collins collins in my mind yeah and then i went back and discovered if touch that he's invisible. He did he was yay zodiac. Was he threw. Service must be inserted of projects at the same time george the that we cannot talk genesis settlers in that ratio interest. Isn't it like like hearing somewhat and then discovered about karlag. Afterwards someone of that ilk to me would have been bjork. Who can love spin. That debut came out was really refreshing. Search a hit. Em maybe maybe thi- the as maybe there were there on completion. Type that someone to give me a couple of years previous and decent. What exactly did you have flushing keeps out now. That the bill a minus as someone who has a subtle ossius kept exploring never shaved. Yeah live yeah scott on my of a native say you know phenomenal reading. She story yet she. She suddenly boom festival still across a wide open. Imagine it's really amazing. Visuals it's ask other. But his curve festival. I would have been glossary ninety four She ran onstage in a pink dress just screaming and shouting and absolutely captivating really really really amazing. The next time bain who is part of a charity thing in sam faces covered in blue glitter. She looked like she was from another planet and the songs were amazing but it was a little bit officials here video world leader the whole get up from the dress. The head face lives. Everything was just phenomenal but the music. Absolutely you're we may be some odd stick up there. Someone else that. I think is mentioned or addressed in a very stars paul weller. Who did that. The jam was hugely successful with that. In the late seventies early eighties moved onto star council. Complete change of of music and then vanished. Will awhile came back on the scene in the early nineties. Early to mid ninety s sounding route but like with that was that his first solo album. No actually. i wouldn't be surprised if there's a couple of between but he came back in vogue at that time and when you look at the the number of singles. They're phenomenal really good. I bet something when i was looking pretty babies brushing but this one this week the bans the go along when lead singer leftover genetic the character in the band left and read. The jam went on without paul weller. Just thinking how the mine example that they were using social thing was in guardian. Were saying about queen. There were saying so freddie after freddie mercury died they tried to carry on climb the debt john john bacon left as well at the same time you play one more get coutries. The freddie mercury troops and left the told rochester ny. They did some fans out of lambert. This guy from x. Factual some america's got tunnels. But that's all they just right here. yeah just for. That must be really hard thing filling the from man's spot and it doesn't work most times. It does well in excess. Try to deny deny show just embarrassed themselves and they got some singer so queen done something similar but actually kind of put off because of said we just want to carry on playing on music forever. The bandar town also going to replace me take tiger mayor with from an different roles anyway. But we're not covering off carried on wins over. Do we do settle. I say about johnny marr. Marcy had more say and johnny marr. Who these socks successful based on big fan of johnny marr. Marci's covering sending makes them a bit. Low the buber. Yeah well i think the difference between the maze morrissey condos morrissey stuff. Is he done anything over the marseille general main johnny ma splits Like electric modest mouse in. You know these cribs then provide years. Yeah so you know. Doing lots of different stuff seems really enjoying it. Yeah enjoys being johnny marr and again you can. You could be offensive and you know she replied nichols we'd like to onstage johnny marr. We had I'm looking around the room trying to figure out. Who was there with sending soldiers tomorrow. Glastonbury t one austria and then. I'm pretty sure campus with you. When james early on and play a couple of james as well then he did his stuff and he had 'electronic cap playing. You really mixing yourself and you can let guys go a huge back catalogue of not just stuff this. This isn't someone who's happy to wrestlers laura's and that's the great thing about all solo kind of tries to days that they haven't been happy. Just go through the back catalogue still stuff weight loss to the point. Amount will morris today royal roads. Some everyday is like sunday which could have been smith's track and pretty much taken that route to stay in that group. Say the couple of trucks on the way it'd be on look albums off. Anything liable has questioned viewpoints and seven things which leads us nicely onto a and brown. Who again we were going to go and see this summer. I think he was. Headlining in victoria got bills and saying that again. Some some cracking psalms that he's done over the past twenty years ago he's been doing it. Yeah where the buffet again. Mike like you know genetic yourself like the first album. The eat eat three good solo albums. I think the style is solid solid music spheres being the most recent on that list. I'm talking about golden greats which wars and finish monkey business businesses and those low to crack in psalms on that low in the underground was sitting down and standing off quasi. He was sitting down. And just you know joel stares straight ahead and it was one of those company yes definitely and then next week just came and it took me three stops to pick up coach. Sit there once i did. I made sure banged his name when sorry go ahead and high in any way he was super army as well new big suitcase in between his legs and he was a big lift dressed in black candidate just looked classic goal draw on his way to whichever taking the was king monkey himself to it was finishing juicing. The latest album dole out there was working on to my knowledge. There hasn't been released his head coach. Gopher for days after days some and when it would sologub Plant don't roses off his back but commend by allied allied to in in manchester a gig at the college. What the geeks all throughout active venues we went to a gig seven and the ball in so i am play by the they get that up. And so the jimmy. Please tune in an answer about something. Eleven o'clock at night. it was brown. A bunch of adams idea. No stuff goes into like a wannabe adult. It's a lot of just mental. i met with. I think it might be. The first time he so played was is are quite a few of the people who do play the stuff that made me thinks first place for quite a while. They really wanted to distinguish themselves from from the past and kislyak who's really dug their heels in said nano planet stuff and play my stuff net doing that. I mean gas coups guests to say seeing