20 Burst results for "John Von"

Supercomputing: An exascale-sized challenge?

Technology Untangled

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Supercomputing: An exascale-sized challenge?

"Terms of supercomputing and high performance computing or. Hp see are one and the same but you hear hp being used more moldy days. There's a growing cool for the democratisation of supercomputers which historically has been tricky because supercomputers weren't really created just to do any old bit of computing. His jacob bama hp and engineering research scientists from hewlett packard enterprise the for supercomputers were invented to solve a very specific problem a hydrodynamics problem for simulating nuclear weapons. So during world war two there were there. Were trying to develop these nuclear weapons they had to do. What's called a numerical simulation. It's essentially a fluid dynamic simulation and so they needed to run that problem numerically through a computer and that's kind of alan turing and john. Von layman come came up with the architecture in sort of the algorithm for running numerical methods on these systems supercomputers have come a long way in a relatively short amount of time thanks to innovation in materials experimental architectures industry pioneers like seymour cray and ever increasing processing speeds but for the most part until very recently these machines have been the domain of scientists the prospects of solving some of the really hard problems that have plagued humanity forever. That's like in our sights now like we could like feasibly solve problems like cancer and all these crazy permutations on corona virus. And and any of these like really scary viruses. That are gonna come out okay listeners. So this is one of those that starts normal and gets a little complicated. I'm going to get a little bit. But i i really wants to get to the bottom of these powerful machines and i wanted to understand what makes a sweeping meters so well super so i could up bill. Manel vice president and general manager of high performance computing hewlett packard and surprise. A super computer is a lot of processors memory and a high speed interconnect time together. Supercomputing provides the the hardware infrastructure if you will to do parallel computing. Parallel computing is important. Because typically in a problem you'd wanna break up the problem across multiple processors or or multiple servers or nodes typically. What you do is break up. The data that's called data partitioning where little chunks are putting in each server on each processor and then worked on independently and then at the end. You bring it all together. This parallel computing is kind of a big deal. It's what makes sense a numeric. Who problems i deal for. Cb computers on what makes them special or different to the the santa my desk. It's mostly because they're optimized around solving scientific and engineering problems in terms of how they can partition data. How they can manipulate the data. How they can keep a certain amount of data in memory at one time. So you're not always moving data back and forth to drive or to network for example. Okay key point. Here is all about data. Starting from those initial fluid dynamics simulation these big machines have been used for all kinds of modeling from whether to weapons alongside their partners. Intel bill and his team are in the process of deploying a supercomputer could aurora one of the world's first x. scale computers at the us department of energy. What's exco well to answer that. I need to know that supercomputer speed is measured in floating point operations per second aka flops which are basically just the number of calculations it can do a second exit scale computers computer. That's able to do at least a billion billion floating point calculations per second so there's no single chip in the world. That can do that. So you've gotta bring together a lot of chips into one system that allow you to accomplish that. It's basically tend to the eighteenth. In terms of number of floating point operations.

HP Von Layman Seymour Cray Hewlett Packard Manel Alan Turing John Cancer Us Department Of Energy Intel Aurora
Making working remotely work well with John Vuong, owner, and founder of Local SEO Search

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

09:49 min | 4 months ago

Making working remotely work well with John Vuong, owner, and founder of Local SEO Search

"For today's episode. And we're really excited to welcome john von as my guest in. He is the ceo of local seo search incorporated. John welcome thanks for having me on. I'm excited to be on your show today. Great so some of you are listening. Might be saying so what does it. Seo search many has to do with when people thrive companies thrive. And what i have to say is as re getting prepared for our interview. John and we're going to talk about working remotely and funny enough. There's a recent episode a just published on if you don't offer remote work options you're going to go the way the dinosaurs so john should jump into it. So tell me about your company had been working remotely all this time or was it a something that you had to implement because of the pandemic and other environmental issues perhaps. Yeah definitely Well thanks for the intro. I started this agency eight years ago so twenty thirteen and the reason i started was Actually i i worked in advertising sales for ten years and the instead longest in was working at yellow pages for five years and i did work in a corporate environment. I went into the office couple times a week But i had a book of business so it was more of a freedom kinda urine sales environment but it was more my independent business portfolio book of business by went in service clients so the last two years at yellow pages. I actually was home-based remote. So i had an idea of how to structure my day how to be disciplined how to perform well Being really focused on metrics right count ability. Making sure that i delivered on all the you know whatever was renewables or up sales or whatever my my boss at the time manager directors advised me to hit targets so fast forward when i first started the company as a business owner now. I didn't even know how to run a business. I was new at everything and just jumping into business. Ownership is completely different mindset as running and working as an employee because all the structures were in place all the processes procedures all the departments. Were already there. So when i first started. It was a little bit more challenging. Getting my foot off the ground. Yes i was a sales. Were up so it was out there selling. But they didn't know how to do all the stuff in the back end. So i had to harvest and learn all that the reason i started a hiring remote was costs mainly and getting understanding what it took when i first started You know working remote in at yellow pages. And i was looking for very specific skill sets based on what i harvest right so i learned a lot in terms of like hiring training evolving. My my staff. And i found that anyone in the world can work in this industry right because it is online marketing digital advertising and as long as customers get good results digitally. They don't really know or care where you're located. I'm very upfront and honest and pure in terms of letting people know anything. They want in terms of my industry. My business and how it operates how he got started but honestly clients all they care about is results who you are as a business person in a human. You know the the leader of it all manning the ship and what is your track record. What is success stories and if you can prove to customers that you know what you're doing and you can get good success and results. They will vet and user gut to decide if they wanted to choose you over someone else. So i've learned that over the years like just yourself right. They either like your and same with harvesting good employees. That are remote. Just be honest right. Let people in on what you're doing they either are with you in terms of value wise and your your leadership and your you know your company or not right and that's okay because there's a lot of people out there that are willing to jump with your your company or not same with clients like the not everyone's going to be a great client. You just learning revolve over the years. So what i find interesting in listening to your story that you know you just started out remote because you've had that experience with yellow pages and then it sounds like that there might have been some education of potential clients and customers but we work remotely whatever. And what's interesting is from. The internal side were hearing from from individuals who are looking to find new employment because their current employer is insisting that they come into work in person and these employees. Don't feel comfortable. And so they're leading. And so what. I find interesting. Is you as an organization may have had to educate your clients about. Here's the value of us working remotely and and the fact that you're looking at the end game. The results are happy clients. Who are well served and does it matter how they are being starved. Zombie well-served so that's the external part. On what you had to say about those companies who internally or say no. Don't we have to be in person and love to lead it. Yeah it all depends on corporate culture. Right it all depends on what's mandated at the top and for more tech startups and companies are more advancing in terms of pro. Just being more forward thinking. I i would say because peop- there's going to be a generation of people that are old school mentality. They're so used to go into a factory. Going to large corporate multinational company with a structure. They clock in clock out. They want to be completely in control and they want to know that even though there might not be as productive they see them. They're right and it's more of a control thing. However i look at more. Like i want the best in terms of my staff wellbeing productivity and less stress and i feel if you harvest a good work environment they will stick with you for a lot longer because you're looking after them and it's more of a good fit for both parties so it all depends right because again do factory kind of work environment or even give you an example. My wife works at a bank. And it's a very large top. Five banks in canada corporate structure and she you know has been working in the office for the last fifteen years during this pandemic. She's move to more homebase because of the situation and we just have to adapt to it and she found that at the beginning was challenging. Because we have a child at home it was more about trying to work around life. Dif- different things that are thrown at us all right But as the months and months gone she found a groove h. He found like you wake up a little bit later. You get more sleep. You're less stressed commuting into the office instead of spending forty five minutes to an hour getting on a train or driving to the office. She saves at my having slow. You know having coffee or breakfast in the morning spending more time less stressed right being as productive as she was in the office but just using technology for you know meetings yes. You don't get that social interaction where you go out for coffee and lunch with people. But maybe there's pros and cons to that as well because when you're done doing that copy break it takes you a you know. Ten fifteen minutes to get back in the groove of actually focusing on productive were but now you're onus is doing ed at work at home and you will productive because you can actually. There's no less distractions. I would say right. And you can actually focus. So i've harvested alive these traits over the years of doing this and even prior yellow pages and whatnot So i've i've kinda got a good groove by doing this for over ten years now right and it takes time and it's not for everyone and it's totally okay to acknowledge that and employees employers. They have to realize there's going to be different types of people for different positions and they have to accept it. They got a fine good matches. Good alignment and focus on. What is the end. Goal is

