20 Burst results for "John Stevens"

Dallas Stars Coach Rick Bowness Leaves Game Due To COVID-19 Protocols

Chris Krok

00:51 sec | Last month

Dallas Stars Coach Rick Bowness Leaves Game Due To COVID-19 Protocols

"The story last night half of the Stars game stars lose. To the Carolina Hurricanes. One Nothing with the story of this one. During the second intermission of the Stars one Nothing lost. The Stars coach Rick Bonus was pulled from the game placed into the cove in 19 protocol because they received a positive test result. Assistant coach John Stevens assumed the head coaching duties for the third period. The general manager Jim Neal, said the bonus was vaccinated in January. Whether they hope that his result is a false positive. Kind of like with Rick Carlisle went through the man. Yeah, they said the team was consult. They consulted with the league about playing the third period, but because of his status It's fully vaccinated and the very low grade of test result. The game continued. Makes you think that they think it might be it. Of all spots. Yeah, I hope it

Rick Bonus Carolina Hurricanes Jim Neal John Stevens Rick Carlisle
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 9 months ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
"john stevens" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"john stevens" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"John Stevens in the background is the shrieking do three freaking so I had to throw that team on the list because they were so important somebody I when I'm in one of those people eleven one ten yes yep all right and then finally do this is it here we go my number one favorite team of all time and this is like that there's no question about this I was at my most fanatical my most passionate I was obsessed with this team and it was kind of like it's it's a very unlikely I will say that without any more suspense will be announced and then I'll explain more if you're ready not anyone I haven't I haven't yes but I'm gonna wait to sail to if I got it it is a really unusual choice for a lot of people the nineteen eighty eight San Francisco it is eighty eighty nine Niners well this is this suit six and five were you it satisfied with the launch of the race all right so let's backtrack a little bit let's let's come to get a full of a feel for this team so first off this is coming after the V. extremely disappointing season of eighty seven where they were the number one seed the NFL they should run the table they should want to super ball and what turned out to be one of the most upsetting shocking playoff losses in nine or history losing to the Vikings in the first round so they're coming off of that and all but the thing I look at that you know they can they still have all the players are intact I mean they did lose Dwight Dwight retired after that game but still I mean that that team was fully formed RAF man Craig I'll believe offense of line Taylor rice Montana Ronnie Lott Jeff fuller I mean they still have like all their big big Hailey Charles Haley dude are they brought in a bill Roman owski is a rookie and like you said after eleven games they were six and five now I was a junior in college in Boston at the time and my mom got bless her she was sending me the Monday versions of the San Francisco Chronicle sports page in the San Francisco examiner sports yeah Alexander love no question no yeah yes so I had both sports pages each week get mailed to me in Boston pre internet he couldn't get closer to not only in nineteen eighty eight would you read a newspaper like three days ago I'll say this again I don't think you realizing like this speaks to the depth of my passion for that team like I was devouring information on this team and I have like this really weird belief in that group like they're six and five do but if they can just put this thing together it's going to happen and then from that point on they ran the table they won seven straight games the four remaining regular season games ran the table in the playoffs won the Superbowl in dramatic fashion and Murph as I've said like that team the most unlikely I think of all the forty niner teams to it too to jazz when the super gory yeah and also bill Walsh's last year you know I mean there's a lot of emotional stuff going on there you kind of knew it was Walsh's last year the wish or is he gonna get fired if he doesn't sound well the sound I mean if if I sent coastal lake in like with that being my favorite team of all time my favorite niner game of all time is in Chicago.

John Stevens
"john stevens" Discussed on Z104

Z104

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on Z104

"John legend you John legend was born John Stevens in December of nineteen seventy eight he got his stage name from performance poet J. IV we met while working with Kanye west the poet said that legend has an old school sound that sounds like it comes from one of the legends he and others including Kanye starting using it although he didn't want to he reluctantly changed his stage name John legend all the hits on the number one hit music station Z. one oh four see yeah please wait like most things so both thank you please so so you think you speaking of styles I'm not the he say he then she he to play.