that twice a day. He did Today i was that. Yeah sars tim twice. Both she certainly done some secret graphs. the sound that makes of bands the boy room in a way up some of the way down but you can brady sort week from the chaff when you hear something like that. That talented On excel he's just my says phenomenal sound in his own voice holds. Bring while yeah. He just phenomenal really someone else. A thinking along the elk was steve mason from the beta back up to. That won't came up as a memory of face. I wish come on. Yeah you did. Not no statements. He's listening to pavement event. Please make sure banged. I would would say the bay as we but yeah he okay. He was playing all of the simpsons. Company claims the past fifteen years and then he dropped in a couple of beat. Obama did eight tracks much. I've not doing that. I wasn't expecting it. And then i had such a big green my face because i thought never hear them do that again. Yeah because they will not refal you can imagine not revolting. But why did they that you stopped just wanted calls which it didn't fall out today because it kind of it was a final took. The luxton was the funding so the last the final what it was like it was announced and this is the end then they start helping any kind of feels very final. The geraldine honey buns reform after two years. Yeah i think. I've seen for five loss ever wanted to stop gigs. Yeah missile ducks with similar numbers. Yeah this very few that saw just because it could see about people voting if you have. Some tomio applied known his own pace visit. It said to be did that. He's also a couple of phenomenal albums as well. I one of my favorites Tracks the ten fifteen years is being one of the surveys of very similar to against limbs era. yeah oh in rainbows taught bleep fall tae. Yeah phenomenal really really good. Quality recommended brady had done so except egos a jordan agreements done. Is he done. They will say checking in the current away. Hey routes milwaukee framed. Who's a film composer who missed out. Investors and golden globes to him both times this year. So he's he's done pretty well in this podcast and then not play radiohead absolutely not. There's no way he's he's going to be playing an owl spirits every and okay. Actually but i guess because neither at some stage had come back in the same way that you might with some nyc who has said tin bird. So you're gonna see tim burgess. He's been playing. Tim burgess tracks but you know that in six hundred seventy per pergram. Catcher charlatans happy with that he's the ones that have left in the band of finish that you probably want to hear maybe one or two the big island the front block the catholics. And we've downsized the bar. It started sending what piqued story. But now i don't that. Apparently he played for the lawyers and then the next didn't play any waving saw. We miss the star. Only played the laura but now in my mind is taken off. You mentioned just one body to hit the play anymore. Pixes did planet than i need to do it on call was ever asia's shouted eighty dollars strategy. Going to start with the pixies on. And i'm going to. I hope it will be another. One of the yeah. Yeah say they'll stay right into the case plays them and there was reading about just slugged. Sorry where is my mind today. And it really. He was explaining. the what was about about it. You could work out is about you. Went on holiday an chased by an angry little fish in the mediterranean. After listening to chat. And you want to throw in clubs sanction. Sting evasive learn hill. Excuse me seven come. From the velvet underground comes out with stuff float while side perfect day. Yeah i i. We've covered all the ones that i thought i struggled to think of anyone that are really excited about is about his to win. They're in the band. And i think that's that's the sign that you've really made it so that you watch and you're not willing to play all the band's songs and then we talked about before that from are you fill that era like rather than phil collins or becoming one contemporary on the absolutely love these nick mulvey who solo artist in love. He was in poor taste. Left right wenton went surveys go two. Maybe three albums phenomenal. I've festivals squad few times Seen him down at which dreams at the cinema at the Brown house beautiful. Beautiful guitar is lovely. So except better than star no Very different and love. that thought. You're right very few between the city. Someone is better than they were in. How about stain. Well these things on my modest big found place but yet it's really tough called. No i don't think so as a silence is better than that in the place. But i think that's a tough because stings excited stuff from no matter what you think of think of it is to the road. It's it's good stuff. He's a great great side of office about to michael. Well yes it's better than is still. Would i listen to. It probably know thing to say. I'm kind of what we've been set. General you've got if you're in if you've of you're already aware about like about then you've already got five is going into this very difficult than the someone to break away because so amazing that you're going to just forget about the golden state in fact. I don't even want him to play the old stuff you did. They have to be pretty amazing pretty tough. Yeah some australian bam powder that absolutely huge the biggest band out that they're incredible and they've they've taught here's what really could band and they break up about ten years ago. Everyone's got it and the they when saturday and it's really really good what he's done. Great stuff burn at finding and he's still silo now at but you're going to save. Not if he's upset incredible. The crowd was absolutely maverick. Plays patterson he refused. He refused for years to play power of songs and now he throws the one must one day sitting and he's good is credible must wonder the right thing when the crowd is absolutely mad for listening for twenty thirty years. Yeah okay something. We've met rapper of that time on going. Certainly so we will move onto. This is a low or higher than the sun. Okay ladies and gents misguide time this week. We'll flying this low. So i'm going to give you a topic the same Needs to say whether it's higher low than the last one she. This first optic is select magazines. How of the year nine thousand nine hundred ninety one now. All of these arms in the top twenty selected by of writers of select magazine at just missing out just to give you a clue. Never loved elvis stuff just under six. We had nine. Momma said by lenny kravitz at thirty two at leisure by blah at thirty four hundred thirty five. Use your illusion to the base one year at number thirty nine for say missing out had butthole surfers jesus jones morrissey and prince so none