19 Burst results for "John Taylor"

"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:13 min | 3 weeks ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The sidelines of the G 20 summit. I'm Brad's and I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg newsroom. Bankrupted digital asset exchange FTX was hit by a mysterious outflow of about $662 million in tokens in the past day or so. Customers are being confronted with what the general counsel of its U.S. arm, Ryan Miller described as abnormalities with wallet movements. Larry summers former US Treasury secretary, he compares the meltdown of FTX to some notorious meltdowns of the past. A lot of people have compared this to Lehman. I would compare it to enron. The smartest guys in the room, not just financial error, but certainly from the reports with fraud. Summers was interviewed on Bloomberg Wall Street week with David Westin. Stocks saw the biggest weekly gain since the summer. Stocks soared on hopes the worst of inflation may have passed and that the Federal Reserve can be less aggressive about raising interest rates. For the week, the S&P 500 rose 5.9%, the Dow was up 4.1% the NASDAQ up 8.1% this week. Influential money economist John Taylor says the Federal Reserve needs to raise interest rates significantly higher to perhaps 6% to reduce inflation, more from Bloomberg's Charlie pellet. He told an economic conference in New York that rates were still quite low when measured in real inflation adjusted terms or when compared to monetary policy rules like the one he developed some 30 years ago, and which bears his name. Taylor also highlighted the risk of a wage price spiral developing that fuels an inflation rate that is now running three times higher than the fed's 2% target. Bloomberg's Charlie pellet, global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm susannah Palmer. This is Bloomberg. This is Bloomberg law with June Grasso from Bloomberg radio. As Republicans and Democrats vied for judicial power, they poured $63 million into TV and Internet advertising campaigns for state Supreme Court seats in the midterms. Some of the ads were positive. I may be blind, but my vision for Michigan is fairness. A Supreme Court that follows the law and protects your rights. I'm running for the Michigan Supreme Court to be an umpire. Not a politician. A good judge doesn't make up the rules or change in mid game. They just call balls and strikes as they see them. But most were negative, some bashing the other side. Outrageous bail rules risk our safety. Yet Jennifer brunner and Democrat justices on the Ohio Supreme Court ruled in favor of lowering and alleged murderers bail. Ohio Supreme Court treats children who were raped and assaulted the same as people in traffic accidents. Justices pat dewine and pat Fisher even tried to deny a victim her day

Charlie pellet Susanna Palmer Bloomberg newsroom Bloomberg US Treasury David Westin Federal Reserve Ryan Miller Larry summers enron Lehman Brad susannah Palmer John Taylor
Jonah Hill Set to Play John Daly in Golf Biopic

Fore The People

01:53 min | Last month

Jonah Hill Set to Play John Daly in Golf Biopic

"Did you know what the news of the week was in all of golf? Tell me. There's a John Daly movie coming out at Jonah Hill as playing him. Oh, that's right. It's being filmed. Yeah, that's pretty big news. That is big news. He's gonna really struggle with the swing of John Daly. That's hard. That's hard to imitate. And he's not a good golfer. I don't know. I don't know. I don't know if I'm on board with that. Elephant actor, obviously, like, so good, so good, yeah. You're gonna have to have a dog. I don't know about the, maybe he's gonna have to have a double. Yeah, because I don't see Joe to he'll make and JD's move at all. That's a hard booth. I don't even know if I could sit there with a fat suit on. And make that make that move. That's a tough move, but yeah, hell of an act. This thing is following him from what, like high school, till now or something, like what's the timeline, you know? No, it's a freaking movie. It's not like it's not a documentary. It's a movie. So I mean, it's got to be about his life. Is it true? Yeah, yeah. It's a movie, but Jonah Hill is playing John Taylor, so it's like it's not a documentary. It's a true. It's like his story or whatever, but yeah man, I mean, you know, a documentary on daily would be crazy enough, but Jonah Hill, first of all, Jonah Hill looks pretty short. John Daly is not a short guy. And you know, his weight's gotten all over the place. But yeah, John Daly is so flexible too. That's why he can swing like that. You're going to have a hard time making that swing work. Like please God, somebody hire me or PD and put us in CGI or whatever we can at least get that swing close. And then Jonah Hill can go around to all the strip clubs and booze in every time and doing the John Daly, all the acting stuff. But let us let us at least hit the bombs with that swing with the killer whale driver that goes wraps around our neck because we could definitely definitely make that make that happen.

John Daly Jonah Hill Golf John Taylor JOE
"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:01 min | 3 months ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"There. So in some sense, it's not surprising that we can see things moving around. But I think a commitment from the Federal Reserve to be clear about where we are headed with those rates is important. And I think that process is underway. Do you think that you can do this without raising unemployment? Well, again, if you think about how tight the labor market is, we are operating with an unemployment rate that is below. I think what most people would consider to be a normal or natural rate of unemployment. So that suggests to me that to get loosening in that labor market to see some of this tightness come out of the economy that you may well see more unemployment in the process of this tightening cycle. Well, you got two camps, one that says you need to keep going, no matter what, and another that says, you need to be careful because these are real people who lose jobs. So how much unemployment is too much? Well, I think anytime someone is unemployed that doesn't want to be. You care about that. I think in the long run, which is where I'm focused, you have to have a sustainable economy, and the best path to full employment is going to be conditions of price stability. And so I think for the long run, that's where we have to be focused to bring inflation down so that we can have those conditions. So what are you looking at when you see the housing market? We saw pending home sales but the weakest again since the beginning of it before the pandemic, even mortgage rates have shot up, we know all kinds of people who backed out of wanting to buy a home because they're expecting prices to fall more. So is that a welcome tightening in financial conditions? Is it a little bit more than the fed is bargained for? Well, I think it's been one of the first places we've seen it. So you saw that initial tightening and mortgage rates come very quickly. Early in the tightening cycle. And that, of course, it does affect the economics of someone being able to afford a mortgage, make that payment they need to pay. So in some sense, this isn't surprising to see these numbers come off to see sales come down. Whether the actual prices, the housing valuation, comes down consistent with that. I think we will still have to see. And I suspect that could be to come. You know, you just mentioned that the funds rate could have to go above 4% to get to the point where you're slowing down the economy and really slowing down demand. John Taylor, author of the Taylor rule Moore, who you know well. Told me that he thinks the fed should be aiming for 5% or even more if inflation does not start coming down more rapidly. Well, I think certainly if we don't see a response in bringing this imbalance between demand and supply to bear on inflation, we will again have to consider where that short term interest rate is going to have to be. So you wouldn't rule out something that high. Well, I wouldn't rule it out. I'm not suggesting that's where we're going. But the other thing Kathleen that I think we don't talk enough about is the sizable balance sheet that the Federal Reserve has, and that we will be doing runoff of that balance sheet. And again, understanding how these two things work together, I think it's going to be important to see how that runoff works as we go through the year. And that's the other part of this rate increase environment that is important to watch. I think. What's the danger of recession that you see and what would you see it in in terms of indications that we are slipping into contraction? So you know, again, when I go around my region, I don't hear many signs of that. From our contacts, what I hear is tight labor market price pressures, supply constraints going on here. I will tell you when I look at global growth though. So we've seen the IMF cut its forecast for global growth. We see the issues in China. We see Europe, and we know that that reduction in demand will affect our own growth here. Simultaneous with the tightening cycle that the fed is underway. So how it how it comes out and balance over time is hard to know. But I think again, the focus on watching these imbalances resolve themselves, we're going to have multiple factors that will come to bear on me. Speaking of your districts, speaking of the world economy and what's driving it right now, drought is big. Across much of the western United States, in Europe now. Is it the point yet where Andrews into a factor in policy? And is something like drought and what it could do to production our cultural production all kinds of things, is it potentially a drag on the economy, which fills you toward recession potentially? Is it something that boost inflation? Because a lot of prices are going to get even higher, particularly for food. So issues that affect our real economy are things that I think we have long taken into account. And you think about a region like mine where agriculture is prominent. The idea that weather events, the idea that commodity prices all come to bear on how the economy does, what it contributes to GDP, where the constraints are. In that sector, I think these events just are continuation of some of that