John Von John Canada
Self-replicating spacecraft

Curiosity Daily

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Self-replicating spacecraft

"Self replicating machines could help us explore the universe. They were theoretical for a really long time. But scientists are still exploring the possibilities. And the technology is starting to seem a lot less far fetched than it used to be. So let's talk about these machines a self replicating robot is often referred to as a von Neumann machine. After the Hungarian-born American mathematician, John von Neumann. He was the first to mathematically model a machine that could replicate itself in today's world of three d printers that might sound like a simple task. But this was the nineteen forties. Von Neumann had this idea when computers barely existed, and he certainly never thought about using. It for spacecraft. That idea came decades later in nineteen seventy nine book by Chris Boyce. Here's how he put it. You launch von Neumann probe equipped with an interstellar propulsion system and send it to a neighboring star system. Once it got there. It could mind asteroids and planets to gather the raw materials it would need to replicate itself. It would make several copies of itself which would themselves launched toward neighboring star systems each of those on Newman probes would repeat the process and after say a few million years you'd have probes exploring every corner of the galaxy and these probes wouldn't just make more of themselves. They also do important scientific research and transmit their findings back to their home world, you could even hypothetically have a probe designed to colonize the galaxy with life. If the technology was advanced enough to tear form planets, and synthesize human embryos, sounds pretty cool. Right. Well in a nineteen Eighty-one paper a cosmetologist named Frank tipplers pointed to the. That if advanced civilizations are out there, then self replicating probes would be everywhere to including our own backyard. He wrote that since they're not here. Extraterrestrial civilizations must not exist. But back on the bright side. Scientists are still looking into the possibilities for our own exploration of the galaxy in two thousand seventeen for example, Canadian scientists announced they'd been developing three d printers that could replicate themselves from lunar material and researchers at North Dakota state university have been working on something similar. There's still a long way to go. But this is one technology that doesn't seem so far

John Von Neumann Chris Boyce North Dakota State University Frank Tipplers Newman Million Years
"john von" Discussed on Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom

"And I don't read on you. Right. And ideally, we both get off in the the worst scenario is obviously where you read on me. And I ran on you. We're both going to jail and neither gets the benefit of writing. And and then there's also the uncertainty, which is well, I ride on you while you don't read on me. Right. Or will the other way way? What will it be reversed? And so what? Happens is if you play a game once you might have a very strong incentive to rat on your friend and get a better deal for yourself. So if you think about markets, you know, if you're just playing one game, you might think, you know, what we're going to have a little price war here and compete with the other company and try to steal some market share. And and that's essentially sort of defecting, but what you find is. If you play the prisoner's dilemma game over and over again and Robert Axelrod in this book, he set up essentially, a prisoner's dilemma game that economists computer scientists and mathematicians could submit programs, and then they would all play with each other over hundreds of times and every strategy would play with every other strategy. And the idea was a find out. What's the dominant strategy is to? Basically always defect or to defect only when the other guys cooperating, and you've lulled into a false sense of security, the answer really the dominant strategies to essentially tit for tat it's to always cooperate. Meaning if the other person's not cooperating, you don't cooperate if the other person cooperates you cooperate. So basically, you're just Mirroring and what he found out is that cooperation emerges as the dominant strategy. And you see this in business where the dominant strategy for our gobble as into ALI'S is essentially cooperation, it's a collusion or whether it's tacit or explicit. But it's like e don't want to engage in price wars and. The mini max theory was permitted by John von Neumann. And the example, he gave isn't she was if mother has two children, and she gives him a piece of cake and gets one to cut it and the other to pick the piece you're going to end up with the most even a cake, cutting you've ever seen. And the the reason why that's the case is that what people are trying to do is to minimize their maximum loss and so price wars and gaining market. Share sounds wonderful except that what competitors really wanna do in the long term is minimized their maximum loss. And so therefore, they they don't really want to have extensive competition in the industry, and you end up with companies, essentially, a cooperating negative from dozens and dozens of of examples and studies indicating this, and you know, we it doesn't matter. What industry you're looking at like, you know, recently, there's a case of tuna in the US, and it was WalMart and other grocers. Brought the case there was collusion in the tuna market. But you know, you seen clues in the Canadian bread market doesn't matter where you look you find that companies generally try not to compete if they can avoid it. Yeah. You know, it's funny because over the summer, I read a book called thinking strategically it's kind of just a basic introduction to game theory and the subtitles the competitive edge in business, politics and everyday life, and most of the examples they use our companies using game theory to figure out how to they can best in a protect their margins. And it was interesting to me because I just wanted to understand game theory better. But all the examples they use are in business so seven it's pretty and this book came out ninety three it's one of the most popular books related to game three. So it's pretty obvious that you know, corporate executives have been reading this stuff at paying close attention to it. So they're not, you know, making these mistakes that you know, the the made in the past. But I also want to come back to this topic to of regulatory capture because that's also another important dynamic that's going on. Absolutely. So regulatory capture is the the idea that a very large companies that are..

John von Neumann Robert Axelrod ALI US WalMart
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"Genius that not all of his ideas were adopted readily because his argument that the United States should launch a preventive strike against the Soviet Union to wipe out that country before it could develop its own nuclear weapons seems particularly horrific to me millions of innocent people who had no say in the nuclear aspirants of the country. They lived in and no contribution toward the development of nuclear weapons would have died. If that were the case, it would have been a massive slaughter of people who had no say in the eventual development of nuclear weapons, I find this notion impossible to justify and while von Neumann argued that a nuclear war would be inevitable should the. Soviets developed the capability to manufacture such weapons and that nuclear war would wreak devastation much much larger than logic a preventive strike against the Soviet Union. It turns out that that didn't happen. At least it hasn't happened yet. So maybe one day there will be a nuclear war, which would in fact, be absolutely terrible. But it may be that it's not a foregone conclusion the way von Neumann believed. So we can look back and say at least so far it seems like not bombing a country out of existence for fear of them developing. Nuclear weapons was the right choice because they did not launch a nuclear attack against us they develop nuclear weapons, but we haven't had a war. So we would have killed millions of people and not prevented a war. Or because the war hasn't happened. Anyway. But still all that being said, we have to remember von Neumann made in calculating contributions toward multiple disciplines and the world would be a very different place. If he had not done that. So for that, I am thankful, and I think it is important that we take into consideration all persons traits their strengths their weaknesses their virtues and their flaws. We should not just idolize people without critical thought that is not a responsible thing to do nor. Should we dismiss all the contributions? We have to weigh everything in kind and try and take a human perspective all of us have contributions all of us have flaws. But yeah, that that sums up my thoughts on von Neumann. He. He has written a ton of very information informational, very educational very interesting papers on numerous subjects I urge you to go out and find some of those if you are really interested in the various topics I've talked about they are very academic. So if you don't have the schooling or the expertise in those areas, you may rapidly find yourself finding it really challenging to understand what is going on. I know I did I've spent a long time since I've taken calculus, for example, but they are incredibly important papers. So if you want to learn more, you can seek that out of still looking for a really good biography about von Neumann, I've read a couple, and I don't think either of the ones I've read have been exactly what I'm looking for. So if you. You happen to know of a really good biography about von Neumann, I'm interested to learn more about that too..

von Neumann Soviet Union Neumann United States one day
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"And he made numerous contributions to our understanding of mathematics, not to mention the foundations of modern computing, and I did say at the beginning of these episodes that I would also address a few traits that some people have kindly described as quirks, but I feel are actually much deeper flaws. One was his love of fast cars now that in itself isn't a flaw. There are a lot of people who love fast cars. Scott Benjamin is a good friend, and he loves cars, but fun women would drive so fast and so carelessly that he earned a reputation for wrecking cars for totaling them and happens so regularly that one intersection at Princeton was called von Neumann corner because he had wrecked more than one car in that location. He was said to. Too often drive while he was distracted including while he was reading. So that's not ideal as it shows a level of responsibility that could end to the injury or death of someone whether it's von Neumann or or someone completely not connected to the event at all other than you know, being in a collision. Von Neumann was also something of a hedonist. He was known to eat and drink to excess his love of parties would continue throughout his life. And again, that's not necessarily a flaw unless it is taken to extremes. And from what I've read it sounds like there might have been a few extreme cases in von Neumann's life, and he was also known to be kinda creepy. He liked being around young women and he liked looking at their legs a lot. Apparently, he would go so far as to lean down to look underneath desks in order to get a look at legs. And maybe even pick up the skirt of a woman, which is absolutely despicable. It got to a point where he had such a reputation for doing this that some of the secretaries at Los Alamos during the Manhattan project actually would have cardboard sheets. They could slide in front of their legs under their desks to block his view. Which is pretty darn creepy. Not cool. Anyway, there's no question that he was brilliant and a genius. But I'm also glad that even though he was a.