of these in the top. Twenty pete you ve. Each goths three lives. Could you do with news because this is no longer working. So pete. starting with white room by the kayla's that was number fourteen list woes. Trum lamont by pixies. Haya will ever la carbon pete loses. Life came in at number four year. Why fixing the seat number. I thought about that number. Four page doesn't know full loveless by my bloody valentine's hya- low it. Oh higher so greedy say hi was. It's your life back escape. Wanted three vibe saying that trump is trump. and it's up three okay. You've lost a life as well. That was number six wash k. So number six in never mind by nevada. was that or lower than loveless. By my bloody valentine haya either. The fox say you those allies as well. That was number eleven so this is going really well. Jim okay that position out the whole year. Yes it's not just to wasn't notice that as by the report by the account favorites album of the year profile tonight low profile. The people reading this and then we can start okay. So let's go with throwing muses real ramona. Ohio lower the netherlands lower. Yes peace through nex base. That was number twenty. How sir let's go bandwagon ask teenage fan club was i'll love it was up. Twenty one number beats okay. Oh that's individual he. And how are you sir state excel. Was that higher lower than bandwagon. Exporting anglo love it was. Larry came in at number seventeen not year paint moving on to out of time by rem classy. That one is. The judge is like it. I loved it loved it. I was higher cool. It was yeah. It was not that year okay. Moving on to blue lines forbe's massive attack. Seminal debut album. All lower than rem assets on that copay shalit's easily a bit of a welcome that i'm going to go higher bases another came off. Well one of the best interest as my favorite. I think favorable okay. Moving on young mc buzzed. The was escaped me. Was that high will lower than no. I was lower goes lower than that came in at number am cpos today. We as well not to too many students have pm. Doom of the heart of so comes the lower. Than what would you say we say. I m c buzzing when leisure via sex lower it was lower came in at number eighteen. So you missed me losing important you don one life here basis dental and life because so you'll to okay so we're number eight seed. Let's go ice tea. Original gangster was a higher or lower high was higher. That was number eight. I think on the list. Their original canyon screaming delegate. He aims higher or lower than ice tea. Original gangsta as national. It was number one. Yeah we've done okay. Students should be julian cope. Peggy suicide was a higher or lower than screams allocate which was number one piece. Give you ten minute. Appreciate therapist now was low that came in at number twelve. We pretty much. So let's move onto enemy single at the one thousand nine hundred ninety four sorry singles. I'm going to start off with the number twenty. Three which was shampoo treble nora. So next openly skull the inner city life. Who's hire whoever twenty three high of again tough to fifty fifty fifty okasha. Well i mean. Oh golly hi. Chuck was higher than number eleven. Go the number. Eleven play was a and boys my blood's higher or lower than eleven in mind every twenty. Three yes fifty. I'm still going go higher. It was it was number one which gives pizza. A lovely freebie whitfield. Saturday night was a higher or lower than number one lower. It was number fifteen. Oh wow in the enemy. Singles of the one thousand nine hundred ninety single. The recruitment credible press based outside porches said several times. is that high or lower them. Fifteen phone can pick up. Well i mean. I feel like it'd be tricked in because it's got to be higher yet. We thought shampoo at twenty three week field to saturday night at fifty eight so it's probably lower. It was low number thirty two years ago. A few soundgarden black hole some higher eleven thirty two to add normally just straight out with higher because then a book put would throw me into a flat spin harlow saying i'm still going go on religious lock. It was number thirty seven black hole sun better and the enemy was a to enemies. Thing was criticizing people's tasty music yet. This is the next one. Up got one nine now. A whole miss world was at higher or lower than thirty seven. Fifty higher peaks outs. It was number forty. Four that year crew love me swelled with whole number forty four. So this is between you and in loser. Back by back was a higher than forty four. Was number six hundred year skates bit. Tricky now this is getting quite sure because the next one on a real tough one on this one sabotage beastie boys tune is that higher will low them back loses. That's great chin. Amazing video one of the greatest Stick on principles hot and it's called as net full good way in theme music now. I had a few more days around three debit. Maybe we'll carry this next week. We've want to ten ten. Ten wins this week. Well done bess abroad. So come off the semi hall home to my own we have. We've inducted inducted. Genghis khan axeman as the We have Chettle things going solo and bettas actually wanna game peter's lost the game for the first time all four something mentioned correct at it's to the spotify playlists narrative. You find his some instagram twitter facebook. His channel those kind of things but thank you very much to take time to to listen to his offering kevin open in the best. I've never loved elvis. I a renewed

johnny marr brian johnson jaakko Fung piggly Etame bassi jeff bridges Jim jimbo ian okay eddie van halen breslin John crescenti earth smith scott victor hill Mike dot hillary Norman oscar jemaine genghis khan genghis khan kim jong hoon Gingas kahn
Johnny Marr: The Rolling Stone Interview

Rolling Stone Music Now

38:48 min | 2 years ago

Johnny Marr: The Rolling Stone Interview

