32 Burst results for "Johnnie"

Johnnie Moore on the Looming, Disastrous Iranian Nuclear Deal 2.0

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:19 min | 7 months ago

Johnnie Moore on the Looming, Disastrous Iranian Nuclear Deal 2.0

"Johnny, thank you for joining us. So you're kind of an expert on international religious freedom. And you also have been following what's happening in Vienna right now with the Iran deal where the Russians are kind of like the intermediaries. Is that right? Yeah, I don't think Americans really realize what's going on in Vienna. I mean, stop to think that while all of this is happening in Ukraine, the deputy foreign minister of Russia has been negotiating what they say is going back into the run deal. It's actually a whole different deal altogether. But it's not even a negotiation, Charlie. The Americans haven't even met with Iranians. They meet with the Russians, the Russians go talk to the Chinese and the Iranians. They go back to the Americas. They tell the Americans back and forth. It's a gigantic charade. It's a disaster, people don't really realize how catastrophic this is. So the first Iran deal was really bad. They said it, the way that the Obama regime spend it spun it, whatever. Was that they were saying that this prevented Iran from getting a nuclear weapon, but we know that wasn't true. Trump canceled it. What is this deal? Yeah, and what the Biden administration said, because by the way, the deal wouldn't have even gotten a vote in the Democrat controlled Congress. It was so unpopular. So in order to get this moving, President Biden said, well, look, we'll go into the old deal and then we'll have a longer, stronger deal. Congress Democrat control Congress didn't even believe the president. So in the last year, they passed a bill that requires that the negotiating teams submit what they're talking about to Congress. Biden's ignoring all of it. The White House is ignoring all those whatever they want. Yeah, and what we understand about this deal is that it relieves they've been relieving a lot of sanctions on Iran, but they basically really the rest of them. They take sanctions off of all these terrorists, including the people responsible for the bombing and the Jewish community, 30 years ago in Argentina. They actually may even take the revolutionary guard off the terrorist list. The IRG, right? That was led by Soleimani. And so what will happen? If this deal passes, we're going to see more terrorism from Iran. We will see Iran kidnap more Americans. We're going to see the Middle East at the first moment where we actually have peace in a generation inflamed again with Iranian

Iran Vienna Congress Biden Administration President Biden Johnny Ukraine Americas Russia Charlie Donald Trump Barack Obama Biden White House Soleimani Argentina Middle East
"johnnie" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

05:48 min | 11 months ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Yep. Because we've chosen. And the battleground, you know, it's not like the real Civil War. You know, this is something new and where this battleground is being played out is on the Internet. Correct. Because for the most part, here's the thing. When we see each other in real life, for the most part, we don't act the way that we do online. And I believe a lot of the players in this have realized like, oh, we can easily control the people through outrageous behavior online. So, you know, what resonates to people like with Trump? You know, a lot of people supported Trump and they're like, you know, I don't really care for his politics, but he's entertaining. He's not a politician. He's not, you know, somebody else. They were like, okay, he's bringing new blood to this. And they supported him, right? And you're saying they're like, but he's an awful human being. Exactly. Is he human? Exactly. But he was able to polarize people with this idea that he's not a politician. People are so fed up with politicians that they jumped on board, not caring what exactly his politics were. Exactly. And that's kind of and we see this cult of personality in the U.S.. You know, we, if you have a celebrity and you criticize that celebrity for a role they play in a movie, then all their fans jump on you and they're like, no, no, no, you're a hater. You know, they start attacking you, they say you death threats. And you're like, when the world, I didn't like a movie he was in. I didn't say it was a bad actor to that movie sucked. Exactly. Exactly. And so we see, I see the way that people are using technology to kind of polarize people and people treat it like a game. So politics has become another game. And we pick sides. Like we would pick sides for dodgeball. And we're all just throwing these balls at each other and trying to knock each other down, not realizing, like, wait a second. This isn't a game. This is our reality here. And the reality is that we need each other to make progress. Exactly. To learn from and to create a balance because that was the whole part or and I know it sounds kind of naive, but that was the whole idea behind having a bipartisanship was to create a balancing government so that one side was not more powerful than the other. But guess what? Guess what? Well, you know what?.

Trump U.S.
Bernard Lee Chats With Poker Pro Johnnie Vibes Moreno

The Bernard Lee Poker Show

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Bernard Lee Chats With Poker Pro Johnnie Vibes Moreno

"You have been playing cash for many years well over a decade and kind of mistakes cash. We're not talking high nose bleed kind of what is it. Been like for that because we will talk about your youtube presence. You're logging in how that really is taken off. But well prior to that you were poker player. It's not that you are of vlogger that plays poker. It's really the other way around. Is that you played poker for so many years and kind of logging has kind of come into this space how was it and what were your trials and tribulations playing cash poker for a living because everyone loves seeing the big scores but people don't understand the grind sometimes of six sessions in a row where you don't win everyone's happy when we have a twenty five hundred five thousand dollar pot and can show it on on air but how many times do you struggle struggle struggle and flush dr doesn't get there or you flopped upset and they get run a runner and now you're going home with you know only job in the world where you can work x. number of hours and go home poor right. I mean it's very rare that that happens talk about your trials and tribulations in how it got to the point where you really felt like you could steadily make a living at this. Because it's really hard. I remember the first day that i left my job as a software developer with 401k health benefits and all these things i remember thinking like if i if i don't make good money playing poker i can always go back and get offered job again and you know the i i i was doing. I was doing well right out of the gate. But you gotta keep in mind that it wasn't that difficult to make money playing cash game poker if you had a solid strategy fifteen years ago because the money was everybody you could find a two five game anywhere that was great and you know there was probably one hundred to five games on any given night in las vegas during this time so i i was doing well but naturally as you progress in any career you want to make more money than the previous year and you want to get better and you want to further your career and you know. That's that's easy to do. Fifteen years ago and poker. You know you could start applying one three. You can make thirty five thousand dollars that first year. Feel like it was amazing but the next year. You know your your goals maybe fifty thousand in the next year your goals. Maybe seventy five thousand. But then you reach a point where you're making around one hundred hundred twenty five thousand dollars a year and you realize that in order to make more than that you need to get substantially better. You need to find better games and the games needs to be big and what's interesting about. That is poker. Games were shrinking. They were getting smaller over the course of the last five to ten years and they were getting tougher. So no i even if even if you got better in your own poker game it didn't ensure that you were gonna make more money than the next year right. I remember i kind of plateaued about six years ago. Where i was in the one hundred to one hundred twenty five thousand dollar a year range and i didn't really see gray prospects for making more than that and and just as a natural Ambitious human being. That started sparking me. Like what else can i do to ignite passion in the game. And what else can. I do to keep things interesting for me. And that's kind of how you know. Creating the poker channel came about My my five ten game had died. That i was playing in san diego on a consistent basis. That game was no more. So i was in a precarious spot. Where how am. I going to continue to make this good money with smaller games and i thought it would be a perfect time to start a new project and i remember those first couple of episodes that i started. I didn't think anybody's gonna watch him. I was just. I was just trying to get better at public speaking. And you know perhaps china Develop some other avenues of interest at a time. When i was unsure where the cash games could take me As far as the ceiling was and it it took off after the seventh episode. When i lost sixty five hundred dollars in a in five ten in in one session. I picked up the camera and put it in my face and i was like this sucks because like this game doesn't run twenty four hours anymore. I got like eight hours a day. That i can play this game. It might take me a while to win back. Sixty five hundred kind of share that on my youtube channel and algorithm picked it up. And they're like wow. This is a real poker player. That's making youtube videos. So i think that the looting to what you talked about before. I wasn't scared to talk talk about my thought process. I wasn't scared to say how i played hands. I was competent and my poker game. I think one thing that a lot of people have have happened as their newer poker players that are making you content so they're kind of more Afraid to just say what happened right and like you know because people are gonna show up in the comments and be like oh you played that like an idiot or what. Are you doing three batting without hand but for me. My confidence in my overall poker game. That part didn't bother me like if you were gonna talk crap about my game in the comments. I was fine with that. You know and i think that. That's what destroys a lot of people in the early stages shirt will have that confidence in know the when you sign yourself up for youtube comments the youtube comments they're gonna come come

Youtube Las Vegas San Diego China
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Great <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> real. Crew ella move <Speech_Male> man. <Speech_Music_Male> Well they killed my mother <Speech_Music_Male> so <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> ran <SpeakerChange> her ass <Speech_Male> off a balcony. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well i <Speech_Male> you feel bad because <Speech_Male> my top two or ones <Speech_Male> that you and sean of mentioned <Speech_Male> with exile <Speech_Male> and sparrow but <Speech_Male> Just means <Speech_Male> you're smart i. <Speech_Male> They're <Speech_Male> both <Speech_Male> like exiled is <Speech_Male> such a. <Speech_Male> It's it's like a <Speech_Male> perfect film <Speech_Male> just in everything <Speech_Telephony_Male> that it does. <Speech_Male> End sparrow <Speech_Male> is also just <Speech_Male> so completely magnificent <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> only way can really <Speech_Male> rectify this is. <Speech_Male> I'm just gonna give another <Speech_Male> special shout <Speech_Male> out to <Speech_Male> The mission <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> which. I don't know how much <Speech_Male> love that gets. <Speech_Telephony_Male> But <Speech_Male> that was one <Speech_Male> that That <Speech_Male> really i. <Speech_Male> I had seen <Speech_Male> him once before. But it <Speech_Male> really just kinda bowled <Speech_Male> me over this <Speech_Telephony_Male> around and <Speech_Male> Yeah the <Speech_Male> staging of the entire <Speech_Male> sequences set inside <Speech_Male> the mall where <Speech_Male> which is really <Speech_Male> only like a <Speech_Male> few camera moves <Speech_Male> in his mostly just <Speech_Male> very still <Speech_Male> but very <Speech_Telephony_Male> beautifully <Speech_Male> done is <Speech_Male> is just something that has been <Speech_Male> staying with me since we <Speech_Male> started this project. So <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> the mission after <Silence> Exiled <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> sparrow. All <Speech_Male> right sounds good. <Speech_Male> I mean <Speech_Male> god. Everything <Speech_Male> else is going to be disappointing <Speech_Male> after this. You know <Speech_Male> i mean of course you know <Speech_Male> once we do the now now. <Speech_Male> You see me cast. <Speech_Male> That'll be another <Speech_Male> high point for us. But <Speech_Male> otherwise <Speech_Male> i feel like <Speech_Male> it's only downhill from here <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> Yeah i i think the <Speech_Male> big takeaway is <Speech_Male> watching. Johnny thome movies. <Speech_Male> Whatever you can get your hands <Speech_Male> on and if you want to get <Speech_Male> your hands on a lotta shit. <Speech_Male> Look jackie <Speech_Male> since twitter. I think he <Speech_Male> posted links for everything. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> there you go <Speech_Male> treasure trove of <Speech_Male> toe for you <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> other than that <Speech_Telephony_Male> if you <Speech_Male> have any questions <Speech_Male> comments. Death <Speech_Male> threats marriage proposals. <Speech_Male> Johnny till <Speech_Male> opinions <Speech_Male> optimism vaccine <Speech_Male> g mail dot <Speech_Male> com is a really good place <Speech_Male> to reach us. Or you can <Speech_Male> tweet at us

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Was bad. Well fuck you. what's what's it like. Wake up every day. Be an wrong sean. You were thinking about that. I actually didn't get that far. Well you'll get there and they'll go. Thank you steve. Thank you for telling me that. I would like this. Because you're right. I do anyways. Yeah i mean. I don't really know what else to say about this other than it's it's very big and bold and not the type of thing i would expect from johnny till at this point in his career but god damn. It's great if if i have one criticism it's it may be has too many ideas and too many things going on all at once but that doesn't make it any less entertaining. It's one of his longer films. It's pushing two hours before credits even hit but yeah it's just it's frequently dazzling and even just a lot of it is to admire just his production design like the different Different rooms in this office Has just this one. It's like the whole world is just existing in this one giant building. How everyone's just part of the sole suck that is the capitalism in their their nine to five jobs and even like when they go out to lead in a restaurant they stirred still in the office and part of the film falls this new hire. Who's like very eager to move up the company ladder. And after his first day he goes to sleep and he turns his light off the cuts out and we see. Oh he's still in the office. 'cause there's like a janitor in the background like sweeping up trash. It's gets great this formerly it's one of the most audacious films that he's done and it pays off five one critique it's i i wish they'd just stayed in the entire time because when when all david is like fleeing after he's been caught embezzling and tooling down the green screen road. Cgi fucking mercedes benz could do without the it. Looks like the car in. This is a really stupid reverence point. But i don't care when rebecca black for the tenth anniversary of friday. She redid friday and it looks like the driving sequences in the new rebecca black like sexy friday video steve dub reference. That was put over even more of a reason. Why it's fucking stupid. Yeah the other weird thing about this like. There's no sometimes. I'm i'm actually really surprised when johnny to- movies don't have like western distribution But then there's other things that we've watched well of course it wasn't over here because it's fucking three d. musical office play thing and you also can't call something the office in america without people the wrong idea but this is like weird be really easily accessible streaming for free on be so you can just go watch it right now if you want to Which is great. You should do that. That's exactly what you should do what. Yeah this shit. If i had a critique i think it almost doesn't need to be a musical like it just it just works like a goofy ass like giant play but also i appreciate it being musical because just like man i'll have baz luhrman over the top shit that i fucking hate. This is what it looks like. When i don't hate it so there you go. I think if i were to say one thing i would say maybe yeah. Take steve's advice but maybe it takes these advice after you watched a few other toby's like i think this works a lot better when you understand kind of a lot of his obsessions the film. I think this really works in that in that respect it crystallizes a lot of things in this film. All right boys well you know instead of doing the usual put over this week. I figured we'd go around. I just wanna know. We've watched nothing. But johnny tale from month. We we didn't we didn't set off to make it this way but it just naturally happened. Because wouldn't you know the guys made a million movies and they're all great so out of everything that we've watched or even beyond what we've watched. What has been your favorite show movie this entire time. So myers you wanna. You wanna go first here. Sure sure i you know in the first episode we did. I hadn't even listed as my my favorite in that bunch. I was kind of enamored with throwdown at the time. But what is really stuck with me. In the meantime is is is nineteen ninety eight film. A hero never dies. Which i don't know i can't stop thinking about the thing. This is the score and everything about it is just the source of our our temporary new theme song now. That's the mission okay. Yeah that's that's the toe down theme but the hero never dies has has away more sort of western score to. It's very reminiscent of like the score of broken arrow sort of which soon coincidentally one of my favorite scores. but it is just. Yeah i i about that. Movie has stuck with me in the way that they use music in a kind of pulse through the entire way. And that stupid fucking dick measuring like coin flipping contests in the bar. I just i really like it. I wanna watch it again immediately. It's a good endorsement. sean. How about you. What's your what's your top tell this month. I have a feeling this would vary. I haven't asked to your of a few. Probably vary depending on the day or whatever but it's really hard to for me to put something other than exiled at number one. It just is just immaculate movie with just like some of the best set pieces And i don't it just seems like has a masterpiece air about it like it. Just seems like all of his Strengths coalescing in one place. i just really love how hard he goes into the the western jonah stuff there. Yeah jake how about you got some dogs barking again. Euthanize them euthanize barking my heart a new low off a whole but we finally got there. I guess that while while jake euthanized several dogs. I'll i'll go ahead and do mine. I can't stop thinking about sparrow. I is one of those where the moment ended. I just wanted to start watching it. Again there's moments that are just like shot dropping league gorgeous everything from the score to the compositions two of the shots to the you know. The acting like every single element of that movie is is perfect. And it's beautiful and it's intriguing and it's the kind of film where you know every single moment you're getting something special from johnny. Tell and you you just. You don't see shit like that ever. Johnny told me it's french. New wave films better than french. New wave directors so suck my dick gianluca dr. So yeah now sparrow. Something where i'd be like. Oh yeah if you wanna get into johnny. To- watch sparrow. I know don't do that. Wash exile just wash exiled. Watch you watch a hero. Never dies and then once you get that just just fucking shoot that sparrow directly into your veins and feel the power. Baby it's good shit. Don't sleep on sparrow. Jay successfully euthanize the dog. Yeah they're all dead now. That's.

