21 Burst results for "John Stole"

Will this new bill save the US Postal Service in time for the election?

Chris Krok

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Will this new bill save the US Postal Service in time for the election?

"The White House and House Democrats don't appear too close to an argue agreement on a bill to fund the US Postal Service correspondent John Stillness has the latest in a statement, The White House said it strongly opposes a House Democratic bill on postal service policies ahead of the November 3rd election. And would recommend that President Donald Trump veto it, the White House Office of Management and Budget said. Instead of reforming the US Postal Service to ensure its continued viability in the modern economy, the resolution would arbitrarily give the Postal Service $25 billion in emergency taxpayer funding without linking that funding to either the covert 19 pandemic or the upcoming election. Bill is expected to come up for a vote in the House on Saturday. John Stole nous Washington

White House White House Office Of Manageme Us Postal Service Bill President Donald Trump John Stillness United States John Stole Washington
White House threatens veto of Democrats' Postal Service bill

Ben Shapiro

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

White House threatens veto of Democrats' Postal Service bill

"House Democrats don't appear close to an agreement on a bill to fund the US Postal Service correspondent John Stillness has the latest in a statement, The White House said it strongly opposes a House Democratic bill on postal service policies ahead of the November 3rd election. And would recommend that President Donald Trump veto it, the White House Office of Management and Budget said. Instead of reforming the US Postal Service to ensure its continued viability in the modern economy, the resolution would arbitrarily give the Postal Service $25 billion in emergency taxpayer funding without linking that funding to either the covert 19 pandemic or the upcoming election. Bill is expected to come up for a vote in the House on Saturday. John Stole

Us Postal Service White House Office Of Manageme White House Bill President Donald Trump John Stillness John Stole United States
"john stole" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:08 min | 2 months ago

"john stole" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"AMC said it expects to open 2/3 of its more than 600 US Theatre locations by September 3rd, with AMC opening more than 100 of its cinemas in the US next Thursday, August 20th. AMC closed all its theatres in the US back in March ends the Corona virus pandemic took hold. Three opening has been delayed several times. In the reopened theaters. Guests must wear masks and the theaters will have lowered capacity and upgraded ventilation systems to mark the company's 1/100 anniversary. Tickets on opening day will be 15 cents, and that's about what it costs to see a movie in the 19 twenties. I'm John Stole this clueless is coming back. And this time the spotlight is on Dion Davenport, a rebooted Siri's of the Classic 1995 film is now in development at Peacock, NBC's streaming service. There's also been a clueless TV, Siri's and an off Broadway musical. I'm an Cade's A conservative judges confirmed today. That's awesome. I never get sick of winning. I'm with you, though I am worried about this Favored nation idea, the one where country install socialist price controls directly from countries with socialized medicine. Their policies will mean fewer new cures less access to treatments and lost jobs for Americans. Gotta believe our guy will back us out of that. He puts America first paid for by a Americans for tax reform visit No price controls dot org's As a kid. I wanted to explore every inch of the world. But then I contracted bacterial meningitis. My kidneys shut down! My spleen burst. Both of my legs were amputated below the knees. But I didn't give up on my dreams. I meddled in the Paralympics. I'm a motivational speaker, published author dancing with the stars runner up and training to compete in the next Paralympic Games. Help kids live their dreams just like me. Put your money where The miracles are give here Children's Miracle Network Hospital. Honest, unafraid, respectful and really not sure how to feel right now. I'm scratching my head right now. I do that often. I'm scratching my head right.

AMC US America Siri bacterial meningitis Dion Davenport John Stole Miracle Network Hospital Paralympics NBC Peacock
"john stole" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"john stole" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Making history testing vaccines on Jane Johnson, Congressmen and civil rights icon John Lewis is making history as the first black lawmaker to Lyon stage in the Capitol Rotunda Linear Kenyan reports on an afternoon of honors. The tributes began with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell today way, pray and trust that this peace maker himself now rest in peace and from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is an official personally, very said honor to welcome my colleague John Lewis back to the capital to welcome his family and his many friends to acknowledge his sacred life, John Lewis, who served more than three decades in Congress and who waged a lifelong battle for civil rights. Died of pancreatic cancer. He was 80. Linda Kenyan Washington Visit to North Carolina President Trump is noting today's star to the biggest test yet often experimental Covad 19 vaccine, and he's predicting more successes in the near future. By the end of this year. We're going in terms of the vaccine, I think in terms of therapeutics even sort of than that. Therapeutics, meaning you go and you give somebody whether it's transfusion or shots or whatever it may be, and they heal and they heal quickly. A corona virus outbreak among the Miami Marlins 13 infections prompted the cancellation of two big league games tonight is John Stole, NIST tells US Dodgers pitcher David Price, who opted out of playing this season criticized Major League Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred for allowing games to continue despite the outbreak when he tweeted now we really get to see if MLB is going To put Playershealth first, Angels manager Joe Maddon said. I think it's really important to trace how it occurred. That's the one thing you need before you jump to a lot of conclusions, and Marlins manager Don Mattingly admitted. It's fair to say my guys are concerned about things. Johnson It's time to check the roads from the draft. Traffic.

John Lewis Miami Marlins Jane Johnson Capitol Rotunda Linear Mitch McConnell pancreatic cancer House Speaker Nancy Pelosi John Stole Senate Rob Manfred Trump Don Mattingly Congress North Carolina Major League Baseball Joe Maddon Dodgers David Price
Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben's, Rooted in Racist Imagery, to Change

WSJ What's News

08:51 min | 4 months ago

Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben's, Rooted in Racist Imagery, to Change