Von Neumann Scott Benjamin Los Alamos Princeton Manhattan
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"Was operating as a think tank dedicated to running nuclear war scenarios. Norman would argue for a concept called preventive war. You could refer to this as a preemptive strike or maybe more appropriately a nuclear sucker punch because they preemptive strike is typically astray. Edgy. We associate with two nuclear powers is the concept of a nuclear power launching an initial attack in an effort to knock out the second nuclear powers nuclear capabilities as much as possible. So that no retaliation is is is available. Norman was going further than that. He was actually suggesting that the United States use nuclear weapons against the Soviet Union before the USSR could become a nuclear power at all. So essentially, he's saying launch a full scale attack on Moscow because sooner or later they're going to build nuclear weapons, it's likely going to be sooner. So let's do it. Let's wipe them out before they can build these nuclear weapons. So his argument was assuming that nuclear war is inevitable once the Soviet Union developed the ability to make nuclear weapons the best thing would be to launch that nuclear attack against Moscow. But it was based on that assumption that nuclear war is in fact inevitable once enough superpowers have. Have nuclear capabilities? So far that hasn't proven to be the case. So Ye for that. But Norman wasn't convinced that that was necessarily gonna hold true. He was actually quoted as having said if you say why not bomb them tomorrow? I say why not today if you say today at five o'clock, I say why not one o'clock. So he was gung ho on this at the time the United States, suffice it to say did not follow up on von Neumann suggestion, and at least so far nuclear war has not happened though. I'm personally, not a fan of the mutually assured destruction strategy that various countries have taken either that's for a different podcast Beckett. Princeton von Neumann would become the manager of the electronic computer project. The goal was to design and build an electron ick computer capable of using a stored program von Neumann had served as a consultant on an earlier project out of the university of Pennsylvania. He had by chance met the leaders of that project that was called the electronic numerical integrator and computer, better known as any AC en EAC was built as a general purpose, programmable electronic, computer. It was funded by the army ordinance department which wanted a computer capable of calculating complicated. Ballistics tables earlier computers were mostly electro mechanical devices, which meant they had real moving parts that operated as switches. But that also meant those computers were subject to wear and tear and worse for the terms of running lots of calculations their speed was limited because they had to rely on this mechanical action of these various components and electronic computer would eliminate all those moving parts and speed things up considerably while any act was still being constructed. Von Neumann would end up working with the creators j Presper Eckert and John v Mauchly too. Design the successor to the and this would be Ed vac that stood for electronic discrete, variable, automatic, computer. So what was different about Ed vac?.

Norman von Neumann Soviet Union Moscow Ed vac United States Presper Eckert USSR university of Pennsylvania Princeton consultant Mauchly John
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"So there'd be very little chance of anyone challenging his thesis, which I thought was a pretty clever way of getting around. And if you have to defend your ideas, just go with something. So obscure the no one has enough expertise to contradict you. At least that seems to be the the the key of the matter. John von Neumann, never one to sit around without something to think about began to look into the the question of logical design, and eventually what would become computer science. He was also studying the mathematics of explosives, he became an expert on shaped charges, which is an explosive that has shaped in a way to focus and direct the explosive energy in a very specific way. And so you've probably heard about this. These are different ways of designing explosive devices for different purposes, it was likely this work that would lead to him being tapped to join a top secret research project for the United States military, the development of the atomic bomb. Also known as the Manhattan project work had already been going strong on the Manhattan project by the time. John von Neumann was tapped to join it. J Robert Oppenheimer managed the laboratory with lots of topnotch scientists working alongside them like Ernest Lawrence Stennis, lov Lula, Neal's bore Seth netter Meyer. Tons of very intelligent, very influential. Scientists and engineers were working on this project all of them trying to develop working atomic bombs. There are three main areas of research in the Manhattan project. There was using uranium as the nuclear material that would be at the heart of the atomic bomb using plutonium, and then the hydrogen bomb or the fusion bomb that would be the most powerful of the three, and it was also the most complex and the one that was on the longest time line for development for the uranium atomic bomb. The team had decided to go with a firing mechanism inside the bomb to detonate the actual nuclear. Payload? So this was referred to in general as a gadget the gadget that would make the bomb go off, and what it would do is it would shoot one mass of sub critical uranium essentially, a hollow uranium bullet into another mass of subcritical uranium in the sense sub critical means that individually the two masses would not have enough uranium to thirty five atoms to sustain a nuclear reaction. I've talked about this in the nuclear power episodes. But essentially what's happening is uranium when it decays gives off some high speed neutrons. And if those neutrons were to collide with another unstable uranium atom, they could. Induce another split another vision, and the reaction would continue and in a nuclear power plant. You do this in in the hopes of creating a contained and sustainable nuclear reaction when the nuclear bomb, you want something that's going to escalate to explosive force..

John von Neumann Manhattan J Robert Oppenheimer United States Ernest Lawrence Stennis Seth netter Meyer Lula Neal
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"She was also from a wealthy Jewish family. She was born in one thousand nine eleven as a teenager. She had become a championship figure skater. She also had been married twice already. She got married in one thousand nine thirty. Eighty one to a man named Ferenc Ingle, but they were divorced. A few years later, her second marriage was in nineteen thirty six to amend named and repulsion. He was still married to her win. Von Neumann struck up a relationship with her. So they were technically they were both having affairs because von Neumann's marriage had not come to an end yet hit the divorce was still in process. So they end up getting into a relationship with each other Clara ends up divorcing her husband. And then marries von Neumann and together, they immigrate to the United States Claro was a remarkable woman in her own, right. Absolutely. She made significant contributions she would become the head of statistical computing over at Princeton. She would become one of the early computer programmers of the mathematical analyzer, numerical, integrator and computer, aka maniac, more on that in the next episode two. And she was also a tragic. Figure so John von Neumann died in nineteen fifty seven. Not a spoiler alert happened decades ago. The we'll talk about that more in the next episode two. So after his death. She would go on to marry for a fourth time this time it was to a physicist named Carl Eckhardt and in nineteen sixty three she drove out to a secluded beach in California. She walked out into the surf and she drowned the San Diego coroner's office would rule her death a suicide so a very tragic ending for her back to von Neumann to to wrap up this episode. I've covered a lot of his work his early work in mathematics in our next episode. We're going to learn more about his involvement in the Manhattan project. That's the of course, the super secret project that was dedicated to designing the atomic bomb. Walser learn about how he helped design computer systems and will learn more about some of his country. Nations to tech and science as well as some of what people have generously described as his personality quirks. I would call them severe character flaws. We'll talk more about those in the next episode..