steve Jay america rebecca black david first episode johnny jake tenth anniversary two hours five jobs first mercedes benz Johnny one this week friday first day a million movies nineteen ninety eight film
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Like just just he's represented because you know the the magic if you could see everybody's like inner personality that's what he describes it as and the not so mad detective bland detective. He's shown a crying child. which is what. It's like to actually watch on screen. So that part of it sucks but at the same time. There's there's so much good shit going on here. And by the time you get to the end i agreed to sean. It's sort of starts to fall apart and lose itself a little bit. But then it's got this kick ass like lady from shanghai like mirror shootout thing going on and you're just like okay. Fuck yeah this. Is my shape care even to the point where you know the the the whole plots around the detective and mr blondie mc blander. Cin they're trying to figure out like how this cop that they know committed a murder and robbery like how do they figure out how to actually like convicted of this murder. Like where do they get the evidence from. How do they pin on him and like ultimately in the end. The bland cop is is conflicted because the mad detective kind of flew off the rails detectors all shot up. This other cops showed up. And then there's this whole scene at the end where this guy is kind of shuffling around like moving these guns around wiping things down and ultimately i was just like i don't actually know what he decided to do like if he decided to frame mr mad detective is the killer or decided to do the right thing and you know show that this cop was killer and all this other shit i didn't it just completely like at. The end is his only aim and that is to extricate. Himself from. The situation is essential. Yeah he's because he's a coward was crying baby man I will say that one thing. I love najib's about johnny to- foams but it's kind of like a hong kong action film thing in general because no one's allowed to have a fucking gone one is interesting to see like how things play out without guns around to like. Every gun is is super valuable and three. You can get a lot of mileage out of. Oh fuck i lost my gun or i don't know what to do with this gun as johnny was done in. Numerous movies yeah. I love a lot about this movie. I think the way he depicts this sort of multiple personalities the detective that they're hunting has i think it's just an excellent it makes for some very Just entertaining and riveting scenes like their whole introduction in the bathroom and where he's watching the guide order and he's got like a gluttonous side to him in an aegis transition to some brute murderer and the whole thing when they're like tooling around in a car and he seeing like these seven people. It's very executed tremendously well and i found it pelling. Most of the way through again. I just i feel like we lose the mad detective from his own movie for a little while. And and that's where things kind of drag but but when he's around this thing it's quite excellent and again it's hard not to put it next to you because they're both lost gun movies and this is Inferior so i guess it loses a little credit this because it's hard not to make that comparison. Yeah it's fun. To the way that he plays around with the fact that like the mad detectives powers work better when he like puts himself in the same places where these multiple personality people were too so that leads to a bunch of ridiculous shit where he's trying to recreate the okays burying himself alive and you know in the beginning we see him like stuff himself at a suitcase and get thrown down some stairs and was oh when he's in the restaurant and he's trying to like recreate. The glutton orders the same meal like seven times until he's just like vomit because johnny to- hates fat people. It's it's a little bit of a twist on again like hacky silly genre premise. But it gives it so much more depth than there's so much more meat to it and it's fucking fun and like johnny told us makes fun shit. That should not be shouldn't have as much depth an intrigue to it it. It does but i i don't get it. The man is magical yet at the end of the opening of that that opening sequence toss the stairs in the suitcase at the bottom he's unzipped and he emerges and he immediately says like as the ice cream truck driver did it and then that guys are actually arrested in was the killer. I wish there were more instances of him like solving crimes in these outrageous ways. Like there's another sequence where we won one crime that was happening with the stolen gun is at this. Armored car courier was a robbed and he like walks up to a number courier like these three armed guys need points his finger gun at them and starts yelling. Bang like something that would get person killed this ordinary situation. Bland comcast assure them no no no. He's just a copy is investigating. So yeah the the mad detective is the best part about met detective for that whole intro to the a ends with him froggatt slice his own ear off and just handing it to his captain. And you're just like what the fuck is this murphy. Get like what. what do we watch it. It's a soa drinking out the gate. I really like how he justifies that too. Because i mean we see him do it and initially think well he's just a crazy kooky guy and then later he is talking about it and someone's like oh like why did you cut your ear off anyway. Just like oh well. The captain didn't have multiple personality. Is that i just. I just wanted to give them like a piece of me or something. Like that is the oc. It's it's good shit like it's it's fun and it's interesting and it's got a couple of really good action set pieces and yeah it's just like all around solid so yeah honestly. It probably wouldn't be a bad entry point for a lot of people if you're into like sorta puzzle box films. This is probably a good way to maybe dip in johnny till it's not necessarily the most I don't know it's a little outside of the box for him but again it might be an easy access point for a lot of american audiences. Yeah what it's literally easier to access to one that actually got distribution in the west. So it's always nice when you can find a johnny thome movie. So that's that's a bonus all right boys. Well we got one left and this is i. Think out of everything. We've watched so far all of the movies for the the tone down here this month. This might be the most outlandish like totally bizarre thing that we've gotten from johnny toews. There is nothing else than his filmography. Like this it's entirely possible. There's nothing else that just exists like this but we watched office and sean. I don't even know if you've got to finish this one. But is jake's making the gym face i got through the first like eight and a half seasons so i'm not sure exactly what happens. Is the people tell you the british ones better. I keep hearing this. Yeah no. I didn't get to finish this one yet. I will finish it but another peep behind the curtain. Sean was supposed to have the week off as we look at the last minute here and i.

Sean johnny thome johnny toews one crime seven people seven times both three three armed guys johnny this month blondie sean shanghai Cin najib jake Bland first american
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

08:54 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Like Like office that's big flashy and when he's doing like these crime movies like crying out of time i don't know it just feels so small impersonal and turn left. Turn right all you can do is like what i could do. I'm guessing you guys do is like the biggest point of reference that we have for rom coms as american romantic comedies. And i kept trying to think about like. Why is this work for me in a way. Like what is if roy cheating. This from like american comedies american rom calms that like are usually just sort of like passing fluff to me. I don't know exactly other than talking to johnny to- sincerity in like that. He just seems very invested in these two characters. Like he just has a certain care. Jimenez co-director have a certain care for these characters rather than using them as like vessels in plot. Points like yeah. I don't know. That's that's kind of what i got out of it whereas like every turn movie has a lot of them just feels really like heartwarming to me and it really does get a lot of mileage out of the sincerity. 'cause i i've been thinking about this since we watch don't go breaking my heart and now now watching turn turn right like you said. Why does this work for me. When i know the american equivalent would just be like that. It would just be that there. She goes song by six pence on the richer play or the trailer and then like to insufferable dick heads and then they would. There be a lot of winking at the camera. Because this is you want to talk about a gimmick this is like very impure in these two characters. They're like oh well you know as children we we met and we never connected and miss connection after miss connection after miss connection and the reason why this movie works so well is because the characters are sincere of course but this gimmick of them missing each other and longing for each other he gets the point. Where you're like okay. I get it and it almost. It almost breaks you and then it comes back around into being endearing because they stick with it and there is a real sincerity to it. It's not like a snarky laugh at the camera. you know. isn't it keeps happening. Yeah it's not it's not. It's not a cynical movie and like now another thing that makes it like different from the louise we're talking. Ron is that there is a cynicism to american like most american ron calms at the you know it seems very visible that they are like okay. We have the story. Let's find the two starts and then the two stars will carry the movie like we don't really care about like it feels less like somebody making movie that they care about and more of just like this festival to see two stars yup exactly. Yeah and it's it's almost like I don't know it's mad. Libs wagon the right people. And then you have this generic vessel around them that you know floats off and makes you chuckle a little bit. I guess where again this is. This is something that feels deeply personal. And i don't want to say that it looks like shit but it is. It's it's kind of washed out and that might be the result of the copy that i had. I don't know. I can't say for sure but it's washed out. It's a little bit flatter than a lot of movies and on top of that. It's almost like made for tv. Look to it. I guess there's a softness to the whole thing but again it kind of it sort of works with the movie because it does it makes me feel like more personal and more intimate and yeah. It's just it's got. It's got a real charm to it so myra tell us all why you hate this movie. I don't i don't hey the movies but it's definitely the least my least favorite of everything we've watched does. I don't think it's entirely successful. I it's certainly not successful for me. I don't think any director could realize this sort of conceit in a way that would be satisfying to me personally because it is a near miss. Sort of format is designed to sort of be charming. Any you know it's gonna pay off in the end so it's a okay right but for for me personally. I don't know it just triggers some sort of great anxiety center in my brain and i just can't get lost in the film. I'm just kind of annoyed by it the entire time. I found the majority of this film to be quite aggravating. And i think toe did as well as anyone with but maybe i'm wrong. I don't know i kind of contradicting myself. Because i also don't think this sort of material really lends itself to his sort of connecticut. Editing and camera movements. I it feels like the film that wants to have a very dense frame where you're kind of searching for these people lingering and not noticing each other but that's not the way this made at all it's made in johnny toe style pans cuts and that's fine. I just it's not for me. I just don't think it entirely works and the even if it did it would just never. I'm overbuilt on this conceit of Near-miss is just never going to be something that i can entirely. Obviously i don't know. I mean i think the part that sold for me was when the secondary characters were introduced so in addition to them having these weird parallel moments where they just kind of miss each other they both simultaneously and up because they get sick at the same time and they go going to the hospital and they both end up with these clingy psychopath. People that just sort of assert themselves and an insert themselves into their lives so then all of a sudden this doctor falls in love with a woman and he's just like oh yeah i just been showering at your house staying here like complete psycho behavior and then the food delivery woman ends up with the guy. She's like oh. Yeah while you're in the hospital. I i just went into your house key and watched soccer at trashed your apartments. They have to like shake these people off and how they're dealing with them at the same time and that's where i kinda came around to. We're really went just over the edge with all this stuff but jake other any other reasons. Why atom perpetually. Wrong about everything i will you know but I i. I'm really citing with sean. I i love this of the four that we watched for this episode. i should mention. I have not watched the episode to have watched most of the films that you guys discussed their as this is my first time really seeing how do like a a romance or of especially romcom and he is really just quite adept at it and Has such a Like the concede on paper. Sounds like it's terrible film. But he just pulls it off with such panache. And i think it's it's it's the equivalent of watching two characters perform identical waltzes but they never quite intersect. And i don't know there's just something really beautiful about watching it. I thought i was really quite enamored with the film and it's Yeah it really really surprised me. Because i will because a few minutes and i wasn't sure how i would take to it but by the end it had just completely won me over. Yeah this is. This is one where i wouldn't say. Don't use this as an entry point. But if you've been following along and your past toe one oh one and toe to a one this is like the grad school chorus toe where you gotta be kinda like really into his shit and then. I think you'll appreciate it a little bit more. But it's it's it's certainly not a good jumping off. I don't regret watching it by any stretch. I think it's it's illustrative as to how his style applies to other. John rose and and we certainly seen quite a few over the course of this experiment. But this one in particular. I don't know something about the style didn't quite fit material and i just don't like the material something that it feels like rejected like net film or something. It's you just bringing the amla into this. no. I actually liked that movie..

John rose two stars four six pence two characters Jimenez johnny first time ron both american two starts Ron sean one each
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Give us some money and jake last words yours. R.i.p charles grodin took.

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Spach scarlet with his son watching then chases his wife and strangles her to death with sun-watching watching several times. Yeah no it is. It is a powerful conclusion to this. Because again it does encompass tells ability and interest in always keeping you off balance telegraphing what he has to say with the film Because you're the whole time. It feels like you're set up to be on locks side. Simon yams character like he is the traditional as he is the one that is gonna have the families best interests at heart. He you know he had this big d. He's a maniac you you you want him to get his in the at bats that it's it's never really the case you know what is made clear towards the end of the film is that it doesn't fucking matter. They're all just rabid dogs. You know they can end this. Yeah pretense but it doesn't mean anything. Yeah it's just the difference is like big the more honest character because he's like you said barbaric lunatic whereas what does the other guy's name lock long lock. Yeah lock. it's just window-dressing for his lunacy like he's just if not more so completely psychotic he just knows how to keep a lid on it. That's that's the only difference So yeah it's really really fantastic and just another one too where it's actually streaming on on to be right now which is a hundred percent free so you don't have to go too far to find this watch. It also hot tip. There's all kinds of like google chrome plug ins that can speed up or slow down any video that you're streaming and to be a runs these ads if you wanna get around the ads though you didn't hear this for me a simple way to do it turn the speed up. Just a tiny bit okay. So most of these you can. You can adjust. I use one called up but you can set it so one point one point though is the default so if you set it to like one point zero one which is not marketing crease of anything you you're not gonna notice it what it'll do is it. Makes the ads like freak out so as soon as an ad will start to load. It'll just automatically default and kick you back to the movie so that's called Steve breaks the ad algorithm. You're welcome and if you're a representative from to be yeah. Don't try this at home. And i certainly didn't do. It is better than my usual methodology. Just leaving adblocker staring at a black screen rather than thirty. Second some blank. Nothing you know what. Honestly that's preferable because especially because of the different algorithms things they end up showing you the same ad over and over again. Remember on hulu for a long time there. Is this ad where it was this piano music piano music. Like dum dum dum dum to and it's like it some ad for like a bank or some shit and it would show this little kid riding a bike while this piano music played and was ten times louder than whatever you were just fucking washing and i absolutely wanted to drown that child in fucking shallow pool. I could not stand the goddamn ads. So i'm with you. I'd rather stared obliges. We also have the cost the concert experience. Where for some reason to be was related league with greg gut foul follow. Yeah we're just getting the guts. The whole ten gut fell dad's in a given movies. Like h your regular right wing talk show. It's got fell things. Our kitten edgy so also about election. Maybe it was just a little bit of fatigue. But i watch this directly after the film. We're going to cover next drug war and the two of them are really exactly what i expected and wanted when we started this project they. They're very much what i had in my mind as a johnny to- film and yet after having cedo out of films are grown very fond of i had trouble engaging with both of them to an extent i this one i think the conclusion is is just so affected that it really brought me in but for a long time during it. I was just kind of i dunno. I was just like all right enough. This article this and that lets. I wish it was doing something a little more interesting. I feel the same exact way about Yeah and the last one that we watched is drug war from two thousand twelve. Which is it's just crazy that from two thousand twelve because there's another one where it's like. What fucking years. This i don't understand. Is he using some like old. I know understand like it came out months after the two that i said like clearly newer of of we watched and yet i was watching it i was like oh yeah i could like. I had this thought with some of the other ones like election. Maybe mission i can't remember has like thinking about the department which is obviously remake of infant affairs. But but thinking about how outside of just that one source for the departed of like like. Oh i'm watching a lot of hong kong action or crime cinema and was probably pulling a lot from johnny toews. Well knowing that drug or came out six years after the departed. I so so weird to me. It makes me think differently about johnny toews. A director at least right now with like thirteen of his films watched that like there. Isn't this interesting trajectory right. Like between of subject matter and style he just kind of like ebbs and flows. It's it's really strange. I think it's something you get into with a lot of the more prolific filmmakers. You could say the same about like a nikkei like it. There's not like boy. He's growing every philby puts out this like always putting shit out always put shit out and sometimes it is special and sometimes it is grist for the million Yeah i mean meek as at like one hundred nine films at this point. But i could. I could name two of them released in the last six years but But yeah as. I love i love. I saw drugstore winners originally released in the revisit. Last night i think even if it is normal by to- standards. I still think it so masterfully done like this film. As it was was was in anyone else's filmography would probably be be like their best movie. But it's everything is just like pitch perfectly calibrated It's just like this elaborate game of chess. That toe sets up between this cop in this drug maker and Yeah can conclude. It concludes with just one of the best action set pieces of his career. Yeah.

two thirty both Steve hulu one hundred nine films Last night johnny toews one point johnny Simon yams Second two thousand twelve last six years Spach scarlet thirteen of his films google ten times them hundred percent
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"I'm steve and it's it's to- down part three and pack again. Sean glenis to. How's it going having me you sound you sound pumped man. I don't usually expect this level of excitement from you while the thing is that i Applied capacity today what we day And when you're thirty six it really takes. I can imagine it's hard on the knees. I will say are are not pick up but twenty one and i won both games all being held but are we recording. Sorry i got this week like the prerecord you go. Do you take your shirt off to like show off like you're you're thirty six year old bod and just let these guys know like you're still in shape as a as a mid thirties man. Not yet really wanna shame them yet. That's true that's true. I understand speaking of body positivity at myrow here you know sean does have like that whole like he. He could have like a real white. Men can't jump scenario in his life. He's got some serious basketball court action going on right next to his sick directly across the street. It's just a matter of time before. He uses his immense height to start hustling. Yeah that's that makes sense. I mean he's definitely six feet tall. So a sky's the limit. At least yeah and also jake appeal is here a has he doing. Oh i'm trying to survive man. Let me tell you something. I was telling you guys this off air but had an incredible experience where i got to watch commando in a movie. Theater privately rented movie theater of room. I guess and with like a dozen people who had never seen commando before so that alone is magical and commando is one of my absolute favorite movies. And i've seen it one hundred times. And today i saw something. I reckon. I realized something that i had never previously thought of and this is the beauty of cinema films. You always find something new that you can kind of latch onto and what i found out today. Was there's the scene where arnold and radon are the driving around. I think it was after the mall. Shootout and arnold are talking about his daughter and how he got out of the special forces because he was like. Oh you know when she was born i was in lebanon and then i said and then she got measles than i was in angola and i started to think of like your daughter got fucking measles. What what year is there. So it's like okay. Commando takes place in one thousand nine hundred five is when it was made and we assume that it's a film that takes place in contemporary time. There's it's not like this. Is you know sixties or something and the measles vaccine was developed in nineteen sixty three and then the vaccine was widely available by one thousand nine hundred seventies. so what i learned. Today was colonel. John matrix this canon is anti vacs. So there you go. Oh no lebron james of his time truly truly unfortunately. Were not going to be talking about commando today. That's we actually have a commando episode. But i think it's patron exclusive. Give us money. We're talking more toe. And i think we're gonna we're gonna start with the kind of weird outlier movie just because we decide to go chronologically So we're talking. Pt you Which is i this. I think this is like one of. It's probably one of his his more seen movies. A lot of these moves that we've been covering minute. There were huge hits in hong kong. Pt one of the ones where you can get this on dvd. This i think Eureka just announced a masters of cinema. Release this so this is one. That's pretty widely available and again. It's kind of funny to me because you watch this and you think about like the sort of action films that toes really known for and kind of an odd ball even though it is still in that crime drama thriller wheelhouse. You know what i mean. Yeah it's It's really interesting the lineup that we have today because first of all we have like three of his most seen movies especially to others. That we're gonna talk about which i think will be just like interesting ongoing conversation this episode to think about what translated or why it was exported but pt. You is while the name which is like police tactical unit or something. Yeah police tactical unit. It just has as a land of a name as drug war. John rutta read this content to swat really just kind of right. I think re bowman chips and soda Type of in here for the movie but It is really weird Which i was very pleased to see. Because i watched this last of the batch and mrs kind of the zone that i really want todo bien when i watch his genre movies. Something that's not gonna break my heart or romancing there where he's just like lingering on really odd things or just like like this. This revolves around a detective loses gun. Which i don't know i'm guessing is on much to the kershaw moby stray dog which i've never seen but there's like this detective who's like car gets like yellow paint dumped on it pretty early just like one of these little things that just make this movie color. This movie to be a very odd thing odd artifact that mixed with just like the various strands that he takes it like one of the main cops the the simon yam character like slapping some kid for like three minutes or something.