"It's a seismic shift for a more than century old brand with a controversial history today, the Pepsico unit that sells aunt Jemima products, says it's dropping the name and image that's long been used on its pancake mixes and syrups because of its origins in racist imagery of black people also today the Mars Company said it would change its uncle Ben's brand and Conagra said it's putting its Mrs Butterworth's brand under review. They're just some of the companies that are reexamining their histories, products and messaging amid nationwide calls for racial justice and Equality. Joining me now to discuss how big brands are responding or Wall Street Journal, business columnist John Stole and reporter Jennifer Maloney. So, let's start with the big decision today from Pepsico to retire. Aunt Jemima products. This is a huge change. The brand dates back to the late eighteen hundreds Jennifer. What's changed the company's opinion on using the imagery and the name here? What did you hear from Pepsi? They say that in the wake of the killing of George Floyd they recognize that and Jemima's origins are based on racial stereotype, and that while they have made changes over the years to update the brand in a manner that they said was intended to be appropriate and respectful that they now realizes that those changes aren't enough just to look back at the history of this brand. It dates back to eighteen eighty nine. It was inspired by popular song called Old Aunt. My that was typically performed in minstrel shows by a white man. Man in black face, and the creators of the pancake brand hired a former enslaved woman named Nancy Green to be the spokeswoman. She made her debut at a world's fair in Chicago in eighteen ninety three singing in telling stories and making pancakes outside booth, designed to look like giant flour barrel, and the packaging has featured an image of a black woman. Originally, she wore a head scarf the over the years. That image has evolved in thousand, nineteen, hundred nine. The company updated the imagery and replaced the headscarf with Pearl earrings analyst caller. And this isn't the only brand that's acted in recent years or even recent weeks at this point to remove offensive stereotypes, but this moment really feels like something of a sea change in the way, companies are thinking about an also responding more immediately to calls for Racial Justice John. Do you see an increase in responsiveness on the part of major companies in this particular moment? I think the era that we're in right now is kind of. Let's turn over the most obvious things that we can do it. My mind went to completely different. People grew, but you think about the Washington Redskins for instance I? I mean for years. There's been complaints about anti-obama for years. There's been complaints about the Washington redskins and it takes a moment like this for a company to say okay. We need to do the obvious thing that is right by our consumers and our employees. You know you have to remember like it's not just the the consumers and the shelves at stores that the PepsiCo executives or executives at other companies are worried about. They're worried about. Their employees are workforces their stockholders. There's a lot of constituents here that they have to think about before making a move in any other direction and I think. We learned a couple years ago when Nike took a proactive move and canceled a shoe that Colin Kaepernick said would potentially be offensive to the black community. It really was a line in the sand. Where I think the company said. Let's err on the side of caution. It is interesting to see. Not just PepsiCo, but other brands thinking about everything from the way that they advertise market to the way that they speak internally to employees to whether they're not. They're going to sell or buy facial recognition that could potentially be disadvantageous to certain racists. The Big Litmus test for me is whether or not or companies stopped doing stupid stuff. I mean it's amazing. How many companies just put their foot in it over and over again on issues that most most Americans would say that just was not a good. Add to even think about. Our ad got leaked. oops, you're like. Wait a minute. Greenlighted the idea in the first place, so you know I you've seen. Companies create chief diversity officers, the board of directors getting involved there will be an extra layer scrutiny for quite some time on every brand in existence, and then on top of that all of the initiatives going forward. Yeah and to that point, Jennifer. It seems that we are seeing an uptick in companies that are responding more immediately. We also heard from the company behind the Uncle Ben's brand today. Right Mars which makes uncle. Ben's Rice told The Wall Street Journal that it will change its ankle brand. It doesn't know exactly how or when, but they say that they're evaluating all possibilities, and they have committed to making a change. We also saw. Saw earlier this year that land lakes dropped the indigenous woman Mia. It had long featured on its packaging. The company said that that was meant to better reflect its culture. She had first appeared in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, eight, and kneeling in sort of stereotypical clothing and clutching Orlando Container, so we're seeing some of these iconic brands that sort of have drawn on racial stereotypes, really doing some soul-searching right now, I mean. When the NFL. Reverses Course on activities that for a long time it tried to stand at standard arm's length from like kneeling during the national anthem, and now has reversed course as aggressively as they have. It shows the force of the moment that we are in, and it also shows I think finally a level of recognition that a big part of the employee base in the NFL or a big part of the consumer base at Pepsi are not just black. They're also empathetic and agreeing with. The social progress that has kind of being signalled with the demonstrations with the constant drumbeat of black lives, matter or whatever other people group. Legitimately marginalized or offended by age old practices. And how big of a role is the public pressure playing here I mean not just demonstrators and. who are out in the streets, but also pressure for these companies from within from their own employees we've seen employees feel more empowered, and and far more bold to say what they feel. And to get the discussion from a discussion to actual action, I mean I think I've done interviews for twenty years about discussions. We've got to have a discussion. We've got a dialogue. We've got to get this out into the public. Square and I think people are saying. Hey, enough is enough. It's like we gotta do something. It's like when people complain. After a mass shooting about thoughts and prayers, thoughts and prayers are great, but they're not going to bring back my son or they're not gonna change this happening again. We need action and I think employees are starting to say. You can put the statement out. You can put the tweet out. You can change the your your your twitter profile whatever you WanNa do for a day or two, but what are going to be the steps to lasting and meaningful change. The employees are definitely starting to feel that way. Yeah, it also seems like there's a much bigger call to action. Now I mean I've spoken to co workers and friends about all the messages were getting via email from companies. You wouldn't think would normally weigh in on issues of racial justice, but. It seems like this is a time where people are saying. Need more than just words, so is what we're seeing from big brands enough. Well, this is what big companies across the United States and beyond are grappling with right now. Their own workforce's are demanding significant structural change. And so you see companies sort of racing, not just to put out statements to supporting black lives matter movement, but. To introduce new initiatives policies in terms of hiring in terms of charitable, giving in terms of you know trying to promote people of color up through the ranks of the organization diversify their boards, and I think we're going to see more as the days and weeks progress, but we already have seen a number of announcements from companies to pledging. Actions and and trying to put money where their mouth is.

Pepsico Jennifer Maloney Washington Redskins Pepsi BEN The Wall Street Journal Conagra Chicago NFL Nancy Green George Floyd Mars Company United States Jemima Mrs Butterworth John Stole Nike Reporter Colin Kaepernick Analyst
"john stole" Discussed on The Canine Paradigm

The Canine Paradigm

04:04 min | 4 months ago

"john stole" Discussed on The Canine Paradigm

"Out there, saying I should pick the smarter dogs and I think that's a huge mistake, but. I won't even say smarter dog because I couldn't be in Bryant Error Laugh at one time when people do that, they'll say of the smart dog, and I'm like no I. Just want the manual to the dog. Like which one are you? Are you an inference dog, or are you a memory dog? And then I s the Cordingley, but the. No, no I would love to do it. With what you bring up a great point, people and information, because like you I used to do the same thing as the dumb dog made me happy, and it still does, but now I. Know isn't dumb dog hat. She has good members at a smart dog that has inference, and now I have to be smarter as a trainer to deal with it, because sometimes as we both know, we don't get to Get to pick yeah, I guess I'll smarter by the dog. Sometimes they teach us how to be better trying to sometimes, that's the that's the takeaway from it. Hey gents. Thank you both so much for your time. It's been a fun conversation and I think what's been good. Is that I think two hours ago. People might say hey, cabinet, Jerry sort of at odds on the way they do things and I think that we've just sort of to hash it out over the last hour and a half that actually not really it's. It's the same sort of thing you both achieving great results using very similar process with. With Moina nuanced differences preferences, and I think what I would like to do. In the whole reason. We wanted to do this sort of set the tone for discourse that goes down like this right so when you say someone out there that you know. Maybe you say what they do and you go. Hey, I'm curious about that rather than going. You're fucking idiot for the way you do that. Come on! Turn. You. took it out and actually we're doing the same thing, and I know you guys don't do that, but I think that has followings that may be looking. Go you know one guy does things one way the other does the other, and it probably turns out that you know. Success usually follows a similar path. No matter no matter who's doing it, so thank you both I. Appreciate it and. Not, sorry guys off. Jerry doing what he does? Yeah we can, you can tell. There's mutual respect all around the room which is great and I've to add to that aubain furiously, nodding my head in the background, listening to both of you talking. People can't say because it's a podcast, but I've been largely silent through these just listening to you. John Stole because I love what you're saying you both talking from the knowledge base that you've gathered over many years of working in being in the field and hurting your out, and it's been absolutely fantastic, really appreciated it, and I'm grateful for pet for organizing this to get it on on the show because it's I think this is very important episode for a lot. Lot of people who are getting involved in detection work to to listen to into reference. I think you gentlemen really appreciate everything you're doing and spending time us today. Guys guys, thank you as well for kind words, and it's a mutual I. I'm glad we got to us down. Have a little in depth conversation. Kind of conversations always are useful in the end for everybody getting to know each other well I know. We were scheduled to teach like four detection conversation. That was before the apocalypse on. The boys from Australia to like. Bring us together, yeah. Be Deal just solving to solving America's problems wanted. Oh! All right that's it for another episode of the Ken Paradigm as always feel like what he plays. Great share, subscribe do that through whatever subscription service you download from. If you want to support the show the best way to do that by Patriarch Three Bucks a month. Get you an extra episode or you know you could directly send Lamborghini if you pay can. We can give you the address. Address to to Nice in other way before the show ease to blossom, cool merch that we have jump onto tastes, bring check us out there, and if you want to get in contact with us the best way to do that east to post something in the discussion group, or if it's a personal thing, send us an email info. At the Canine Paradigm Dot Com. That's IT, Glenn Music. I..