John Stevens J. IV Kanye
"john stevens" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

17:34 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I would say from nineteen forty six to nineteen fifty two. You say that you've not quite sure in your book what they ever saw in the Soviet Union. Well, how can you be? They like it idea the Soviet Union. And why well, I think they liked the my father at one point says he was stubborn in his ignorance. I think they like the again -tarian idea. I think that my father in particular in my mother to some extent was shaped by what he saw as the economic inequalities that grew out of the great that were more obvious during the great depression when the whole notion of capitalism was being questioned were strongly because of what had happened with the collapse of that system. And I think that the stubbornness in his ignorance was not seeing the the the paranoia and murderous history of the Soviet Union until later newspaper man when he loses his first job. And why he was fired of the in February twenty ninth nineteen fifty two during those hearings with an FBI informant called the grandmother spy baronies Baldwin. Was called to testify. She'd been a member of the communist party of paid informant for the FBI from I think nineteen forty three to nineteen fifty two when she came in from the cold everybody in the party knew her. She testified she she named names. The point of those series was really to investigate the United Auto Workers and the communists in that in the union. But there were a lot of other people were collateral damage. You might say my father was one of those house un-american activities committee nineteen thirty eight abolished in one thousand nine hundred seventy five. Yeah. It was a part of American history and one of the central questions of my book is what is an American. What does it mean to be American the chairman of that committee during one thousand nine hundred eighty two was a Georgian John Stevens would who had voted against every civil rights Bill that came through congress briefly been a member of the Ku Klux Klan had some other dark parts of his past calling my father who had been the commander of flak unit in World War, Two un-american. Where's he from? He's from the northern Georgia. Grew up on a farm and then became a lawyer in canton, Georgia. And was for briefly worth the north Georgia circuit. As a judge and was a lawyer, and then got elected to congress from from that congressional district of their. You highlight fella named Kaverner Tavender was really an interesting guy. He was the the committee counsel for the house on American activities committee in nineteen fifty two. Been a council. Earlier during the period when the more famous investigation of communists in Hollywood was conducted. He came from a Woodstock Virginia out in the Shenandoah valley. He was sort of a product of the bird machine of their. And in World War right after World War Two. He served as the acting general counsel for the US mission at the Tokyo war-crimes tribunal sort of trying the Japanese who were responsible for the trustees. Because we're going through listening to this idea of having a council interview somebody from the committee and in this case he was counsel. And he ask your father. He did all the question. I mean, the committee members would participate as well. But most of the the tough questioning was done by the committee council that was the way it worked at Husak fifth amendment the fifth amendment is the right invoke the fifth amendment to not justify against yourself. It's written into the constitution of the United States. And it's you know. And yet historically people who've used a fifth amendment. As defined by saying, well, that means you're guilty. The point is not whether you're guilty or innocent. It's whether you have the right not to be browbeaten confessing. How often did your father use that? I didn't count the number of times. But almost most not all of the questions, but but certainly used it to not testify it gets themselves. But to me, many other names testify against anyone else is he was interrogated. So when you started this project, where did you go to find the things that you needed to write this book? Well, I to so many places, but one of the first places I went was the national archives right down the street, and the people there were terrific and all of the house that American activities committee records are open. Now, it's you know, it's congressional committee. And the archivist. There helped me find what I needed in terms of that week two weeks of hearings, and within those files there was one file that was Elliott Maraniss my father before that because it was a public hearing in Detroit. I'd love known about the transcript and in the transcript, my father says I have a statement. I'd like to read and the chairman would does not allow them to read the statement. He might have let him you probably would've let them read it if my father had confessed to his sins and seek sought absolution and name names, but he didn't. And so therefore he was not allowed to read that statement. So I thought what you know. We're is that statement I'd love to see what did he say? And the moment that I found it in his file. Was one of the most powerful was the most powerful moment of my experiences reporting this book, and it just washed over me for the first time here, I was in my mid sixties. This was a central part of my family's sort of back story. I'd never really allowed myself allowed wrong word. I'd never really focused before that moment on what my father had endured and seeing that statement. At one particular part of it, which which was he? He starts saying statement of Elliott Mariners in the essence statement of capitalist jumps off a half space and people who remember the era of typewriters remember that keys would stick. And sometimes they move up half space. And it was that moment of seeing it that brought made it real to me because I knew my dad I'd see them tight putting Tektite typist for years and years, and I knew that. Typed really hard keys would stick. And that was it that was me sort of finally putting myself in my father's place at that moment and C span radio. This is Q day with journalist and author David Maraniss specifically, and I'm open to to eighty eight where you print this statement specifically where did you find it, and how long did it take you to find? I wish I could cite the exact bucks number and file number. It's in the book. But it was it was it was in the files of the Hugh curing in Detroit ebony