"Hey, Brian, Hiatt in this Rolling Stone music. Now today we're gonna be talking to an actual rock legend. Johnny Mark, who has a quite excellent solo album out called call the comment. He also has an autobiography that's a couple years old with his permission. We'll talk a little bit about that because it's a great books. It is still your life even if it's a couple years old, but welcome. Thanks, Brian. You invite people like to say you were a gun for hire, which isn't your favorite phrase, but you were doing a lot of different things, your phone, it seems like it never stopped ringing from the moment. You the Smiths ended reading your book. It's like the phone just went from one thing to another, or is that allusion? Was there ever a time when things were follow and quiet and you wonder what you're doing? I don't think so. So you know, my phone didn't really need to ring for the guest for the full years, thousand motive smile. So it wasn't like every day a phone was constantly ringing, but now. Got to be top player make and playing shows with, you know, locally for me pretty much my favorite musicians. So it's kind of been like a an amazing of trajectory us right word and journey say, okay, what you mentioned about the journeyman thing and the gunfire a lot. I mean, I star of vice even in nineteen seventy eight. That phrase was so worn out seven in nine, you know, for journalists to use the phrase, gunfire higher. I mean, really, it's light nights are we talking about the Doobie brothers fan? So so I don't really, you know, never really want to engage without kind of rhetoric. Buffing may be the is on people kind of understand my ammo now really, which is just kind of plain simple. Bena musician won't into with interesting people on interesting projects. You know with some hopefully interesting outcomes would hopefully stand the test of time. And I think the was really beautiful and important part of matzo posts. Rear those is done us still detested time as a few electric songs, certainly thoughts. I would've, hey it to have missed work in on, and then the list goes on and on this plenty of things with the pet shop. Boys, I would hate to have missed out on an would have really not wanted to miss out on doing some the film about dome with Zimmer and the still continuing to really so all makes total sense to me enough ill, very fortunate to be doing in frigates players. Seemed like about the best job in the world. This album as with all your soul stuff so well produced and you're the co-producer on it, you've done some producing, but I'm surprised that that hadn't been a big focus of your career because I think you would have big incredible fence a made a deliberate decision to turn down low to production office loss because been produced a search, a massive, emotional investment if you are doing it right. And in a way you almost be. Being a nice person, you almost put more responsibility on yourself for is particularly young is than you would on your own records to be a little. You know, I don't know. Just Mara fight about Moammar coats. I enjoy the of production and a lot of what I do want. One of the things I learned over the earliest McRae was arranged -ment. You know what I do. Technically, this month began a little too Museau. One of things I learned while I was working on even before the Smiths really would these experiments was making with putting towels on tape was arranging I was fascinated with the way these glam rock records were made when I was a little child basically and how they will put together. I really love that. And you know, one of the things on good, but I just out an out, turned down a load of producing and still do because I would care about it like it was my own record in some ways care about more than it was my own Recco because you're the protector of. Of other people's dreams, hopes and dreams. So you'd better not mess it up and it just his his, not worth it for me really because there's other things I need to be pointing my time into. So it was really not made me make decision. What's your bug from the new album? Just from the very beginning of the Smith, it's clear that you heard guitar parts in their totality. You weren't. And I think that's also true of the way you learned guitar is you're less focused on one lead or one guitar part, but more about like China and cops, the same song. In fact, sometimes I think you were learning to play songs in ways that you were you were trying to play the whole song at once. I think that helped form your style. No, that's exactly right. Will was learning in as a little kid, tiny, eleven. I would listen to records by the hoople. Eero was forty fives because I was into hoax and succinct. A brilliant thing, a forty five with do, and these little symphonic three and a half minutes of symphonic pop music. But because I was listening to wanting to do all of that on the Qatar so appropriate. A of what I was hearing. I was very look on all our lives of by definition subjective. Puts very Lookie that being a little teeny Bopper you're starting. So young at nine, ten eleven and the times coincided with nine seventy nine seventy one seventy two seventy three Bookham as it became no music in the u. k. we kind of got almost all the best of the American store. So you know, we got sparks in the charts and there was all these great British bonds in those David Bowie and Roxy music and Allah, that's when I learned to play. I I learned play listening to all of those very eccentric records that were Bill on very radical guitars. You know if you listen to the early sparks records Deke star, Salat insane a lot. Those Bowie homes they were hit. They were in the charts. I would hear those those records before going school in the morning, that was what you would hear in the background and they all had outrageous guitar playing on it and I was listening to, but it also have string arrangements and the organ would come in in the second verse. And then some background vocals would come in on the second chorus. And then there would be a stop going into the coder and hours studying all the student, I absolutely became expert and a student rather of the way those records when together and is Bush for me that crossed with this absolute obsession with the guitar and flair for you know, knack for being a play, but look because I was such a little teeny Bopper obsessed with pob. It stopped me forget into into Led Zeppelin and deep purple and going down kind of blues thing. You said that you were really averse to anything with wizards in it and that kind of thing. These days of mellowed a little bit, and and I'm partial to a little bit of flu now and again, and the late sixties cop shows and stuff out. Oh, yeah, mainly just wrote Tolan an all of that business. It was just also very unsexy music. Yeah, and there's no girls involved in the audience and which wasn't a good sign familiar ever still is in, and I was never really into that larger thing. He was just to testosterone and boy, I showed never never, really a group really, really tight with sisters, only eleven months, my junior and she would never let me go away with wizards and organs. Of t. Rex is a really big deal for. Yeah, yeah. See Rex, who will the thing was it was eccentric as well. You know, it was a lot of fun. I this thing sometimes where I say pop music. I've to modify it somewhat in the last ten years. Two stunned that because pop as now well and truly come to mean something other than what I mean as being. But Sern pop to me at a law, feminine in it was very liberating in again, it's subjective into with times I was growing up with, but I, she think this thing I'm talking about, I think a lot of people in the night is concerned