Federal Reserve John Taylor Moore Kathleen Europe IMF western United States China Andrews
"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:54 min | 3 months ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of power. As we all wait for Jackson Holmes, particularly chair J Powell's remarks. This Friday, we've got some economic data out today, and it was not altogether encouraging. The PMIs composite for the United States were down to something like 45. In the meantime, Europe had become PMIs were also under 50, about 49.2, and new housing sales were the lowest in 6 years for the United States to give us a sense of where we are in the economy as we head toward Jackson hole. Welcome now, twist and slot. He's chief economist for Apollo management. Tourism, great to have you back with us. Always is good to see you. So where is the economy? Is it slowing down as much as some indicators suggest? Yeah, the data's a day, as you mentioned, David was a bit worse than expected and what was particularly surprising is that the services sector, which has been holding up not only the U.S. economy, but also the European economy was showing a little bit more sign of weakness and combining that also with the housing data being a little bit weaker. It is clear that there are some signs at least now in the services sector, things are slowing housing has been flowing for a while, but it looks like fed rate hikes combined, of course, with the situation in Europe on the native front are beginning to have at least somewhat of a moderating impact on growth. So that was going to be my question. Is it too soon to know whether in fact the fed is starting to have the effect that it seeks or just slowing down the economy some, particularly to get at inflation? Yeah, that's really important because obviously with in the U.S. and Europe inflation is essentially 8% with the target for these to be in the fed is 2%. It is very clear that both of these would be in the fed are trying to get that very high number 8% down to two. And that does require tighter financial conditions that that can either come through higher short term interest rates or higher long-term interest rates. But it can also come through wider credit spreads or lower stock prices. The challenge for the fed more recently is that stock prices have been going up in the last four or 5 weeks. The same thing also have seen for credit spreads have also been rallying. So in that sense, the mold may be needed to be done in short rates, but the good news if you will from a fed perspective is that there are some signs now that the economy is at least on some fronts beginning to slow down and that's exactly the goal that they're trying to achieve. Of course, one question we all have is how much is it slowing down? Can we in fact get inflation down as you suggest it's got a long way to cover this point without having reception. We heard from John Taylor that famous economists whose rule is named. We heard from him actually. And he suggested maybe it is possible to avoid a recession. This is part of what he said. I don't think it needs to be part of the cure. What we've experienced if we let inflation build up over time, like it's in the 70s, it was 7 years of higher inflation. If we nip it in the bud, which I still think we can, then you don't have to have these negative effects that people are worried about. So torsten, what is the chance of a so called soft landing as John Taylor suggesting? Yeah, this is a very important question because this is at the heart of the debate about how much does the fed need to raise rates? How much demand do they need to destroy the economy? Well, the answer to that question depends very importantly on why did inflation go up, the inflation go up because there was more demand or the inflation going up because there was some problems with supply in supply chains or labor supply. And a fed working paper month or so ago basically quantified that question and found that a third of the rise inflation was because of demand. And if we therefore are waiting for two thirds of the problems on the supply side to get resolved, maybe the answer to Taylor's question here is that we could actually have a soft landing if it is the case that a lot of the problems that we have on the supply side are going to resolve themselves if supply chain issues are getting better with a certain amount at the moment transportation costs are coming down everywhere. So both are drug costs by airplane by truck by container by rail. If that's the case, we could actually have a soft landing. If it is the case that these inflation problems solve themselves on their own, if that's the case, all we need is time to resolve those issues on the supply side. And then maybe the demand destruction that's required is not as significant as it was in the 1970s. So it's a very important debate, which also surrounds around this question. Well, how are the drivers of inflation? How are they quantified in terms of was it the demand was it supply? And if it was really mainly supply with some at least working paper suggesting, maybe we could have that soft landing that therefore seed bed was keep on saying is that all of which takes us to Jay Powell, the chairman of the Federal Reserve, what he has to say on Friday because it strikes me, it's complicated enough and what you just said to us and I interpret as saying a two thirds of the problem is outside his control and yet everybody is waiting for him to solve the problem. That's exactly right. And that's exactly why it's so striking that fed paper that was written

Federal Reserve Jackson Holmes J Powell U.S. Europe Apollo management John Taylor Jackson torsten David Taylor Jay Powell
"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

", UBS managing director Ali McCartney says with increased volatility, investors need to be mindful of stock picks. Over the last number of years, you've really been rewarded no matter what type of equity you have. The concept of security selection and active management is really something we're leaning into. Ellie McCartney with UBS says rising rates and inflation will create uncertainty and equity markets. Investors will closely monitor the Federal Reserve's Jackson hole economic symposium later this week, Karen, where chair Jay Powell will speak. Stanford University professor John Taylor says the fed should not cut rates again. If we let inflation build up over time, like it's in the 70s, it was 7 years of higher inflation. If we nip it in the bud, then you don't have to have these negative effects. Stanford economics professor John Taylor thinks the fed should aim to raise rates to 5%. Stick with Bloomberg for coverage of the Jackson hole symposium, Bloomberg surveillance will be there beginning Thursday. Politics now, Nathan, it's primary day in New York, Florida and a runoff in Oklahoma, longtime House democratic colleagues, Caroline Murphy, are Caroline maloney, rather, and Jerry Nadler are competing for the same seat in New York in the 19th district of Democrat pat Ryan as running against Republican Mark molinaro. In Florida, Republican incumbent senator Marco Rubio will likely face democratic representative Val demings in November, Republican governor Ron DeSantis will face either former governor Charlie Crist or Nikki freed. Then we're getting more evidence caring of the toll that the pandemic has taken on our lives. Bloomberg's journey to young joins us live with that story. Good morning, Rita. Good morning, Nathan, the CDC says life expectancy in New York State dropped by three years in 2020, the biggest decline among all states during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. New York State residents are expected to live to just under 78 years old, the 15th highest life expectancy in the U.S. in 2019, New York had the third highest ranking. The CDC said last year overall U.S. life expectancy plunged by 1.8 years in 2020, the biggest drop since World War II, live in New York, I'm Renee young Bloomberg daybreak. We need to thank

Ali McCartney UBS Ellie McCartney fed John Taylor Jay Powell Stanford Caroline Murphy Caroline maloney Jerry Nadler Mark molinaro Bloomberg Val demings New York Ron DeSantis Nathan pat Ryan Karen Florida
"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 8 months ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Reflects the difference between the interest rate and inflation What the fed's doing is assuming their own success with respect to inflation that comes down to about 2% and then saying that their interest rate forecasts will represent a positive real interest rate and will correspond to their neutral interest rate But it all depends on assuming their success Markets are saying that real interest rates aren't getting anywhere near the fed's estimate of the neutral real interest rate Anytime in the next 5 years and certainly that's what most professional forecasters are saying in terms of their views about inflation So I don't think we're seeing the kind of increase in interest rates that's usually necessary to go for inflation I don't agree with Republican economist John Taylor on that many things But his tailor principle that to stop inflation you have to raise interest rates by more than inflation goes up because otherwise the real interest rate is coming down that's a valid principle but not one that's yet been internalized in the fed's forecasts Third thing that we heard from the chair this week was he admitted I think that it's going to be difficult to have a soft landing He nonetheless is confident It can be done in part because it's been done before There are at least three other instances people are pointing to right 94 84.