archives for their research room. And it was right there at the national archives in Detroit. No, no. The nest of downtown ten Washington DC archive says all of the congressional Hewitt files. And it was one of the first things I've found among all of the documents that uncovered doing this. So thirty four years old, right? The day that he testified and wanted to read this and the chairman said, oh where was the family? How big was the family at that time? And did he have a job? Just been fired a week earlier from the times of Hearst newspaper in Detroit where he was the lead rewrite man on the copy desk. Which was a different job in that era than it is today where he'd take all the feeds from reporters and put it into English and write the stories. And. So we didn't have a job. He the family was I was two and a half. My older sister, Jeannie was five and Jim was almost seven my older, brother. And of course, my mother. So it was a family of five at that point. And we were living in Detroit in a flat. In in Detroit and. I don't I don't remember it. I, you know, the first thing I say in this book is I have no memory of that day. Jim remember, he does very much. So yeah. Jim first of all, Jim, my older brother is both my brother and sister to the smartest people I've ever known in my life, and Jim has not a photographic memory. But a very very sharp memories of certain things. Ican recite any poem that he's ever read that sort of stuff, but he was traumatized by this period. Much more. So than I I mean, he GD my sister. In school. And so the five years that followed this event the rebounding from one school to another as my father was trying to find get his life back together. So yeah, Jim remembers even remembers going to the to the headquarters of the. Communist newspaper. What my father was also working as an editor. The Michigan herald Michigan worker remember some of that much more. So than I do there's one scene also remembers that after immediately after my father was called to testify there were stories in the newspapers there and one of his friends. Mothers said, you know, Jim's dad is a communist and sort of from echo of that fifth nineteen fifty two and how did he find himself in the United States military, and what year did he going in? And was he a communist then? He went in. Right after Pearl Harbor. He enlisted. He wasn't a member of the communist party. He was definitely a leftist. I would say. My mother's brother. Robert Commons was a member of the communist party. And but you know, so he he wanted to fight against Hitler in Mussalini and joined the war effort. And you know, one of the wonderful or important illuminating. Parts of my book in terms of understanding my dad or the that he wrote all these letters home to my mother during that whole period from from nineteen forty one to nineteen forty five hundreds of letters, and their, you know, of course, they have some typical romance and other things in them. But they're also very illuminating in terms of the what he viewed the world, and particularly once he was able to to show what he is leadership skills as a commander of that all black unit. And you see those letters. And I would argue also see in the many essays which will get to later editorials. He wrote when he was at the Michigan daily is a student. I think you see is love of America throughout that period. And his belief in not in destroying America, making it better. What would it have meant to be a communist in nineteen thirty nine versus a communist in nineteen fifty two. That's that's the question. I think it meant different things. Nineteen thirty nine. There were already vast evidence of the evils of the Soviet Union. But it was there were a lot of different factors involved was of the Spanish civil war, which we can also talk about what should just ended where. The United States and France and Great Britain were neutral, and it was really the the communist party was part of the effort to defeat Franco and Hitler and Mussalini in Spain in this important precursor to World War Two. So there was that. There's also during the war at self the Soviet Union in the United States were allies. Fighting against Hitler. And so that was a different period as well by nineteen fifty two the Cold War was deep into the Cold War. There was also a war going on in Korea. Against the communists there. And so it was a different. It was a different matter. And I think that the the members of the communist party in the United States the membership had shrunk considerably from nineteen thirty nine to nineteen fifty two. Many. Left turned away from the party by then. So my parents there were people continued after that, my parents did not, but the did longer than I would have thought you mentioned Charles Potter. Member committee. But and most of those years was the committee was run by Democrats of a couple of years, and we're publicans what's his story because you write him up in here. And well, I phoned chose powder to be very interesting. Study. He was a classic mainstreet midwesterner from from Michigan. Not the peninsula. But the northern part of Michigan. What off to fight in World War to fought as an officer through the battle of the bulge. And then the Komar pocket where he was severely wounded in ended up losing both legs and one of his testicles. Trying to work. Stop. Pocket of Germans there and stepped on a landmine. And so it came back like so many veterans to to their home states and towns, and and got involved in politics is one of those young veterans was elected to congress put on the house on American activities committee much like Richard Nixon or a lot of those others. Other young veteran congressman they sort of made their name fighting communism. They're staunchly anti communists during this period of the fifty two in the hearings were held in Detroit. He was starting to run for the Senate. Potter was. Yes, I'm sorry. And and was elected that year served one term, but in the Senate he was put on the subcommittee. With Joe McCarthy. And that's where we started to see sort of the the different machinations manipulations of McCarthy and the complexity of a lot of the issues that before that to him it seem pretty black and white. So jump forward to the nineteen sixties. He wrote a book called days of shave where he acknowledged a lot of the mistakes that that the Republicans made during that period allowing McCarthy to go as far as he did even right to section where he defends the fifth amendment and regrets that he that was used as a way of saying people were guilty and. When important, right? So..