John von Neumann Ferenc Ingle Walser Claro United States San Diego Clara Princeton physicist Carl Eckhardt California Manhattan
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"But reportedly, it was one of the few things in academia that he was not great at or at least people didn't really like his style. So the trouble mostly appeared to be that von Neumann was super duper wicked smart any at a phenomenal memory as well. So he could work out complex equations in his head, and he would leap around the topic quickly which left a lot of students struggling in his wake they couldn't keep up. They didn't weren't able to connect the dots. Like, he was he got a reputation for scribbling out important equations hurriedly on a chalkboard. And then erasing them before anyone knew what they meant or could even copy them down. However, he also had a reputation for being able to communicate complicated ideas in. Straightforward way in a one on one setting that would allegedly make sense even to Dullard like myself if I had been given the opportunity now since von Neumann died decades before I was born I can't actually put this claim to the test. But by many accounts, he was talented at explaining complicated ideas to people who didn't have the expertise in mathematics to understand all the bells and whistles in nineteen thirty three he was named a mathematics, professor for the institute for advanced study in Princeton that was a brand new department. He was one of the six experts in the original group of professors. He was also the youngest of the six those professors included, some really smart people, including one that. I'm sure you've all heard about that would be Albert Einstein. So he was in really good company. Nineteen thirty three was also the last year the von Neumann would lecture for a term in Germany. He was going back and forth. He would do a term in Germany. He would come back. And do a term in the United States and so on and so forth. The Nazi party. However was starting to consolidate power in Europe around this time, so Norman withdrew to work solely in the United States. Now, some of his peers would leave continental Europe in an effort to escape the Nazi regime as it got more powerful. But von Neumann had already relocated in an effort to find steady employment. As an academic ni- say this only because as I was researching von Neumann, I came across differing accounts, some of which said, you know, he was fleeing the Nazi regime, but from the information, I could find it sounded more like he was looking for a steady gig. And he got one at Princeton. And that was the guiding force in his decision. It just happened to predate the rise of Nazis in Europe. So he had already left by the time the Nazi party was starting to pick up steam in Germany in the mid nineteen thirties von ointment would become interested in the problem of hydrodynamic turbulence, and the theory of shocks this would become really. Portent the next decade this area of interest was also really complicated is so complicated. That even von Neumann's mind couldn't tackle some of these equations because hydrodynamics is very counter intuitive, especially when it comes into shock waves. So he wouldn't need a device to help him suss out the more complicated nuances and that began von Neumann's interest in computer science. I'll talk a lot more about that. In the next episode as well now in his personal life, John and his wife, Mary yet had a daughter named marina, but von Neumann's private life was not one of matrimonial bliss, according to biographies, I research he was affectionate toward his daughter. But he wasn't really involved in her upbringing at all or in the care of the household, and general he considered that to be the work for his wife, and that he was going to just dedicate himself to his scholarly work. And then tying went on occasionally getting. Rip roaring drunk at parties. That was his those were his two interests. So as relationship with strain now, eventually Mariot with leave him and the two would divorce interestingly Mariette would go on to marry again, she married a physicist named James Brown. Horner Krueger sometimes known as Desmond for some reason. The this guy Cooper, he was part of the the radiation laboratory at MIT, you might remember. I talked a lot about that particular lab on my episodes about Alfred Loomis. So if you want to learn more about that look into the tech stuff archives for the Alfred Loomis stories now on Norman would be married. A second time his second wife was Clara, Dan Clara was like von Neumann from Budapest..

von Neumann Europe Nazi party Albert Einstein Princeton Germany Alfred Loomis Norman United States Dullard Horner Krueger MIT Mariette professor Dan Clara physicist James Brown Budapest Mariot
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"John von Neumann was working on quantum mechanics. And a really exciting time Heisenberg had just proposed his uncertainty principle now that's largely based off the fact that matter can act as both a wave and a particle. And that would mean there's a limit to how precisely we might know particles properties, like an electrons position and speed, for example. So the more precisely we know one of those two things the less, we know about the other. So the more precisely weekend talk about the electrons position the less we know about at speed and vice versa. John von Neumann's contributions were unsurprisingly related to the application of bath Maddix when it comes to quantum mechanics. Von Neumann's emphasis was on mathematical rigor that is his approach emphasized the degree to which a mathematical representation of a concept in quantum physics is logically sound he wanted the math to be as strong. Wrong and a method of proof as possible to logically support these various principles in quantum mechanics. Now that put his approach in contrast with a nother physicist deigned, Paul Dirac who argued for a more pragmatic approach that was less mathematically rigorous, but it was also more efficient. It was easier to apply, and it would lead to conclusions that were easier to understand than these very complicated mathematical formulas, so you had these two very different styles coming at quantum mechanics at the same time. So John von Neumann by the late nineteen twenty s was already something of an intellectual celebrity at least in academic circles, and he was doing groundbreaking work in game theory and quantum mechanics in nineteen twenty nine he was invited to lecture at Princeton University on the subject of quantum theory. And he said he would be happy to do. So, but I he had to attend to a small personal matter that small personal matter. There was a wedding his wedding. He got married to a woman named Marietta Vesey Nova she and Vanoy man had known each other since childhood Kahveci was a talented economics student at the university of Budapest. She was also something of a socialite in Hungary. She was known for appearing at parties and being very glamorous von Neumann was also a fan of the nightlife. Apparently, he was quite well known as a patron of the cabaret circuit in Berlin. He would teach in the daytime and go out for a night on the town in the evening and his love of parties and alcohol would follow him as he relocated to the United States. In addition to Marion Kahveci von Neumann, converted from being a non practicing Jew to a Catholic. Now. This was not an indication that he had found religion. He was agnostic through most of his life. I'll talk a little bit about that. In the next episode as well, it was more. Of a practical decision. So that he could actually marry Vesey. So he converts to Catholicism, and then he and his newlywed wife move over to the United States. Von Neumann would become a professor at Princeton..