John rutta hong kong radon angola six feet lebanon John arnold Today Eureka Commando today lebron james three minutes one hundred times steve both games thirty six Sean glenis twenty one
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Of the choreography of the fights etc very strong like heavy wire work kind of you know anti gravity elements to it's going to. His muscular physique is sort of an almost like a packaging. Almost like you know kind of external end the shield against i think the fact that he's trying to engage from the world he's gained insight into the world that he doesn't want to he. He basically tries to stop acting in the world to some degree and in the secular world. He just just nonsense stuff. He andrews bodybuilding contests and he works as a male stripper. You know he's he's just kind of like you know he's not doing anything great and only towards the you know he meets this call that he kind of becomes kind of enamored with and also like a you know. It's not not even romance there. Which i think you know you'd almost expect would be would make sense. You know you a man and a woman meeting a movie. Normally that's an angle you duchess naturally fits in and toan wi fi. Don't don't fall. That had just seemed like their kind of colleagues and they kind of help each other out but it's really just meeting her and seeing that she's in danger because she has bad karma effectively that that he starts to integrate back into the world and starts try to take action to change the world and the the film subsequently is basically an examination of what the you know what his actions will accomplish which turns out to not be what he expected to accomplish. And who's really interesting. It's kind of difficult not talk about this the ending of the film. If you haven't seen any of these movies do go and watch them. I i guess. But i'm running karma has again the surprising thing of like the woman the corpse karma so bad she heave reckon. She's going to die and she does. She is murdered. that happens. That wouldn't happen. Probably in a western movie short of like seven or something like it would be if it were to happen more. Typically in western movies at a main character like that would die on into brutal fashion. It would gruesome something that would like to american audiences. Will you would just go down in cult film lord like could you imagine doing that. And in this is kind of like it becomes almost incidental because it's he starts to understand that greater flow of things and yeah. It's just this film really more than any other film that i can think of really repels john. Complete because sean rick categorizes world in a certain way and this becomes a meditation on kind of how the world really is or how you know. It's strangely in. Its in its own reality becomes about how we you know what we do in the world and that kind of means can't really take shortcuts a lot of this to at so it's a very strange way and that. It's a very heightened reality. That i think actually come through with a very kind of real message is really impressive. Piece of filmmaking. This is just such a strange film and an will that you know wrongfoot you continually like you will. You don't know what's going to happen. I just told you what happened you to vote in. You have no idea absolutely no idea. I'm glad that you mentioned back there. Wyckoff who i like. He is along with like one of the most important people milky way toes career. I think that in essence you can divide sort of toes photography into the films that he made with lycopene without like there's sort of this this film in particular was co-directed and there are a number of films that are directed though not the other ones. They're covering on the podcast. But i think even more than that. It's more the films that has been involved in whether it's writing or producing on other films. I think there's a very clear break. And running on karma is sort of a prototypical example. Because it's all about s- essentially wyckoff is wheelhouse which is essentially plot twist almost meta fictional aspect at times this spiritual epiphany striving for spiritual enlightenment to a certain degree but it's it's a more valley the way in which characters relate to each other into the world which is very different from the way that that tomes operates them. We can definitely get into this more with other films experiments since his very clearly a toe only film but you a lot of allow the romantic comedy set. Toe is made have involved. There's my left eye cisco's which is a really really beautiful film and especially a lot of his films in the twenty tens have have been very heavily influenced by why even something like drug were which which would seem to be the outlier. In which i know you'll cover is very much alive influence phone because of how its characters sort of pinball and this almost fate this fashion very much dictated by fate and an almost farcical nature to the violence which is very distinctly different from how to by himself would make it so and we can definitely end to these more as as we go through other fellas but i think it's very important to know and it's i personally. I'm not exactly certain in what way the co directed films are necessarily distinct from the co written or produced films that why is done with toe but vise career in another self is fascinating. I i know especially the film filmed. I've seen of his directed too many ways to be number one from nineteen ninety-seven is one of the best films. Also and a very different one but it has this incredible approach structure and to character and starting to lend which is which is absolutely great. And i think that the the why the why touch cannot be underestimated into his career Yeah you mentioned sparrow is a good time to jump over into that movie because it feels like almost. I'm glad that we watched this in the group that we did. Because i think running on karma and then going into sparrow. It's a good transition away from his more action oriented stuff which is also kind of funny. Because i feel like. I don't know like the last sequence of sparrow which i will talk about in detail is like one of the most impressively choreographed things fair life. I mean and people like you know. This is jaw dropping or something like that. But literally i was like drooling on myself as i was watched. My.

sean rick Wyckoff seven john nineteen ninety-seven twenty tens one one of best each american most ways sparrow
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"He's like oh. Let's talk to ryan swan. Thank you very much for all of you. And for sean to sean for inviting me. It's very it's very fertile topic definitely and listen to your first episode in this series and it was quite good. I'm excited build upon that. Thanks i promised you. the quality is going to dip. Because i'm back on. The point is the first rave we've ever seen my god. I'm happy in bronze hanging on my wall. This is sort of my personal victory. Lap because I just filed my taxes for the first time ever by myself so i'm rushing pretty high. Honestly wow that's impressive. How how many did you do the turbo tax easy file. We just got click three times. Does it say how many dollars are you getting back. Journalist like buddy yeah. It was awful. I hated every second of it. Really isn't miserable experience. That's why i filed an extension today. So that i can prolong the misery for even longer now. I know our audience is really into finance. But i figured we'd probably just jumped toe down episode two so this is our second episode of the. I'm calling it down. But i don't think we officially named it that i feel like our first episode was kind of like your johnny till gateway drug. So you get a little taste of the good stuff to kinda get you hooked and now we're going to go on a little bit deeper and we're gonna we're gonna jump from like johnny one. Oh one into a selection phones. That i think kind of break away from the action cinema that he's primarily known for in the west and i just want to say it cannot be understated. How prolific and consistent of filmmaker. He is especially even if you compare him to other big titans of hong kong cinema. Whether you know. That's like long. Core wide john. Woo ringo lam people like that because these are all guys too that were in some way shape or form either quoted by hollywood whether they directed american films are had their work remade in the west but not johnny and at the same time. He wasn't just pumping out sequels to exiled or something he just kind of hopped between john rose. In a lot of cases he completely defy genre classification or he would deconstruct conventions like it was just no big deal just like oh johnny. Tell us what i do. And he was a fucking around and doing it as just a fun exercise. He was made these brilliant acclaimed and popular films and for some reason for some reason. I can't even watch most of his shit without hunting. It down on a private torrent tracker. So i guess i'm going to throw this out to esteemed guests ryan twin. Where the fuck is the toll respect. Why can't i get this stuff on blu ray man. Well i would. I say that it is like even for the figures like you mentioned like say prime period blue or ringo lam that they themselves even though they don't have especially consistent track record in terms of home releases and blue like popper the proper channels. And i think that's hong kong cinema in general has has suffer further from that partially due to sort of scattershot interest from the west partly due to dodgy tangled financial financing things and. I think that that still applies to toe. I think that tokyo is an interesting case. Where he has had films have sporadically become relative. Hits in the west like say p to you or or drug war. But he hasn't had that sort of consistency. I think that it's in some ways highlighted because of because he's made so many great films and yet because there's just been so many it's been the. Us market hasn't been the best in keeping up to it. So i think it's more like it's not necessarily that. He's a particular case in which it's been particularly laxed is just that because he's just had so many more. It's just compounded in a certain way it's not like it's more cases that than i also missing now. I think you're totally on point with that. Because i mean even even if you have someone like the guy who does hong kong rescue those releases where he does really nice releases sort of on the down. Low unofficially What he's doing. Something like john or something like that. Like he's he's only looking at three or four different movies that he needs to really focus and remastered and released but which only tell you take twenty of his films and easily just start bumping him out so it's not like there's there's just like two or three great ones that you can just cherry and be like okay. This is the definitive work. Because i think this this episode of the podcast is going to be a really good example. The guy can do pretty much. Anything it really. It's kind of mind blowing and one of the movies that we watch this week was was running on karma and off off air. I was joking with you guys that like. How could you even begin to explain this movie to someone and more specifically even if you did how could you be like at the also kind of teared up at the end and a really profound viewing experience for me. It's just running karma more so than anything else. We watched this week. It's just completely blew my mind in terms of what it was. I mean if if i were if i were to describe it to somebody i would probably say something along the lines of among turn bodybuilder with the gift ac- into people's lives befriends of female copies gift to change the force of carmen her destiny. I mean it's really kind of god a did you do you write a lot of. Imdb didn't even mention the muscle. Seuss like some sort of radio would probably say a six point six hundred ten here. It's popular with friends. David ehrlich's review would be like it's avatar. The last air bender meets magic mike. It's really strange film. Because it's kind of when you start out in this movie. It looks like it has to be a comedy. 'cause what career and even is a star. He's literally in like the aforementioned rubber bodybuilder sued like he's in this pathetic sou- which is at at. I instantly looks fake but also way more realistic than i'm comfortable with new to actually want jumps. It's very strange effect. And and he's in the suit for pretty much the entire movie and so you think okay. It's a comedy there's a he's hell. He's got a superpower he can see people as karma so you know it's like he any health teams up the cop to catch criminal and multiple criminals. It it makes a lotta sense. It's kind of genre film. A kind of a kookie comedy mismatched cop. Payer superpowers tracking down criminals. And then it's not really bad at all but by the close combs kind of a meditation on kind of action. And what you know being in the world and you know the idea of what it what it means to do good. It's really no it's actually it turns into like you know all those revenge movies that are about how revenge is bad. Actually this is actually better than ninety nine point nine percent of them on that exact topic and several were. It's a strangely stirring film. But you know when you walk into it. It seems like this is a comedy rush and then at a certain point. It's not some terrible things happen. Ambled the guy still in a rubber suit. So so you're kind of saying it's like Hong kong's Rebuttal to cbs's early edition. Yes worked at from out exactly what it is..

ryan swan David ehrlich two john rose Imdb three first episode Rebuttal second episode nine percent first rave today this week three times ryan twin hong kong johnny first time six point six hundred ten
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

22:57 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Where it worked bringing this this app. So this kind of our intro to johnny toews so we should maybe just mention a few just things about him and we'll bounce back in other episodes to some earlier and later work but johnny is probably best known in hong kong cinema because he he created his own production company milky way productions with waka fi and they were like nine hundred ninety six and so they kind of create this very distinctive voice. And but they're not a big budget studio. That's not what they do. And the mission. I believe was like improvised over like twelve days. Like they didn't really have a script and seems like johnny to- phones routinely just right the scenes that morning you know. They're the so. Jake say they're incredibly well planned and they are. They have to be visually. They're not planned from the script standpoint. They're not planned. Like i guess the traditional way do what he creates on the spot. It seems to to at least to some large degree. A lot of the films are credited. Add rushing is credited the milky way creative team so there's kind of a group effort there. Several rogers acknowledged with us and johnny. To- himself on probably the accuracy komen to create these sequences. It's it's an unusual way to work in hong kong cinema and join toes. well came through. He started in television which matches incredibly hectic and hong kong and i think brought that work at the film's when he started making feature films really in the late eighties and he kinda worked with cinema city and choi hawk and so on that he added you mentioned earlier about his influence of western films. I'm i'm not sure. Johnny has room to watch movies. Like i'm he probably. He must do but like he is incredibly prolific. He's like hong kong takashi. Me gay character. He's always making movies. I was listening earlier to frank. Jin chinese film critic and program or talking about ad johnny toews career and saying that he reckons one of the reasons. Toe is not better known in the west. And it's films aren't more distributed is because tow literally doesn't make the time to come over to america or europe to talk about his movies because he's too busy making other movies and if you look at his career i mean it's it's milky way bounces is incredible. Balancing act of making these very low key often gangster oriented films like the mission and exiled and at pt. You and so on. And then they also make a lot of like broad comedies and at chinese new year films which are a big event china for a populous plow crowd-pleasing films and they're striking that balance and kind of maintain that creative voice 'em and towed deal Keys directs all these films almost all of milky milkyway's films are directed by him several films milky way that are credited to other directors to- direct attempt to he took them over couldn't he couldn't let go of the reins and so yeah. It's incredible. he just seems to end your he just seems to show up on set interested make films just from the ground dope. Just build them and it is when you watch these films. They feel so ordered and control and just immaculate and yet clearly he is just shooting from the hip to some degree just working off his own understanding of how it must together and what he needs to do and so ultimately just say joint to is is just a master craftsmen. And i think even if you hated his movies. There's no way you can look what does not understand that. This guy is just an incredible craftsman. Who's gonna hate his movies. I i guess few just interested in crime movies. I feel like you'd at least find something to appreciate because it is brief and it's not like over stimulating in the way that some woo and be A for a hong kong action film. This is a great deal of stillness in his work. And i mean when. I say western influence i might be entirely wrong. I it could just be the sort of evolution of that hong kong style. Paralleling what was coming out of hollywood at the time. 'cause i mean both both directors i'm setting are certainly was a graduate of the hong kong industry and one is very obviously influenced by that entire movement of the eighties. I have no idea frankly. It's is just curious cuts. I know he. He doesn't make a lot of space for anything other than making the next movie. Sure is clearly interested in western film that it seems to be relied on his commodity. He he must be certainly. I mean we won't talk about this. Episode like sparrow clear his umbrellas of your board of all movies attached to so that. There's definitely touchstones. I just. It's kinda funny that he seems to be so quintessentially a hong kong director but also kind of a guy. You came up in a very transitional period for hong kong cinema. 'cause hong kong cinema really kind of peaked in the early nineties under the industry hit it's absolute apogee of production quality and resources and then really with the anxiety of the the british handover back to mainland china and so visit the various economic difficulties. Oh and also try at involvement apparently was a massive issue Really strip hong kong industry to being kind of you know it's. It's a shadow of what it used to be in the eighties in the early nineties ample but johnny toe has managed to kind of just keep moving through at Films up a clearly are not seeding quality to anyone. Yeah well we should get moving around a bit of a tight window here. But i think we'd be remiss if we did not mention at the very least. The cheering chunks very bizarre score for this film Second to be for everyone. But i i was saying it kind of reminded me a lot of James horner's working commando with the sort of oppressive steel drums over later. Everything which can be chocked sealed. Rupp give on first viewing steel drums. Forever baby yeah. But i think once you get on this wavelength It's something fairly remarkable. So anyone else have a soundtrack comment before we move onto exile. Here you will. You may have heard that the opening theme at the top podcast if you're wondering what that was a sampling at now right on. Well shall we. Yeah speaking of western influence. How about western the russia because that's certainly influence our next film which is essentially if not in conception in execution a very neat companion to the mission some eight years later. This is two thousand. Six exiled Jake what do you think of this. One yeah Definitely spiritual successor to the mission Four four men show up at a house waiting for the occupant Two of them are there to kill him. The other two are there to save him We quickly learned that. After a short gunfight that they were all childhood friends they grew up in the same gang together and then the man who was targeted is wanted for dead because he betrayed the boss and so they decide to band together and protect him against the onslaught of croat forces. That is gonna come for them for betraying the mission basically and it is a again just near two hours of totally perfect staging of of characters in rooms and where everything erupts into the most beautifully choreographed gunfire you will ever see. Your blood is a red chalk. Blood is a nice powder. Yeah that just burst out of your to really cool like martial arts effects and martial arts films. Use a lot of like talcum powder to emphasize hits puffs off on the impact and really reads on screen and yet he just. The blood is a dust. Puff and excellent kind of move. That honesty is the frank. Zappa quote talking about music is like dancing about architecture. Honesty talking about eight thought is. I just watched like look at this fucking movie. This great because i was just Rewatching on time in the west for the first time. Since i was like oh late. Teens and that in itself is a revelation in But watching that in close to this just saw like obviously have the dust jackets and the killers and whatnot Just the pacing is just like a so close and so similar in that. He's just watching. Everything is done through gestures in sound there so little dialogue and so little like information given vocally and just thinking about like that beginning like i don't know twenty minute of a Leoni western wear it really. Is these guys sitting in a station looking at each other every once in a while and you hear all these sounds like you're getting all this information and it's like the same thing here where Especially specifically the beginning before they're going to do this hit on this old friend of theirs. I mean that's the whole film throughout is just so much done through gestures and you know people are in a room looking at each other conveying information. Not only to us but to what they want to do. What's going to happen But also we should mention that. There's a bit of Which is not uncommon in toes films. It's just different. How it hops up. But there's like some quote unquote magical realism thrown in pretty early. We get this sense. Obviously the The blood but there is just like playing with gravity and the the hitman manipulate gravity. And it's it's not too heavy throughout but it's just there and it's it's just this consistent playfulness in tos films that i really afford to. Actually they confirmed that the door thing can happen on mythbusters. I don't know if you saw that episode was part of the curriculum. Yeah they did a special hong kong action episode where yeah they they know but The door just being blown off it's hinges and just rotating in mid air in tandem with the bolting it is just and that's like in the first fifty minutes to. It's just such an incredible incredible thing that happens and then the movie keeps going. It has sudden shift While you're still trying to figure out exactly what is going on between like them going to do this. Hit on this guy that turns out to be this guy that they've known for a long time in our closer to like this extremely warm familial scene of them repairing all the damage that they did in the house And taking pictures together in it. It's one of those things that it's done up. Top is like very warm seen in. It's like the only warmth really like that sort of congenial forward scene but it casts such an umbrella emotionally over the rest of the film. There's an understanding within this film at yet. Alternate tweet that even that warm. Very warm seen anthony wong. I made many recurring actress. Said this is a real successor to the The mission that made the same people show up again not the same characters. But you could. You could picture them being almost the same character as earn the same rules. Anthony wong is kind of the most hardened professional killer again of the group of the most you kind of balanced to order and still in the in this warm kind of they patched up the guy's house in they're talking and he just kind of again reminds him as i look i i will have to kill you at some point. Those are the rules sets the job and again it has that kind of trajectory of the mission that it's a group of men realizing the bonds of fraternal bonds of of the triad gangs. Don't really play to their benefit. They have these stood the responsibility. Find tweet shelter. Outweigh responsibility to a boss which ultimately is a betrayal within the system and and makes him outcasts make some exiled and the film itself takes place in macau rather than hong kong. So it's it's in a kind of a a separate space to where these normally would be these films normally unfold very scenic space. But you know the gangsters. Ver- clearly are hong kong based Here because that's where the one guy who was broken. Some rule has has kind of found himself lange himself and mad. They come after him and again. This very strong to me. When i first saw this several years ago at this point this really felt like takeshi. Kitano kind of gone fights ever the action in this is absolutely kind of stylized in that fashion where we're kind of the blocking essentially creates these kind of you know angles where people are all standing. There's kind of a unity a disparity they do. You know it's it's like two guys in different types of room shooting at each other and may maybe like four guys and one side of the room. Three hundred guys on the other side of the room and they're all just shooting at each other while standing in space and in the way that it's called and blocked and created it. Creates this kind of that. These four men are like some kind of unit singular block against a city. And it's just frankly you know this is a master class of filmmaking like mine god thursday restaurant chewed there's a sequence in a doctor's office and frankly the doctor's offices the most bizarre things teschigahara eyes without a face or whatever or face another the other one is it's a doctor's office just full of of just everywhere and partitions doors in the middle of nothing is his apartment. That's just been refitted for like an underground. This is where the go if then they get an injury. This is where they go to get 'cause they can't go to a hospital. There's this quack repairs under the the overall tone than think show on your your your saleo a reference. I think is spot on this kind of this league kind of tone to it. It's sort of a debt. We know we know it's not going to like these aren't walking out of this but it's kind of that question of what is the weight of being on this earth. Thursday kind of greg substantial element to. It's like what do we owe to each other. Where do we go when of course the demand that their i sent kale has has a child and the queen would. They were all children. They knew each other young men young boys what cemented reminded me a lot of i actually ended up watching it right afterwards for the first time in nearly fifteen years because so much to takashi meek as dead or alive two which is a similar film similar in theme very different in execution but kind of like how an action movie extensively but really a film about the cumulative waste of your actions on earth kind of moral play in the most beautiful way. Yeah it's it's interesting. You kind of get into something that i. I just barely got to dip my toes in an stephen tao's book on joining tow but He was just talking about how how much his films were marked by. Fatalism fatalistic hero As opposed to Which like set him apart from someone that was stylized as john woo but These guys know in in this film as well as something here on advertise that like from the beginning there like is limited right so then like their life it becomes less about staying alive and it's just ordered by other things like here. I guess trying to keep somebody else. Alive and trying to provide for for his family is just an interesting shift in priorities were preoccupations within his his his character so interesting that they act not according to their own survival which i think is unusual for western audiences. Yeah i think a lot of the structure of these feels very unusual as someone who's more accustomed to western film was just never can get a bead on exactly where these plots are going like. This feels like yeah a film that exists as an archetype and yet it kind of keeps you off balance the entire time like okay while the they're going to band together to save their friend. No hope oh. They're going to band together to provide for his family. It's like Well really i guess in the end. But it sure doesn't feel that way for like ninety percent of their like on a gold rush or whatever. They're just flipping a coin to decide where to go. The wanders around there's a mad mission and they make a friend on a really hurts at thing but it it kind of it scans really well and again our leona. Is i think a very good match your that. Those kind of like you know. Hey were robbing this. But you know security guard you seem to know your stuff with a gun and everything and you know you also know you're just another you're just know their salary salaryman. So why don't we just band together and take the golden. The yeah did there's everyone's conscious establishing their relationship to each other and ultimately it just comes down to that. There exists a over mike. There's an overarching plot. Basically that is hong kong ganz gangster played by simon yam. The irrepressible omnipresent simon. Yam of hongkong always a pleasure to see him on screen. Honestly i could watch the guy forever. And he's hong kong edited boss. He comes in. He comes into mccowan. He basically tells the biggest gangster macau. Listen you kick over to me. And we'll take over the whole place but if you resist me i'll kill you that this gang overtake and these four man just kind of realize it's like they're simon yam's employees but there's this realization that honestly there's no recip. Reciprocity between this you know. They don't really if they gave him what they owe him. According to the rules they won't get back anything worthwhile and it's kind of like this kicking down generation. It's of realized. Aaron a dead end situation because what. They've allied themselves to but the future is unwritten for the child. What's the value of child and it sounds really cheesy when you put it like that but the film ways everything up so an an also lays in these little difficult things i think johnny tow like the role of women is very very interesting. I mean these are absolutely masculine films about but the women play key roles threat as just kind of honestly as like sort of just being let down frankly and be pushed aside in the mission for example at the gangster boss won't put just kills his wife because she has an affair and it's kind of that realize as kind of a realization of the other guys i guess sent like. She was really justed employees to she was really just another. She was on their level despite being the boss's wife. And you know this guy who they're sent to kill. His wife is kind of. She didn't sign up this and they start to realize that. There's you know she can't do what they're doing. They need to do something to help her. And yet it's just you know basically that all of the pristine burnt bonds a fraternal order. Don't actually help. People creates a lot of problems. These are the tension is the films explore quickly. Like while you're talking about the women is specifically an exiled if we want to talk about the western as well like you have this This character this woman who's left with nothing but her child. You know her her her husband. The father of a child is taken away from her. And she's just you know there's the shots were in the window and she has. That's very easily seen in in the canon of westerns. But also i love this like house. That acts like a saloon. Like where you have the prostitute in the top Like or the the sex worker upstairs always looking over the banister but she's like on the margins in this very interesting way where like you're not You don't forget that she is plotting her own about like how to get the hell out of there and also get yourself some money and obviously the end plays out Pretty satisfying in ways. That involve her but Yeah it. I just really liked the used. That setting also kinda remind me like the king who like house or not house but like a restaurant bar. Type of location yeah. The the clinic seen deserves special mention. I think is just so tense and wonderfully black. the end it's a brilliant action setpiece. Certainly my favorite in this This might be my least favorite of the bunch. I think because it is a little more normal you know. It is probably the most traditional narrative film of the bunch but it also manages to be probably the most emotionally impactful so it's probably a very excellent entry point. If you're interested until his work for me give me some of this weird shit Speaking of a hero never dies This is a nineteen ninety eight film and it's very strange and unlike some of the other stuff where we're talking about differentiating toe from john. Woo this one. Feels our peace with moussaka output ange. Frankly out of his america as well. I'm gonna go back to jack on this. He likes to talk jack. What what is a hero. Never dies the hero. Never dies is absolutely. This is quintessential heroic bloodshed cinema..