Detroit United States communist party Soviet Union Jim chairman Michigan FBI Charles Potter Hitler Joe McCarthy United Auto Workers commander congress
"john stevens" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

"I'm Melanie Avalon. And I'm here John Stevens I regarding. How are you today? Jin? I am doing great. How about you? Well, I do have an exciting update. I can't wait to hear it. So, you know, this, but I finally released my new app, which is super exciting. Oh, I did know it, and the reason I know it is because it was made by my favorite app developer in the world. That would be Jin sun. Yes. Cal Stevens app developer extraordinaire, so tell us all about it. Yes. So he did an amazing job. Basically it is. It's an app for. Vision of a food sensitivity guy that I have on my website. And basically that guide is a it's a guide to three hundred plus foods, and it lists not their specific levels. But their general levels of food compounds that a lot of people often react to so one that people are relief the million with it's like histamine. So, you know, if you have problems with like wine or -firmative foods or things like that, you might have problems with histamine that also has like oxalate so people who have kidney stone problems that's often. A problem has Nightshade which are things like tomatoes potatoes peppers and the other one's like AMI's glutamates. So listen, late, s- soul, fights and files. I think that's everything. But yes, basically you can search through and you could sell these foods and the ark is really beautiful. I had wonderful artist design all the pictures, and it shows like the general level. So it's more just to like help people if they think they're sensitive to a certain compound. Or believe they might be sort of, you know, navigate that world more easily, and you can make your own lists and things like that. And I'm really happy with it. And when it came out it was top ten for itunes apps in its category. So yeah. So if listeners would like to download it, I think it can really really help a lot of people especially because intermittent fasting makes you more in tune. I think with how your body reacts to certain foods. And so I think this can just really catalyzed that and help out that aspect as well. And if you do get it, I would love to hear your feedback about anything doesn't have every who'd on the planet, obviously. But it does have a ton. And it has the best like I did a ton of research, and creating it and cross referenced so many sources because a lot of these foods there's like differing opinions on the specific, you know, that these different compounds. So it's kind of hard to like for some of them to figure out exactly what it was. That's why it's more general and it shows like a you'll see when you get it like it shows like. A general bar. But yeah, I hope people really like it. And if you do like it, and you are able to write a nice review that would really really help. This would have been really helpful for us back in the day. Or is it was way before at suggested. But one of my sons, not Cal the other one will don't talk about as much because he's not in the app world intermittent fasting, but actually does kind of intermittent fasting. But he was very sensitive to solicit like it caused behavioral problems for him and say we had to avoid foods solicits. So I would've loved having an app like this back in the day. Yeah. So you can get it. Now, she like it's called food since. So I'll put a link to it in the show notes. I was able to find it. I just searched Melanie Avalon. Oh, it came up that way to. Yes. So because I've gotten used to looking up apps like when I want to see something eight tight Cal Stevens. And it brings me to all of the Azis ever made that are listed under his name..