fed John Taylor
"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"Something that is holistic, you know, whole body and mind spirit. That is what's going to help us move into another stage, right? And so I think the potential is there. I don't know where we're going to be. I mean, it's a great question to ask in ten years. Boy, boy. I think my goodness. The places where we can be considering how so many things are accelerating. As well. Richmond, as he knows, has become my home in the sea monument avenue change. So that all those generals from the war era. They're all gone. They're all gone. And even their bases are now becoming any gone. As well. I never thought I would live to see that happen, right? And I think this is one of the ways in which mindfulness can help contribute to that change is that, well, first, as you once that box is open, you can no longer unsee. Right. And more and more, especially the past few years. With the way things have been in the world and here in the U.S. and inability to not see these tensions that they were never gone, we were never in a space where we did it, mission accomplished, we're now this free and open society, no, we haven't been. And now this is seen. And we're no longer avoiding and suppressing the history, but that's a constant struggle there too. Because the textbooks are become at their heart from one location and that location has an iron grip on historical rewriting revisionist history. And suppressing history. And more and more, because we have opportunities like the digital age. Along with, of course, it's difficulties in this information. Able to make, well, here's what really happened there, here are the facts of this that are not open for discussion. These are the facts. And that can be validated and should be validated on your own absolutely. That's also part of this. Right. And that tension of how do we how do we merge the, again, the non duality, the stress of stress itself, and the conditions leading to it because of those conditions are still there. Well, then we're just creating a shell. Around us. And it's just a sneakier way to avoid and suppress and it can't but we need to still get at the roots of the causes and conditions of stress. Not just in you or me or someone who's experiencing it. But what is leading to that? Over right in the world. And this is one of the challenges I often find in the workplaces. Oh, people are burning out. Like, well, what are the costs and conditions of that? Well, because they're getting worked up, I don't know. What are the causes and conditions of burnout? Gallup poll, for example, Gallup did a survey, what are the things that are the conditions and the 6 different things they came up with, they were very directly in really conditions in the workplace. Not about time responding to those conditions, but conditions in the workplace. So we as mindfulness can teachers can help with building resilience, not resistance, but resilience to this, how do we work with the difficulties that are there, will not just being okay with the difficulties when perhaps we can change those conditions. Right, we do that. Yeah, and yeah, it's fascinating to. The outreach to the community and now like the various corporations and other businesses are like knocking on our door at work center help. These people, my people, they're really struggling. And it's like you said, once your eyes are open and then you're comfort you're able to kind of like have some comfort with discomfort. There is no end, right? I mean, it's like, okay, so this is a problem. And that is, and that is, and what's really needed. Is revolutionary or evolutionary, right? I mean, we can't just paper it over or just put band aids on things. Look around the whole thing is a disaster, right? Anyways. On that happy note, John, is there anything else that you would like to share with the listeners or if there's a particular website that you could offer to them, what might that be? Yeah. Well, there's the inner work center here in Richmond. And where I've done most of my mindfulness work as well is the University of California, San Diego's mindfulness center. So those could be things. That could be helpful along the way. So I can point to those. They will have links to those for those of you who are listening. On the episode page for this episode of links to those and a little bit more information about our guest today, John Taylor, John, thank you so much for being here. Good to speak with you today. Thank you so much for having me, Ted. I really enjoyed our

Richmond Gallup U.S. aids John University of California San Diego John Taylor Ted
"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"These programs and the ones that are like this that are so solid and there's been decades of study, right? So that it is based on science as well as experience. To see this become that much more. Into the awareness of the various communities that were there so that we can offer. Things like 8 weeks can really assist people. If it can be as effective as it as it was with the gun violence group, then I don't know who I mean, these are the people that were from any of the big shootings, right? That were like, you know, we're aware of them. I mean, they were represented in that class and they were able to move very well through that. And so another sort of way in which this could be effective, interestingly, the conversation with John Cabot said and you picked me. And I was so thrilled, you know? To be speaking to John Cabot zen, who was just a regular guy. But at the same time, you know, like he's the one that coined the phrase. He's the one that's kind of like, this is going all over the world. In one form or fashion, unfortunately, I think somebody gets diluted along the way, right? But interesting in John's conversation, you know, is talking about. Non dual kind of like expressions. For example, right? And I was kind of struggling with that because it's like, you know, as you would already, you know, like Beth's partner talks about and taught in the RTTI. And maybe our AT&T as well. It's like you are here to help people with reducing their straps. This is stress reduction, right? And so it's like, you know, that's my focus here, right? I mean, that's really what we're doing. And the other, the other things along the way. But then the here John talk about this movement being more than that. It being kind of like a vehicle for awakening in a way. For what I was kind of understanding. And I was like, I was like, that's not in the textbook, right? Necessarily. So his desire to kind of really, to move society in that kind of way. I'm kind of interested to see what he has in mind. And along those lines, what's interesting with this pandemic is the availability of different things. And so I started studying with Mark Kelly, all right? Yeah, yeah, yeah. And so. Because of the glimpses, kind of blew my mind, right? And I was like, wow, this is really interesting territory. And so, and that is that direct path without bones, you know, like being. Non dual oriented, right? And so it's like, oh, and so I've been having very interesting sort of experiences with that. And then some of my other colleagues are now kind of reading while Kelly. And so it's open me up to some of these other non dual teachers. And so Jon kabat zinn is interested in that. I'm like, well, how are you going to more explicitly express this? Within this community as well. So that's interesting kind of like thing. It's fascinating this connection between the idea of non duality. And even that is not an adequate way to describe it, but non duality. With the still lived world experience of racism. Right. Poverty. And all the rest of it and how does and how might a non dual way of thinking help with changing those conditions because those are also very real. And I think that is one of the fundamental uniqueness of how mindfulness is in programs like MBSR, knowing that they're different definitions, different ways mindfulness is in the world and different kinds of settings. That here, it's not one that's about avoidance suppression, escape. But about engagement with what is here. And that itself is an endless endless sort of source of exploration and learning and how what we are finding can help shift what it is we're exploring in the first place. Absolutely. And so yeah, I have a very brief teaching mindfulness. But how it's changed. Since 2018, you know, as we were dealing with people's stressors that were very individually in oriented, right? And then with, you know, other people that have other concerns. You know, one of my first most diverse class was with my colleague bringing Richmond public school teachers, you know, making that available. And so all of a sudden, if you're primarily white classes, half my class or more are from the public school district various ways. And it was decidedly different because the stressors were decidedly different. Yeah. And so, and then with all the awareness of what's happening, instead of coming from individual, which is definitely there. But societal and societies, you know, various issues now being identified as stressors, right? And so are these tools that can affect this. I genuinely believe that they can. Address those things that I was concerned with before I discovered that spirituality is kind of my core base. Those things that were, you know, I'm primarily on my mind. Of injustice of racial and class and all the rest of that, I believe. Can also be addressed. And. One memory and that comes up is the 2016 election. And I sat up with a friend of mine who was a film director and we're just kind of like all that kind of three 30 in the morning. It's like, okay, you know, our new president is going to be this person we didn't want. There. And how troubling that is. Our conclusion, he has a Buddhist sort of influence in his life as like what needs to happen is a deep spiritual