the same and maybe people go into the Smiths twelve info in fifteen. Well, we may be not. Maybe we were where that we were doing and we were very proud of making it kind of a drudge Innis an eccentric. You know, the star of she'll take above. For instance, his up breast Bank of little total to we wrote the as a single. Just for this is going to be strange on the radio, and that was all the more reason to do it. And we felt that the kids who followed his. Light, those eccentricities and that we weren't playing safe because really add. We've been on a major commune if we didn't have any balls, we would not on the front of a single and we made all loads of decisions like they will always tipped on to the side of is this century, therefore interesting and messing with the kind of commercial idiom some more and all the is why romanticize pop what pop can be. I'm sure there are good examples of it right now. I mean, I think Kendrick Lamar's Popeye's in because he's bringing not the obvious jesse's voice alone, you know is right down the line. You know between is just graze, got kind of sensuality to think, and he's five those as well. And so there's still some people doing it, I think. Yeah. Yeah, yeah's great pop group. So that's that's my terminology source sticking with it. Really your guitar style. Tracing it in the book is really interesting because you played all sorts of stuff. Yeah, including some very traditional rock-n-roll stuff you played along with stones records, and I was amazed you you're in a band, the covered American Girl by Tom petty. So there's just all sorts of steps along the way. But you crystallized all into, you know, one of the greatest and most singular guitar style. So I mean, what were the steps in your mind to kind of crystallize the style that you've expanded upon and done a lot of things with, but it's still is often recognizable as what you you appreciate saying, you know, what don't his impression in the vibe, you know, it would almost be easier to say while I rejected because if something's only to blues, it sounded to elemental to me. It didn't have all the things I was just talking about before it didn't of sensually didn't centrisly. Ernest regular guy rock, which was the staple of that was being fed two boys who were interesting playing guitar of my age of my era. Just before punk, there was some things that were outside of the I saw out and the smaller of my Mace would do the same thing. Let bebop the looks. This guy, Bill Nelson. We try seek out the things that weren't elemental meat and potatoes, bore boring straits of, but ERM you know, you mentioned yet the Banos in we did American Girl. I mean, that was like the strokes, five years before the strokes, and he's a great pop song is a great pop arrangement. And luckily again, you know, when a really start getting together at fifteen came of age, when punk was happening, bought new wave was happening, which to older people was a little bit of a kind of misnomer. ROY was a corporate dirty word, but you know what, for me four in fifteen. I liked because the night by Amir already was really a big pile Smith van. But I lied that she made a commercial record is a great sounding song and then Blondie here. So for me, this thing of arrangements and the great pop gesture, the great pop sound. It was all fair game. However, I also was very serious about, and this is something that still with me this day where all came from, you know, so that really fired my interest in Orissa west pies, misdoing Ron, be my baby by the Ronin it's isn't that some kind of Bogo Merckel from the sixties. Right. Okay. So go into that and undergoing affil- Spitzer on one of the things about pub Cuccia so grays that you know your heroes to new onto this education. You know, I'm also deduct, you know, and in every sense of the word so so taught myself. And when I used to bunk of school is to go, read the music, press an, it's or find out about literature and find out all these whole save influences of about William Burroughs. From David Bowie found out about Rambeau from pice myth and blah, blah, blah on and on. It goes by also found out about whether music comes from so wanna go into new young nextstep, go deeper finer about Burr Jentzsch and Pence angle that spoke to me got really into that. Go deeper, find among Kathy find out about the war sins. Just go as deep as you can into. You just get to the bottom of it, absorbed what you counsel big of Mike guitar techniques combined to plane is folk music, the psychedelic aspects of it. If you listen, some burn hundred manual though psychics will happen in the early two, thousands, some concern a little bit. Like while I was doing in the Smiths, some of my acoustic plane is psych folk. I got that from spending maybe three month period. Absolutely absorbing myself in Burr Johnson, ROY Harper. So every finish fair game for me as long as it isn't straight. He said that when people start. Making Roger McGlynn comparisons. You actually hadn't heard that much birds and then went back and some of that same with high life, man, journalists, you know, interesting. When we came out in the Smiths people were making these assumptions, I guess, because played the Rickenbacker. That's all of the story that I was really into the birds. Also buffet. There was a bit of a movement of people in Scotland, they were being cited by own think I only knew Mr.. Tambourine man turn to turn so thus interesting thing about being common it on. I kind of went, okay, but a check this out and what was useful to me. I kept him what was not useful. Elast best example is is that when this chairman monkey amount of quite a few reviewers mentioned king Sony day hours. I didn't have the skill in the knowledge to be to be fair. I wasn't not hip to be influenced by highlife. Let's hear that intro for second. That is crazy because even now I still better than it was influenced by highlife because it sounds tremendously like it completely accident. I think he's because I rish. Yeah, on the only Irish highlife musician. No, I think it's to do with eccentricity of of average music. That's like the the sort of the modes and of the sort of Celtic. Yeah. Yeah, I think to do with the accidental Celtic assimilation. Yeah. So it's sort of like a parallel evolution thing, like the same animal evolves on two different continents. That kind of thing, you know, crazy mental picture. They're like a leprechaun, south of South African leprechaun. That is wild. So you know, maybe vampire weekend rather than ripping off highlife action ripped off that one song. We don't know. Also, you know, again, this good example of is a fact then Sern I was playing the sound of my feelings and not moment, and quite often very exuberant, little dude. I know as I had reason to be zoo print, I