John von Neumann Marion Kahveci Heisenberg United States Marietta Vesey Nova Paul Dirac Princeton University Kahveci university of Budapest Hungary physicist Princeton Berlin professor Vanoy
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"Set theory would become one of many areas that von moment would continue to study and develop over the course of his life. There's a concept in mathematics called the von Neumann universe. In fact, although some scholars like, Gregory, h more have gone on to say that this attribution is somewhat misleading, but will leave that for now because we otherwise be diving into an area of mathematics, so far outside of my expertise, and understanding that I would just be reading from textbooks or history books, and I don't think that makes very good podcasting. In addition to mathematics and chemistry. The young von Neumann was also fascinated by technology and aviation and they began to work in an area. That would have a really big affect on many different. Different industries different careers moving forward that would be game theory. Now, personally, I find the term game theory to be a little misleading because it under cells what it's all about you could use game theory to describe how people play a game like poker. But it's actually way more than that in psychology. You might refer to it as a theory of social situations, and it really comes down to how human beings interact with one another in specific types of situations. And generally you can break it down into two large branches cooperative game theory and non cooperative game theory. And the names kind of our self explanatory cooperative game theory describes how people will work together to achieve a common goal. How will they leverage their strengths? How will they compensate for their weaknesses? How do they manage to go after the school together? Non-cooperative game theory. You could call it competitive. Game theory describes how intelligent people will interact with each other as they each are working toward achieving their individual goals now those individual goals might be the same. So it may be that everyone's trying to go after the same prize and only one person can get it or it might be that each person has a different individual goal. And it may be that some of those individual goals are at conflict with one another for example. Maybe my goal is to get a certain trophy and someone else's goal is to get a certain metal. But the problem is that the when one person that she's one of those goals the path to achieving the other one is cut off. So that would be another example. Now, John von Neumann was not the first mathematician to suggest using mathematics to describe game theory or to study game theory or to come up with. Various strategies in game theory, numerous thinkers, had worked on various applications some for specific games like chess before von Neumann had ever come onto the scene. But von Neumann's work was some of the first general purpose game theory, work, not dedicated to a specific implementation his scholarship effectively established game theory as its own distinct field of study, John von Neumann published. His first paper on game theory in nineteen twenty eight it had the title theory of parlor games. He recognized that a game like poker had a lot more going on then just probabilities. So if poker just was reliant upon chance, then you can memorize all the possible outcomes of around of cards, and you would have a good chance of being able to play your hand to the best of its effectiveness. Right. You would. No that the odds of someone having a better hand would be higher or lower than any given hand that you have. And that would help you make a decision. However that does not take into account the human element of bluffing. So with bluffing a person can act as if his or her hand is stronger than it really is. Or maybe they are giving off the implication that they aren't working with the very strong hand. And they're hoping that you will get out of the game. There's love psychology in their doubt enters into the equation. So von Neumann started to work on this idea. And he saw how it could be app applicable to all sorts of stuff not just games, but stuff like economics. And he partnered with an Austrian economist who was at Princeton University named Oscar Morgenstern and together, they would publish a book titled theory of games and economic behavior in the introduction of that book..

John von Neumann Gregory Princeton University Oscar Morgenstern
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"So in a real world example, the classification of mammals includes all animals that are vertebrates that have for that typically give birth to live young and they produce milk for offspring. So a cat fits that definition a cat fits the set of mammals. All cats are mammals, however sets themselves can be objects that belong to larger sets so in this example, mammals is a set. But it's also an object. It belongs to the larger set of all animals. So a cat belongs to the set mammal as well. As to the set animals and mammals are a subset of animals. If you've seen a VIN diagram in which you have to circles that. Overlap in some way, you've seen a representation of one aspect of set theory. So let's give an example of VIN. Diagram? Let's say we have two circles one circle represents people who love they might be giants. And the second circle represents people who love Andrew w k these circles each represent different sets, the overlap or the intersection of those two sets is where you have people who fit both categories. They bluff they might be giants. And they love Andrew w k we could even give this group. A new name. We could call it something else. Like weirdos like Jonathan Strickland because I love both. They might be giants. And Andrew w k, but we can also talk about these set difference of this VIN diagram, the set difference for the people who love they might be giants would include all the people who only love Andrew w k and the opposite would be true for the set difference for the people who love Andrew w k. You also have symmetric differences, the symmetric difference of these two sets would include all the people who only loved one of the two bands. But not both. There are many other ways you can describe sets. But you get the general idea as for axioms, those are statements that are self evidently true things that are true. Because of common sense, we can declare them to be true. It's about fundamental as you can get infected is as fundamental as you can get what truth. So one of those might be parallel lines will never intersect by definition parallel lines will never intersect that is an axiom. It is a fundamental truth. It's a commonsense statement, it's not based on earlier or or even more granular statements. So these axioms can be used to deduce further conclusions, but doing that can be tricky if you build deductions on axioms, and you find that two different deductions you have based off the. Same axiom end up contradicting each other. Then you've got a problem on your hands. So let's say you've got your axiom. A this is your fundamental statement one that you've declared to be true. Then from a you deduce that because a is true statement be which is based on a must also be true. And then from statement be you deduce that statement p is also true. Now, let's get back to a let's say that we start from a again. And now we're making a different deduction, and we deduce anew statement. We're calling this statement D And that one must be true. But now from statement de we make a deduction and from statement de we deduce that statement p has to be false. So this is a problem. You have one line of reasoning that states p has to be true. Because a is true. Be as true p is true. Then you have another one that says he has to be false. Because a is true d is true. That means p must be. False. This is a paradox or a contradictory statement. And it means we have to look over the entire system. We have to look at the axioms to make sure that they are actually sound, and we have to look at the process we've used to deduce the truth or falsehood of the statements that followed from this axiom. This falls into an area of logic that I absolutely loved studying in college. Now, I'm no von Neumann not by a long shot. But I gotta brag for just a second. So when I was in college, I took a course in symbolic logic. And I found that my professor was teaching directly from the textbook. So I made a tough decision. I decided to stop going to classes, I only took the exams and aced the course now granted the version of logic..