John Cabot zen RTTI John Cabot Jon kabat zinn Mark Kelly John Beth Kelly Richmond AT
"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"In that seat. Absolutely. And yeah, and it is, I went from co teaching to solo teaching, so I did a number of classes on my own. And now me being the leader of the more senior person, I'm not really the leader at all. We kind of like very conscious of presenting an equal voice as we present as we teach, because we facilitate. But yeah, and we're in the midst of it, right? I mean, we've just finished our third class. And one of the things that we're doing as well. With the members of that cohort who were on the bench in Spence says, we're now getting more training on how to do teacher training so that we can also be co teachers with other folks. And to do that on the international basis, really, so yeah. Yeah, because much as having a fairly white audience or cohort of students who take an MBSR course as an example, and it's a very, very white. You don't see a lot of people of color there. Even more so in the teacher base. And that shift. So that's really one of the things I am very interested in so happy to hear is that there is this intention around welcoming bipoc as the teacher side of it too. Now just taking this course, but being able to spread that wide because that presence, as you've noticed, your own presence makes a difference. That's what's going to really, really energize this shift that is inevitable anyway, but we can choose to make it happen sooner and well. Instead of just organically, that's great, but I want to water and this too. No, absolutely. And one of the things that kind of struck was just the society of one day she said, I don't ever want to teach. With another white person right in this way, right? I mean, it's kind of like, this doesn't make any sense. And so, and it was the person that she was working with at the tally foundation Larry young, who was like, oh, you're getting it. As an Asian American and really sort of an activist with this whole idea, right? And so yeah, so that was part of the motivation as well. And in terms of it making a difference, it's really interesting in that way. And who it affects. And so mindful leader was offering retreats and came to bath because teachers nobody retreats and became an expert at doing it. Over Zoom, so they approached her. And she asked me to co teach our code lead with her. And having me on the brochure, there were white folks that were like, oh, you know, like, I want to sign up for that one. Because they value the diversity themselves. And clearly, other Brown folks, black and brown folks were like, okay, that makes them more interesting. So I think it's very committed to that because they started their online MBSR a couple of years ago. I created that program with them and teaching on how to teach mindfulness live online and some of that with Beth and some special sessions there. And mindful leader has been wonderfully, so just a shout out to mo and Claire and Chelsea and that team on their interest in it because of course the understand that this is open for everyone. So again, thanks to them for really being later in the yeah, yeah. And so along the way to creating the bipoc cohort, Beth was approached with the opportunity to work with. Gun violence survivors. And. John kabat zinn actually approached her, would you be interested in taking this on? And she, you know, her first response was heck yeah. And I was like, can you put together a team? She says, absolutely. And then she's like, you know, after the phone call. Okay, now I actually need to do this. And so, you know, she approached me and carranza was here in Richmond to be part of that cohort. And then you probably know sidas or sata as well. And then best husband Hugh. We became the team to take on two core cohorts. For that program. And it's very interesting. I mean, you know, life is messy, right? And so the idea was that we would have 40 or so people that had kind of been a little bit seasoned, right? It's kind of like work through some of their issues, you know, was the idea. That didn't happen. And so in life. Yeah, no. And so we had people that potentially may not be kind of like accepted into an MBSR. 8 week course. And there's all sorts of ideas about how do we accommodate the organization that we are working with to pull us together and all this conversation. And I finally said, look, we're going to be a teacher, facilitators. That is our lane. That is what we do. I've talked this over a few years now, and I've seen the miraculous. The I've explainable, the unexpected, every class, every class, and I think we can hold this space, right? They did have a couple of psychologists counselors that attended class in my case they were just attending class like everybody else. And we were able to hold the space. We really were. And it was really fascinating. And it was a very diverse group of people as well. And what became a parent as well as with the African American participants, there's obviously going to be somewhat of a comfort. But then this also, you know, the real reality of it is that we are a different culture. We do communicate in ways. We do move in ways. We have other sort of expectations that are very close being African American. But at the same time, they can be significant enough differences. And so not just one culture. Right, right, exactly. Yeah. And so what was fascinating to me was

Spence Larry young John kabat zinn Beth carranza Claire Chelsea mo Brown Hugh Richmond
"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"And so that allowed me to. Really start working with mentors and really kick it off. And so I did all of my 22 hours and Beth of them become the leader. You see San Diego mindfulness center. And to understand, you know, to where she was. At that time, she's like, we really need to have a great adversity. And she's looking around. She's like, we're a bunch of white middle class women that teach this. It's like, you know, and this is not acceptable. And so, you know, at the same time, you know, this idea of really kind of working with intention to have POC people of color, like in the space. And at the same time, one of her friends wanted a relationship with the guitar foundation, had the same idea. So they came together. And wrote up. Wrote for funds to do such a thing. And was accepted. And so she was like, okay, so I'm going to find people of color. To do this. And who's there? And. My co teachers here, they were obviously further along and they were doing their ATT eye. With bats and Baptists like had met someone in a TTI from Richmond. Who has an incredible background and already pretty solid. And she said, I could work with her and they're like, you need to get to know John Taylor. And so then Beth and I began to talk about all of this. And. Yeah, we really began to do this work. And so yeah. And that brings us to now. So right now, well, a few things on this first one, thank you so much for that candid reflection on what brought you to this moment in your background with mindfulness in your life because all of that, what's wonderful about what you shared is how all of these threads see these different conditions are dynamic and changing. Wait, I'm not a spiritual person. Holy buckets, maybe I am. And all the rest of that. And influenced by things like in search of. So you get a gold star for bringing up in search of because I used to watch that too with Leonard Nimoy. Yeah. And all of these different things, which just show how we're a dynamic process. In a constant folding and that is really at the heart of mindfulness is the exploration of that as it is occurring as it is occurring. And so what brought us together here for folks who are listening to this is some probably a couple months ago as of this recording, there was a session that we were both on with a number of other teachers from all over the world and Beth and hi Beth. I know you're listening. Is it dear friend? And in one of the parts where people were sharing, it was moderating this and called on union talked a bit about some of the diversity work that you're doing. Associated with the folks at UCSD and colleagues there. And that immediately. Reignited a fire that had been smoldering for a while as I've taken a bit of a break from podcasting and haven't been putting the spotlight on this stuff as much as I usually do. Around diversity because as you described and as I have seen in various contemplative communities in different kinds of contexts, it tends to be folks who are more affluent and that affluent tends to come from being white in at least in the United States. And that has, that's not good. Isn't that healthy because it's not representative of what the country makeup actually is. And so while it is, where do you set about looking at all? We need to find some people of color. That's a very real thing that is a very real challenge because the roots of this and how it has grown in this way has been more reserved for folks who have the extra money to do these retreats and take this kind of training is over $10,000 to become a teacher and that's an inhibitor. Let alone taking the time off. If you're a single parent or your job is not one where you're flush with lots of cash to be able to spend that, these are the kinds of challenges that exist. It's not just about here's a scholarship. That's great. That's wonderful. But it's also providing some discrimination by itself. And it's more than just the tuition. It's also time off and all this other stuff. There are lots of conditions in there. And so I immediately even sent a note that you may not have seen in the chat on that meeting because I really want to talk to you all dressed up when we did finally connect. And again, thanks to Beth. For making that connection a little more clear because we are connected. Externally anyway. But I want to talk about and this is really the heart of our conversation today is your work around what you described there in how do we make this shift from where we are today and historically have been. Which is something reserved for people of affluence, typically people who are white. And have this more accessible to everyone because it's about being human.