Jerry sort Bryant Lamborghini Moina Glenn Music John Stole Australia America
"john stole" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

04:17 min | 6 months ago

"john stole" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"And my child I threaten. Your child missed your stop. I can give you a month of free lunches. If you want I could take Jamaican beef patties on Friday okay. I'll pay for them to eat. That's where my son eats meat there. He just launch your husband on the phone here now too. Yeah what happened there? What happened high. I told her I was going to start Chelsea. And I I really didn't mean come out that way I are. You want your son and your daughter. Okay I do not. I do not know child listen. I hated management courses right now for other things but that's another couple of more. See I thought little cody was telling lies. Or something Sir pocketing the money and maybe go to the hotline anyway. I duNno period. You're not gonNA report me. Are you miss? I'm not gonNA tell you my kid but I'm not GONNA report you lose my job over this before you catch you. I didn't say anything claiming anything my Kate. Okay let's listen. We had sloppy Joe on the menu for today. I was GONNA pull your kids off the line and tell them they couldn't eat until we got our money handle delinquent payments. You can't expect us to run and not send us anything saying picking up the telephone and calling people talking ten minutes civilized and let them know. I tried to call you in a civilized manner. Just now well. That's why we're on the talk. I'm sorry but I needed to discipline your kids. Okay you discipline. My children got me thinking about that. How do you mind right? Would I rule with an iron spatula? I am John Stole for the President of the kitchen committee more on the new sheriff in town and handle things my way new shoving Tom. Doing things people ask you to. I understand okay. I'll tell you what we'll do. We're just going to stop right here because I love. You can call murder Danielle. This is scary from Elvis Duran in the morning. Show come to now. What do you WanNa tell your husband kill you? I hurt you so bad when you get home tonight exclusive. Hotel tap was recorded with permission. Granted by all participants rain phone tap on Durant in the morning show Alvis in the morning. Show Cardi B. Look at that. That was that was what three weeks ago and never get those. It never gets old anyway. Even though it's been a long and very very trying week we've had such a great week. It is Friday but we're not done even though we're off on all all the radio stations except for one in about twenty minutes. We're doing our bonus hour. If you want to join US online you can listen to us. Z one. Hundred New York on your iheartradio Effort River New York. We're live because we're doing is e one hundred show coming up so make sure you're listening. He thought about what you're going to be watching on TV this weekend like why. What's your number one thing this weekend? Well you gotTa Watch tomorrow. The one world together at home concert is going to be amazing. Yeah that's all we need fifteen hours all right. We'll be back for a couple of other thoughts right after this. Cvs Pharmacy delivers and right now to meet the needs of the current health situations. They're offering free one to two day. Delivery.

cody Durant US Cvs Pharmacy Elvis Duran iheartradio Effort River New Y Chelsea Kate Joe John Stole murder New York President Alvis Danielle Tom
Decade in Review: Tech and the Corner Office

WSJ Tech News Briefing

11:59 min | 10 months ago

Decade in Review: Tech and the Corner Office

"John is you wrote in your piece a decade ago. The world was waiting for the other shoe to drop. We had just experienced the financial crisis of two thousand eight and we were just getting back on our feet as an economy. What did the job of CEO look like back then? Yeah I think there was a lot more concern concern about just the general fragility of the economy. Could we trust regulators. Could we trust interest rates. Setters could we trust the SORTA heard of the fabric of what was holding together the global economy with what was going on the EU. There was general distrust of all of that ten years ago. I mean you didn't know if we were going to go through a double dip. Recession financial crisis had been just so traumatic and it did touch every industry that took several years to really emerged. Emerged from that with the sense of okay. This economies rolling we can begin to invest again begin to hire again and begin to think about innovation in leaps and bounds. mm several years versus just trying to make incremental innovation so investment started to roll sometime well after the financial crisis but yes definitely the beginning of the decade was was a given worrisome time for NCO energy industry. Well let's breakdown sort of piece by piece. The technological factors that have driven some of the intense change. We've seen in the corner corner office. First and foremost probably social media in two thousand nine. It was in its earliest stages. How is social media change? What we expect from CEOS? Yeah I don't I think we necessarily expect them all to be tweeting and on facebook and Instagram as much as we expect them to be responsive to how small and how fast the world has gotten with its response to crisis or trends or what's popular anything from the most recent examples with Peleton the exercise company and some of their ads. That didn't go over too well to earlier. This year with Boeing Definitely got into some real hot water with some of the technologies on on their planes and some of the fatalities that were related to not having everything in order there and then in front of that you had a lot of. CEO's being and pulled into a tumultuous time with the president of the United States who likes to tweet obviously and that creates a whole nother layer of communication and skill. Oh that the CEO didn't have to have you know five six seven ten years ago Slight miscalculation in the way the company presents itself on social doesn't communicate fast enough can lead to a barrage of criticism not just newspapers in in in in the marketplace but just in general arena of Public Opinion Union because it's all become so condensed on social media. Social media's also heightened this expectation of corporate social responsibility it allows companies to engage more directly with their customers customers and it pushes. CEO's to be Social Justice Warriors. Who have been some of the winners and losers in this arena? Yeah I think by all means in any company that has a strong front on issues like climate change gender equality issues. That are not always gonNA make a big difference in the ledger in in the dollars and cents but issues that are really near and dear to a particular millennials who are our shopping much more with their hearts than just their wallops these days. They're making decisions based on companies. They believe in you know one of the one of the interesting test. Cases Has Been Nike Shoe Company. That is ubiquitous that has been built on the strength of its affiliation with athletes in performance and recently they've had to make some tough decisions and this is obviously around on Colin Kaepernick An NFL player. WHO's not even playing anymore? But it's associated with the brand almost as much these days Michael Jordan not quite but He's on a level that very few athletes have been affiliated with Nike in the past. And that's because they've stood behind him. They've advertised in his favor. They've said that the steps that he took when he was on the football field kneeling the national anthem basically equating that to courageous I step on his part now. Recently the companies had to be very mindful of the the fact that not everybody clearly likes kneeling during the national anthem. They have a broad customer base and they need to be able to play in both the arena of understanding the sensitivity of of the part of its firebase. That doesn't agree with that. But the fact that most of its most loyal and passionate buyers will back Colin Kaepernick and so they've had to make business decisions that you know sometimes isolating ostracized. Part of. It's it's it's buyer base in order to continue to the edgy and continue to be progressive and continue to look like it's on the social edge versus being behind some of these issues so recently with a with a tennis shoe that Colin Kaepernick thought was offensive. The betsy rush you they. They had to pull that from the market again. I think it was about fearing backlash on social media. It wasn't worried necessarily worry about getting hit with boycotts and things like that. I mean social media is so powerful right now and. CEO's are are clearly very aware that they can be criticized heavily in a heartbeat. I'm talking with John. Stole of the Wall Street Journal Moving on here John. There's also a different kind of pressure. The rise of the Fang companies facebook Apple Amazon Netflix. Google the five most popular tech stocks out there. They've developed lt normal power. Can you tell us about their influence on business decisions. Yeah I think it's fascinating to talk about the in the in the context of the last decade or decade. Plus if you think think about ten twelve years these companies not apple necessarily but Amazon for sure facebook Netflix spotify. You go down the list of major her tech disruptors major tech companies which almost every customer now interacts with ten twelve years ago these companies were in their infancy. We didn't know the kind of influence they were going to have on marketplace or even a technology much less overall American life. Today they're ubiquitous. Everybody has netflix. Everybody streams their music. rarely early. Do you see physical copies of movies. And CDs and items like that. And meanwhile there's an increasing number of people shopping online through Amazon or now through their competitors every CEO has had to respond faster than they ever thought they would to these disruptive forces I had a session with number of CEO's last this week in Washington where some of these companies have very little technology built into the way that they do business they make nuts and bolts or which it's washing machines and things like that they aren't high tech features but they realize that it might be in the way that they talk to customers. It might be in the way. They manage their supply. Chains Fang. These facebook Amazon Apple Apple Netflix. Google had changed the way that just central businesses done. And I'll just give you a quick example if you think about Amazon and what we know them for which is an online bookseller now and online good seller their money machine is cloud computing and that is a completely different animal than what we associated Amazon with fifteen fifteen years ago but they've just changed the way that we store data and we moved at and Microsoft and IBM old blue chips have had to catch up. So you see this every day. Every every headline in the Wall Street Journal it seems that these companies are influencing the day to day business decisions across industries and across the company. What about artificial intelligence the mechanization tation of basic tasks? That's beginning to change. The makeup of the workforce as employers our companies had to adapt. Yeah this is. This is the megatrend to watch. I think for one employment base. The workforce is getting older. People are are waiting longer to get into the workforce because they're going to college longer. What have you and so the the basic complexion of who will worker is and what their skill set is what their mentality is is changing in walks artificial intelligence? We are not new to the story of automation. The Nineteen Eighty S and nineteen ninety S. A lot about the robot plants and making sure that you had as many robots as prudent to take out a lot of the human capital and increase efficiency. Now we're in an age when you know again much like the conversation that we're having about Amazon or facebook and they're they're they're wide influence over business artificial intelligence and the ability liberty to manipulate collect and analyze and apply data to the basic business operations of what you do it's table stakes if you're not using data whether it's customer data or logistics data or employees data your going to be caught short against competitors who are probably more nimble. They may not have as much capital but they're able to use artificial intelligible use the machine learning to create a better mousetrap. Now on the employment side I think this is about making workers better. I've done a lot of work on talking with employment economists who see a changing but not necessarily a shrinking workforce United States and if people are going to get older they're gonNA need more automated tasks if workers are are in general older if the workforce is more fifty five twenty five. You're GONNA need tasks where computers are really assisting in aiding being and keeping the momentum going where the people are further removed from education or further removed from their early even their prime years. You're going to see artificial intelligence. It's come in and do a big job there today. I think we're still in the early innings the very early innings of this. We hear a lot about automation in like an Amazon logistics. Six warehouse. Where you hear a lot about automation at Tesla? I've been to the Tesla plant. There are still thousands of people working and that doesn't mean that they're going to be replaced but the ability to efficiently recently moved products through a production system or through a supply chain. I think this is going to be over the next ten years. We're going to be having a conversation. Twenty thirty about rapid development and and major development. That's happened in that area over the decade to come John. It used to be that. CEO's could set a five year plan and work toward that goal with new technology advancing so quickly quickly in the public essentially reacting in real time through. Social media is a five year plan really possible anymore. It doesn't feel like it is and I think I think there's a couple of things that CEO's have told me Whether it's ingenuity ran Pepsi for many years or even Carlson running Houdini a small manufacturer of clothing and I talked to folks who are in the financial industry and a couple of do things are changing the ability to really look out five years because you had this kind of expectation on. CEO's many years ago to set out that five year plan then go meet them it could that'd be profit it could be revenue goals. EPS Return on capital investment. And that stuff. That pressure doesn't go away but it is becoming more difficult in one of the factors that is making it more difficult. Is this rapid change in technology. You really don't know what's going to happen in twenty twenty in terms of the rate of advancement and the size of innovation vacation. So Yeah I think ubiquitously I've got CEO saying it is very difficult to look one year out much less five. It doesn't take the pressure off. And they have to do it. But but boy you better be ready to rip those plans be Nimble and be responsive to consumer who are seemingly constantly demanding faster and better productivity out of their companies. This I guess this is related from where you sit right now. What do you expect that the biggest challenges will be for CEOS going into the next decade nature is for CEO's? I used to say talent there. Always is this concern about particularly with companies. That have big workforce's are they going to be able to staff them with types of people both in the C. Suite and white collar level and the blue collar level with folks that can come up with new ideas and execute on new ideas below. That is going to be the thing that we talk about with trying to resolve uncertainty. Uncertainty doesn't go away but with these inputs of of trade wars and sort of this regulatory guessing guessing game. That's going on. Those are things that will eventually become industry changes and so the companies that actually begin to adopt adopt new strategies new ideas new products companies. That we don't even know about today could be the next Amazon's the next facebook's next next one to ten I know Wall Street Journal reporter. John Stole John. Thanks a