Andrew w k Jonathan Strickland professor Neumann milk
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey there to tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer and a love all things tech. And in a recent episode. I mentioned a guy named John von Neumann said I should probably do an episode about him and several of you wrote in and urged that I should do this sooner rather than later. So today, we're going to learn more about van noy man and his numerous contributions to science and technology. This is the first part of a two part episode. His achievements were remarkable perhaps made even more astonishing by the fact that he only lived to his mid fifties. And yet he was an incredibly prolific thinker? But he also had his flaws now, I'll talk about those as well because I think it would be a disservice to just gloss over them. So while he was a genuinely intelligent brilliant, man. He had some some flaws to his character as well. So John von Neumann. I was born Norman Yasha LA Lloc Margit tie in Budapest Hungary in December twenty eighth nineteen. Oh, three am. I know. I know I butchered the pronunciation of that. But I'm doing the best. I can he was born into a non practicing Jewish family, so ethnic Jewish family, but not a practising Jewish family. Now, according to the biographies, I read the household liberally mixed in Jewish and Christian traditions together. His father was a successful banker. His mother came from a prosperous family. So in those biographies, they also mentioned that he came from a wealthy background. He was the oldest of three boys. His younger brothers grew up to be a doctor and a lawyer, respectively, and the family would employ governesses to look after the children and from them fond knowing began to learn French, and German and English and other languages as well, even as a kid. He was obviously gifted he could talk with his. Other in Greek and tell jokes in Greek he could memorize an entire page out of a phone book in just a few minutes and answer questions about who had which number or what a person's street address was they would do this as like party tricks when he was six years old John von Neumann was an apt student in school, and he attended the Lutheran high school starting in nineteen thirteen..

John von Neumann Norman Yasha LA Lloc Margit Jonathan Strickland executive producer Lutheran high school Hungary six years
"john von" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"john von" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"Little blue green planet who's ape descended lifeforms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are pretty neat idea, but retained the existence of a so-called exotic object, which exist scales far outside of their experience. And as we consider what we've learned lives marble at the fact that we're living in a world where new mathematical zeros and Infinity's such as those found in and around black holes are found and that we've already harvested on dripped of bounties from this nearly God forbid and information on Jonathan and I'm Gabriel, and this has been breaking math. Gabriel do have anything to plug. So actually, if you think, I think I plugged last time the fact that I'm still working my way through a great fan fiction book called Harry Potter. Andy methods of rationality. I'd love to do a podcast on this. I don't know that I can. I need to look into the legality of that aspect, but we probably can. I also like to plug some ideas for future podcasts. I really wanna get into economics. I had a discussion on Facebook that was on somebody posted a video. The essence of the video was on socialism and it said essence, socialism is not all that bad. It's been misunderstood. It's been misrepresented, etc. Etc. The comments in this video were pure vitriol like so much hatred. Now, the reason why I want to bring this up as a discussion as I'd like to talk about models of economic stability. And I'd like to talk about how not only different nations do it, you know, in terms of their economics, how much of it is influenced by the state and how much of it is influenced by privatization, but also within the United States, I'd like to talk about how diff-. Different states and their economies are diversified how they relate to, you know, the the federal government as well as just the state government. All of that stuff fascinates me and at the heart of economics light is game theory, which is so simple that it wasn't discovered until like the twentieth century, and even John von Neumann was confused by it. And what what I love about this topic is I had mentioned earlier the whole the vitriolic exchange. Is that a term vitriolic good. Like the vitriolic exchange people were, you know, like using horrible terms to talk about other human beings. Well, you know, I wanna break things down as much as we can into mathematical models. I'm very familiar with, let's say, fiscally conservative arguments for economic stability and individual rights and liberties. I'm also aware of ideas that you know sometimes things are more efficient if they're done. A federal level. So without without even going one way or the other to be Frank, I'm very interested in just discussing and then tearing apart different ideas about economics and I am, you know, obviously this will come down to math, but, but then what you know, the other question is, what assumptions do you make in your mathematical models? Good. And of course it, we're being mathematicians. We have to be able to accept conclusions. So even though you might not swing one way or the other, we might make some statements that would seem to some people as controversial. So we're not maybe doing that next episode, but we might be so keep look look out for that because we're definitely going to do it at some point in the future. Yeah, it'll be a do you know after doing this three parter on black holes, my brain feels like it's scrambled across the edge of the of the event. Harare my brain is we definitely need a pallet cleanser. So I just thought talking about economics would at least be invigorating an interesting. You know what I mean? Like like, oh, yeah, definitely. And the way that I've wanted to do it with my friends across the political spectrum is I'd love to talk about any model and talk about it like, you know, as I'm trying to sell you on it, but then also talk about the critiques that even Karl Marx, even for those who are very opposed to to to communism. They say, well, he certainly. Addresses some concerns with human behavior and critiques. You know, even though somebody might not be a communist, that can still knowledge what he said in why it may be appealing to some people and then you know the opposite's true as well. So in my opinion, love is more true than the other, but we have one going into that. We also have the thirty.