Beth San Diego mindfulness center hi Beth John Taylor Leonard Nimoy Richmond UCSD United States
"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"Me and the other channel, we were invited to take a mindful self compassion class. And we did. And it was amazing. One thing that comes to mind with that is your inner voice and your inner critic in a kind of thing. And for me, it was, you know, not as explicitly like horrible. It's like some of my other classmates, you know? But it was politically correct, right? It knew that inner voice not to really come down on me because that's not really useful, but it was still needed a lot of work, right? And so that really helped me to kind of address that. And I was like, okay, so this is good. And other things. So cutting to the cutting side of the present really quickly, me and my other friend from Richmond, he was invited to come back to the school district. And lead the entire district in mindfulness practices, setting up mindful mindfulness rooms. And all the schools. And so it's become this model, you know, for the other schools that are there. So that's the direction that he went in. And for me, and what I'm doing now. And so I then got a number of mentors from the inner work center. To sit with to have conversations with to explore different things. And we decided that the route that we should go is MBSR. That's the core from which other things have sprung, but that's the would be the court program. And it's like, you know, do you want to do it in Massachusetts or San Diego? We've done most of the training in San Diego. And it's like, yeah, San Diego sounds good. And then there was these prerequisites, you know, as well. And one was a 5 day sign of retreat, right? And I was like, can I get out? I don't want to do that. It's like you got to do that. You got to do it. It's important. And I was like, oh man, so I went through the various morning stages, you know, that you do. Having to say, because not really realizing that I had done, you know, half days or three quarters of days on the tree. And I survived. But me being this extroverted customer. You know, when I brought the idea to my Friends, they were like, yeah, you know, you're gonna be able to sit for 5 days. That's the way. You know, silence. So I went on YouTube and saw people survive ten day silent retreats. And I was like, me being, you know, in my early 50s, been around the planet a few times. I can do anything for 5 days. With me, so horrible. And so I did. And it ended up being one of my very favorite things in the world to do, right? And is a fascinating sort of space that kind of just be on my own with 50 other people, but on my own and to kind of hear what was going on. Internally, you know, as well. And boy, I mean, it was this cacophony. It was just like, oh my God, you know, it's so much noise. And one was the different personalities that I came up, and so the storyteller, you know? And so this constant sort of way. Okay, I'm going to tell family and friends all about this. And so that's story time I was there. And then there was a comedian kind of making fun of different things. And then there was a self doubter and there was like all of these and I was like, my goodness, you know? So it's this fascinating experience. And I came away being like, that is so killer. Everybody needs to do is, you know, when they're ready. And then a few weeks later, I went to teacher training and September of 2017. Somewhere north of the San Francisco Bay Area, earthrise, I think, and finished up my teacher training. It's a beautiful center. Yeah, yeah. And then some of your colleagues, you know, were there leading and that was fascinating. In its way. And I had this incredible experience because I decided to leave initiatives to change to work where I am now. Which is called side by side, and we're works with LGBTQ plus youth throughout Virginia. And so I was changing jobs and the old boss sent me this, you know, I can email while I'm sitting there. And it was like about having to do with some of the conversation issues right. So it was one of these experiences of everything being turned. Oh my God. I'm not going to have any kind of freak out moment. You know, right when Susan is going over something similar, right? I think it was difficult. Difficult experiences or whatever, not pleasant, but challenging experiences. And that happened right there, right? So I was like, it's a win around the class. I said, I have something for you right here. And what that demonstrated was this whole idea of a number of things, kind of like in permanence. Because I was freaking out, but then that kind of came to a crest and fell. I didn't seek to be distracted and I sat with that. Those uncomfortable feelings, right? And then I also noticed start to really kind of get the idea of the pattern and similar kind of situations. There is a similar curve of discomfort to feeling back into an equilibrium again. And I was like, oh wow, this really cool. So that's just one example. This is great example. All week of kind of like aha moments. And then I started teaching go teaching that by early 2018. And. Part of the part of the challenge with that is the, you know, where the incredible cost to kind of like support and moving through the program. Yeah. And but you know, my wife and I were doing well, but we also have three kids. Like in college. And in between each stage, so it's like our kids and then my parents who were their health challenges are showing the pile up. And I was like, I don't know how I can do this. And so the inner work center, they're like, well, let's figure this out. And so they developed a whole program, you know, because of because of my kind of like not being able to really afford this. So they developed a scholarship program not only for me, but for other folks to make the

San Diego Richmond Massachusetts YouTube San Francisco Bay Area Virginia Susan
"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"Mindfulness continues to become more and more integrated into contemporary society, it faces a growing awareness of the relationship between non duality and the realities faced in everyday life. Can we really extinguish suffering without facing acknowledging and working with the external causes and conditions of that suffering? Not just for us, but for others. Inequities, privilege, bias, all play a part in daily life too. And mindfulness may not be living up to its full potential without rolling up its sleeves. Our sleeves. On those realities. John Taylor is certified MBSR teacher with a long meditation and retreat practice. He's an active member of the greater Richmond community, where the primary focus of his work has been on racial equity and reconciliation initiatives, as well as facilitated community dialogs. He is currently serving on the board of the Richmond peace education center, one common unity based in Washington, D.C., and an advisory committee for the chrysalis institute where he teaches mindfulness. John is also been a food security activist who initiated urban farming programs in Newark, New Jersey. John is a graduate of the college of Worcester and lives in north Chesterfield, Virginia with his wife, three children, and three dogs. Our guest today is John Taylor John. Welcome to the podcast good to see you. Oh, great. Thank you so much, Ted. I've been looking forward to this. Me too. And I want to say a little bit about that in a little bit, but I'd like to start with having you tell us a little bit about your journey and what it was that has brought you to mindfulness and keeps you in it. Yeah. Wow, that is an interesting sort of question to ponder because there can be a direct sort of like, this is with primary thing in this house. But naturally it begins long before that. And so I had an interesting sort of entry into the world, my mom was engaged to my biological father. And then decided to we're going to break this off. And so she got him off. And yet she was pregnant with me. And she was in grad school at that time studying social work and got into a feud with her father was a big city lawyer in Detroit. Michigan and she was determined, I'm going to take care of all of this on my own. And so in the first 6 months, I was born, and Cincinnati, Ohio, because she was not. In communication with her parents in particularly her dad. And the first three months I was in a foster home. Well, she was studying. And then the next three months I was in Detroit, Michigan, where my grandparents lived. And that was at an orphanage. For. Women and similar situations, I mean, this was a time where there was a major sort of upset around baby's born out of wedlock. And so it was my grandfather's church was a big baptist church and. So it's there for three months and my grandmother who was African American and yet still there was a connection to Native American culture where her great grandmother know her grandmother was Native American from here from Virginia. And so she was a social worker in town and this being still segregated. It was born in 64. And so the community was tight in a way. And so that combination of the African American close knit community, her being a social worker, her being very in touch with her sort of Native American roots, she had an inkling that there was something wrong. And so the story is, it's this she ran there grabbed me out of that place. It took me to the doctor and tears and the doctor was like, this is a healthy baby boy. 6 months. And so I was raised for the next two and a half years with my grandparents. And as I came to be, I came to understand them as my parent. You are all on my parents, Brett, right? Kind of thing. And my mom and sisters were my siblings is my understanding. And my grandmother, when she could, she would teach spirituality to me. And it was primarily based within Christian tradition. But not completely. You know, she was like in and out of that because of her own sort of experience, life experience. And so that was the first sort of inkling that there was something else that she was the first person to kind of have those conversations with this toddler, really. And I can recall. And then the story developed later about why she came running in there. But we can maybe come back to that. And so from then on, I went to live with my mom and father who adopted me, who I now know as my dad. And then it became more of an intellectual sort of exercise, really. Like spirituality and religion. And by the time I was 5, we started an attending this Presbyterian Church. One because that was the tradition of my mother's family. The women, the woman sign. And. It was a prestigious sort of Protestant understood welcome. Idea. So my dad was like, sure, you know, him being more industrious and sort of the former salesperson that's like, that could be a great way to kind of connect. Interestingly, as Presbyterian churches go, it was seen as an integrated church. It was kind of like one of those really unique kind of things. You know, where there was a diverse group of people, African Americans, Asians, and American folk, primarily white, but there was that aspect to it. But that was really more intellectual to me. I never really kind of got the feeling. I would sit in the various things that they had us all do. And I never kind of like got it, right? I never it was never nothing really turned on in a way.