Cal Stevens Melanie Avalon histamine developer John Stevens food sensitivity Jin Jin sun
"john stevens" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Michigan and Kelly Chellios guys. What are you expecting tonight? You know, everybody talks about these traps games. And let's face it. Tampa Bay really hasn't fallen into these trap games this year. And I think a lot of that is because of the depth rolling four lines and good goaltending. They receive the kings our team it goaltending has been really good for them this year. We know about Jonathan quick when he's healthy. He can still you games tonight. Could be challenging it. He is on an playing very well. What are you expecting tonight? Yeah. Well, quick will likely be in his career numbers against the lightning are pretty good. He's six three and one in his career with the one point seven two goals against average. But Andrei vasilevskiy is also really good especially with some rest, and they had the day off obviously on New Year's and then a nice long practice on Wednesday. And then the morning off today. So I think both goaltenders will feel pretty sharp getting into this one. We saw an impressive goaltending performance between Gibson and battling fury. Made thirty five. Phenomenal saves really both goaltenders needed to stand on their heads in that game to keep it just one one going into the overtime. But I think you're gonna see a tight checking game. If Los Angeles is able to play the game that they want to and that's a similar style to Anaheim in that they like to play a heavier game and try to take away space in the neutral zone, and they have some big bodies. It'll be a big test for them. They won three of their last four at home. But obviously has not proven to be a consistent team for more stretches, the not, and I think the lightning. I mean, they just continue to show that they're. Not a team whose lost that hunger. And who's? Lost that urge to wanna win every game. Despite where they are in the standings right now. I think that they have a lot of players coming in and out with injury. Like Matthew Joseph? Adam Ernie earning. Some more consistent time the lineup with JT Miller out and those players just feed off of each other that Sara Lee Ernie and Gordon line is a great example of just players that are relentless on the puck, and they're put together because of their work ethic and their ability to make plays and create offense their bottom six has been impressive. So I think the Los Angeles Kings have a tough task ahead. Trying to shut down the Tampa Bay Lightning. But it should be a good game, especially as the lightning look to continue to make those defensive adjustments that they need to if they want to continue to have sex success down the stretch, I'm curious to see the kings tonight because seeing them last year. Now, remember John Stevens took over last year. They made the playoffs in Vegas in the first round. They got slept at all the games, really close. And last year. The talk was. The big strong, heavy slash slow kings are going to try and segue. It's more of a skill making type of team. They were talking about that. When the lightning came in November. Remember Adrian campaign was about to start. They'd added. I follow who's the guy who had seen in some of their development camps. They were scoring more than in previous years even years where they had great success. But obviously that experiment has ended spell John. Stevens is no longer the coach. They can't score their last in the league in goals. They still have some skill guys like campaign. Jeff Carter is a natural goals for has been his whole career curious to see if they try and play kind of like Anaheim, Kaley which is slow it down heavy steady. Kind of grind out shifts. Or if they have a little bit of a hybrid with with some of their Myers skill guys. They're coming off a game in Vegas. They get dominated. Are. They got absolutely dominated loss to nothing. It was only closed as Campbell was outstanding it net. They got out shot forty eight to seventeen the whole game. Look like we spent in the LA on they're gonna look to obviously played better than they did in that game. But they are facing another team. It's capable of doing that to the opposition Lanier capable of dominating games. That's why I'm kind of curious to see how the kings play and also had a lightning play against the kings. All right near the scratches going, the lightning and LA. JT Miller is still injured. It's dandruff parties turn to sit as the kill circuit Jeb comes back in after sitting out the last game for the lightning Ganic Bartels the other scratch a slew of injuries for Los Angeles. Trevor Lewis Alec Martinez, Pearl haggling, and Johnny Brzezinski are all injured Paul do and Kyle Clifford are the two healthy, scratches four, Los Angeles. Bass Leschi gets the start again. Fifteen two on the air at two point five eight goals against any point three. Save percentage. Jonathan Quakers missed a total of eighteen games this year with two separate injuries gets the starts eighteen game. Played. This year is six ninety two point eight seven goals against any point nine four. Save percentage in the first period bass Levski in the lightning dependent at to our left and skate left to right in the roadway jerseys with blue numbers quick the kings are defending the net to our right. They'll move right to left in the first in their home black jerseys with white numbers officials tonight, the referees, juice Lynn there, and John McCain Isaac the lines Brandon, garlic and Lonnie and opening phase out moments away. First game in two twenty nineteen four the lightning there in L A to take on the king's next.