Karl Marx Gabriel federal government Harry Potter John von Neumann Facebook United States Andy Infinity Jonathan Frank
"john von" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"john von" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Way that someone like they card or earlier maybe religiously motivated views might have described the essence of a person so a lot of my book is about arguing against that trying to argue that actually well the brain is super portent for us but it's not our essence it's part of what makes us who we are a great overview so i think the first theme had to do with seeing the brain as being a biotic could you discuss that in a little bit more detail absolutely yes so one of the most dominant views of the brain i think in in actually both within the field and outside the field is the view of the brain as a computer as a mechanism more generally but specifically as a computer and this actually really dates back to the very earliest moments of the digital age so there was a computer pioneer john von neumann poop wrote a book called the computer and the brain based on a set of lectures just before he died in the nineteen fifties and he with that book kind of established this analogy whereby the mechanisms of the brain the things that the brain does get mapped onto what digital computers too and there's a lot of truth to that so one of the first things i think people learn about brain cells neurons chiefly is that they fire these little electrical impulses called action potentials and those are electrical impulses that are generated by molecules neurons that they look a lot like the electrical signals that travel down wires or now fiber optic cables in a telephone network or that the in and out of computer chips to turn bits on and off and that electrical nature brain processing i think is part of what underlies the computer analogy and other pervasive and actually genuine similarity between brains and computers is that well they both have circuit elements in them so computers obviously digital circuitry wires and so on brains have neurons that are often arranged in patterns of connectivity that looked like circuits they connect with each other they're often in regular raise that kind of if you look at them in the right way they look like a computer chip and that's true enough but when we think of the brain is a computer well the language that we bring to that becomes frankly really odd for or something when something is a computer while we can think of its inorganic we can think of copying cloning it we can think of sending it through space it sort of innocent brings with it a certain mysterious or other worldly characteristic that we.

john von neumann
"john von" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"john von" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Which you can snip snip dna rearrange it patch it together so for example you have fifty percent of your dna from your mother fifty percent of your dna from your father and it's also spliced together by cutting tools and these cutting tools are the bezos so the right have within them the ability to cut the spliced together to create more complicated sequences of dna and that allows dna to reproduce and that's why we can have children that's what we have evolution because they are mistakes introduced in every generation of replication now you ask an even deeper question what happens if we do this with robots can we have artificially intelligent robots keeping about dna is that it reproduces itself now then the question is can robots reproduce themselves is that a possibility well it turns out that mathematicians have actually asked this question there was a famous mathematician john von neumann one of the great mathematicians of the twentieth century he discovered gained theory he helped the bill the hydrogen bomb he explored many new branches of mathematics and he asked himself the question can you build a robot which like dna will reproduce itself in other words does it have right bezos but what you can splice together a code to create artificially intelligent robots that can reproduce themselves well he started with a simple algorithm let's say i have a bunch.

bezos john von neumann fifty percent
"john von" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"john von" Discussed on WCHS

"Which you can snip snip dna rearrange it patch it together so for example you have fifty percent of your dna from your mother fifty percent of your dna from your father and it's also spliced together by cutting tools and these cutting tools are the riva's oems so the right bezos have within them the ability to cut the splice them together to create more complicated sequences of the na and that allows dna to reproduce and that's why we can have children that's why we have ever lucien because there are mistakes introduced in every generation of replication now you ask and even differ question what happens if we do this with robots can we have artificially intelligent robots keeping dna is that it reproduces itself now then the question is can robots reproduce themselves is that a possibility well it turns out that mathematicians have actually asked this question there was a famous mathematician john von neumann one of the great mathematicians of the twentieth century he discovered gained theory he helped the bill the hydrogen bomb he explored many new branches of mathematics and he asked himself the question can you build a robot which like dna will reproduce itself in other words does it have riva's oems but we can splice together a code to create artificially intelligent robots that can reproduce themselves well he started with a simple algorithm let's say i have a bunch.

riva bezos lucien john von neumann fifty percent
"john von" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"john von" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Which you can snip snip dna rearrange it patch it together so for example you have fifty percent of your dna from your mother fifty percent of your dna from your father and it's also spliced together by cutting tools these cutting tools are the right so the rag presumes have within them the ability to cut the day spliced together to create more complicated sequences of dna and that allows dna to reproduce and that's why we can have children that's why we have evolution because there are mistakes introduced in every generation of replication now you ask an even deeper question what happens if we do this with robots can we have artificially intelligent robots thinking about dna is that it reproduces itself now then the question is can robots reproduce themselves is that a possibility well it turns out that mathematicians have actually asked this question there was a famous mathematician john von neumann one of the great mathematicians of the twentieth century he discovered game theory he helped the bill the hydrogen bomb he explored many new branches of mathematics and he asked himself the question can you build a robot which like dna will reproduce itself in other words does it have right bezos but we can splice together a code to create artificially intelligent robots that can reproduce themselves well he started with a simple algorithm let's say i have a bunch.

bezos john von neumann fifty percent
"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"john von" Discussed on TechStuff

"Ah forward facing side to them where they would have contact with customers but ibm didn't their customers were other companies ibm grew larger and more powerful and became a leading name and business machines and it all started with mechanical devices but eventually transition to electron eq and then microchip technologies in the nineteen forties ibm would partner with harvard university to build the company's first computer although most people refer to it as harvard's first computer known as the mark one or the automated sequence controlled calculator this was an enormous electro mechanical computer so in other words it had electric parts electric parts rather and the chemical parts and it played a very important role with several war related calculations in the nineteen forties including some designed by john von neumann as part of the manhattan project that's the project that developed the atomic bomb it had seven hundred sixty five thousand components and more than one hundred miles of wire and cable so obviously this was not a home computer although i guess if you were desperate you could maybe cut a hole in it and make it a home but still not quite the same thing as what we mean when we say home computer in nineteen fifty two thomas j watson junior would become the president of ibm and thus began the golden age of the company the engineers ibm did groundbreaking work including creating the first commercial hard disk drive by the nineteen sixties ibm was a leader in producing massive computers for businesses to help them manage their data and at this point no one would dream of owning their own home computer even after the invention of the transistor these machines were still pretty darn massive and they would take up an entire room of your house in the early nineteen seventies as the first computer hobbyists were experimenting with building their own basic computing machines.

harvard university john von neumann president ibm partner manhattan