Richmond peace education cente Washington, D.C. chrysalis institute college of Worcester north Chesterfield John Taylor John John Taylor Detroit John Virginia Michigan Newark Richmond Ted New Jersey Cincinnati Ohio Brett Presbyterian Church
"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one 66 of present moment. Welcome to present moment, mindfulness, practice, and science. I'm Ted meisner. Present moment is a podcast with interviews, conversations, and round table discussions. We speak with mindfulness researchers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals. Teachers about their understanding and methods as they work with students of mindfulness. Authors about their books and interests, and we also speak with everyday practitioners. The website present moment mindfulness dot com has shown notes for each episode along with resource materials. Today we speak with John Taylor about his life and work changing the conversation about diversity and mindfulness communities and teaching institutions.

"john taylor" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"Welcome to the propaganda report. This is monica. Peres with my co-host brad. Banquet our special guest today. Who may need no introduction to our listeners. Brinkley and i both agree. He is an original gangster. In the truth. And podcasting rounds. We both remember early days even though. I'm sure you're younger than i am. But you're way ahead of me on carving a path through the truth and finding what's really hidden behind the trees. My first exposure to you john taylor data entry which. I have mentioned many many many times in the years. Since i i saw that some people might know you from that platform which was tragedy and hope or the podcast piece revolution today. Your signature your marathon. Podcast is your sunday night. Grand theft world and have also shared a screen a few times on union of the unwanted which is a privilege so it was inevitable that we would get together. It is a pleasure to have you say richard grove. Welcome monica. thank you for that Warm genuine spontaneous introduction. I think that's one of the best intros overhead brad..

Peres Brinkley monica brad john taylor richard grove
"john taylor" Discussed on Leading Saints Podcast

Leading Saints Podcast

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Leading Saints Podcast

"As an apostle. You know, as part of his apology, he would make that trademark statement. So when they removed them, you know, William was removed from the quorum, was it didn't Joseph wasn't Joseph in the meeting and say, hey, don't do that. It's not a big deal. We're just family here, or these decisions that the corps of the 12 was just making. The charges were brought against them, and there was a bit of a feeling that this was inappropriate behavior. And so once word got back to William, you know, William, he takes a little time. It takes a couple of weeks to cool off. He'll go back to Joseph and apologize. And what I've noticed is you can do just about anything to Joseph. And he would forgive you. You know, Joseph will have good qualities rough qualities. He's still being polished, but one quality that Joseph has that I think is very impressive is on most instances he would forgive if you just came back and apologized. From a beating with fists to a misspoken word, Joseph to William mcclellan Orson hide, he just says, I frankly forgave them. You know, and that's Joseph's just kind of personality trait. One that I wish I had, you know, how quickly he would forgive. As far as the you mentioned, peculiarities in the 12. What are some stories in that room? Yeah, yeah. You know, and when the 12 was first organized, they organized the core of the 12 by age. And so by their organizing in February by about May they have had this organization where the oldest who is about 35 down to about 23, all corn of the 12, but they really had to determine how the quorum functions and who's in charge. And so what they would often do is they would rotate who was president for a while. And they'd go the senior would be president and then they'd go down to the next senior and down all the way down. So everyone had a turn to conduct and practice being in charge of the meetings. Eventually, Thomas B marsh will be set apart or recognized as president of 12, but this idea of age will stick for a while. And they have trouble getting this idea out of their head that if you're older, you should be in charge. And so when new members when members of the corn 12 fall out and new ones come in, something interesting happens. And they'll call Wilford Woodruff as a member of the quorum of the 12, and John Taylor had been serving for about four months. But because Wilfred Woodruff was older, they leapfrogged him in seniority. And this leapfrog would stay in until about 1861. And so for the next almost 20 years, Wilford Woodruff would have seniority over John Taylor. And it wasn't until Brigham young decided no, this needs to be time in the 12 and not age. Now Brigham is an eclectic individual and he has a lot of interesting ideas. And so he will flip flop on this occasionally..