CEO Amazon Facebook John Wall Street Journal Colin Kaepernick Google United States Netflix Nike Shoe Company EU Boeing Tesla Michael Jordan
"john stole" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Here's Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole John. What got you thinking about this President Trump tweeted about Boeing, okay? So bowling the company in the penalty box right now for very serious situation with they're playing at seven thirty seven max he suggesting look to ditch the name make the plane better rebranded. And I think a lot of people look at that and say, okay, there might be some business logic there. But if you look at what happened with Tiger Woods, I think a lot of people, you know, for the reason this guy's done. He's washed up we need to move on. And then there were. Some companies that stuck by him. Stuck by the name and continued to invest in him, and he really delivered on Sunday on that investment. Basically the investing in the comeback and the moral. There is, you know, a company like Nike, and this is Jason to Boeing company like had so much invested in tiger. They had created a logo much like the Air, Jordan logo. And and really to give up on that investment. Was was something that they just did not see as as as a good idea in two thousand nine and yes, it took a long time for that to pay off. Just look at the fruits of of of that patients in that wisdom that they had a company to stick with them. You brought up the great cyclist Lance Armstrong in your story to Nike gave up on him. What made the two different? That's very good point. I think that you know, what what Nike said at the time was that that Lance had this scene people at the core of his talents. Meaning his product was not legit. You know, nobody. Question whether Tiger Woods would legitimately winning call matches in the nineties and two thousand Lance Armstrong was winning by ill-gotten means and that was reason to drop him because his is brand would never come back. And that was a calculation they needed to make. So with regards to Boeing when somebody says change the name do they mean change the name of the seven thirty seven max or Boeing, more broadly? I don't think it's it's the suggestion that you would you would rename Boeing Boeing it so big, and they have tentacles and so many different sectors, including defense, seven thirty seven. Max anybody who flies a lot, you know, or aviation knows this name. I mean, it's the workhorse for them. It's kind of Toyota Camry for the airline industry. And I think the suggestion here is let's put this chapter behind us yet rename, it dream cruisers, something, and you know, every case is different. I I noticed in my column like you can't just say never give up on a brand if your brand name is your perfume named ISIS, which there was a perfume named ISIS at some point. You got to throw in the towel and say, you know, our brand name is is is we can't bring it back from where people associated with. But it's far more common. His see companies invest in a brand figure out how to make it. Call again or relevant again or meaningful again and reap the rewards. Investors will. Will reward them very richly disproportionately richly, if they go out there and do that kind of work Jones, Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole. It is thirteen minutes now in front of the hour.

Boeing Lance Armstrong Nike Tiger Woods Wall Street Journal John stole President Trump Toyota Camry Jones Jason thirteen minutes
"john stole" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Here's Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole John set this up President Trump tweeted about Boeing, okay? So bowling the company in the penalty box right now for a very serious situation with their planes at seven thirty seven max, he's suggesting wanted to ditch the name make the plane better and rebranded. And I think a lot of people look at that and say, okay, there might be some business logic there. But if you look at what happened with Tiger Woods, I think a lot of people, you know, for good reason. I thought this guy's done. He's washed up we need to move on. And then there were some companies that stuck by him. Stuck by the name and continued to invest in him, and he really delivered on Sunday on that investment. Basically be investing in the comeback and the moral. There is you know, a company like Nike and this is Jason to Boeing company. Like Nike had so much invested in tiger. They had created a logo much like the Air, Jordan logo. And and really to give up on that investment. Was was something that they did not see as as as a good idea in two thousand nine and yes, it took a long time for that to pay off. But just look at the fruits of of of that patients in that wisdom that they had as a company to stick with them. You brought up the great cyclist Lance Armstrong in your story to Nike gave up on him. What made the two different? And I think that's a very good point. I mean, I think that you know, what what Nike said at the time was that that Lance had this scene people at the core of his pal. Talents. Meaning his product was not legit. You know, nobody questioned whether Tiger Woods was legitimately winning golf matches in the nineties and two thousands Lance Armstrong was winning by ill gotten means. And and that was reason to drop them because this is brand would never come back. And that was a calculation they needed to make. So with regards to Boeing when somebody says change the name do they mean change the name of the seven thirty seven max or Boeing, more broadly? Yeah. I don't think it's I don't think it's it's the suggestion that you would you would rename Boeing Boeing it's so big, and they have tentacles and so many different sectors, including defense, seven thirty seven. Max anybody who flies a lot, you know, or is in the VA shin knows this this name. I mean, it's the workhorse for them. It's kind of the Toyota Camry for the airline industry. And I think the suggestion here is let's let's put this chapter behind us and rename it dream cruiser or something. And you know, every case is different. I I noticed in my column like you can't just say you never give up on a brand. I mean, if your brand name is perfume named ISIS, which there was a perfume named ISIS at some point. You got to throw in the towel and say, you know, our brand name is is is we can't bring it back from where people associated with. But, but it's far more common to see companies invest in a brand figure out how to make it. Cool again, four relevant again or meaningful again and reap the rewards. Investors will. Will reward them very richly disproportionately richly, if they go out there and do that kind of work. We're speaking with John stole Wall Street Journal business columnists. He's written a piece entitled Tigers back, and that's good news for other troubled brands, at the very end of your piece with regards to Boeing here, you said Boeing and its troubled max planes will be forgiven. That's according to a preserver slash expert that you talk to how did he feel that that was going to happen? Is that the alternative which is if if you create a distraction by saying we've renamed these planes there, you got another layer of distress. Why did they have to rename it? Why didn't you just fix it? And so by and large we do live in a in a in a society that does celebrate failure. We spec failure. We talk about it when it happens. But we also celebrate comebacks and redemption and Boeing is as American as Tiger Woods or it's American Chevrolet based on Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole..