Los Angeles Los Angeles Kings JT Miller Tampa Bay Lightning Jonathan Quakers John Stevens Anaheim Tampa Bay Vegas Michigan Kelly Chellios Adam Ernie Andrei vasilevskiy Bass Leschi Sara Lee Ernie Gibson Matthew Joseph Adrian
"john stevens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And welcome once again suit John Stevens..

"john stevens" Discussed on Spittin' Chiclets

Spittin' Chiclets

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on Spittin' Chiclets

"And that's when I got the call that I got traded actually in the hospital yet. Really? Yeah. And and I remember thinking like I fucking lasted. I'm though I out laugh. Like two days. I think they traded me two or three days after firing him. I was like I was there longer you were like a badger von or it's on your hallway page. That's Michelle you go wit you go the width dog what? Because my father used to say don't worry about him. You'll be there longer than he is. And then I was like Jesus that being pretty close though. Well, are you mentioned two four coach changes for coaching changes in the last seventeen days quickly? I don't think Willie Desjardins the long-term answer for LA either. That's I don't think that's. Any rocket Scientology is needed for that one. John Stevens voice. We mentioned it just kinda wore out very very very similar to solder. I I don't know. I think Q's going to be in the running for that job got to think that they got the money to pay him. And and fuck man, you get to live in LA also to you wonder at this stage of his career is want to be in line to try to get another Stanley Cup is he looking for more of a project, you know, reclamation type thing I this teams L A's probably on the downslope of the nice. They add right now. And you know, that's gonna be a bit more of a challenge as you wanna team. That's better and have a better chance at a Cup. Would you guys agree? I feel like Saint Louis LA right now or at the same place. They play very hard heavy game. It's a little slower compared to taste standards. And maybe it's caught up to them. I I keep making excuses for LA and same with Saint Louis because I liked the guys, and I like everyone so much, but just seems like that's how they drafted and developed their players where it's difficult to just go in there and all of a sudden change, it's just the system and right now the two worst teams in the league statistically right now, the the least amount of points in one thing about. One number that jumped out at me. He's only eighteen game should a five hundred games coached already. He's quietly amassed quite a few games. You know for the seventy opportunities had gotten teams to the playoffs. You obviously doesn't get the opportunity this yet being fired fired. And all so like, you said biz it's not gonna be long before he's not gonna be out of work. He'll he'll get a job whenever he wants in about fire and coaches actually found out from a year ago. So it was all in the past ten seasons. Again, going back year. NHL teams had fired thirty eight coaches three point eight per year. The next closest was NBA thirty major league baseball twenty five and football at nineteen. The NHL fires coaches at a much more rapid clip. And it's Connor pots. And let me tell you what I think the reason for that is where you could probably agree with me hockey for the for the most sake. It's it's all the same systems. Like, there's little tweaks here little tweaks there. I mean like, okay, maybe you start the game. And you're playing like a a little d or pinching it's you're playing to. Two one two or the center's kind of just being a little more over protective that the jumping in you know, maybe a little bit more prepared and have different types of off plays. Maybe your type of plays, you know. But but for the most part, it's all a same..