Joseph William William mcclellan Orson Thomas B marsh Wilford Woodruff Wilfred Woodruff John Taylor Brigham young Brigham
"john taylor" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"So when i was a when. I was a young blogger. People talk about the taylor rule which came from a macro economist. John taylor this is i. Don't know it's like a formula. There's some variables in it. It says what the interest rate should be and for a long time. I don't think the fed ever should've of explicitly followed that. The taylor rule but the understanding was that this guy's work was fluential and that it was You know kind of a way to think about Monetary policy that that people took very seriously and during the great recession in it's sort of most acute phases. Even one thing people would say. Look mathematically like the taylor. Rule says we should be in deeply negative interest rates which were not going to do for various reasons. And that's part of the case for obama's fiscal stimulus. So you know it's like you can do things in the economy in this taylor framework. It's not like a hawk all the time view but it says currently that like the fed should raise interest rates to five percent. Basically right way. And that is a view that was kind of predominant way of thinking until really really really recently would say that look. You can't let inflation get above two percent or stay there for any meaningful period of time because people will come to believe that. There's inflation that there's going to be like right now at the price of cars has gone up a lot so you can have a car buying frenzy right in which everyone who is even vaguely thinking about buying a car is like holy shit car. Prices are going up faster than incomes. I better by car like as soon as i possibly can. And then the prices go up and up and up and like we're in a disaster so the fed needs select slammed the brakes right now even if it throws people out of work we need to make it that like you just cannot afford a car and that's the only way we're going to get this back done and it sounds crazy but like i think it's important to understand that like that was how we were doing things like really really recently that like not just it would be undesirable to have three to four percent price growth but that it would be like apocalyptic and at any cost we had to stop. That mapping. yeah. And i think the a critique of the kind of inflation targeting regime which involved the taylor rule that became influential started kind of early in the two thousand tons of his wasn't starting with the economic blogosphere about people like yourselves reinvent many others. Our were very influential in pushing. The argument was that the inflation target becomes like ceiling. Which is another way of saying about you. Know your target metaphor which is to say that if you get that nervous about inflation being over target. You're not actually aiming at a target. You have a ceiling now. Inflation will always be a little bit below and this powerpoint between nineteen. You know if you're always a little bit below target you can actually start to drift down inflation expectations and thus inflation will drop and thus rates have drop lower and you end up in this kind of negative dynamic where you're always on the under heated side. You're always like in the wrong gear on the slow and you're always never quite getting the economy back to speed as quickly and as fast robustly issue cut and so having much warren explicit acknowledgement that. The fed wants to air on both sides understanding that on average it will hit its target gives it opportunity to take periods like right now and instead of just saying like the numbers of the number like the equations you know now through now we gotta we gotta stop everything and slam on the brakes and put the economy into a quasi recession. Slow down you can actually look at it much more holistically and say okay is. This sectoral is transitory. Is this going to decline. You know we still retain the tools to slow down economic activity. But it gives us a framework understand. Like if we actually think this is transitory if this reflecting economy that is coming back to life so rapidly it's causing some bottlenecks in supply chain issues but it will resolve itself. Well you know we have the bandwidth to sit this out and wait a little bit to take action which is important to give the economy time especially for a recession like this so i wanna pivot a little bit and ask you about kind of big picture theory because you know in addition to being a a great monetary policy noar. You're the author of a book freedom from the market which we talked about on this show and you know it's Well it's not about this. But it's about you know the limits of a market society and neoliberalism and i always get the sense that part of the disjuncture between what you and i have been talking about here and the way some progressive activists things is that this doesn't sound freedom from the market marquis enough to them like we're talking about solving problems and making the world a better place but like nothing has been de commodified. Nothing has been redistributed necessarily from anybody. Where like saying some guys on a board need to make somewhat better technocratic decisions and then people can just like get jobs more easily or higher pay and so i wonder i mean because you you really in this space you know. That's like critical of the market society. And how do you how do you think about that. I mean who do you hear from. How do you talk to people. So there's definitely a. I don't think it is reflected in mainstream journalism or progressive activism. But there is a sort of marxist critique of of left cantinas. I would insert myself a left kensington in my political orientation my economic orientation. There's a kind of like marxists left. Critique which says like this ultimately won't work because the battles between employers employees and and you can't massage system that's prone to collapse and i think that's outside this conversation and certainly i think we can do better on keynesian economics and then maybe we'll figure that other stuff out later. Yeah i mean. That's not really what i mean. I mean more. Just the sort of psychic emotional. You know interpretation that. I think people want to. They want to fight the bad guys on one level. And also they want to bolster so we. There was a version not that they were super left wing but like there was a version in in late obama of like a progressive structuralist critique of the economy that was like look participation has fallen in this shows. We need new investments.

taylor fed John taylor obama warren marquis kensington
"john taylor" Discussed on Niner Faithful Radio

Niner Faithful Radio

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"john taylor" Discussed on Niner Faithful Radio

"So i don't think it's gonna work But patrick willis and john taylor got into the forty niners hall of fame that was announced during the state of the franchise of chapin Last week I believe or like last week garlic a little bit before And so they both did interviews inside them for this week so it has something to talk about And stuff so. I watch vocal on this morning just to kind of get a refresher in both really good. patrick willis talked about The sm like if he if he remembered when he last wore the jersey like the first time he will report Jersey in the second time he wore Blossom your jersey hammered. That had a little bit about that. He talked about they asked him. About warner andrey greenlaw. And how. They're like a good deal linebacker. Do in how that change and he said he really think they're playing really well and relax what they were doing. inside He talked about his feet a little bit and stuff which Always forget he had a lot of feet problems on. He mentioned that Quite a bit Iras how big of a deal. That was back then But yeah he. I guess he had to get a surgery on one any just kept having like bunions on his toe with big. Tell what he uses a push off of And stuff so. He said he had had a lot of problems And it was really hard for him. I'm during the time But yeah i mean there wasn't a whole like there's a lot of cool stuff on it but a lot of it was just like reminiscing about the days. I didn't realize he was a cowboys. Fan growing up. I didn't realize that because you mentioned that a couple of times. He said it was weird. He got draft like it was weird to being opponents uniform and he was playing but he said it felt right He talked about Some different things just like they ask questions on receiver actually played a video. Might be are now. We're going to get audio. That s the problem Comment we never got audio on that other little video. I've played I did turn up the volume I don't think i could all the way it's going to destroy my ears because it's going to go through here So yeah. I don't know and i don't want unplugging want wanted to be like a weird echo because i do have the for To monitor the stream do twitch so yeah That is pretty much on patrick. Was he talked about some other stuff. he's having his own business now Name and stuff like that in this. What he's been up to now in They asked about. It just has about a random lot of random. Stop if lead game every show Playing here About a lot of different lot of random stuff Whatnot man. He was so good just watching him. I just kept thinking about having bowman playing linebacker position. There were just so good as a duo is crazy They did ask about Well speaking a little bit John taylor because john taylor other interview To a bit Did ask combat john taylor. Because they were interviewing him next and unresolved interviews and stuff and He he just had a lot of respect for him in a lot of fun Talking about that and how would have been cool to be teammates of him and stuff in Just watching him go. 'cause like the all know the big names here like joe and steven jerry and stuff like that So he's always like well. This guy's also really really good And stuff like that. So it's pretty cool yeah Men i really wish like i could play it because it have been so much better to kind of like react to it. There's don't remember All the questions Pretty simple pretty straightforward He's just he's in a good Seems like he's in a good place now. he He got. I guess he got the phone call that he is going to be into When he was flying somewhere and He missed the call from jed which i thought was pretty. Funny that I guess he got Tax or something in Is up and got roped into what was going on so i thought that was very funny. what else They just reminded me how much. Sometimes i miss them but he was really good. They'll get wrong. I love the group. We have now but man when having bowman that defense something out sometimes They're so good Yeah i mean nothing to to to crazy About him that we could talk about Now did they ask you about no. I only be active about Trae i don't think so. The ad they ass. John taylor road trae yet. Actually get answer Actually like taylor with a little bit of a better more lively interview. Been well as well as bad. But you could tell taylor was a little bit more comfortable in the interview That would have more accepted. I didn't know So i like that whatnot Yeah i mean that was pretty much willis's interview. I mean that into crazy They i mean he just. He remembers it Rumors his career obviously in his all that stuff in he did a good job and he has his own business now on. So he's doing it i do. I do think. I still follow him on instagram. He has imposed he post. But like some of it's always gets lost in the instagram algorithm crap. So i don't see a lot of what he's doing But yeah he's been. Yeah you just been chilling on basically so Yeah i guess that's really it Her.