Boeing company Tiger Woods Nike Lance Armstrong John stole Wall Street Journal Tigers President Trump Toyota Camry Jason
"john stole" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Minimums that can be opened in five minutes Capital One. What's in your wallet capital? One in a business models much like French fries. Don't always travel. Well, this is a lesson for the restaurant business industry. Is it struggles to draw diners through the door or the drive through and looks to food delivery apps to sue the financial heartburn chains such as McDonald's rushing to link up with the likes of Uber eats? But Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole says, we're learning that MC delivery comes with a costly. Downside John explain what's been going on for longer than I realized is that people are eating out less. They're less inclined to be trafficking any of these fast food to casual dining even. Is less than fine dining, but you know, some of the some of the places that you think are hopping aren't hopping nearly as much as they were maybe a decade ago. So that's a challenge for executives at a time. When grocery are delivering people are eating at home more looking for different options. And so obviously, but the boom in delivery services, whether it be your door dash grub up more and more of these traditional deeply entrenched restaurant chains are embracing that for all good reason. But there are some downsides to that part. So at the heart of this as you point out is restaurants efforts to deliver food in a timely fashion while it still testing good, and you open your peace with the French fry example, like, you know, how does it come from? This this terrific fry in the restaurant not Morphing into as you say a cold limp. Greasy wedge that takes some courage to swallow. Yeah. How are they going to solve this? Well, I don't know if it can be solved on the French fry. There's been a lot of innovation and or curation of the French by over the last thirty or forty years with health concerns and moving from one kind of oil to another and what have you? So the French fry is indicative of what maybe you're dealing with. But several different meals that were meant for restaurant to some chin or something within five ten minutes and being delivered in thirty five minutes pizza works. Well, as opposed to the French fry because you pizzas are built a certain way and kept hot at certain weight. And there's been a long sort of tradition of pizza delivery. The French fry would probably take it not to say that it's not happening. But it's probably gonna take a lot of research and development on the part of food companies either suppliers or or the restaurants themselves to say we'd come up with a new innovation fresher longer, and that probably will happen. I don't know. I don't know how. How important that is to society? But obviously the McDonald's of the world which French fries core staple of what they do. They're going to have to figure this out if if it's gonna be compelling to create a complete order, maybe things on the menu that travel well across town. French fry is not one of them and the milkshake is not one of them. Nope. You either you either change delivery. So that you have a better tools on board of a car or bicycle? It's crazy the deep fryer. I know. Or or you or or you change the technology in food the word technology innovation right recipes.

John stole Wall Street Journal McDonald thirty five minutes five ten minutes five minutes forty years
"john stole" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Has been harder to find apple has had no breakthrough on TV a modest success with its watch. A stumble in music and a lot of speculation concerning its intentions for autonomous cars, or creating original programming Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole says now as an comic book movie were all left to wonder whether Apple's greatest strength could be its biggest weakness, John. How do you see it? I think a lot of times in moment. The VCR think of walkman is a great example ubiquitous. Products hot products. They may have had different life spans than the iphone. But at the time, you don't think about life after some of these devices, but they do go away, the blackberry that was so hot a decade ago. We don't see blackberries anymore. And so I'm not saying the iphone is on death's door or that. It's it's really a slumping product happens. Americans seem to seem to have them go at apple will need to reconcile with the fact that it will the iphone will not always be the iphone someday. It's going to go away, or at least greatly diminishing the importance of what Americans want to buy for for that for communication. You point out in the story. Somebody said apple has a legacy of invention. Yes. That was the CEO. And he's right. I mean, no doubt. If we look at companies in the last half century that we would. Associate with with invention. You know, once once you get past that sixties and seventies into the nineteen eighties. There's there's Microsoft apple in just a few others that really have had the impact. And that's why these companies are valued so high they invent and they innovate and they continue to transform no. You know, the MAC the I series Steve Jobs. These are all iconic. Portraits of American invention. And I think the case for apple is, well, maybe they can transition to a services company or a software company or a healthcare company. And I think it's disappointing for a guy like me because I think apple for all of the hiccups in the addiction issues with iphones. Apple products have made my life better. They work their user friendly. I like going in the apple retail store, and I'm saying, hey, guys continue to innovate. What is the pipeline? Look like what's next from this company for speak with John stole business columnist at the Wall Street Journal, he's written a piece entitled polaroid walkman palm pilot iphone? I thought you made an interesting point about Nokia, which kind of no they had to reinvent yet. Couldn't pull it off. Yeah. Nokia which is a company I became familiar with when I lived in Scandinavia. Was a tragic decline in fast. It happened in the so anybody who's holding up number Nokia? Would remember that they were dominant in handsets? Flip phones and other devices that we were using little of the, you know, connected telephone, and, you know, by the time the last decade ended their dominance was really fading. No part of it with new players like apple came along with mousetrap. But no kid had. The insight, according to you know, a lot of people that we've talked you had the insight that smartphones could be hot. But they didn't have the get up and go in and make it happen. What are the key things that they let go they beautiful hardware? They really make devices that worst rissole it. But the software was not nearly as user friendly as I don't for or of course, Google's Android, and that was the snag. It was it was it was not hardware game anymore. It was really a software game. And they dropped the ball on that. And one of the things that in hindsight. A lot of people talk about is. They really did get arrogant, and they believe that they could a weather that storm even by picking up a third party software, which Microsoft made in that didn't go so well, and so now they're they're no longer in business fish UpJohn with the kind of the success stories here companies that had like a second run with greatness. I from Detroit, I covered the streets. No for a long time. And I think about Ford Motor Company once upon a time the model t was the iphone it was every person's car the universal car. Everybody had them in at some point the company had the foresight to public on that. And now we have to move on anything about the Mustang and the f one fifty and Thunderbird and the Lincolns and even now as they move not communists. They're still here. John Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole twenty minutes. Now in front of the hour on.