america johnny tow europe johnny two guys Anthony wong anthony wong four guys milky milkyway macau john woo Three hundred guys both Two johnny toews two first fifty minutes Jake john one side
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

21:21 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Sure. Johnny has room to watch movies. Like i'm he probably. He must do but like he is incredibly prolific. He's like hong kong takashi. Me gay character. He's always making movies. I was listening earlier to frank. Jin chinese film critic and program or talking about ad johnny toews career and saying that he reckons one of the reasons. Toe is not better known in the west. And it's films aren't more distributed is because tow literally doesn't make the time to come over to america or europe to talk about his movies because he's too busy making other movies and if you look at his career i mean it's it's milky way bounces is incredible. Balancing act of making these very low key often gangster oriented films like the mission and exiled and at pt. You and so on. And then they also make a lot of like broad comedies and at chinese new year films which are a big event china for a populous plow crowd-pleasing films and they're striking that balance and kind of maintain that creative voice 'em and towed deal Keys directs all these films almost all of milky milkyway's films are directed by him several films milky way that are credited to other directors to- direct attempt to he took them over couldn't he couldn't let go of the reins and so yeah. It's incredible. he just seems to end your he just seems to show up on set interested make films just from the ground dope. Just build them and it is when you watch these films. They feel so ordered and control and just immaculate and yet clearly he is just shooting from the hip to some degree just working off his own understanding of how it must together and what he needs to do and so ultimately just say joint to is is just a master craftsmen. And i think even if you hated his movies. There's no way you can look what does not understand that. This guy is just an incredible craftsman. Who's gonna hate his movies. I i guess few just interested in crime movies. I feel like you'd at least find something to appreciate because it is brief and it's not like over stimulating in the way that some woo and be A for a hong kong action film. This is a great deal of stillness in his work. And i mean when. I say western influence i might be entirely wrong. I it could just be the sort of evolution of that hong kong style. Paralleling what was coming out of hollywood at the time. 'cause i mean both both directors i'm setting are certainly was a graduate of the hong kong industry and one is very obviously influenced by that entire movement of the eighties. I have no idea frankly. It's is just curious cuts. I know he. He doesn't make a lot of space for anything other than making the next movie. Sure is clearly interested in western film that it seems to be relied on his commodity. He he must be certainly. I mean we won't talk about this. Episode like sparrow clear his umbrellas of your board of all movies attached to so that. There's definitely touchstones. I just. It's kinda funny that he seems to be so quintessentially a hong kong director but also kind of a guy. You came up in a very transitional period for hong kong cinema. 'cause hong kong cinema really kind of peaked in the early nineties under the industry hit it's absolute apogee of production quality and resources and then really with the anxiety of the the british handover back to mainland china and so visit the various economic difficulties. Oh and also try at involvement apparently was a massive issue Really strip hong kong industry to being kind of you know it's. It's a shadow of what it used to be in the eighties in the early nineties ample but johnny toe has managed to kind of just keep moving through at Films up a clearly are not seeding quality to anyone. Yeah well we should get moving around a bit of a tight window here. But i think we'd be remiss if we did not mention at the very least. The cheering chunks very bizarre score for this film Second to be for everyone. But i i was saying it kind of reminded me a lot of James horner's working commando with the sort of oppressive steel drums over later. Everything which can be chocked sealed. Rupp give on first viewing steel drums. Forever baby yeah. But i think once you get on this wavelength It's something fairly remarkable. So anyone else have a soundtrack comment before we move onto exile. Here you will. You may have heard that the opening theme at the top podcast if you're wondering what that was a sampling at now right on. Well shall we. Yeah speaking of western influence. How about western the russia because that's certainly influence our next film which is essentially if not in conception in execution a very neat companion to the mission some eight years later. This is two thousand. Six exiled Jake what do you think of this. One yeah Definitely spiritual successor to the mission Four four men show up at a house waiting for the occupant Two of them are there to kill him. The other two are there to save him We quickly learned that. After a short gunfight that they were all childhood friends they grew up in the same gang together and then the man who was targeted is wanted for dead because he betrayed the boss and so they decide to band together and protect him against the onslaught of croat forces. That is gonna come for them for betraying the mission basically and it is a again just near two hours of totally perfect staging of of characters in rooms and where everything erupts into the most beautifully choreographed gunfire you will ever see. Your blood is a red chalk. Blood is a nice powder. Yeah that just burst out of your to really cool like martial arts effects and martial arts films. Use a lot of like talcum powder to emphasize hits puffs off on the impact and really reads on screen and yet he just. The blood is a dust. Puff and excellent kind of move. That honesty is the frank. Zappa quote talking about music is like dancing about architecture. Honesty talking about eight thought is. I just watched like look at this fucking movie. This great because i was just Rewatching on time in the west for the first time. Since i was like oh late. Teens and that in itself is a revelation in But watching that in close to this just saw like obviously have the dust jackets and the killers and whatnot Just the pacing is just like a so close and so similar in that. He's just watching. Everything is done through gestures in sound there so little dialogue and so little like information given vocally and just thinking about like that beginning like i don't know twenty minute of a Leoni western wear it really. Is these guys sitting in a station looking at each other every once in a while and you hear all these sounds like you're getting all this information and it's like the same thing here where Especially specifically the beginning before they're going to do this hit on this old friend of theirs. I mean that's the whole film throughout is just so much done through gestures and you know people are in a room looking at each other conveying information. Not only to us but to what they want to do. What's going to happen But also we should mention that. There's a bit of Which is not uncommon in toes films. It's just different. How it hops up. But there's like some quote unquote magical realism thrown in pretty early. We get this sense. Obviously the The blood but there is just like playing with gravity and the the hitman manipulate gravity. And it's it's not too heavy throughout but it's just there and it's it's just this consistent playfulness in tos films that i really afford to. Actually they confirmed that the door thing can happen on mythbusters. I don't know if you saw that episode was part of the curriculum. Yeah they did a special hong kong action episode where yeah they they know but The door just being blown off it's hinges and just rotating in mid air in tandem with the bolting it is just and that's like in the first fifty minutes to. It's just such an incredible incredible thing that happens and then the movie keeps going. It has sudden shift While you're still trying to figure out exactly what is going on between like them going to do this. Hit on this guy that turns out to be this guy that they've known for a long time in our closer to like this extremely warm familial scene of them repairing all the damage that they did in the house And taking pictures together in it. It's one of those things that it's done up. Top is like very warm seen in. It's like the only warmth really like that sort of congenial forward scene but it casts such an umbrella emotionally over the rest of the film. There's an understanding within this film at yet. Alternate tweet that even that warm. Very warm seen anthony wong. I made many recurring actress. Said this is a real successor to the The mission that made the same people show up again not the same characters. But you could. You could picture them being almost the same character as earn the same rules. Anthony wong is kind of the most hardened professional killer again of the group of the most you kind of balanced to order and still in the in this warm kind of they patched up the guy's house in they're talking and he just kind of again reminds him as i look i i will have to kill you at some point. Those are the rules sets the job and again it has that kind of trajectory of the mission that it's a group of men realizing the bonds of fraternal bonds of of the triad gangs. Don't really play to their benefit. They have these stood the responsibility. Find tweet shelter. Outweigh responsibility to a boss which ultimately is a betrayal within the system and and makes him outcasts make some exiled and the film itself takes place in macau rather than hong kong. So it's it's in a kind of a a separate space to where these normally would be these films normally unfold very scenic space. But you know the gangsters. Ver- clearly are hong kong based Here because that's where the one guy who was broken. Some rule has has kind of found himself lange himself and mad. They come after him and again. This very strong to me. When i first saw this several years ago at this point this really felt like takeshi. Kitano kind of gone fights ever the action in this is absolutely kind of stylized in that fashion where we're kind of the blocking essentially creates these kind of you know angles where people are all standing. There's kind of a unity a disparity they do. You know it's it's like two guys in different types of room shooting at each other and may maybe like four guys and one side of the room. Three hundred guys on the other side of the room and they're all just shooting at each other while standing in space and in the way that it's called and blocked and created it. Creates this kind of that. These four men are like some kind of unit singular block against a city. And it's just frankly you know this is a master class of filmmaking like mine god thursday restaurant chewed there's a sequence in a doctor's office and frankly the doctor's offices the most bizarre things teschigahara eyes without a face or whatever or face another the other one is it's a doctor's office just full of of just everywhere and partitions doors in the middle of nothing is his apartment. That's just been refitted for like an underground. This is where the go if then they get an injury. This is where they go to get 'cause they can't go to a hospital. There's this quack repairs under the the overall tone than think show on your your your saleo a reference. I think is spot on this kind of this league kind of tone to it. It's sort of a debt. We know we know it's not going to like these aren't walking out of this but it's kind of that question of what is the weight of being on this earth. Thursday kind of greg substantial element to. It's like what do we owe to each other. Where do we go when of course the demand that their i sent kale has has a child and the queen would. They were all children. They knew each other young men young boys what cemented reminded me a lot of i actually ended up watching it right afterwards for the first time in nearly fifteen years because so much to takashi meek as dead or alive two which is a similar film similar in theme very different in execution but kind of like how an action movie extensively but really a film about the cumulative waste of your actions on earth kind of moral play in the most beautiful way. Yeah it's it's interesting. You kind of get into something that i. I just barely got to dip my toes in an stephen tao's book on joining tow but He was just talking about how how much his films were marked by. Fatalism fatalistic hero As opposed to Which like set him apart from someone that was stylized as john woo but These guys know in in this film as well as something here on advertise that like from the beginning there like is limited right so then like their life it becomes less about staying alive and it's just ordered by other things like here. I guess trying to keep somebody else. Alive and trying to provide for for his family is just an interesting shift in priorities were preoccupations within his his his character so interesting that they act not according to their own survival which i think is unusual for western audiences. Yeah i think a lot of the structure of these feels very unusual as someone who's more accustomed to western film was just never can get a bead on exactly where these plots are going like. This feels like yeah a film that exists as an archetype and yet it kind of keeps you off balance the entire time like okay while the they're going to band together to save their friend. No hope oh. They're going to band together to provide for his family. It's like Well really i guess in the end. But it sure doesn't feel that way for like ninety percent of their like on a gold rush or whatever. They're just flipping a coin to decide where to go. The wanders around there's a mad mission and they make a friend on a really hurts at thing but it it kind of it scans really well and again our leona. Is i think a very good match your that. Those kind of like you know. Hey were robbing this. But you know security guard you seem to know your stuff with a gun and everything and you know you also know you're just another you're just know their salary salaryman. So why don't we just band together and take the golden. The yeah did there's everyone's conscious establishing their relationship to each other and ultimately it just comes down to that. There exists a over mike. There's an overarching plot. Basically that is hong kong ganz gangster played by simon yam. The irrepressible omnipresent simon. Yam of hongkong always a pleasure to see him on screen. Honestly i could watch the guy forever. And he's hong kong edited boss. He comes in. He comes into mccowan. He basically tells the biggest gangster macau. Listen you kick over to me. And we'll take over the whole place but if you resist me i'll kill you that this gang overtake and these four man just kind of realize it's like they're simon yam's employees but there's this realization that honestly there's no recip. Reciprocity between this you know. They don't really if they gave him what they owe him. According to the rules they won't get back anything worthwhile and it's kind of like this kicking down generation. It's of realized. Aaron a dead end situation because what. They've allied themselves to but the future is unwritten for the child. What's the value of child and it sounds really cheesy when you put it like that but the film ways everything up so an an also lays in these little difficult things i think johnny tow like the role of women is very very interesting. I mean these are absolutely masculine films about but the women play key roles threat as just kind of honestly as like sort of just being let down frankly and be pushed aside in the mission for example at the gangster boss won't put just kills his wife because she has an affair and it's kind of that realize as kind of a realization of the other guys i guess sent like. She was really justed employees to she was really just another. She was on their level despite being the boss's wife. And you know this guy who they're sent to kill. His wife is kind of. She didn't sign up this and they start to realize that. There's you know she can't do what they're doing. They need to do something to help her. And yet it's just you know basically that all of the pristine burnt bonds a fraternal order. Don't actually help. People creates a lot of problems. These are the tension is the films explore quickly. Like while you're talking about the women is specifically an exiled if we want to talk about the western as well like you have this This character this woman who's left with nothing but her child. You know her her her husband. The father of a child is taken away from her. And she's just you know there's the shots were in the window and she has. That's very easily seen in in the canon of westerns. But also i love this like house. That acts like a saloon. Like where you have the prostitute in the top Like or the the sex worker upstairs always looking over the banister but she's like on the margins in this very interesting way where like you're not You don't forget that she is plotting her own about like how to get the hell out of there and also get yourself some money and obviously the end plays out Pretty satisfying in ways. That involve her but Yeah it. I just really liked the used. That setting also kinda remind me like the king who like house or not house but like a restaurant bar. Type of location yeah. The the clinic seen deserves special mention. I think is just so tense and wonderfully black. the end it's a brilliant action setpiece. Certainly my favorite in this This might be my least favorite of the bunch. I think because it is a little more normal you know. It is probably the most traditional narrative film of the bunch but it also manages to be probably the most emotionally impactful so it's probably a very excellent entry point. If you're interested until his work for me give me some of this weird shit Speaking of a hero never dies This is a nineteen ninety eight film and it's very strange and unlike some of the other stuff where we're talking about differentiating toe from john. Woo this one. Feels our peace with moussaka output ange. Frankly out of his america as well. I'm gonna go back to jack on this. He likes to talk jack. What what is a hero. Never dies the hero. Never dies is absolutely. This is quintessential heroic bloodshed cinema..