patrick willis john taylor niners hall warner andrey greenlaw chapin steven jerry John taylor bowman cowboys jersey Jersey patrick jed joe Trae taylor willis
"john taylor" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"john taylor" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"802 831 on 1.5. Okay. Anthony book, always begging Governor Murphy, please extend the restaurant curfew for the Super Bowl and Valentine's Day. Don't make us go home at 10 o'clock before the game is over, so that maybe we give these places a chance to get some business Some desperately needed business on this brings up the question. Would you go to a bar or restaurant to watch the Super Bowl? If Governor Murphy extended the curfew until midnight, And while we're at it, give me the best bar or restaurant to watch the Super Bowl in if you're going to recommend the place Peters and Lawrence in New Jersey one on 1.5, a Peter I would so No, Because I worked. I worked money. You would say no. Why? Why would you say no? Um Sometimes that you you got two sides rooting for the teams. You have one team. Being round. Your team is losing right? Do you really want to sit in that bar and feel like a smoke? I've done it. I've done it. Yeah, but but that's part of the game that you're going into. You know, I mean, that's part of you. You know, You can't worry about that. You're there to eat, drink, be with your friends, right? Don't drink anymore. Okay, But what about those who do? I don't feel comfortable. All right. Thanks for the call The New Jersey one on 1.5. All right, one ain't gonna do a 31 on 1.5 see, like, you know if you missed the bar atmosphere Would Ugo it? And the idea that you finally get to get a night out. You finally get to go and enjoy mean those who go to bars or restaurants to watch the Super Bowl. Anyway, you've got it. You got to come up with one dynamic reason to get you out there. You know what? Especially now that all they've got overcomes for us the rules ago as opposed to just go any friend's house and you know, it's an uphill battle. Exactly. Because say, you do want to go to this part. You do go to the bar with friends. Well, are you gonna drive there? Are you going to get a d? D. Are you gonna count on uber or you're just not going to drink while you're there. When are you gonna drink? Exactly? So you have to prepare for that. And you know, Uber's gonna be super surcharge and is already such a hassle. David, let me tell you trying to get it. I took an uber twice during Cove. It And it stinks. Really? Yeah, I just I mean, it's zoo. This shit you don't you do it by yourself. You can't Sheriff brand there anymore, right? No, like I did with my girlfriend once. Both conceited and just T go to a party for the Fourth of July and then to go into just to go out on the town in Montclair once And it's it's It's tough. I mean, it Z already kind of expensive to begin with, and then it's like, all right. Gotta wear the mask in the car the entire time, and it's just a whole bunch of other things, too. Where is like I could just drive to my buddy's house. Leave the car there crash on the couch after getting super drunk when my bets hit during the Super Bowl. You got to find a way to get people out there crying when your best don't hit during the Super Bowl. Exactly. So it's you got to find. I mean bars or some of the most ingenious, you know, intuitive marketers there aren't they always find a way with some sort of, you know, shot, wheel or incentive to get people in the building they'll find during the Super Bowl. You're all the profits that are going on. You could play the squares. You could do all kinds of stuff in the played squares for the first time last year. And it is so much fun. I mean, I mean, I gamble have alleged wit anyway. No, but it was fun anyway. It's fun being like God, I really hope the scores ended a 0 to 1. It's it's It's the little things that you care about. I went to Ah, I went to how it's during Super Bowl party. Really? What year Gonna wind speed 88, The Joe Montana John Taylor famous comeback drive. Really? I was the drive game, the Bangles and just knowing I'm in a conversation with Gary and Ronnie Limo driver on while we're talking and drinking and talking, and I'm just watching the drive didn't procurement each one another dagger in my heart because I really wanted the Bangles. The winning really, What's the big deal? I don't know why I just at the time like a good idea. You know they were the underdog. Uh, but, uh, that the squares and I think I ended up with like, eight and zero. Like the worst possible square idea. Absolutely. No shot. Square was the one I got. Wow, that's always tough. It's just funny because it's like, all right, I'm gonna get this random numbers for each quarter. What an incredible drive. Oh, yeah, it was that the was that the was the Dallas Clark catch? Was that that know that when I was the cat, that was the catch. I was 81. He died of a less Dwight Clark Dwight, but no Dwayne Clarke. I think it was But it's a corner. This was John Taylor. They caught the 1988. But you know, everything is coming down to this one Drive, and Joe Montana takes the field Joeckel. There's there's that he's in the huddle..

New Jersey Joe Montana Governor Murphy John Taylor Dwight Clark Dwight Anthony Dallas Peters Montclair David Lawrence Square Gary Dwayne Clarke
The Bible That Leaks Oil

Thank God I'm Atheist

06:10 min | 3 years ago

The Bible That Leaks Oil

"Well Dan yes does. Have you ever heard of the Oil Bible Lael by Dan Oil? It feels like I should have. Oh goodness gracious Dan. Can we say with the Texas all the whole Jerry Pierce and John Taylor has been traveling? The Nation Dan with the Oil Bible. Okay now let me tell you this Bible when it sort of magically secretes oil. Oh my God right like Ooh from it is clear this oil just flows so gross and they whenever there so apparently part of the the the trick here is the it doesn't actually seep oil when they're traveling only seeps oil at home but people visit them at home in order to encounter the Seeping Oil Bible and They yeah people have attributed healings of course An any pretty much anything you could imagine has been attributed to The Bible It's performing. Miracles is what it is performing miracles. They give away vials of the oil and they've they're growing famous and making a lot of money off the Oil Bible. Well the good folk good folk at let me see. What is this news organization? That's the little local their local news or the Chattanooga Times free press okay because in I. I assume somewhere there in Tennessee in Dalton. If that's a place in Tennessee the town is called Dalton. Okay then the times free press decided they were going to do some investigative reporting. Oh okay so. As any good organization news organization would do so. They started asking around and they got a source at the Dalton. Tractor supply which says that Pierce Right Would consistently go in and and by gallons of mineral okay And but but company policies prevented prohibited him from telling anything more specific than that. But that's pretty. That's pretty damning right there. Yeah so the Times. Free press paid for a series of chemical analyses of the oil that they were giving out the oil that was available at the Dalton. Tractor supply okay. Sure and they sent these analysis or these tests to the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Okay that compared the samples and they said that it was the same thing. Oh shocking oil. Petroleum derived and the results quote strongly suggests that oil sample is mineral oil. Just like the stuff for sale. Right okay And then the second test that compared the chemical composition of Pierce's oil to the product tractor supply found a nearly exact match. They're doing mass spectrometry. Is that what they're doing it? The article doesn't get into such thing and using a gas chromatograph. What are they doing? Frank I don't know all right fine. There Ministry though began in two thousand sixteen in the week after Donald TRUMP'S INAUGURATION. And these these two guys So that they had a powerful religious experience As oil began coming out of the Bible. Now these guys are just clearly. Just fucking liars. It's obvious just charlatan right right. They're just soaking a Bible. They dropped a Bible into a VAT of oil one time and then just made a claim about it and then to realize we'll fuck all just just keep doing this and their followers. The people who've been healed people who've had deep religious experiences Are predictably sticking to their guns drinking with them. Yeah even though clearly. It's a fraud. It's a complete and utter fraught. So the the Oil Bible. Let me tell you something. Bats heads new. Here's the thing about human psychology for most humans. It is more tolerable to to believe some to to deal with the cognitive dissonance of believing something you know has been proven true then to change your mind. It's too painful for most people to change their mind and so they would rather deal with being idiots essentially believing something that has been proven false. Yeah well it's you know it's just it's the it's the media. Yeah it's it's Tanic right the devils newspaper Chattanooga Times free press you know yeah. I'm sure that that's satanist. The Lucien Greaves Editor in chief. The Times free press is it good on this local news. I know a great right again. Well done guys. How do they even have any money to do any testing? Probably all pro bono right probably including the reporting. Yes indeed okay. There's there's no money for independent newspapers anymore. That's what we're getting. That's the

Oil Bible Dan Oil Dalton Jerry Pierce Chattanooga Times Times Donald Trump Tennessee University Of Tennessee Texas Chattanooga Lucien Greaves Fraud John Taylor Frank Editor In Chief The Times