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"john stole" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Has been harder to find apple has had no breakthrough on TV a modest success with its watch. A stumble in music and a lot of speculation concerning its intentions for autonomous cars, or creating original programming Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole says now as a comic book me, we're all left to wonder whether Apple's greatest strength could be its biggest weakness, John. How do you see it? I think a lot of times in moment. It's a good VCR. Think of walkman is a great example. Ubiquitous. Products hot products. They may have had different life spans in the iphone. But at the time, you don't think about life after some of these devices, but they do go away, the blackberry that was so hard to go. We don't see blackberries anymore. And so I'm not saying the iphone is on death's door or that. It's it's really a slumping product Catholic Americans seemed it seemed to have them go at apple will need to reconcile with the fact that it will I will not always be the iphone someday. It's going to go away or at least greatly diminished in the importance of what Americans wanna buy for for that for communication. Yeah. You put out in the story. Somebody said apple has a legacy of invention. Yes. That would play the CEO. And he's right. I mean, no doubt. It's we look at companies in the last half century that we would associate which. With invention? You know, once once you get past the sixties and seventies in the nineteen eighties. There's Microsoft apple and kissed a few others that really have had the impact. And that's why these companies are valued so high they invent and they innovate and they continue to transform. No. Mac the I series Steve Jobs Connick. Portraits of American invention. Think the case for apple is, well, maybe they can transition to a services company or a software company or a healthcare company. Disappointing for a guy like me because I think apple for all of the hiccups in the addiction issues with iphones. Apple products, have made my life better they work through user friendly. I like going in the apple retail store, and I'm saying, hey, guys continue to innovate. What is the pipeline? Look like what's next from this company for speak with John stole business columnist at the Wall Street Journal, he's written a piece entitled polaroid walkman palm pilot iphone? I thought you made an interesting point about Nokia, which kind of no they had to reinvent yet. Couldn't pull it off. Yeah. Nokia which is a company became very familiar with. When I lived in Scandinavia. Was a tragic. Decline in fast it happened. So anybody who's holding up ember Nokia would remember that they were in handsets? Flip phones and other devices that we were using in lieu of the connected telephone. And you know, by the time the last decade ended their dominance was really fading. No part of it was new players like apple came along with mousetrap. But no kid had. The insight, according to you know, a lot of people that we've talked to the insight that smartphones could be hot. But they didn't have the get up and go in and make it happen. What are the key things that they let go there? Beautiful hardware. They really may devices that worse, but the software was not nearly as user friendly as for. S for or of course, Google's Android, and that was the snag. It was it was it was not hardware game anymore. It was really a software game. And they dropped the ball on that one of the things that in France. A lot of people talk about is. They really did get arrogant and made that they could a weather that storm even by picking up a third party software, which Microsoft made in that didn't go so. Well, so now, they're they're no longer in business fish UpJohn with the kind of the success stories here companies that had like a second run with greatness. I from Detroit, I covered the streets. No for a long time. And I think about Ford Motor Company once upon a time the model t was the iphone it was every person's car the universal car. Everybody had them in at some point the company had the foresight to public on that. And now we have to move on anything about the Mustang and the f one fifty and Thunderbird Lincoln's and even now as they move in autonomous. They're still. Thanks, John Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole twenty minutes. Now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news. The clock is ticking. Every day you put out buying life insurance can cost you big time. The older you get the more you'll have to pay and a sudden accident on.

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"john stole" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Has been harder to find apple has had no breakthrough on TV a modest success with its watch. A stumble in music and a lot of speculation concerning its intentions for autonomous cars, or creating original programming Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole says now as an comic book movie or all left to wonder whether Apple's greatest strength could be its biggest weakness, John. How do you see it? I think a lotta times in moment. The VCR think of walkman is a great example ubiquitous. Products a hot product, they may have had different life spans than the iphone. But at the time, you don't think about life after some of these devices, but they do go away, the blackberry that was so high that decade ago, we don't see blackberries anymore. And so I'm not saying the iphone is on death's door or that. It's it's really a slumping product happens Americans seemed it seemed to have them go at apple will need to reconcile with the fact that it will I will not always be the iphone someday. It's going to go away, or at least greatly diminishing the importance of what Americans wanna buy for for that for communication. Yeah. You put out in the story. Somebody said apple has a legacy of invention. Yes. That would play the CEO. And he's right. I mean, no doubt we look at companies in the last half century that we would associate with. With invention? You know, once once you get past the sixties and seventies in the nineteen eighties. There's there's Microsoft apple in just a few others that really have had the impact. And that's why these companies are valued so high they invent and the innovate and they continue to transform the I series Steve Jobs. These are all iconic. Portraits of American invention really think the case for apple is well, maybe they can transition to a services company or a software company or a healthcare company. And I think it's disappointing for a guy like me because I think apple for all of the hiccups in the addiction issues with iphones. Apple products have made my life better. They work their user friendly. I like going in the apple retail store, and I'm saying, hey, guys continue to innovate. What is the pipeline? Look like what's next from this company speak with John stole business columnist at the Wall Street Journal, he's written a piece entitled polaroid walkman palm pilot iphone? I thought you made an interesting point about Nokia, which kind of no they had to reinvent yet. Couldn't pull it off. Yeah. Nokia which is a company I became very familiar with. I lived in Scandinavia. Was a tragic decline in facet happened. So anybody who's holding up Nokia would remember that they were dominant in handsets flip bones and other devices that we were using little of the connected telephone. And you know, by the time the last decade ended their dominance was really faded. No part of it was new players like apple came along with mousetrap. But no, kid Ted. The the insight according to a lot of people that we've talked to the insight that smartphones could be hot. But they didn't have the get up and go in and make it happen. What are the key things that they let go there? Beautiful hardware. They really made devices that were solid, but the software was not nearly as user friendly as iphones IOS for or of course, Google's Android, and that was the snag. It was it was it was not harbor game anymore. It was really a software game. And they dropped the ball on that one of the things that infanticide. A lot of people talk about is. They really did get arrogant, and they believe that they could weather that storm even by picking up a third party software, which Microsoft made in that didn't go so. Well, so now, they're they're no longer in business fish UpJohn with the kind of the success stories here companies that had like a second run with greatness. I'm from Detroit, I covered the streets. No for a long time. And I think about poor voter company once upon a time the model t was the iphone it was every person's car the universal car. Everybody had them in at some point the company had the foresight to public. And now we have to move on. Anything about the Mustang and the f one fifty and Thunderbird Lincoln's and even now as they move. They're still makes John Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole twenty minutes now in front of the hour.

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"john stole" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Has been harder to find apple has had no breakthrough on TV a modest success with its watch. A stumble in music and a lot of speculation concerning its intentions for autonomous cars, or creating original programming Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole says now as in a comic book movie, we're all left to wonder whether Apple's greatest strength could be its biggest weakness, John. How do you see it? I think a lot of times in moment. VCR think of walkman is a great example ubiquitous products hot product, they may have had different life spans in the iphone. But at the time, you don't think about life after some of these devices, but they do go away, the blackberry that was so hard a decade ago. We don't see blackberry. Anymore? And so I'm not saying the iphone is on death's door or that. It's it's really a slumping product. Hasn't Americans seemed seem to have them go at apple will need to reconcile with the fact that it will the I will not always be the iphone someday. It's going to go away, or at least greatly diminish in the in the importance of what Americans wanna buy for for that for for communication. You put out in the story. Somebody said apple has a legacy of invention. Yes. That would play the CEO. And he's right. I mean, no doubt if we look at companies in the last half century that we would associate with with invention. You know, once once you get past that sixties and seventies into the nineteen eighties. There's there's Microsoft apple in just a few others that really have had the impact. And that's why these companies are valued so high they invent and they innovate and they continue to transform the MAC the I series Steve Jobs. These are all iconic. Portraits of American invention. I think the case for apple is, well, maybe they can transition to a services company or a software company or a healthcare company. And I think that's disappointing for a guy like me because I think apple for all of the hiccups in the addiction issues with iphones. Apple products have made my life better. They work their user friendly. I like going in the apple retail store, and I'm saying, hey, guys continue to innovate. What is the pipeline? Look like what's next from this company speak with John stole business columnist at the Wall Street Journal, he's written a piece entitled polaroid walkman palm pilot iphone? I thought you made an interesting point about Nokia, which kind of no they had to reinvent yet. Couldn't pull it off. Yeah. Nokia which is a company I became very familiar with when I lived in Scandinavia. Was a tragic. Decline in fast. It happened in the so anybody who's number Nokia. Would remember that they were in handsets flipping homes and other devices that we were using the, you know, connected telephone and, you know, by the time the last decade ended their dominance was really fading. No part of it was new players like apple came along with mousetrap. But no kid pad. The insight, according to you know, a lot of people that we've talked to they had the insight that smartphones could be hot. But they didn't have the get up and go in and make it happen. What are the key things that they let go beautiful hardware? They really made devices that were were solid. But the software was not nearly as user friendly as. I don't for or of course, Google's Android, and that was the snag. It was it was it was not hardware game anymore. It was really a software game. And they dropped the ball on that one of the things that in hindsight. A lot of people talk about is. They really did get arrogant, and they believe that they could from a weather that storm even by picking up a third party software, which Microsoft made in that didn't go so. Well, so now, they're they're no longer in business fish UpJohn with kind of the success stories here companies that had like a second run with greatness. I from Detroit, I covered the streets. No for a long time. And I think about Ford Motor Company once upon a time the model t was the iphone it was every person's car the universal car. Everybody had them in at some point the company had the foresight to on. And now we have to move on. And you think about the Mustang and the f one fifty and Thunderbird and the Lincolns and even now as they move in autonomous. They're still John Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole twenty minutes now in front of the hour on.