was in a band. I absolutely adored with people. Absolutely adored. It went in a situation. I've been felt I was born four. It was always work for our never been work-sharing. And then you know, if you listen to some of that really exuberant music, that's in the Smith, listen to our go, God, his a so wonder didn't explode with joy, but that's the way I was feeling an odor apology. I was feeling because me and my band Emma Mace were making if a record in the studio and we were sounding Pritam good. I always almost like I, I don't know whether the guys the guys put it in these terms. I was like the walking human barometer of how the four was was feeling good and bad. I internalized. It all and Athuenis quite the says, quite a lot. Good things about the boundary because quite lov is very, very positive. So you're so album call. The comet definitely gets into some darker moods. There is a genuinely spooky song called walk into the sea. Let's hear that one. Just where did the, it really struck me the vibe. Well. The thing with a record was I was really led by my emotions and the whole of Alba. I was following hours feeling and I didn't want it directly discuss Brexit or Donald Trump or anything like that bought sun. I think a lot of adults will relate to. I think I was feeling kind of emotionally Felli shellshocked. So as it was right in music, oh, is unintentionally and unbeknownst to mail was making music fell outweigh way and walk into the seas one those tracks. And I also had been reading recently a bounce. Funny again, you know, talk about Africa but reading about these baptism. And so the idea of rebirth with Emma mind. Again, I probably just tend to kind of a veto awards trying to find some positives as a person earn. So I just decided to come up with the narrative of about being. Born, but what is it? You know, because realize afterwards when a row, some walk into the sea that actually looks like a suicide note puts in fact, what is the stories of of me going climbing on these rocks and clambered over the ropes and going free diving into the sea in the hope of being reborn. So it's very, very metaphorical, obviously. And the key line in the sonny's hope breaks on me. I think that's what I was looking for and same ago with the music, and then it all happened in in the space of a few days. I didn't really have to move censor second guess myself. So it's a very dramatic song and is quite few very dramatic songs on on the record for that one particular dramatic as say, it was only two weeks layer so that I realized that some people could see that title in. It seemed like trying to off yourself when he fights the opposite did the Hans Zimmer experience and people don't know you collaborate with him on the Saudia inception and other things they that's a whole different world. Did you talk about a sense of drama. Atmosphere at what it. What did you learn from from working with him? I learned from to re acquaint myself and be totally okay with the most melodic and dramatic and emotive things I do. That's what hunts brings me in full are just a Minova of okay, will if that's what he wants, it does. What he thinks is the golden Maeve you coulda musician, then I'll go with it and that's where even -fluenced walk into the people of us me about it because it has strings on it and his orchestral sounds dramatic. And look cinematic puts the been the biggest influence that hunzas sprouts in my career dot is trying to get the our meal time the kind of if it sad, it's really sad if it's lifted is really uplifting. 'cause I object get off and some light new wave kind of art rock thing every day all day long if a can. But he's kind of always one emir play motion the all the time. Let's. Johny twelve string, twelve string, you know? So which we hear from your work with him. Let serum time of inception. Grizz thing is after after reading your book and reading Morris's book reading a whole bunch of stuff. Here's something I still don't understand. And then I was trying to see if I was the only one who doesn't understand this. No, it actually seems to be a common thing. No one is it's a simple thing. Real reason that the Smiths broke up became less clear to me reading these two books the way it comes off as that. It was all basically a miscommunication that you were reported to have left the Smith and therefore you ended up fucking I'm leaving the Smith, which is seems insane. Yep. If you're going to, if if you're gonna put it down to what you read, you need somebody tire book that was just dedicated to the break-up of the bond. And I ain't gonna do. A new wants to eat once. Well, guess there's some people want to read that. Go and without knowing what the Tolkien about. So I mean, not the miscommunication just one fussing though, isn't it his, you know? So abundant break-up just because of miscommunication. The asked to be, you know, the end I wouldn't left my own band. I formed and put my life into just because of a misunderstanding. You know this it was on tenable is the would isn't it? And you know, I felt like I was left no choice in us. Fine. A subset right. Yes, it was very sad, but it was meant to be, why was it untenable? I mean, one thing that's unspoken is you were doing so much work and sometimes instead of being grateful to the person who's doing so much work, who's arranging everything in staying and not sleeping for weeks to do all this sometimes instead of being grateful. Some people are resentful, whether it's in the context of a band or in another context, I felt that might have been. Yeah. Well, maybe that was the case. I don't know about the there was probably a time in my life when I would have felt. I don't really feel now as an adult now configure like when things come to an end a meant to come to an end all kinds of months. Shit happens. People will know talking about with relationships and jobs, and even if you wanna, you know, wanna move out your palm and you just don't tune in the game state, you know. So things kind of stopped breaking down when then when when they've run out shelf-life, you know, as as mature at all less the way I see things, how. Mean you and things out meant to bay. They just they break down like cogs in a machine stop working. They stop being harmonious and it's the same in buns. As is in relationships in his is in jobs, Fultz of life of ink. So without beating still don't feel like, what was it a personality thing? Or was it just all of the book of? Yeah, all of the above. Just different people, you know. So chemistry was a think. The differences in personnel is a won't often make for interesting chemistry. And then inevitably, you know, the differences in personnel e comes a point when those things are gonna stop forward, motion guess, and you know. So I, I suppose, well, a, he just saw