america europe anthony wong Two Jake johnny tow Anthony wong john woo johnny toews four guys ninety percent Johnny both two guys four men two frank Three hundred guys two thousand milky milkyway
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Teases out of these berry like john mara heavy plots. While you know sean. I'm going to be certain to kick you describe a synopsis for throwdown. So don't worry got it was. It was jake. I think you mentioned earlier in discussion Professionals it's like yeah. John make movies about professionals and professionals. Don't tell each other what they do they just do. And that's his films are almost bris oni in that they are just people doing things acting their action films of action. Whether that be so. I mean it's honestly almost the weight of two guys shooting at each other or some guys sharing at cigarettes. So it's almost like like equal weight to the the process of unfolding on screen and it's really fascinating kind of a balance of things. Yeah i mentioned. The the professionals bid is i mentioned sort of in reference to michael man in that both him and johnny to- have an interest in watching watching professionals be professionals on screen and i think the the greatest joy and success of the mission like many other Johnny toe films that Is just watching like these. Five men go to work when it comes time to do business like there's this anytime they get involved in some sort of shooting they just sort of wordlessly. Got each other's backs in coverall exits at. It's just so immaculately staged performed. It's excellent to watch. This is true also features One of cinema's great characters in james who is just eating shelled peanuts the entire time piling them up. Everyone has an infinite supply peanuts in this movie. It's fucking incredible character. Which is what this movie. And all of his work. Really excels at is sort of giving people these wordless traits that define them and distinguish them and in many ways. What this movie reminded me of was less michael man and more Tarantino in many ways. Like this i found interesting with his early films especially. I'm in not early early but the earliest that we looked at. I would say these nineties films are a little before. He completely found a unique voice like the ladder. Films are distinctly the product of johnny toe. And these feel more like something that shows us influences Quite readily and i. I found interesting. This sort of like irl boroughs going on between hollywood and hong kong. Yeah in this era because this feels like something that is our owing a lot from reservoir dogs which of course osas existence to bring a lamps city on fire Hong kong classic. So it's interesting. I it's something i will also get into a little with a hero. Never dies which feels a lot more like woo. But i don't know it really feels like nineties. You know the work that was doing in hollywood. It feels like there's a lot of western influence in this era of toes output. But the stuff that was really showing through and that influences is directly influenced by hong kong itself. It's going from hong kong to hollywood and back to hong kong through until it's the with wu it's like everything is very hyper kinetic like he'll have child fat slide down the banister shooting with two handguns at a bunch of guys at the bottom floor. And it's like it has like three hundred cuts but it's just all very exciting. With jani toe he's characterized by stillness. Everyone is just firmly planted feet on the ground. Actually more reminds me of for. Just comparing the directors takashi kitano namely like sony teen where every shooting in that movie is just everyone just firmly planted on the ground. Guns pointed straight ahead. Nobody's like running and dodging. Everybody is just like like just a firm poll. I guess that that shooting at other targets. Yeah that stands out incredibly in the action sequences in this film. There's almost no like kinetic movement in the actors. This is all driven through camera movement and That can be incredibly effective. Says one of the greatest action set pieces. I've ever seen in my life with this grand mal shootout that it is just i thought it was a petite mal. Yeah it is essentially you know like eight guys standing in place kinda duck in buying pillars occasionally moving firing each other but it has this energy that's totally derived from the direction and it is the way he and his reflection and the space. And yeah that too but it is an impressive piece of filmmaking. Yeah i think the the like. I think qatar is really a really good base for this because like the mission really feels to me like hong kong son eighteen more than even within catano like very much that film and that it's a film about a bunch of guys who've kind of chosen a meal you there's no way around us. They're kind of bonded by the rules and the codes of their basically criminal organization. These guys have chosen kind of work somewhat. In the periphery anti long for example is moving. He's hairdresser. He prefers being a hairdresser to a bodyguard. But he's really good at being a bodyguard and he's brought back in and you know anders through towards the end of the film a subplot emerges where which basically sets these men against each other through a process of honor Kind of a code rule that that has one of the breaches that has to be. His death has to be executed and there is this kind of internal movement between it because demand kind of ally off against each other which is really interesting subplot within the film that honestly this is kind of like a film before employees realizing they have more in common with each other than with their boss. I mean this is almost like gangster office space almost in in the wildest reading of but like sonatina it's a film of liberal moments of these little grace notes of just guys just kind of sitting around kind of sharing a space being mysterious to each other but also absolutely bonded to each other by similar decisions and fates and weights in the world and it's just really compelling. I know that. There's a certain element i guess of macho. Fantasy guys are like a guy's movie is so about you know killing people and having a gun and being cool and dying and stuff like that and then you know most of us work office jobs and we just hang out. But there is the underlying kind of kinship that against men have kind of cultivate. That's kinda cool. You know that we don't you know there are these certain shared bonds book going. Don't talk in depth about them. I mean the mission is not a dialogue heavy film. There's a lot of guys Live just hanging out talking about something else. The under the subtext is clear to their alluding to something else. It's just a really. I mean honestly like this is just. It's fantastic filmed. This is just one of those films. It's like eighty five minutes without a step wrong. It's just heavenly watch. You mentioned that moral shoot house which is really just created like you say it's just a couple of guys starting around the camera slowly moving in on certain shots and it is unquestionably one of the greatest action. Set pieces that has ever been put in cinema lino hike. Its that good not kidding. And it's created out of i watched. He's again last weekend and heat. Has that phenomenal heights shootout. And it's incredible. Don't get me wrong. Mike amandus on top form. But the so many moving parts and it's organized. It's just an incredible piece of work but toll create something of similar ways at using just almost nothing. It's it's incredible like a couple of guys standing in an empty space and he just divide it out and it's just quietly bills you just a god you know whenever we're talking about like what director it's like what johnny towed does it's director does like that's what it's house. If you ever doubt directors having a job.

Tarantino johnny towed eighteen takashi kitano john mara John two guys eight guys michael catano Five men both Hong kong eighty five minutes johnny qatar One johnny toe jake Mike amandus
"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"johnnie" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"Optimism vaccine. this is obviously. You're you're very usual. High energy host admire myross. I a sif can't be here today. It's damn shame. I will have to soldier on without him. So we're going for a little more. Npr feel here Joining me for this very very important. Cast is We have jackie gleason as per usual. How you doing jack. Pretty good adam. I'll let the npr field. It's good i try my best. I just don't have the same. Dj energy that steve brings to the table We also have as per usual. Jake pila how're you doing. Jake doing fine adam. Thanks for thanks for hosting enda. Too bad couldn't join us. Because i think this is a very a very stellar lineup of films we have in front of us. That's true you know when he exits we we bring in some actual films to talk about. You know we have to keep going our about this fucking godzilla trash. Steve says watch trash. We all say no also back from the abyss. He's finishing his travels presumably will be regularly on going forward. Here returning sean glenis. What is the call for this sudden switch into good content that you're watching your idea. Yeah i think you heralded this interesting. We were just trying to figure out a way to hook you back. You walk into that one didn't you. Well we sean was not tolerant of our fucking mortal kombat casts and etc etc. But we need. we didn't back in the fold. We got to bring in some good films once. It's interesting. I'm just saying there's there's a correlation between me returning and you guys returning to good quality content correlation not mean causation. It doesn't but there's something to be looked at their And i'm sure if we look at it. I'm sure if we look at the analytics there's probably a corollary there too But what we're going to say moms. I'll i was just gonna say sean that. The quality of the material does not equal content. So that's true. I can't promise much today. Yeah this could very well be. Our worst episode is to say but we are talking Quality film so we are starting an exploration. That's gonna lasse really entire month. We're going to do some johnny tow because Who does like some good hong kong action. We have picked for her each episode. Here we're going to start with a pretty interesting selection. Probably someone's a lot of people have not seen None of the the real heavy. I guess although i think exile this is pretty big one but These are some of his lesser known releases. I would say But they are enjoyable. And i think we're going to get started with a pair of films will start with with the mission from nineteen ninety nine But these are probably the most accessible in traditional of the four here As far as all kong action films and they're both excellent stuff. Let's get going on the mission jack. I'm going to get started on this. What what is the mission. And why should we care. Well the mission is a very straightforward mission. Really it's a group of guys or assembled to protect a triad leader. There's a hit out on him. Multiple attempts have been made on his life so he gathered some kind of old friends and confidence people troughs who are kind of so know each other but they are all somewhat mysterious offi film for no reason the pan pipe work excellent arch. Yeah that's that's what happening. Robert deniro shows a door halfway through. It's really late night while word. Yeah yeah so so we these four guys who were all various degrees of of kind of they know each other but they don't know each other but they're all united in a single calls which is to protect this one gang boss who has so many in his life until they can figure out what's going on and it's a really. It's it's an incredible film. It's it's kind of amazing. How much toa assembles from. Almost nothing when you walk film. It's not like a big sprawling films tight. Knit cast very simple set pieces. But it's kind of surprising mixture because it really runs. I think like eighty five minutes. It's amazing how much down time. It's kind of like a hangout. Movie it's Covers a lot of these kind of quiet moments of the guys. Just sort of hanging out and smoking cigarettes and shooting the shit and being bored because being a bodyguard is kind of an. There's these incredible action sequences that are not in john. Woo molder these much. More restrained but equally stylized kind of concoctions camera movement and just kind of angles of kind of blocking of where people are to each other all bending john woo just like everything is exploding simultaneously. Thing and yeah. It's it's a really tremendous film and it's honestly it's a shame. This isn't kind of an acknowledged classic like hard boiled or a lot of other hong kong movies settling distribution. If this come at the cheese. I think this this would be a big title in the west. I'm glad you mentioned that was like threadbare a conceptually or on paper. Because i was like hoping that myrow was not gonna ask me what it's about because i mean all these films like if you read the plot synopsis of these four killers and assassinations and friends turned enemies like rivals like i. It's it's less about. What the plot is more about the order. An honor.

Steve Robert deniro Jake Jake pila today four four killers four guys each episode adam sean glenis eighty five minutes steve johnny tow both john woo single calls jack john one gang boss
As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

All Things Considered

04:01 min | 2 years ago

As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

"Or require. That is a dilemma Many employers are facing as a covert 19 vaccine comes closer to reality. Ah, quarter million people in the U. S have died from Cove it once there's a shot can that can prevent illness Should it be mandatory in the workplace? NPR's Andrea Hsu has more Only a couple of months into the pandemic. Holly Smith had made up her mind. Her restaurant Cafe Juanita in Kirkland, Washington, would not reopen the diners until there was a covert 19 vaccine. She's She's already already told told her her staff staff you you are are going going to to get get vaccinated. vaccinated. Some Some of of my my young young millennials millennials are are like like Saran Saran taking. taking. This This is is a a directive directive like like as as a a mandate. mandate. Is Is that that how how you you mean mean it? it? And And that's that's that's that's a scary thing. You know, like Yeah. Yes, yes, Smith had 28 employees before the pandemic. She's had to lay off all but five. Her fine dining spot has become a take out on Lee business. Even with a much smaller staff, Smith is serious about safety. She requires her workers to get tested. If they go on vacation with people outside their bubble, or if they're showing any sign of illness. I believe in civil liberties and all those different things, but you know, we have people who live with their parents. We have people who lived with her husband, who has diabetes. The staff have to be healthy and safe before you could move forward, she says, you know for vaccinated I think I can move out in the world and be responsible for these 28 or 30 people. Plus all the people coming in. Now, if you're wondering, Can she actually do this? Can she require her workers to get vaccinated? The answer appears to be yes, but her workers also have the right to request exemptions. Under federal law. Someone could say I have a medical or religious reason I can't be vaccinated and companies must try to provide accommodations. It's incredibly hard to manage a mandate. Johnnie Taylor Jr is president of the Society for Human Resource Management, He says Each request must be evaluated on its own merits. Now imagine if there were hundreds of them. A recent poll found four in 10. Americans don't want the vaccine, though that polling was done before anyone knew how well the vaccines would work. So this is a true headache for HR professionals. That's why you're likely to see many companies strongly encourage the vaccine, but stopped short of mandating it. Take, for example, the pork producers Smithfield, the company told NPR. They're not anticipating a firm mandate, but they want to offer the vaccine on site. Even with all the headaches, Taylor things many employers will go for the mandate. After all, they have an obligation to get rid of any known hazards in the workplace like Covad. It's real and it's devastating. So I think the dynamic changes. Employers are actually going to position this as I need to do this full stop. Now. There are some workplaces that already mandate the flu vaccine, most commonly hospitals. Dr. James McDevitt is dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He says the annual flu shot is required for some 14,000 people, doctors, nurses, med students, even the clerks. They're sitting in a computer that don't see live patients. It's the right thing to do for society, he says. If you claim an exemption, you have to wear a mask. Now with the covert vaccine. Baylor is not going to make it mandatory until they can actually get enough supply to cover everyone and until it's been deemed safe, not just by the FDA, McDivitt says, but by his own colleagues. Johnny Taylor Jr says. Whatever companies decide there are likely to be challenges. And so Congress and state legislators are going to have to think about how to offer some protection on both sides. Legal protection for companies that mandate the vaccine in case someone has a bad reaction. Even though you will have to sign a waiver before you get the shot. They've also gotta protect the employers who decide not to make it. Mandate and then who are sued by employees who contracted Taylor has been meeting with federal employment officials telling them employers want to do the right thing, but they're in a tough spot, and they're going to need help getting through this.

Andrea Hsu Holly Smith Cafe Juanita Saran Saran NPR Johnnie Taylor Jr Smith Kirkland U. Headaches Society For Human Resource Man Dr. James Mcdevitt Washington LEE Diabetes Smithfield Mcdivitt Baylor College Of Medicine Johnny Taylor Jr Taylor
Diageo to Buy Ryan Reynolds Aviation American Gin for up to $610 million

Business Wars Daily

02:40 min | 2 years ago

Diageo to Buy Ryan Reynolds Aviation American Gin for up to $610 million

"Well, the Movie Star and Entrepreneur Ryan Reynolds certainly had something to celebrate this week. His Liquor Brand Aviation American gin is being acquired by the world's largest spirits business on Monday. Reynolds. Announced that Dr. Joe is buying the Startup Jim. Maker for up to six hundred, ten, million dollars the the fourteen billion dollar owner of brands like Johnnie Walker Whisky Tanqueray Gin and Guinness Al among others. The deal is a coup for Reynolds a Rakish forty-three-year-old celebrity actor best known for his performances a superhero with a twisted sense of humor in the twenty sixteen movie deadpool. It's also a testament to reynolds star turn as a copywriter. Reynolds bought an ownership stake in aviation in two thousand eighteen and became its brand ambassador. He applied his quirky provocative sense of humor to the task to here's just one example remember the Peleton ad that went viral in a bad way the one where the poor Peleton wife played by actress Monica, Rees appear to be exercising against her will to satisfy her sexist tons desire for skinny spouse. Well, Reynolds decided to help his career and Tro Peleton at the same time he cast releasing an ad for. In it, she in two friends are sitting at a bar, their nursing MARTINIS. She looked downcast while her two friends look on with concern. The peleton wife then downs, the entire Martini and the friends pass there's to her the implication of course, is that she has left the suddenly abusive husband on social media just to make sure we all got the joke Reynolds wrote Hashtag exercise bike not included naturally that ad went viral in a good way. It was cheeky ads like these along with Reynolds thirty, six, million instagram followers. And fans on other social media platforms that helped aviation sales skyrocket revenues grew in triple digits in both twenty, eighteen and twenty nineteen making it what Fast Company called the fastest growing super premium gin and the World Diario who's Gordon's? Gin. Brand is the world's largest was watching closely just three years ago. The conglomerate bought a Tequila brand from George Clooney valuing it at a billion dollars. That brand has performed rather well for Dr Geo. Now Aviation's biggest rivals have become family with the acquisition both tanker and Gordon's GIN become sister brands to aviation. The deal doesn't allow Reynolds to simply take the money and like the superhero he plays deadpool run he'll stay on as an owner and the brand's ambassador presumably for the next decade Diarios paying three hundred, thirty, five, million dollars now and offering an early of two hundred seventy, five, million dollars more over the next ten years depending on aviations performance

Ryan Reynolds Brand Ambassador Now Aviation Gordon Tro Peleton Dr. Joe Johnnie Walker Dr Geo George Clooney Guinness Al Peleton Fast Company Monica Rees
Should More Airline Passengers Be Screened for COVID-19?

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Should More Airline Passengers Be Screened for COVID-19?