apple John stole Wall Street Journal Nokia Ford Motor Company Detroit Steve Jobs CEO Microsoft Google Scandinavia twenty minutes
"john stole" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Has been harder to find apple has had no breakthrough on TV a modest success with its watch. A stumble in music and a lot of speculation concerning its intentions for autonomous cars, or creating original programming Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole says now as in a comic book movie, we're all left to wonder whether Apple's greatest strength could be its biggest weakness, John. How do you see it? I think a lot of times in the VCR think of walkman is a great example ubiquitous. Products hot products. They may have had different life spans than the iphone. But at the time, you don't think about life after some of these devices, but they do go away, the blackberry that was so hot the decade ago. We don't see blackberries anymore. And so I'm not saying the iphone is on death's door or that. It's it's really a something product happens Americans seemed it seemed to have them go at apple will need to reconcile with the fact that it will I will not always be the iphone it someday. It's going to go away or greatly diminishing the importance of what Americans wanna buy for for that for communication you put out in the story. Somebody said apple has a legacy of invention. Yes. That would play the CEO. And he's right. I mean, no doubt if we look at companies in the last half century that we would associate which. With invention? You know, once once you get past the sixties and seventies into the nineteen eighties. There's there's Microsoft apple, and it just a few others that really have had the impact. And that's why these companies are valued so high we invent and they innovate and they continue to transform. The I series. Steve Jobs are all icon ick. Portraits of American invention really think the case for apple is well, maybe they can transition to a services company or a software company or a healthcare company. And I think it's disappointing for guy like me because I think apple for all of the hiccups in the addiction issues with iphones. Apple products have made my life better. They work their user friendly. I like going in the apple retail store, and I'm saying, hey, guys continue to innovate. What is the pipeline? Look like what's next from this company speak with John stole business columnist at the Wall Street Journal, he's written a piece entitled polaroid walkman palm pilot iphone? I thought you made an interesting point about Nokia, which kind of knew they had to reinvent yet. Couldn't pull it off. Yeah. Nokia which is a company I became familiar with when I lived in Scandinavia. Was a tragic decline in it happened. So anybody old enough number Nokia? Would remember that they were in handsets? Flip bones and other devices that we were using little of the connected telephone and. You know, by the time the last decade ended their dominance was really part of it was new players like apple came along with a mousetrap. But no kid had. The the insight, according to you know, a lot of people that we've talked to had the insight that smartphones could be hot. But they didn't have the get up and go and make it happen. What are the key things that they let go they beautiful hardware? They really make devices that were solid, but the software was not nearly as user friendly as I less for or of course, Google's Android, and that was the snag. It was it was it was not hardware game anymore. It was really a software game. And they dropped the ball on that one of the things that in hindsight. A lot of people talk about is. They really did get arrogant, and they believe that they could a weather that storm even by picking up a third party software, which Microsoft made in that didn't go so. Well, so now, they're they're no longer in business fish UpJohn with kind of the success stories here companies that had like a second run with greatness. I from Detroit I covered the streets know for a long time. And I think about. Ford Motor Company once upon a time the model t was the iphone it was every person's car the universal car. Everybody has them in it. Some the company had the foresight to put on that. And so now we have to move on anything about the Mustang and the f one fifty and Thunderbird Lincoln's and even now as they move dot com. They're still here. Thanks, John Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole twenty minutes. Now in front of the hour on This Morning,.

apple John stole Wall Street Journal Nokia Ford Motor Company Steve Jobs CEO Detroit Microsoft Google Scandinavia twenty minutes
"john stole" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The next big thing has been harder to find apple has had no breakthrough on TV a modest success with its watch. A stumble in music and a lot of speculation concerning its intentions for autonomous cars, or creating original programming Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole says now as a comic book movie, we're all have to wonder whether Apple's greatest strength could be its biggest weakness, John. How do you see it? I think a lot of times in the VCR think of walkman is a great example ubiquitous. Product hot products. They may have had different life spans than the iphone. But at the time, you don't think about life after devices, but they do go away, the blackberry that was so hot a decade ago. We don't see blackberries anymore. And so I'm not saying the iphone is on death's door or that. It's it's really a stumping product happens. Americans seem to seem to have them go at apple will need to reconcile with the fact that it will the I will not always be the iphone it someday. It's going gonna go away or at least greatly diminishing the importance of what Americans wanna buy for for that for for communication. You point out in the story. Somebody said apple has a legacy of invention. Yes. That was the CEO. And he's right. I mean, no doubt if we look at companies in the last half century that we would associated with with invention. You know, once once you get past the sixties and seventies into the nineteen eighties. There's there's Microsoft apple in just a few others that really have had the impact. And that's why these companies are valued so high they invent and they innovate and they continue to transform the MAC the I series Steve Jobs. These are all iconic. Turkish of American invention. I think the case for apple is, well, maybe they can transition to a services company or a software company or a healthcare company. And I think that's disappointing for a guy like me because I think apple for all of the hiccups and the addiction issues with iphones. Apple products have made my life better. They work their user friendly. I like going in the apple retail store, and I'm saying, hey, guys continue to innovate. What is the pipeline? Look like what's next from this company speak with John stole business columnist at the Wall Street Journal, he's written a piece entitled polaroid walkman palm pilot iphone? I thought you made an interesting point about Nokia, which kind of no they had to reinvent yet. Couldn't pull it off. Yeah. Nokia which is a company I became familiar with when I lived in Scandinavia. Was a tragic decline in fast. It happened in the back. So anybody who's holding up number Nokia? Would remember that they were? Flipping homes and other devices that we were using in lieu of the connected telephone. And you know, by the time the last decade ended their dominance was really fading part of it was new players like apple came along with mousetrap. But no kid had. The insight according to a lot of people that we've talked to they had the insight that smartphones could be hot. But they didn't have the get up and go in and make it happen. What are the key things that they let go there? Beautiful hardware. They really made devices that were solid, but the software was not nearly as user friendly as I don't or of course, Google Android, and that was the snag. It was it was it was not a hardware game anymore. It was really a software game. And they dropped the ball on that one of the.