Saint Louis LA Saint Louis LA NHL Willie Desjardins Michelle John Stevens Cup NBA seventeen days three days two days
"john stevens" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Chicago Blackhawks professional hockey on Blackhawks radio here with you pre-game. Chris boden. The Blackhawks stopped one streak a couple of nights ago. They look to start another a different better kind with a second straight home win here on the west side as the Los Angeles Kings make their only trip to the United Center this season. And has these teas teams slugged it out in the playoffs? A few years back. It's been a season of change for both is look to find a way back to those high stakes match. John wiedeman. Enjoy Murray are standing by to bring you the call the bottom of the hour here on seven twenty WGN. Good evening, everyone. Welcome to the United Center. And welcome to the vob. Roman auto Gook, Chicago Blackhawks pre-game show. Visit the Bob Roman auto group at warming dot com. And let's get right to tonight's Blackhawks storylines November fourth was the date of the kings decided to move on from head coach John Stevens replacing him with former connects bench boss, really yarded that came. Two days prior new Blackhawks decision to move on from Joel Quenneville bring in Jeremy Collins at these are different times compared to those back to back Western Conference final matchups of twenty thirteen and twenty fourteen the stars have gotten older the searches continue for the right? Supporting cast members as a salary cap is squeezed some roster flexibility in both cases, Patrick Kane says yes, these are different times for both teams kinda going through a little bit of different phase for us as organizations of franchises. But they're still big games. You know, they're trying to turn it around. And they got a new coach there and same thing with us. So big game. Especially after last game winning the gaming maybe start putting something together here, especially at home because some confidence and we know come ready to play because they need to points kinda get back into the kings. Did not have Dustin Brown to start the season that after adding Ilya Kovalchuk does lead their team with five goals in fourteen points, but Jonathan quick and then backup Jack Campbell. Both suffered the exact. Same injury a tournament discus heater would I took the net, but he caught an illness on the trip here. He will back up tonight. But the starter is going to be former Notre Dame or Calvin Peterson from Waterloo, Iowa, he'll make his.