"Let's start with you. Testing passengers already is taking place in parts of Europe. You WanNa tell us a little bit about it. Yeah, it's something that that several allies working on. CICULAR. Lifthansa has set up a testing center well to in fact, the the big one is in Frankfurt. They've teamed up with a biotech company and they're referring PC tests, which I believe are the most accurate test at the moment available to tell whether a passenger has grown virus not so that referring rapid results on those tests. In a bid to to help passengers meet the requirements of countries that do now need that testing for arrivals and all say justice source of health. Confidence travelers want to night that getting on board that plane. Infecting anyone on that journey. So tell us how it works. Mean you're saying people get tested before they leave or do they get tested when they arrive in Europe or is it? A combination. It's Jam The government has recently at the beginning of August broten a requirement for PC tests for arrivals from certain countries I consider. So in that situation, a passenger arriving from one of those countries can get straight off that plane and get tested at the airport with results or if a passenger wants to travel to a country that requires negative test for entry, they can do that at the moment. You you you. Can. You guess a link when you book your ticket with tons, you get a link, an information about the country you're traveling to. And then you can put your test online and up with your hiding and get tested at the Apple. They will have a sloth, a citizen. Munich, and natural to other. The Anna An and considering other in. Germany. They want to to set up this tax bill T. You just use the phrase rapid results. But when I read your story can take as long as six hours to get those. I think if you can pay for the fast-track two to three hours but yeah, it's not it's not. That's one of the things when I spoke to you lift answer for this article, they did talk about how they hope that. You know the the the the time it takes to get results his it's games beginning foster and foster obesity. That's six hours is still quite long time to add onto your Johnnie if he wants to do that when you arrive at the apple, but these tests seems to be evolving all the time. And if it's if you pay extra, you can get in as little as two hours, correct yeah. That's great. So do these tests cost and who's paying for them. Are the passengers paying for them or is the airline paying for? The let's take the example of Frankfort. The the standard speed test is fifty nine euros on the fast track test one, hundred, thirty, nine years. But if you're a passenger arriving from one of the at risk countries, the German government is is taking taking on both the charges. So that's free of charge for the passenger when they go to the testing center. Okay, not not a bad deal, Ben. Let's hop over the Atlantic to you. Are there similar efforts afoot in in the US. Efforts in the US today have been very minimal. I. Think. A lot of that has to do with the lack of federal government involvement both the TSA. Customs and border. Patrol have been a very hesitant to to really dip their feet into this testing issue. They've sort of adopted a the government in general has adopted sort of hands off attitude pandemic. You know they haven't even. Gone ahead and enforced mask wearing or You know done anything on temperature screening so Sort of behind the ball in the United States. Interestingly the State of Alaska actually did did try to implement a wide scale testing at its airports and the way that worked towards. These were free pc artists on site at the eight Alaskan airports that receive out of state arrivals. So you could show up in Alaska get a free pr on site and then you go in. So in socially is or self quarantine until the results became available at which point you would submit to an online portal and after a week or two to state would actually have you come back and take another test to to double check to verify. that. You don't have it. So That policy however actually as of August eleventh that change the state of Alaska is no longer offering free tests at airports because if some logistical challenges involved. With that whole process. Now, what they're doing is they want you to submit A test or prove that you have taken a test with seventy two hours of your departure to Alaska But that's a little difficult too because you know the timing is sort of up in the air it might take. It might be that you take a test within seventy two hours. But you don't have a result. So you arrive in Alaska, you can show them. You've taken the test, but you can't produce a negative result So then you still have to go in quarantine and then they still have to follow up with you and it becomes Really sort of an administrative headache and I think they've run into some challenges are trying to implement this on a wide scale in

Alaska United States Europe Apple Lifthansa Munich Frankfurt Atlantic TSA Anna An German Government Johnnie Germany Frankfort
The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Archetypes

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:42 min | 2 years ago

The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Archetypes

"I'm. Where going back to daily bread. archetypes are perennial teams that reside at the level of the collective universal source. They are representations of our collective soul's yearnings imagination. And deepest is is. These archetypes have existed in every culture in every tradition since the beginning of time. archetypes, our ancient gods themes, motifs stories literature. Art Paintings. Even paintings on the was of caves from longtime ago and they embody. Symbolically. Themes of expanded or higher consciousness, you can say symbolic representations. Of A particular aspect. Of The divine intelligence archetypes and Forms and shapes the there soon. Shift throughout history, but their core meaning that Gore theme that God motif remains the same. archetypes everywhere. In popular culture. Movie Stars Sports Heroes. They're all basically representations of archetypes. Visionary leaders are representations of archetypes. Saints are great activists like Nelson Mandela Martin Luther King Junior. Mark Maguire Andy Abraham, Lincoln or Representation of archetypes, but so products may be a brand of sopa Volkswagen brand, new car, or even Marlboro cigarettes. These represents architects, the guy who's used to advertise Marlboro cigarettes who has a? Very tough-looking. Cowboy on the Horse, and now of course is on a respirator, but that archetype. Of was very successful in selling cigarettes. And Johnnie Walker is a very successful. archetype selling whiskey. Because it attracts a certain team, a certain personality, a certain story. Movies TV soap operas, media tabloids. These are actually all right. archetypes. And every person they representing every idea they represent are every product represent seems to be larger than life. It seems uncomplicated. It seems at least the way it's advertise pure of intent, whatever that intent may be sacred or profane. It does matter. And so I say exaggerated expressions of the conscious energy of the collective source. That is the adventure or the secret of the sage of the rescuer of the redeemer or the love object. That the archetype represents. is in fact, the symbolic representation of a divine intelligence in the conscious energy of our collective Sola. Born of the collective soul, but enacted by the individual. Becomes very powerful as they representation. Of that are detected theme for example Marilyn. Monroe was the archetype of the Greek Greek Goddess Aphrodite representing sensuality and beauty and sexuality.

Mark Maguire Andy Abraham Johnnie Walker Nelson Mandela Martin Luther Monroe Marlboro Gore Volkswagen Marilyn
"johnnie" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"johnnie" Discussed on WTVN

"Lot of you are as you heard Johnnie people working from home even in our building here at six ten WTVN we we have some guidelines that are invalid for example quite often in radio at battle here but our sister stations we have we have gas that come into the station to you know you talk about whatever and war have having no gas right now we're spreading out our ours our sales staff different people coming in different times to try to keep the social distancing physical distancing intact obviously a lot of you are dealing with that with your office is maybe you're working at home and they're obviously the up people it for our families with their kids I am too high school age kids that are going to be home for at least three weeks and listening to governor to wine talk sounds like it's going to be longer than that and potentially even for the rest of the school year so those are some of the things that all of us are dealing with on a day to day basis and if you have your kids at home a lot of them might be frightened at this time about what's going on we have on the live line Dr Alex hamlet of the child mind institute a child psychologist who joins us Dr hamlet thanks for getting up this morning for us one thank you for having me Matt okay let's start there this is scary times if my kids are even in high school I'm a freshman and a junior they're a little bit unsure if you're dealing with younger kids I they're probably years or even more questions how do we as parents deal with this right now in terms of calming their fears yet to making sure they're educated and being safe I think that's a great question I think there are a few pointers that I have one first and foremost is don't be afraid to talk about the virus with your kids they definitely heard about it they've seen images though not discussing to make things actually worse what I would do is that emotional tone try to manage your own anxiety and even if you're anxious inside that okay just trying to be here com and even helped convey the facts and really encourage kids and teens to hell tell you them or tell you what they're what they've heard and what they know and how they feel about it give them a lot of opportunities also ask questions you know when when you get into a routine may have your kids going to school every day and now you know for the foreseeable future they're going to be home it can cause stress with mom and dad hot how do you deal with that yeah you got to do with your own anxiety to do you're not yes I really think that Aaron but the my favorite analogy is thinking about putting your own oxygen mask on before you help others and that goes for parenting I think you really need to kind of take a step back to breathing manage your own anxiety and it's okay that you have anxiety it's just more about managing it in the face of your children and helping them to be that filtered new system for that and also helping them to create routines and sticking with that during an uncertain time can be really helpful in managing anxiety and get this thing with doctor Alexander the child mind institute here on newsradio six ten WTVN and delay on how to deal with our kids during this corona virus epidemic are I guess I should say pandemic right now the when you talk to your kids I guess you got to be reassuring at the set it is an uncertain time we're not sure how long this is going to last before things start to research return to some sort of normalcy so you can't like tell your kids take three weeks from now it's going to be fine so how do you address that how do you be reassuring I think you have to be as honest with them as possible tell them what you do know in a very clear and calming way and say that as long as you're getting your information you will be filtering it to them as appropriate it really is an uncertain time and being as honest and clear as possible about what you do now is is is the best course of action since our kids to ride this is a stressful time but I imagine you got to have fun with them too right yeah and I think that's a great point I think one of the ways you can spend a little bit more family time is that you can have fun you you can pick activities together and use this as an opportunity to bond with your kids yeah you know maybe put down the the iPhone's a little bit now have sought some more family sorry I I guess you got to try to find ways to make this a positive and make your kids feel feel safe and comfortable your whole yes trying to make lemonade out of lemons if you well it's really hard and I think that approach could be really what he things idea day how much information should we give in is it does is it dependent on age in terms of this somewhat how much is too much you don't want information overload you don't want to scare your kids but at the same time you do want to give information keep track of the news of exactly what's happening and why you were saying a we don't want to have the group playdates that we normally do so where is that balance where you have to find it I definitely think that helping your child to limit what they're consuming media wise is really helpful first and foremost you almost want to be taking on that media filter for them and then also thinking about what they do you already know which is why I think it's helpful for you to ask them what they know first and going from there and then considering developmental appropriateness of what you're saying right as a kid is younger the low age six you really want to be as clear and and limiting as possible and as your child gets older it's more appropriate to take their lead and and then start answering the questions that the gauge for what they know and.

Johnnie
The Late George Curry

In Black America

10:56 min | 2 years ago

The Late George Curry

"The reason I do what I do because I grew up in Alabama and the first black journalists avenue with me. Get A job and couldn't get a job in my hometown newspaper so you will never be able to say you never met a black killed 'cause campuses around the country and some reading they always WanNa know what you think. What topic Us Don't ever have one called anybody who knows me knows that comes comes out but I actually have seen. I actually have a challenge tonight and I hope you make a decision tonight and my topic is in the form of a question. Do you want to be eight of Mamata or do you want to be a thermostat? Let me put it another way. Do you want to measure the temperature? The temperature the late George E curry former editor in chief of the National Newspaper Publishers Association New Service Former Editor in chief of emerged magazine author and syndicated columnist. Curry died on Saturday August twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. He was sixty nine considered the dean of black press columnists his weekly syndicated column appeared in more than two hundred. African. American newspapers. Curry was a journalist journalist. He began his career. Sports illustrated magazine. The Saint Louis Post dispatch and then the Chicago Tribune where he became the New York girl. Cheap two thousand three. The National Association of Black Journalists named him journalist of the year he is also in a BJ's list of most influential black journalists of the twentieth century. Curry was unapologetic. Stewart and champion for the Black Press and frequent need for it in the civil rights narrative. He was deeply committed to fostering the next generation of journalists of color. They became the founding director of the Saint. Louis Minority Journalism Workshop in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven. I'm Johnnie O. Hanson junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program a tribute to the late. George E curry in Black America emerged was a news magazine that was published for ten years up the year. Two thousand I was editor to the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July called the best of emerge at Ballantine books a publishing in your arm of a random house and it has the best collection of Of Our stories over the years so it's very different and quite frankly one day soon. I expect this starbucks. We got the most attention. Because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas. Random as the amount of his head and they me ram two years later. The lawn jockeying for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen. Single Clarence comes today. People mentioned that though. That's that's not the stores I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith who was arrested. Twenty four give a twenty four year. Mandatory sentence been Amman. Mine are basically going with drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she needed sold or used drugs But she was very attached as ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on and ran a couple of other stories. In addition to that a couple of years ago she was pardoned by bill. Clinton I'll Office Delay George. E Curry is best known for his heir to ship of the former emerged magazine. Most recently for his work as Airdrie and cheap for the National Newspaper Published Association from two thousand to two thousand seven and again from two thousand twelve until last year. Warren George Edward Curry on February. Twenty third nineteen forty seven in Tuscaloosa Alabama is mother worked as a domestic and his father was a mechanic. His father abandoned fan when he was just seven years old leaving him to step into the role of the man of the house assisting his mother in raising three younger sisters and nineteen sixty five. He graduated high school where he was a member of the football team and sports energy to other school newspaper and nineteen sixty six curry moves in New York City way worked for the student. Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He earned his bachelor of Arts degree in history from Knoxville College. In nineteen nine hundred seventy fulfilling a lifelong dream. He began his professional journal. Career as reporter for sports illustrated magazine in nineteen seventy. He was the second African American hired by the publication. Curry died on August. Twenty two thousand sixteen. He was sixty nine. I met curry back in. Nineteen eighty one and N. A. B. J. National Convention in Louisville Kentucky. The following excerpts of interviews from two thousand one and two thousand and three well up up in totally segregated tuscaloosa hours can Segregate my feelings tell people that In terms of the so called gration after drink from separate water fountains right back to the bus go to separate schools and I have very strong feelings about that But at the same time when I look at my black community those black teachers black people who were supportive There's nothing in the world like it and I wouldn't trade if anything you a pretty good athlete. Bet Did all right for the country boy. I play football. Play quarterback When a quarterback call plays from the attendant Knoxville College in Tennessee? I'm Alma Mater and I'm still in the blue. I'm on that board of directors there and what sparked their initial interest in journalism and The newspapers Emma wouldn't do the newspaper hometown the only time they wrote about black people when they were suspected of crime committed crime plan football it being an entertaining and I thought they were so many other stories out there. It'd be told and since they won't go and tell them. I decided I had to be the person to tell them now. What is interesting is that I could get a job my first job out of Knoxville. What is that sports illustrated so I can get a job at Lodges Sports magazine in the world but couldn't get one in my hometown. Newspaper reminded me that every time I go should be sending a thank. You note saying thank you for not hiring me so I can go out and see the world but that meant that meant a lot. I mean that could not get heart my hometown paper and And whenever I go back I remind them how Tuscaloosa be. I was back a couple years ago and they gave me a key to the city then told me it was fine but you didn't open anything. And secondly I wanted to the bank and combination to the vault. But they haven't done that yet. Former editor in chief of emerged magazine. Tell us about that. Publication well merge was a news magazine that was published for ten years up to two thousand. I was editor of the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July call. The Best of emerge at Ballantine books are published in the New York arm of Random House and it has the best collection of Of our stores over the years so it was very different and quite frankly one day soon expected starbuck and what was some of the highlights of of that publication well We did a lot of things and we're proud. We got the most attention because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas Random as the amount of not hit and they may ramp two years later. The Lawn Jockey for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen single Clarence Thomas. Today people mentioned that though. That's that's not a lot of stories. I'm I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith. Who WAS ARRESTED? Twenty four and give it a twenty four year mandatory sentence. I've been Amman mine of exit. Basically go over to the drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she neither Seoul nor use drugs but she was very attached ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on it and ran a couple of other stories in addition to that and Couple of years ago. She was pardoned by bill. Clinton in office and So we're real proud of that story. I'm proudest of is One of my staff members. I fortunately I feel vegetable about young since college lower. Hit a little little experience. Laurie Robinson was all right how she was on my staff and And it really shouldn't be up the whole Staffan certainly are and she's a graduate of Spelman in Atlanta and There was a allegation at Morehouse being raped. Spelman woman and only because laureate toby. She wanted to write a book about her experience. I suggested that she go back there to her alma mater right about that and then we've been home person experience with it and it was just one powerful story and those are the story. I mean a lot of store them reattached. But those are those are the real special with you on the immediate past. President of the American Society of magazine editors in the first african-american Elia and also not from New York. Right right they kinda you gotta be from New York and got to be life. Magazine's the worst newspaper in terms of diversity but They did in all fairness did let me president and it was indeed a Han and You know in fact. I'm coming from a black magazine representing the magazine industry so I was so pleased with that. Your current position as editor in chief of the National Newspaper Published Association. Give us a brief history of that organization and your responsibilities with black presses. About one hundred seventy six years old gotten around fighting against niches slavery and everything else. I have been here. Two years. Essentially is a federation of more than two hundred African American newspapers Most of them weekly and essentially what I do is provide news out of Washington and and National News as well For a member newspapers. And so we've pretty much such service. Washington bureau founders for audience. That aren't really familiar. That are not African Americans. Why has the black press particularly organization the two hundred or so Weeklies still viable in this country today. Well I wish having spent thirty three years journalism most of not into black press. I wish that the media was doing this job. And there'd be no need for the Black Press a Hispanic Women magazine but it but it is not doing. It does a terrible job and still a worse job. I think when I came to business thirty three years ago. So if you're going to get in order to be well informed you have to read from a variety of sources in the first place you know you just can't read just to Austin space when you just read just you know Dallas Weekly. Just can't you gotta read from different sources and so So would ask an American perspective gives you a different look at some of the same national issues and then he's going to be really inform. You need to reap the black newspapers and go out website. black press. Usa DOT COM

Black Press Editor In Chief New York Warren George Edward Curry Clarence Thomas Curry National Association Of Black Sports Illustrated Magazine Emerged Magazine National Newspaper Published A Alabama Knoxville College Starbucks Random House FED Editor Kemba Smith Tuscaloosa George E Curry Amman
Harvey Weinstein trial: Defense witnesses dispute accusers' accounts

The Frame

07:05 min | 2 years ago

Harvey Weinstein trial: Defense witnesses dispute accusers' accounts

"With closing arguments and Harvey Weinstein's trial all about to start we catch up with a reporter who's been in the courtroom then. Her surprisingly modern film portrait of a lady on fire. Selene CRI wanted wanted to tell a story of women in the seventeen. Hundreds when asked the experts like a hallway women doing with the period of time. How are they handling abortion? At the time they know everything thing about the hair. They knew everything about how I should dress and behave the didn't do much about their privacy and we'll explore the sonic wonders of Ambien Church. That's today today on the frame. We'll be right back. Harvey Weinstein's defense team rested its case in State Supreme Court in in Manhattan yesterday the outcome of the trial hinges on six women who testified in court that Weinstein sexually assaulted or raped them the five felony. The charges against the producers stemmed from the allegations of only two of those women. Those charges include rape criminal sexual assault and predatory sexual assault. The last last which carries the possibility of a life sentence variety senior correspondent Elizabeth Wag. BICESTER has been following the case. She laid out the allegations of the two main accusers accusers. One of the women. Her name is Mimi Khaleej He. She is alleging that Harvey Weinstein assaulted her and that was from an an incident in two thousand six now the other woman. Her name is Jessica Man but we didn't know about her prior to trial started. She was Jane Doe and we didn't well her name or her story until she testified and she is alleging that Harvey Weinstein raped her and sexually assaulted her over the course of many in years during many different occasions. So what has been the core argument presented by the government in its choice of an questioning of witnesses including wounding several other women who described a pattern of alleged assaults committed by Harvey Weinstein or presenting a case that shows the Harvey Weinstein was not justice of sexual harassment sexual assault or rape once twice or three times. They are showing that he has a pattern of sexual title predatory assault now. Even though all of these charges stem from two women largely there have been multiple women who have comment according flip testified. Now the reason that that has been done so that the prosecutors can establish a pattern and the judge allowed women to take the stand to testify justify to help establish the pattern their card mall now witnesses and even though charges do not stem from their account they have taken the stand and told the jury what they allege Harvey Weinstein did to them and it's worth noting that what they said happened to them happened too long ago to be used directly in a case in New York against Weinstein so the defense rested yesterday they did not call Harvey Weinstein as a witness. What was the thrust of their defense strategy? Yeah so the rest of the defensive strategy was essentially to make these women appear as if they were opportunistic and as if they wanted their own benefit they wanted career advancement they wanted personal access from Harvey Weinstein. Of course Harvey Weinstein has said from from the very beginning of any allegations that all sexual encounters have been consensual. He has maintained that his defense of course has maintained that and his defense pence is trying to poke holes in these women's stories and they've done so by showing evidence of text messages of phone logs of emails that depict the women and stay in constant communication with Weinstein after they alleged. They were assaulted. We're talking with varieties. Elizabeth Wagner about the trial of Harvey Weinstein. One one of Harvey Weinstein's defense lawyer gave an interview to the New York Times as Megan twohey in which she suggested that sexual assaults are basically and I'm using in her words now that blame rests equally between the person who is being assaulted and the person committing the assault. I think women need to be very prepared prepared. For the circumstances they put themselves in and I think absolutely women should take on equal risk. That men are taking on and the responsibility responsibility should be equal as well as that been mirrored and how they have questioned witnesses at cross examination. It absolutely has that interview. That Weinstein's lead attorney Johnnie Gave certainly made waves A lot of people have said that she is a victim shaming and victim blaming while in court when she she stands up in Cross examines these women what she has said is you kept emailing him. You stay in constant communication with him. Are you really telling the ladies as in the gentlemen of the jury that the man that you call your rapist is also the man that you email to make sure that he had your new phone number in court. Though when many of these women have taken the stand they have explained to the jury. The only reason they went to a hotel is because Harvey Weinstein said. Please meet me in the hotel lobby for a business meeting. So they went under the understanding. They were meeting him for a business meeting and then they were lured off into a hotel room and brought into a situation said that they did not believe they would run into. I think it's also fair to say that rape experts have said that victims sometimes remain on hourly good terms with their assailants after the assault. It also seems that many of the women not only believe that Harvey Weinstein was interested in helping their careers but also feared what would happen to them if they spoke out about what happened. Yes so all of these women on the stand they have said that. Not only did they think that harvey could help them with their career because that's exactly what he said when they first met him. You know that he said to Alabama you know you're an actress. I think you're great for this lead role. Why don't you come in meet? Meet me at this hotel to read a script but they also said not only were they hopeful of the career advancement that Harvey might be able to give them but that they also feared fear that if they spoke out that they would be blacklisted from Hollywood he would ruin any chance of career entertainment that they would have so as the the government and the defense lawyers put on their closing arguments. And the jury's begins its deliberations is the fundamental question whether or not these encounters were consensual. Is that what it comes down to. Absolutely I mean this is a case ultimately of he said she said the the big question is was. This consensual wasn't not in. There is a lot of gray the area none of this is cut and dry in fact only one of the accusers ceased all communication with him after she alleges she was assaulted so there is gray area here because the question remains why did these women keep in contact with him and were they trying to advance their careers by complying with his requests. And that's all down to