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"john stole" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"john stole" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Has been harder to find apple has had no breakthrough on TV a modest success with its watch. A stumble in music and a lot of speculation concerning its intentions for autonomous cars, or creating original programming Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole says now as in a comic book movie, we're all left to wonder whether Apple's greatest strength could be its biggest weakness, John. How do you see it? I think a lot of times in a moment. The VCR think of walkman is a great example ubiquitous products hot products. They may have had different life spans than the iphone. But at the time, you don't think about life after some of these devices, but they do go away, the blackberry that was so hot a decade ago. We don't see blackberries anymore. And so I'm not saying the iphone is on death's door or that. It's it's really a slumping product happens American seemed it seemed to have them go at apple will need to reconcile with the fact that it will the iphone will not always be the iphone it someday. It's gonna go away or at least greatly diminishing the importance of what Americans want to buy for for that for communication. Yeah. You point out in the story. Somebody said apple has a legacy of invention. Yes. Play the CEO. And he's right. I mean, no doubt if we look at companies in the last half century that we would. Associate with. With invention? You know, once once you get past the sixties and seventies into the nineteen eighty there's there's Microsoft apple and just a few others that really have had the impact. And that's why these companies are valued so high they invent and they innovate and they continue to transform the MAC the I series Steve Jobs. These are all iconic. Portraits of American invention. Think the case for apple is, well, maybe they can transition to services company or a software company or a healthcare company. And I think that's disappointing guy like me because I think apple for all of the hiccups in the addiction issues with iphones. Apple products have made my life better. They work their user friendly. I like going in the apple retail store, and I'm saying, hey, guys continue to innovate. What is the pipeline? Look like what's next from this company for speaking with John stole business columnist at the Wall Street Journal, he's written a piece entitled polaroid walkman palm pilot iphone? I thought you made an interesting point about Nokia, which kind of no they had to reinvent yet. Couldn't pull it off. Yeah. Nokia which is a company I became very familiar with when I lived in Scandinavia. Was a tragic decline in fast. It happened in the back. So anybody who's holding the number Nokia would remember that? They were. Handsets? Flip bones and other devices that we were using a little of the, you know, connected telephone and. You know, by the time the last decade ended their dominance was really fading part of it with new players like apple came along mousetrap. But no kid had. The the insight, according to you know, a lot of people that we talked to had the insight that smartphones could be hot. But they didn't have the get up and go in and make it happen. What are the key things that they let go there? Beautiful hardware. They really made devices that were solid, but the software was not nearly as user friendly as I don't for or of course, Google's Android, and that was the snag. It was it was it was not hard beer game anymore. It was really a software game. And they dropped the ball on that one of the things that in hindsight. A lot of people talk about is. They really did get arrogant, and they don't believe that they could a weather that storm even by picking up a third party software, which Microsoft made in that didn't go so well, and so now they're they're no longer than. Finish up John with the kind of the success stories here companies that had like a second run with greatness. I'm from Detroit I cover the streets. No for a long time. And I think about Ford Motor Company once upon a time the model t was the iphone it was every person's car the universal car. Everybody had them in at some point the company had the foresight to on that. And now we have to move on anything about the Mustang and the f one fifty and Thunderbird Lincoln's and even now as they move not communists. They're still here. John Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This.

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"john stole" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"john stole" Discussed on KTOK

"Many in American business have yet to welcome our new robot overlords. If the economy goes south, you don't want a robot just sitting idle while you're still paying it off. It's a story by Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole John. What have you found I found here was kind of a surprise visit to this company airstream, which we all know there there there, I contact you can't you can't mention airstream without saying the word iconic in the same sentence, but you know, high end very fashionable travel trailers and we've been talking for a long time about coming down and visiting. What I did. I said, okay. Let's see the robots. We'll see the automation by all means you've been doing this for thirty five years in the same facility years. There's gotta be a ton of automation here. And I didn't find it. There were no robots and they were just a couple of machines. And most of it is human labor building. The same product over and over again, what you would think lend itself to automation, but I got into very interesting conversations with the executives about their preference to invest in people, and that's not all about being a good citizen. It's about baking a good business decision in an environment. Which you don't know when the next shoe was gonna drop you'd rather invest in variable cost like a person who can be trained, but also be full load than buy expensive pieces of machinery that once the market falls out. You're stuck with a robot not doing anything, and that's common. It's not like it's one company in the middle of Ohio that is common for today to have to make that choice. And that's why you're seeing a tight labor market right now. It's interesting. I mean, you flat out said it in the piece there's not a robot insight at airstream, right? I I can't emphasize enough. What a big surprise that was because I've been through manufacturing plants, everything from fisker scissors to Cadillac Escalades. I've seen the being made with an enormous amount of automation. And you know, those are investments sometimes that were placed decade. We know sometimes we think well as much a robot. They're invading these plants in some cases, the nine hundred ninety s were really the moment when these companies invested in this automation, and now they're upgrading it. But new investments in automation are nearly as fast as you investments in buildings and people. It's interesting. So the in the coming years then. Will it gets far less expensive to purchase of more efficient robot? And therefore, we might see them as overlords. I think there is a lot of evidence that. Artificial intelligence and automation can't be had at at at discounts versus where they were before the financial crisis or back when you know, some of these things were coming into vogue, but. The payoff is something that you have to be relatively secure is is is is is gonna be quick enough for holders and boards of directors to say, hey, that is a worthwhile investment. Even.

airstream Wall Street Journal John stole Ohio fisker thirty five years
"john stole" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"john stole" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Many in American business have yet to welcome our new robot overlords. If the economy goes south, you don't want a robot just sitting idle while you're still paying it off. It's a story by Wall Street Journal business columnist John stole John. What have you found found? Here was kind of a surprise visit to. Company airstream, which we all know there there there I contact. You can't you can't mention airstream without saying the word I tonic in the same sentence. But high end very fashionable travel trailers and we've been talking for a long time about me coming down and visiting. But I did I said, okay. Let's see the robots. We'll see the automation by all means you've been doing this for thirty five years in the same facility forty years. There's gotta be a ton of automation here. And I didn't find it. There were no robots and they were just a couple of machines. And most of it is human labor building seen product over and over again, which you would think lend itself to automation, but I got into very interesting conversations with the executives about their temperance to invest in people. And that's not all about being, you know, a good citizen. It's about speaking a good business decision in an environment. Which you don't know when the next shoe was gonna drop you'd rather invest in the variable cost like a person who can be trained, but also be followed. Then by expensive pieces of machinery that once the market falls out. You're stuck with a robot not doing anything, and that's comment. It's not like it's one company in the middle of Ohio that is common for CFO's today to have to make that choice. And that's why you're seeing a tight labor market right now. It's interesting guy. I mean, you flat out set it in the piece there's not a robot insight that airstream right, right? And I can't emphasize enough what a big surprise because I've been through manufacturing plants, everything from Cisco scissors to Cadillac Escalades. I've seen the being made with an enormous amount of automation. And you know, those are investments sometimes that were placed decades ago, we know sometimes we think well, it's meant to robots that are invading these plants will in some cases, the nineteen eighties nineties. We're really the moment when these companies invested in this automation, and now they're upgrading it. But new investments in automation are nearly as fast as you investments in buildings and people. It's interesting. So the in in the coming years then. Will it gets far less expensive to purchase of more efficient robot? And therefore, we might see them as overlords. Yeah. I think I think there is a lot of evidence that. The artificial intelligence and automation can't be had at at at at discounts versus where they were before the financial crisis or back when you know, some of these things were coming into but. The payoff is something that you have to be relatively secure is is is is is gonna be quick enough for shareholders in boards of directors to say, hey, that is a worthwhile investment. Even if.

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"john stole" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"john stole" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"Man sherman yeah and we can play the jimmy fallon one too because he stole that about so where robin hood and we're taking print john stole it from the people papa john yes baba john sola from the people and fallon took it back and or way no he's public papa john and and we're yes i love lip synching oh it's so funny when like straight guys do it it's so funny it's like wearing wish we could do that that's another thing i wish we could do it just sounds like we have tried to do it before it just sounds like playing the song oh picture this though because you just mentioned straight is yeah a stud and he's doing like shakira but he's we're really into it what do you mean he's doing secure like that's the sunny lipstick he's doing his hips like a girl and really doing it have you seen this before is this just think you're coming up with right now i'm picturing what i want on tv i'm sorry but what you want to see on tv out there you know what i you wanna watch yes when actually fight for a better world don't say that like you can't actually make change in the world can i use this in my comedy school i'll pay you both okay okay yeah why are you sound so reluctant about it's hard because it's for me i understand and like the exposures already so valuable i don't wanna cheap it.

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