futures differently. ASA, why I just didn't see my future being in that group anymore. That is a very circular statement. Will get so soundcheck. I don't wanna be a tool like fix five hours. The issue of you doing outside projects seems to have which inure telling isn't a big deal at all, like working with Bryan ferry and stuff that that was nothing to you at the time. And yet it seems seems to have been very hurtful to Morrissey barely you have to ask him about that's his account. Is that. You know, maybe so yeah, I'm not gonna disagree with if that's what he says. I'm not. I'm not gonna disagree with it. Fine. It's so wall. As we said. I mean, it's hard to imagine a better outcome for someone who lost their amazing bandits such a young age. You were what? Twenty three, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I mean, that's when your life is just getting started and then it it could have gone a lot of different ways, but you've had this amazing career. Cute. Yeah, I didn't know he was going to will count that way, but I don't really. I didn't really feel like a lost my band because somewhere along the line of they say. So it's kind of about so sore projection that people kind of pull on the Smith because a big part of that was inside me was a probably knew I always wanted to work with different people before the Smith. I reco- came out a discussion with Bernard Sumner so there was a clue right there, and that's because I'm a musician, and in some ways, I'm kind of. Almost archetypal musician. The lights play with people a like to learn. And from that very first session I did when Boone at someone who was producing a factory band, I walked in there and what's in Emily, sorry, like walked into. So the future, an ominous early, my future for he was working. He was working with sequences on with the bunko section, twenty five on a song called view from a hilltop. He was done a remix of what I what, not studio. As I say, the Smithsonian even the first record out on I owed of you from a hilltop remix of it. That was next level psychedelic electro music. So I was excited when I heard that will burn. It was working on, and so it was worth me walking in the studio just for that. So I'm a musician. So I'm like the five years. I remember what feels like when with Kirsty McCullum many, many songs, her process of recording backing vocals, an approach of write lyrics, which I was privy to with something I would never give up. So this is my juice. Because us Asian. So me working on other projects. That's my vision you say, I'm sorry if you know some people the five years ago yet, but you supposed to stay stood against the wall it with the same hair. 'cause the other guys? Well, that maybe that vision needs to sort of widen a little bit and stuff and can a bit more communication because if they want to know what I think I think musician, and that was my instinct, you say, so may work with the bands and an after the Smiths doing what I've done was fantastic being guitar player. Another said awhile about now. I feel like as Qatar player of the best job of almost unequalled player of in very, very, plus it over to out little bit sometimes to do that. One thing I felt that I never heard from you in the book was a feeling that some people might get of like fear of, oh my God, what am I gonna do now? How am I is this going to be able to keep going. Because essentially there's a certain point when you're, you know, obviously had the in mouse mouse this period of essentially you're, you're like a an extraordinarily high level freelancer, you know, and so this didn't have a steady gig, but never seem to be fear of where the next thing is coming from. Yeah. Well. I don't think being in c- the let me see one joined the night in a okay, so and then when a left there, it was late night in night, two thousand four and a half years. I don't really feel like a freelancer. The didn't really feel like a freelancing gig and think if you ask not Johnson and James Allah and David Palmer, who was in the band when I woke up in the morning of four and a half years, who the guitarist in that bond was who so Johnny guitar by sort of mean inbetween when you weren't in electric, they weren't electric from what was electorally from electron informed in eight. Okay. Saint homes though, was into the and finished a guess what's he thousand two thousand one a think. So. Now you have to do the mossy like nine eight, nine years or something as kind of a long freelance gig always have been paid like a freelancer. So I don't really feel like not just. Kerm of musician been in abundance, you know which a fella communication when I was a kid felucca kit who'd been in the bans. Nominee dole has been in a law, bans vessel fail. Let's hear getting away with it by electric. Can just plink biggest hits in America. Probably the biggest. But what do you remember about that specific song? The thing we get away with it was a remember probably the three or four hours he came together because it was me and Bernard Sumner and Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe in a room, and it was the first time we'd met. And then, yeah, just like if you meet interesting people in a bar or in a restaurant or gigawatt of a you remember that. But we happen to be right in a song whilst we were meeting. It was one of the rare occasions when a musicians working in the studio with the with a window in it, and it was a so MS evening. So it was a some filled room with this really great, beautiful excitable, atmosphere between I wanna say five in the evening and ten o'clock before we went out to the Hassi Enda. So it was his feeling of all of the above and we're about to go out to the known Assadi night and we just put just written this hair does what remember about getting away with it. So is that was a good moment. Johnny. One of the first things you did post Smith was record with talking heads. The end when as Brock recruited you for modest mouse, he actually cited that stuff as his favourite stuff. He did. Yeah. And I thought it was interesting forgot would song was, but when you were, I think it was the first thing you tried to record for them. You were given a track at first. It was just sort of terrifying. You went blank trying to figure out what to plan. It always talking heads with token heads up. Yeah, yeah, it was. It was a song that was the single nothing, but flowers. Yeah. You mentioned fear before. That was that was a, that was a faithful situation probably because it was so young and. A doubt. Our would be quite fearful now, but I think it was a healthy creative Mohan of fear because he was just a baseline in a German groove and expected to, I think blunt converse was the the phrase that was used publishing on that because. Now for me to, I was just posing about