Harvey Weinstein Assault Rape Selene Cri Ambien Church Elizabeth Wag Mimi Khaleej Bicester Reporter State Supreme Court Jessica Man New York Times Jane Doe Elizabeth Wagner New York Alabama Manhattan Johnnie Gave Victim Blaming
Helicopter In Kobe Bryant Crash Being Investigated

Sports Investors Weekly

09:00 min | 2 years ago

Helicopter In Kobe Bryant Crash Being Investigated

"The noise the other big story that's been developing all week was the investigation to the helicopter crash that killed Kobe Bryant his daughter and seven other people the investigation has been focusing a lot on the fog and weather but it's also going to look into the helicopter itself and the pilot who received clearance to fly in poor weather conditions there is also been conversation about terrain awareness warning system that possibly could have prevented the rack but in this case that warning system was not present on the helicopter that Kobe was flying on the NTSB has been arguing for a decade and a half that system to prevent crashes should be mandatory helicopters that accommodate six or more passengers such as a Sikorsky S. seventy six helicopter that he was flying in but these efforts have been turned aside from the FAA the NTSB will be releasing a preliminary report on the accident soon but for more on what we know so far we spoke to Chris and Carla he's a news correspondent for I heart media in Los Angeles to tell us a little bit more about what we know about the investigation so far the NTSB right now he's drawing out all of the physical what they call perishable evidence so anything bad maybe call it did hear a dog in the open or that needs to be collected in order to piece together the puzzle a little bit later there could be looking at many different aspects of this crash though that people given the books of the company they'll get into the background of the pilot we'll get it there what the air traffic look like around southern California during that time and of course they'll get into the weather what were the conditions like they'll look at the engine of the aircraft to see if there was any malfunction or error there and then they'll also looking to be a mechanic that the aircraft industry that are everything was in good working order so all of that ball together is going to be the broader NTSB investigation what we heard today was a more ironed out time line of this flight that they took off John Wayne airport down in Santa Ana which is about seventy miles from Cameri out and it started its white worked its way up to Burbank and it without Burbank that the pilot requested to go from visual flight rules to special VFR special visual flight rules eat put in that request and the reason if you wanted a transit some air space there all along those with special rules which basically says that you can fly when the feeling of the feeling of below one thousand P. which is kind of a basic minimum and also with less than three miles of visibility so they ended up circling right around the the airport there Burbank about twelve minutes hold that request was approved and it was at that point that they started to work their way back down the one eighteen freeway and using the freeway they follow the one eighteen to the one on one end and work their way down toward camera as they are packed Burbank the band I fear space they then requested fly straight through the Cameri which was where they were going to land the the pilot requested what's called flight following and basically that just means there's a constant contact if you will between air traffic control and the pilot the air traffic control that that the pilot was flying too low for flight following that's not necessarily a warning as much as the it's just a statement of who we are we can help you out based on where you are can't get a new whatever it is that they need in order to maintain that following the pilot been requested two wives add to avoid a cloud layer and ask the air traffic control for clearance I was the last contact between the pilot and an air traffic control so of radar indicated that the aircraft rose to about twenty three hundred feet and then there was the old black descending turned and then that was the last radar contact what we know on the ground is that when it hit it was at just about one thousand eighty five feet above sea level and the the pre field is about five to six hundred feet they've got a pretty it didn't scatter you know if you if you think about your crap accidents and crashes often those debris fields will last for maybe a half mile or a mile or even further so they can join idea of just how hard the aircraft was able to it hit the surface there yeah and it's still it does really seem like the weather I've probably played the most important factor obvious we don't know yet if there was any type of mechanical failure or whatnot but just all those requests or and and he was granted the pilot was granted to fly in these poor weather conditions it just really seems that all of that is adding up to what was the culprit and as you said in the end when he climbed up and then drop back down so rapidly that was where everybody unfortunately perished and and you know investigators and and corners were out there trying to gather remains and even the terrain there is a little difficult they all had to to hike in and and be flown in as well yeah so the NTSB is actually asking for pictures for people who are around Calabasas and had taken pictures of the weather conditions or had taken pictures somewhere near the crash site they can get an idea of what the weather conditions were like they were also pretty quickly after making that request did they were pretty quick if they live and it's not that we're just focusing on the weather here there are all of these other factors we have to look into but this is just one important piece of the puzzle certainly there are and there is a lot of reporting out there about how difficult it is the flying conditions like this how big back while there was it specifically above Cameri all our Q. three above but how about this and how easy perhaps we could have been for the pilot to become disoriented while the either asking for that for that increase in altitude or while out what movie across what had been activated is that the aircraft hit the help that is a pretty high rate of speed around a hundred sixty miles an hour so yeah they they they told you that the pilot was at least moving with a certain degree of purpose yeah and every time there's a crash a plane crash or something like that people always ask is there a black box and that's not the case with this one right there's nothing there was no black box on this helicopter no they're not required to be black box on aircraft like that and yet in court to talk about the aircraft as well as the course you that if the twin engine aircraft built yeah that that's important when you're trying to narrow down the possibilities of what could happen because yeah we have two engine I mean one failed you least have enough power to to work your way back down to the ground in an emergency landing in in this case we didn't hear any sort of emergency call there was no mayday that we know of infer that tells you that whatever happened happened quickly and was catastrophic enough that the pilot couldn't even get anything out on the radio which in most cases is instantaneous it's always important to remember the victims and all of this obviously everybody knows Kobe Bryant and and you know the world the sports world a lot of people really feel for that but you know it also included in the victims were his thirteen year old daughter Johnnie who goes by Gigi us some of her friends that I play basketball with her their parents and coaches I mean that they were on their way to one of Kobe's sports at tournaments are one of the or their basketball tournaments where his daughter was going to play and you know these were all just people United by the sport of basketball obviously a lot has been made about his daughter and her aspirations with basketball and they've seat been seen together at Laker games but these are the victims really a very close knit group of of people who who played basketball together and he coached the team things like that yeah you know it's important to think about this in the in the context of what they were doing and where they were going so that the mamba cop was this big back all tournament and I thought that the mamba sports academy which was something started in created by Kobe Bryant not just for use force but also yeah I'll be here great stories about NBA players who trained up there with Kobe or with other players it's just a really nice facility or not only basketball but also other sports like volleyball up there and so you you're you've got these people that are geared to go go back up there again there down in Newport beach seventy air miles from from thousand oaks and if anybody knows anything about southern California Subir mild bout five hours of driving when you really consider traffic even on a Sunday so that they give you an idea of why graph they were flying up there and they're flying up there with the number of people who were from the neighborhood and yeah I guess not really hidden within the strategy but certainly a piece of the strategy tragedy if you have a couple of families that are just but I mean they're incredibly impacted the other fellow for all the belly family had three family members the the father the wife and one of their daughters on that flight so you've got I think there are two other kids who now are having to deal with basically losing more than half of their family Chris and Carla news correspondent for I heart media based in Los Angeles thank you for joining us yeah of course

Kobe Bryant
"johnnie" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"johnnie" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Big our Johnnie Wright jihadi Russo is going to be here and what I did is before you came out of the book I read actually I I've got the preview because I interviewed him on television and I said I'm looking at these the notes that they gave me I'm saying there's no way this is true is this true and what is his who lives in the extraordinary life he was taken in by somebody who ended up being connected to the mob would never actually joined would be a part of his entire life the people these were around the the the the major events that he saw that are included in this book will absolutely blow you away and I don't want to give it away but I'll go through the entire thing and you'll hear from generosity G. R. A. Rousseau and you still going to want to go out and get his book is a lot of details in there I couldn't actually cover meanwhile as you look back and look at twenty twenty now they were about to say we're gonna see an incredible action season no doubt about it we're gonna see some wonderful debates and then we're going to see one nominee emerge after conventions which will be covering live going on the road with the show we're gonna get two nominees in a sprint to November like you wouldn't believe it if you see how the in the Donald Trump of a or the media has to media media has ganged up against him and have people of run to the polls to make sure he doesn't get another four years and you see the fact that he fights all comers at every given time you know this is going to be an incredible eventful year which is unpredictable on a daily basis just think about how we ended twenty nineteen think about the horror which reported what are revealed think about what John dorm said what we can expect as he takes the criminal investigation over and what Harley said about the run up to the twenty sixteen election it is devastating devastating for the FBI and I hope Democrats would read it and feel just as angry as I do and I think the president does because this isn't Democrat or Republican it could be you next not to not to burst merge the FBI but the group of people involved in looking into trump the candidate unsavory and I hope they never had they don't have a long track record of of performances like that so we'll look at twenty twenty was he without has in store I mean everything from the space force Katie getting into gear to the president I'd states coming in these trade deals the the next one probably on deck this winter maybe Feb worry one with Great Britain all the maker economy more competitive all to bring capitalism front center look for these words this year free market not capitalist market and socialist for the Democrats that's going to be a reassuring feeling for the next generation of Americans but I'm also heartened by something else is going to change the one up on this election year and that is the president and his team's determination to attract the minority vote economically the numbers show wages are going up the jobs going up it all minority communities across the board from Asians African Americans two Hispanics but the president and the Republicans have not made a concerted effort to win back that vote and guess where it's a popping up in every American magazines guess what's happening they have a presence at historic by colleges Hey guess what also is happening opportunities owns with the private investors are being incentivized to come in is our revitalizing cities and for those who have incredible success it's also tap into your heart wondering how do I get back he giving back still while keeping capitalism front center I think that's a win win win so it's going to be a special hour so sit back and enjoy this so if you like the Irishman if you like good fellas if you like all the mob movies from sopranos on down sit back kick back and understand the Johnny Raso Russo was lived incredible life you'll hear from him you'll see the story and you'll probably want to get to know him because they couldn't be above a more exciting person to talk to anything but boring back in a moment.

Russo Johnnie Wright
How 'Broadway Joe' redefined the NFL

Retropod

05:31 min | 3 years ago

How 'Broadway Joe' redefined the NFL

"Com. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen world with retro pod a show about the past rediscovered fifty years ago a few days before his team took the field as huge underdogs in the super bowl. New York jets quarterback Joe Nemeth known and then and forever as Broadway. Joe arrived at a Miami Hotel in a Turquoise Cadillac Nemeth known to sometimes show Eh Games. Still drunk from the previous evening's activities. was there to accept an award. The quarterback sat on the dais next to his companion for the evening. Mr Johnnie Walker wrote Mark Kriegel in his two thousand five biography when it was his turn to speak Namus said I'd like to personally thank all the single girls in New York for their contribution. This was pure Broadway Joe tipsy free willing amorous and so was the cockiness that emerged from his whiskey. Soft lips later the jets will win in Sunday and said `I garin teeth. I the colts win by a large score. Today I'm GonNa say Baltimore Colts by a score of thirty five to ten. I think New York to win forty one thirty one. Nemo's prediction wasn't just hockey. It was really New York over forty one called the his opponent. The the Baltimore Colts were seventeen point favorites nameless knees were beat up. The colts have the second most potent offense in football in the best defense. Some were predicting a blowout. They said that it couldn't be done. But it has been near. The Third Super Bowl could gets one sixteen to seven was named most valuable player. Performance wasn't all that stellar. He didn't even throw a touchdown. But in critical wrote the moment itself took Namus fame and pro football's popularity to different planet in fame's pecking checking order. Nemeth suddenly outrank Sinatra. The biographer wrote. Actually at that moment he outranked just about everybody who wasn't a beetle doc attendance around the NFL Sword Soda TV or ship particularly with the launch of Monday night football the following season. The League made sure that Nemeth in the jets played in that inaugural game he's going NBA. Joe Name. After George Sauer for the touchdown everyone wanted a piece of Nemeth especially reporters profiles of Nemeth for the nineteen seventies equivalent of Click Bait legendary columnist. Jimmy Breslin wrote a famous story about Nemeth For New York magazine entitled Nemeth All night long in it. He compared the quarterback hanging out at a bar to Babe Ruth hanging out at a bar. I saw ruth once when he came off the golf course and walked into the bar at the Old Bailey side course in queens president wrote in one shot. He swallowed the mixing Xing Glass Ice Chunks. And everything else. He slapped the mixing glass down instead. Give me another one of these things kid. The place went went nuts. It is the same thing when you stand at the bar with Joe Namath. Life went on like this for awhile not surprisingly Nemeth endured his fair share of busted relationships drunk driving charges bad business. The steals fading playing ability in then of course fading fame drinking was the biggest problem. Nemeth was an alcoholic alcoholic. He settled down in Nineteen eighty-four marrying Deborah. mays woman he met at a voice class with her insistence. Nemeth was able to quit drinking a few years later but after they divorced in two thousand Nemeth began heavily drinking again leading to one of the ugliest and most embarrassing moments of his life during a jets game in two thousand three Nemeth wearing his old number and obviously heavily intoxicated intoxicated was interviewed on the sideline by ESPN reporter. Suzy Kolber he answered one of her questions in a truly shocking way. What does it mean to you at now? Team is struggling kiss. I couldn't care less about the teams throttling Nemeth apologized and entered Rehab. Namus is seventy five years old. It's easier for him to look back now on that improbable win and understand and just how much it changed his life and sports forever. I think about it now. He recently told the New York Daily News. But at the time time I

Joe Nemeth Turquoise Cadillac Nemeth New York Jets Namus Colts Baltimore Colts JOE Joe Namath Mike Rosen New York Daily News Football Joe Name Babe Ruth Jimmy Breslin NFL George Sauer Miami Hotel
Clean Energy's Ever-Changing Policy Risk