being on the league tower, token head song still Murli. But yeah, adult agent of any singing on wonder, you paddock. You had to basically compose of each part of a song on the spot. Yeah. Yeah. But you know, I was playing on top of Tom, Tom club against, you know, and I went for walk, just froze. Ryan was like, oh shit, yes, she anything damn damn damn there, and just went for walk around the block and for all moan of lost it of lost as funding coming out, the grand old age of twenty three. I've lost my Mojo and then I just kind of just looked in to decided to just be myself as I just needs her. I was being too respectful in a way it was being humble almost. So there you go as a lesson for you. Don't get to homophobes. Other than perhaps that moment it doesn't seem like the riffs and ideas ever stop falling from use of the the first time he jam would I love the story of the first time you kind of jam with Isaac Brock, and he's like, did you have a riff and you had a riff and the kept having roofs and you kept you were just reading and writing. Is it that way for you? Is it sort of an unedu flowing fountain? No, really, really what she was. No. Like a said to you while you know of saints you like? I think fifteen year old had been in a lotta bands when I was fifteen. And so I was one to play with modest mouse of first night because at been a fifteen year old buzney loads abundance. I learned that time the if you're gonna walk into a room with a bunch of people who want us to write some songs, then you bet will the few riffs with you in a way should be professional and being small and pragmatic now that they might not work. But I had a few things I'm I'm always working on an ho gonna tune in songs and is express. Silence in that scenario, just me and him very late at night meal woozy from jet lagging and with his Big Joe, go wine and being very sort of, you know, forceful made me play that riff, which became dashboard by modest mouse, and a very specific way played it real temporarily chopping and it just kind of can gather. Maybe we've been playing that way for twenty minutes. I don't know does how that happens. And then when. So when we came when when it came to jam with the Crips for the first time of the day, just being that we, that we would just pull out four five EP for five with three or four songs on it for a few days before I just crammed what riffs of ago in a while ago, try and come up with something Junko, put him on the phone just in case, you know, and this is all stuff, the alone at four in fifteen sixteen. But now I mean, you know, just like any other musician will tell you like you hope the riffs flow. You know, in my book is not really much point in me talking about the times nothing happened. You end up to implant pages, right? So this plenty times on this new record, call the comment as set our an in there with. I had one song which Spiro say because we've been playing it live and gunned down well. So I was like, okay, that's going on the record, you know, because I don't need to be signed his two good side for not Blunk zeros and ones an a hoped, and this is. The way I live my life. I'm looking for inspiration Milwaukee for riffs. I'm looking for some lucky for June. I'm looking for titles on looking for hoax. Masan riot assault on a most. Hopefully going to the well trying to fish, hopefully all all the time. What's cool. I'm still hearing stuff for me. That's genuinely surprising. There's a you put this wild guitar. Soul on, I think on, hey, angel almost reminded me of latter day Nils Lofgren I know you used to listen to them. I don't know if. Oh, well, I'll tell you. Yeah, yeah, because Nils is amazing, fine guitar player. And if you go back through the what Nils if it reminds you Nilsson we're talking Jimi Hendrix, really? And yeah, a solo is sometime really, like I look layer often couple takes. It wasn't like something technically tricky a sound it, but I wanted to do something really psychedelic and also radical as well. You know, there's not too many backwards in your face real loud solos and particularly on indie rock records. So I'm not the stolen. Oh, I didn't even clock it as backwards that that helps explain it. Okay. Yeah. And then learn things about your soul to several has loving is you are singing Smith songs. Is there any psychological barrier that you had to overcome or anything like that to to get comfortable with the idea of that, or is it just straight ahead for you? Now? No, you're there is. I mean, I wouldn't if the was really eight would just because it just be too much hassle. You know, a guess I'll go very lucky without right because almost again, this this thing of playing with the musicians. I dunno at that meant Sally, I wouldn't have picked up the phone Neil Finn in whenever that was two thousand three full. I was recovering from a serious illness pleurisy nearly two thousands, and a really was not supposed to be working. But Neil Finn invited meal with sid news eland and aegis assumed I was going to sing. There was a lot never goes out because it was a big song right now. I, I arrive there with all his Smith baggage which allow people seem to still be carrying around, aren't won't even in the group undone a realize in instant when I balked his suggestion and he looked at me quizzically, well, kind of what you may never ever sacred cow a realize. I was just being just too precious. Yes, it's music. This is bullshit and a went on the stage with Neil because he said, you could singer, and he loves the song. He sung it. The sound check. I sung it and then we did it. And again, I guess now I'm looking back on never really curse maybe because I I out in the way I do and interact with other musicians. Follow music would maybe have no the opportunity to be to be on a stage with Neil Finn and Vada at O'Brien from Radiohead, Lisa Germano, they're both shit. You know, I would have been just like some precious, you know, churlish big baby donate. So did it. And the audience reacted in such a beautiful way and in in a way of, I think mentioned in the book of nail to funk for that because he gave me gift really just puncturing nonsense. But that's because a musician spend my time. Now we musicians now, he's in Fleetwood MAC's. Just never know how these. Things are gonna tag Lookie fleet with monk. Absolutely are. Thank you so much for being here. So right. This is been stoned music. Now we'll be back here on Sirius XM next Friday, channel, six pm time. We are podcast download us as a podcast scribe to his podcast where we get your podcast. This device relied tunes as always thanks for listening. See.

Smith Smiths David Bowie Hans Zimmer Nils Lofgren Bill Nelson Johnny Mark Emma Mace Bernard Sumner Qatar ROY Harper Isaac Brock Brian Neil Finn Burr Johnson Mara McRae Tom petty Rex