The Energy Gang

12:25 min | 3 years ago

Clean Energy's Ever-Changing Policy Risk

"In the summer of two thousand eight Britta von Essen took an internship with a major investment bank after wrapping up business school. It was considered at the time one of the top places to work it was with a company called Lehman Brothers and it was actually a fascinating summer. I was working in their global power group but focused on renewable energy and you know there was a lot going on at the time. Tax Equity was really ramping up. People were figuring out how the structuring was going to work with that. There are a couple. IPO's that were right on the horizon so it was a fascinating summer from renewables perspective and also what was going on at Leeman. It's been an unnerving week for US financial markets and now the potential collapse of Lehman Brothers once the fourth largest investment firm in the US at at that time. Lehman Brothers was the top investor in renewables it had bought big portfolios of wind and solar projects. It was a leading equity investor and it was helping take companies public it was an exciting time but as the summer war on market conditions worsened investors got nervous in things got grim for Leman analysts say the bank's future is in doubt out afterward reported a loss of nearly four billion dollars in the last quarter. Leman brothers is suffered heavy losses as a result of the US housing slump while I was there. It was just constant reassurance that that these cycles are normal and and you know financial markets go through this occasionally and everything was going behind of course it was not fine be one of the watershed days in financial markets histories. He was a manic manic Monday in the financial markets. The Dow tumbled more than five hundred points after two pillars of the street tumbled over the weekend leman brothers or one hundred and fifty eight-year-old firm filed for bankruptcy in the lead up to the Leeann bankruptcy in the fall. IPO's fell apart project financing dried up and cleantech companies beneath loans underwritten by the bank were suddenly exposed to risks. They didn't foresee. BRITTA had a front row seat to all of it. After leaving lemon she picked up and moved to Italy where she helped build wind and solar projects for a German developer soon after she witnessed yet another period of chaos the swift rollback of feed in tariffs the Italian market came to a screeching screeching halt. It did teach me a lot about developer resiliency the fundamental optimism that is required to be of renewable energy developer and and taking the long view on a lot of these projects so British took those lessons and apply them to the next chapter of her career. She now advises clean energy companies knees on how to manage risk so you've managed to witness the collapse of one of the biggest investment banks and one of the biggest European renewable energy markets back to back. That's quite an entrance into the industry well. I swear it's not me I'm not the not the driver and all of this but I think what it taught me was that things change and the markets move and those that are resilient and those that figure out how to work in the new paradigms that they're given are the ones who are successful so I've taken a huge amount of those lessons into my current job and into my current business where I'm basically advising folks how to roll with the ever changing markets that we see in wind and solar. I'm Stephen Lacey in this episode produced in partnership with Cohnresnick and cohnresnick capital talking talking with British Ivano sin about those ever changing market conditions today Britta's a managing director at cohnresnick capital over the last decade. She's seen all kinds of market risk mostly expiring or changing policies that create financial risk you know I it was the sixteen o three grant expiring then it was. ITC expiring PTC's stepping down. What are the safe harbor policies we we didn't even get the IT safe safe harbor policies until fairly recently. I think it's just a fundamental aspect of this industry. It's Salat about planning for the unexpected in British. Job is to help figure out how to get renewable energy deals done in the face of those challenges so I sat down with her to unpack some of those policy uncertainties and what they mean for renewables and I wanted to know how often does policy change derail projects so I have. You've worked on project many projects that were potentially derailed that we manage to work around various policy changes. I think change in tax law was a really interesting time where we had to figure out how to keep the investors active of an investing in two projects that would probably not be commissioned for another twelve months and how to get around the fact that there was a very likely change in tax law to be passed at that time and yet nobody knew exactly what that was going to look like. I think this PG bankruptcy recently and the California I think it was a be ten fifty four the wildfire response bill that has been high in the mind of a lot of California developers at the moment who were focused on contracts with sce NASD Johnnie and whether or not those credit ratings. We're GONNA take ahead that policy was passed and I think both of those organizations are are quite secure and short up and that was that was great news for California winging developers across the board with or without contracts well. Let's walk through some of the big drivers and uncertainties around them so you mentioned. PG Ag any I'd like to talk about PG and understand. What are you now looking for in a bankruptcy proceeding what kind of risks to contracts tracks are there currently what has been sorted out and what's still left to be sorted out that would impact renewable energy developers so I believe there is still still quite a bit of uncertainty as far as the potential for PG any to cancel contracts that are considered out out of market today so these would be some of the earlier vintage. PPA's there are several conversations and I know cohnresnick has been a part of several several of these about trying to restructure this through bilateral negotiations with pg any and kind of nipping in the bud lead and coming to a good solution for all parties but otherwise I think there is still a strong degree of uncertainty here there there are investors who are then making plays in this and trying to pick up these assets making a bet as to whether or not there will be restructuring of the contracts are not as as well as you know. It's an unfortunate situation but it's certainly a very active group of projects and sponsors that are figuring out working working through how to navigate that uncertainty. Let's go to tax equity. The solar investment tax credit is now facing the beginning of its step down schedule this is obviously going to impact the economics of project development but we have had some clarity on this step down unscheduled for for years now how is facing down the IDC GONNA change the way projects are financed and does it present any risks that were not there previously so you're right. There is a very clear step down schedule which I think has been helpful for folks trying to new forecasts what this looks like that being said given the safe harbor provision. I would venture that there is a generic assumption option from those who are procuring. PPA's at the moment that their assets that their projects will be safe harbored many of the major. I pee pees Jason. Strategic are making significant safe harbor place. They are you know doing this both for their own projects jags and under the assumption that there will be Ebony advantages over the next few years which I agree with. I think a lot of these developers that are procuring making this assumption are going to limit themselves to buyers of the assets that can then fulfill the safe harbor in order to meet the Economics Amax. What do you think the chances of an extension of the investment tax credit are. I know that the Solar Energy Industries Association has all of a sudden and put this back on their priorities list. They think maybe there's an opening to extend the federal tax credit. What do you think the chances of that arc given what you know so there's a couple a couple aspects of this that are important absolutely it would be beneficial to the industry right that being said we are months away from the step down last time this extension happened. I think we had a good twelve months of lead time so it allowed loud folks to plan at least partially accordingly in this case you would actually jam up probably some more some of the more major players who have made significant safe harbor plays that would have been capital that was not necessary to deploy a and potentially at pricing that is not beneficial to their assets so there are mixed mixed feelings throughout the industry about this. I think there is a decent chance I also think it's interesting giving kind of the economic markets at the moment and the potential for a downturn. Let's call it in the next twelve to eighteen months renewable such a critical component of job security and job growth in the US economy at the moment that especially if we're facing some type of downturn it may increase congressional and government support for some type of extension here. What about the storage tax credit. That's been floating around Congress for for a long time if there is this renewed push for potential solar. It see where does the storage. I T C fit in there would would it be something separate. Would it be wrapped together. And what do you think the chances of getting this thing finally pastor. I think the storage credit is actually much more critical critical than the than the solar one in the in the near term here I think with Alda we will continue to have murkiness around trying trying to loop storage into either wind or solar tax credits which is is just messy. It's hard for investors to get their heads around it. Just adds a lot of confusion and it also limits what you can do from adding storage onto existing renewable energy projects objects. I think throughout the energy community there is a consensus that storage is a critical component that needs to be deployed on a large scale will in order for renewables to continue on the growth. It is an in order to hit. Some of these are targets hundred percent in California boring. If for example you you have to have the storage component there otherwise you're facing you know a variety of issues on you know intermittent see or demand or any variety of aspects so. I am a little more bullish on the storage tax credit. I I think a standalone tax credit does a lot to simplify and streamline financing aspects for storage whether or not it connected to renewables and whether or not commissioned at the same time as the

Lehman Brothers Developer United States California IPO PPA Britta Solar Energy Industries Associ Britta Von Essen Leeman Pg Ag Leman PTC
Knowing When You Need a Break

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

08:29 min | 3 years ago

Knowing When You Need a Break

"Joe so tell me a little about your story. I'm really interested in here in a little of what you do how you've done on it and when you realize something like you know and I know your your particular market is a huge Micronesia of what you do so maybe when did you realize that Micronesian Johnnie Shing was an essential component for success and maybe tie that into what your story is and how your story is put together yeah absolutely so I really took a traditional route and when you you have a nice guys podcast. I fit that perfectly. I'm an Eagle Scout. I did things right. I went to college and got a degree in psychology and comparative religion got degrees than in counseling and psychology followed kind of the traditional script of higher education and started working at nonprofits and residential facilities Lydia for angry kids kids that were kicked out of their houses around probation lip things on fire stole cars things like that and I loved that work as like grew I realized that I was headed towards burnout inside kept kind of leveling up within that traditional route supervisor positions and eventually landed at a community college college when I was there at that community college I launched a side private practice really just a pay off student loan debt making a little bit more per hour can renting from some other other counselors and thinking you know if I make a couple of thousand dollars a year working some nights and weekends then maybe Nobel at a little extra money to the bank but but as I was doing that I really realized that therapists in particular and helping professionals that have big hearts oftentimes are never taught anything about business and that was part of my story I had gone to Grad school all this time and money in learning how to be a good clinician but never learned how to build a website how to market myself and have the idea of if you're good at it people just come and it just wasn't true and so I started reading a couple business books just to learn some of the basics and realized that so many the people had already done this before but hadn't applied directly to private practice and so without really doing a lot of market research said to myself. I'm going to just start blogging about what I'm learning about about marketing and business and I started this website practice of the practice dot com with the advantages share and Colin with people and say hey does anybody know that there's actual full business people that have done really cool in amazing things and done ethically and made money and they didn't sell their soul to the devil and through that that gained Kennison popular because no one was doing it kind of on that level and then in two thousand thirteen launched a podcast and that time I actually did some market research to to find out where there were immense gaps in at that time there's only one podcast for counselors it was put out by the American Counseling Association and it had been dormant for six months so day one. I was number one podcast for counselors price nice and it's taken off since there I left that job at the college about five years ago I actually sold my counseling group practice last June so now exclusively doing consulting for people that own private practices and that's expanded beyond just counting now it's massage therapists chiropractors some dentists Jason and even a random online taekwondo course once in a while so what's interesting about it is and and and I appreciate you sharing a little bit of your your history what's interesting about it is one one of the areas that I keep seeing over and over and over again and a lot of the work that you that you focus on is something like this. The scheduling idea you know the idea of of helping with is that time management is that scheduling this is like a big issue for people that are in private practices managing their own time see. I would actually zoom out a little bit and hopefully if you have a job that you like or maybe even love you WanNa do it all the time and you're thinking about it. You go around in. You're listening to a podcast or it's the weekend and you're out on a date with your partner and you say oh my gosh. What if I did this in the business. Hopefully the kind of lives that were building is really exciting and so if that's the case that also means that you're probably not giving yourself enough of a break and you're the brain research and neuro science actually really supports this that we need a very clear breaks away from the work that we do so that we can speed up and be more effective in the time the rectory spending on the business and so for me. I could work on my business all the time because I just love. I love it. It's so exciting and I it's genuinely impacting people's lives but if I'm GonNa do that effectively. I have to set some very clear boundaries around my schedule and so a couple of summers years ago I didn't experiment where took Fridays off to see. If that would actually impact my schedule impact my bottom line and helped me. You know impact people differently by the end of it. I found that I made more money. I'd worked fewer hours. I got a lot more and so I kept going that experiment passed and I got that Fridays off going then the next summer's summers. This was two three summers ago. I decided I was GonNa try the same thing but for Mondays and so could I do a three day work week and so I did that and same sort of thing got more done and then in the last year I reigned in from working until five to work till three thirty as I drop off the girls at school. Start my day around nine. Am and I'm done by three thirty most days and and so by doing that. It's forced me to then set some boundaries around time but then there's always things that are left over that I could work on second either. Just let those go or can out source close to other people or find systems or technology that can get it done outside of my own time so that ends up helping me level up way way different than if I just kept working harder what's amazing about it and your timing could not be any more perfect with the recording of today's episode. I've now been out of my office for probably about the last two weeks two and a half weeks and as of the recording of this and I've been running probably seven days a week while I'm out of town meeting seven days a week focused on and focused on business and the issue is that when I'm back home in a in Los Angeles I'm East Coast for last couple of weeks. when I'm back home in Los Angeles Agilis I do the three day workweek also Tuesday Wednesday and Thursday keep my Monday and Friday schedules open. I take the weekends off for a really really decompressing and those those days that I take off. Mondays and Fridays have been the most productive days for me personally and also have discovered as you are saying so. I guess I'm providing evidence to what you're saying is true not even realizing we're. GonNa talk about this today in the last two weeks two and a half weeks. I've I felt bad. I've I've eaten worse. I've not I don't feel like I've accomplished as much as I can and I'm like I feel like I'm on that hamster on the wheel going backwards. I haven't even seen outside in the last has two weeks. It feels like I get in my car and I might go get gas for the car. I might run errands of the bank. Come back and start doing work again. This is is killing me and I keep saying to my girlfriend Jay back in Los Angeles. I'm like I cannot wait to get home so I can pick up my three day workweek again. So how fitting it is to have you on the show today at but I got a bigger question though and I am sorry I didn't mean to you know go around it to make this point. But why is that so what is the neuroscience behind behind that because what you're saying is one hundred percent accurate and this is where you've kind of focused a lot of your career yes so the neuroscience is really clear on this one study that really stands out to me is a University of Illinois study and what they did is they college students and they brought them into a computer lab like a solo room and they give them a super boring task so they said here's your four digit number so it was seven one four eight and whenever that number comes up on the screen over the next hour hit the space based bar and there's going to be all these other four digit numbers that come out so very very boring task and so what usually would happen is what's called vigilance detriment vigilance how well we pay attention to something detriment meaning breaking down over talent overtime and so what they saw at the beginning of this study they would be noticing there for digit number and over time they would would miss it and miss it and miss it more and so people couldn't pay attention for that full length of time now. They did a control group that was a control group the other group but they did is at the one third good mark. They interrupted their time and they said hold on. We put you on the wrong computer. Can you just go have a seat in the lobby for a minute. It's just GONNA take us to get the setups. They had a one minute break. They didn't have any access to cell phones. There is magazines but it just got up mood for a minute and then went back and sat down. They found that there was no vigilant detriment with that group. They did the same thing at the two-thirds March march they to one minute breaks in that hour period of time.

Los Angeles Private Practice Micronesia Micronesian Johnnie Shing Eagle Scout JOE Lydia American Counseling Associatio Grad School Supervisor Nobel Jason Partner Colin Kennison East Coast JAY University Of Illinois Three Day
Ill Drink to That: The New $25,000 Scotch

Business Wars Daily

04:25 min | 4 years ago

Ill Drink to That: The New $25,000 Scotch

"Business wars daily is brought to you by papal when it comes to growing your business. You need a partner you can trust for today and tomorrow and pay pal processes over ten million payments per day. That's experience you can rely on. Visit pay pal dot com slash growth to set up a free business account today. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this. November sixteenth. It's been an intense month already, and we're only halfway through if you're breathing a sigh of relief that it's Friday. You might be thinking tonight's a good time to raise a glass and toast the end of the week. Now, if you're a whiskey drinker, you have a lot of choose from and more coming every day. Expensive, single malt scotch is of long been considered the top of the line blended scotches are the poor cousin to the fancy single malls. Well, these days in the complex whiskey world snob. Appeal carries more and more weight, according to the Daily Beast US sales of scotch whisky of shot up sixty five percent over the last fifteen years alone. Single malts have led the growth, but you might imagine that a rising tide floats all whiskey you'd be wrong blend. Sales have actually been faltering blended whisky companies one in on the rapidly growing. Luxury scotch market, and they're trying to catch up the world's leader in single malts. Scotland's mcallen founded in eighteen twenty four that companies doing so well that it recently built a one hundred eighty million dollar distillery and architectural wonder designed to mimic the hills around it several of its bottles have sold for a million dollars or more blame the catchup game. Johnny walker. The biggest blended whisky company it released its oldest whiskey to date in October painting the fifty year old blend as one that true connoisseurs would be lucky to get just listen to the way the company's master blender Jim beverage describes it each drop of this whiskey has been Hansel elected from some of the most valuable and precious casks of Malton grain whiskies to be found in our reserves. He says at twenty five thousand dollars a bottle. It's hardly for everyone handy because Johnny Walker produced only one hundred bottles in by the way, individually. Numbered. Handcrafted black crystal decanters, perhaps you lust after a taste of Johnny Walker fifty year old whiskey, but you don't happen to have twenty five thousand dollars to spare tonight. Well, the company will be happy to serve you say a drink of Johnnie Walker black label the bottle ranges from ten bucks to two hundred fifty dollars. Now that could seem like quite a deal. From wondering this is business. Moore's daily this week's episodes were written edited and produced by lane Appleton grant, Ginny lower is our editor and producer our executive producer is Marshall. Louis rated by or non Lopez were wondering, I'm David Brown. We'll see you next week. Business wars daily is brought to you by pay pal. Wants an attorney in New York City, Linda transformed her resale hobby into a thriving luxury consignment company called Linda stuff. What was once a passion project that started by selling her kids? Video games is now a one hundred person company in ninety three thousand square foot facility wholly focused on designer fashion as a company specializing in high end, previously owned goods, reputation is everything integrity and trust. Or a critical part of how the company operates from day. One Linda has counted on pay pal every step of the way to help. Give her customers confidence and protect her business from fraud, even when selling internationally when it comes to growing your business. Pay pal is your payments partner for today and tomorrow, visit pay pal dot com slash growth to set up a free business account today. That's pay pal dot com slash growth. To sign up for free today.

Johnny Walker Partner David Brown Linda Johnnie Walker Hansel United States Scotland Mcallen Fraud Jim Beverage New York City Ginny Lower Louis Lane Appleton Moore Lopez Attorney Marshall Executive Producer
Soddy Daisy Man Pleads Guilty To Child Rape; Montgomery Gets 15 Years

Rush Limbaugh

02:24 min | 4 years ago

Soddy Daisy Man Pleads Guilty To Child Rape; Montgomery Gets 15 Years

"The iranians last week gave us a veiled threat of oh you pull out of this nuclear agreement there's consequences to pay and this and that i'm thinking okay what might they do i'd like to know your thoughts going forward on scenarios because i know the iranian republican guard has got you know the the good old sleeper the boogeyman sleeper cells everywhere and and then my last my last question i'll take up the air as you think the maple leafs are gonna come back and game seven thanks thank you thank you for that jones so let me remember this it's it's the toronto maple leafs playing the chair on infant infidels slayers in game seven i think that's what he was asking about we'll get to the ron infidel slayers when we come back 'cause we got a little off track there but i will address that question that's coming up next on america's number one radio show the rush limbaugh show live from the excellence in broadcasting network i bill wockhardt johnnie walker center take to four years in prison served a year while awaiting trial at as a first time offender will be eligible for parole after serving thirty percent of his state sentence he was driving the school bus that crashed in november twenty sixteen killing six would more elementary students the attorney for the hamilton county school board is a busy man special ed cases the would more school bus crash couple of examples now scott bennett will be paid twenty thousand a month on retainer saudi easy man pleading guilty to a lesser charge in a sexual assault case that story from w g o w's louis lease got montgomery from saudi daisy was accused of child rape back in two thousand fifteen the attack allegedly happening in twenty ten originally charged with rape of a child under thirteen years old montgomery pled guilty monday to sexual battery by an authority figure for that he was sentenced to fifteen years and an additional six years for statutory rape by an authority figure stories people talk about w g o visit jack from banyan hill you like freedom i do you like money due to if you like freedom and money then you're gonna love freedom checks you see over the next few months an estimated thirty four point six billion is up for.

Toronto Louis Assault Scott Bennett ED Hamilton County School Wockhardt Limbaugh RON Leafs Jones Statutory Rape Rape Montgomery Attorney Johnnie Walker Center America Thirteen Years Thirty Percent Fifteen Years
Beyoncé and Jay-Z announce "On the Run II" tour

Lori and Julia

02:15 min | 4 years ago

Beyoncé and Jay-Z announce "On the Run II" tour

"To be seen as an adult yeah and and um and then he doesn't really want to be asked about any thing about political about his dad i would assume so even though five yuval him on twitter he gets very political he's great yeah i'll a i get a kick out of his way to see fall from the democrats the republicans dole god's house yeah yeah well you know arnold is over and over and over his true this is true yeah you know i mean i can't be blind the apprentice care fathalla thing was my favorite i'll my gosh that was unbelievable that was out state were really quite key every johnny did you see them in person did you get a chance to see them no i did it was slim had so many people did have chemistry with each other like was it obvious an evidence kind of fun in there a couple of reviews that i read i guess these to have crazy chemistry i want a degree i view it if they were interacting grain i bet it shows unscreened they must sad i don't know what all the entourage highly send people thank you about that afterwards naval gotha publicists merrin jersey omega paul yep another preval says here this luckily from here yeah there were alive anywhere we're going to give those tickets we all week johnnie talked about last hour that beyond say announces on the run tour two with jay z and she's broken the internet and contain yourself she took to facebook to announce the tour lung center has been this was rumored a couple of weeks ago because something went up and then went down about an on the run to on the run tour apart two and it was the black and white clip that she posted with some behind the scenes home videos of beyond say and j gallivan teen about their place and um her announcement broke the website two and august eighth in minneapolis at us banks stadium tickets go on sale march nineteen wow yeah why will be sold out on march nine t pathetic 22nd interval that's what we're looking at so if you're a big big fair and you might want to check out if there's an early booking thing getting a member of the.

Arnold Johnny Johnnie Minneapolis Jay Z Facebook Us Banks Stadium