Blackhawks Los Angeles Kings Chris boden United Center John wiedeman WGN Patrick Kane John Stevens Calvin Peterson Ilya Kovalchuk Chicago Jack Campbell Murray Joel Quenneville Iowa Waterloo Dustin Brown Jonathan quick Jeremy Collins
"john stevens" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"LA kings have fired coach John Stevens Willie Desjardins will coach the interim. And finally Paramount Pictures is developing a remake of its nineteen ninety-five comedy clueless. All the latest headlines and information during the sportscenter on ESPN radio all throughout the day. The big lead wrote something about the number of Cowboys in the booth because there are a lot all over the league for a team. That's won two playoff games and twenty three years in Stephen shouted at Michael Irvin. Earlier in the show you got to win three of those to win a Super Bowl at the very least in one season and you've had to in twenty three seasons. Right moose Johnson. You got Tony Romo? Got Troy Aikman. You got Jason Witten and the idea. Jerry Jones wants it this way. He wants Cowboys on all the telecast. He is. The most powerful man in the sport. I had never noticed that before. That's not something that I noticed before that the Cowboys have that kind of prime positioning in broadcasting, and it's it's just all their guys. It's Michael Irvin on the NFL network. And then the four white guys on network television. You know, it's it's wet and Jimmy Johnson. Right. I've noticed it. I just never given it much thought. I haven't noticed it though. I mean, Jerry's probably not so happy about Jimmy Johnson being on one of the channels. But he's flooded the zone by having all the other channels of former former Cowboys. Giving you the analysis. Right. Is there another team that has to is there? Is there another team not just football? Is there another team across you know, Klay? Thompson dad does some broadcasting. I mean, you're making a great point or no dolphins calling games. Right. I mean, there's no just dolphin games. I understand. National on the national platforms. I'm trying to think of other teams who have multiple broadcast. It's a jarring number of Cowboys announcers to have in the booth telling you how to enjoy your football. When Michael Thomas goes running to the end zone and pulls a cell phone out. Those were Troy Aikman's old cowboy sensibilities coming forward, I just don't know how he can have those old cowboy sensibilities when he played on that team. And I don't know if he was in that courtroom that Michael Irvin walked through in a fedora and an a mink. Those teams were very bad behaving teams. I don't know. Why? Troy, Aikman goes crazy. Whenever Michael Thomas. Does something like pulls a cellphone out of the goal post. I guess the giants have a few people are texting in when Phil Simms. Tiki barber. Michael strahan. Enough. Ronda barber and booger McFarland for the bucks are on this to their climbing. How? Is that can that be thing because the theory that the big lead is espousing is that if you put? The the former Cowboys in the booth then you will have a better chance of getting in play as a network for the Super Bowl. And that seems from where I'm standing to be stretch that Jerry Jones would give her help lobby to make sure that ESPN gets a Super Bowl right because Jason Witten is in the booth that seems like like trying to hire, you know, Leonard friend order to keep him in Toronto as your coach Abbas also have Darren Woodson what he. Cowboys lead by mile, but they are America's team strange. Where's the Bengals have to Luma and Collins worth about that? Why are they still America's team? The ratings prove this. Yeah. I mean, okay. Because last night's game was the highest rated you know, week nine game. And I don't know how long and the highest rated television show since Mark. But the ratings bear out that the the Dallas Cowboys are still a big time national draw terms of consistent ratings. Huge patriots have Bruschi in moss. Just a ESPN hiring a couple of guys doesn't count because we have to we have two litter our library with former athletes, so we don't count. Orlowski is wandering around here. We have to we have two litter the Damien Woody that patriots. Are you just gonna keep blurting broadcast question, man? I'm just trying to do some research for you. But these are not the broadcasters on these are the lead broadcast on the national games the big game tonight as a cowboy the big game that we were watching yesterday as a cowboy on it next. Jeff Van Gundy, Mark Jackson. Cowboy and buck. And Tibo patriot. I cannot be right. That can't be right with the big lead is can I pop the sizing the idea that somebody would hire. How is that possible? You asking me because I don't believe it because I don't understand what it is. There seems to be a lot of Cowboys in play by play boots. But they're all amazing incredible talents. That's not true. Oh, awesome. They are. Everyone agrees with that. That was better than Romo. Okay. Very good. I liked Troy Aikman's I- perspective. I really appreciate it. I I never knew that people would react that kind of way to Michael Thomas. Who else was reacting that way? Joe buck. But who else who else are the only two in America were they were the only two out there yelling and screaming, certainly the only. Was that initially didn't know it was a Mazda Joe horn, Mike, I'm I've got to tell you like once upon a time, the broadcasters could absolutely influence the reaction. Are you telling me that Aikman? And Joe buck were complaining about Michael Thomas, and the people watching were not that this was not a social media frenzy that people weren't outraged by unsportsmanlike behaviour the selfish act of costing your team. We're the minority. I liked that nonsense. I thought it was so cool that he was doing something from like my teenage years, what a cool throwback and couldn't believe that was an Omar from fifteen years ago. I didn't realize that Joe horn was fifteen years ago. It's the only thing I know about Joe horn Joe horn. That's all I know about it. I mean that is shot for shot recreation. It was amazing. It really was them. Put it on the poll is that all you know, about your horn. I know I news fast. I got very little information for you outside of that Oranje. I don't believe that's as big, man. I don't think that that's wants to God's was referencing. I think that was just an inner thought that popped out. I think what that happens all the time went through got. I was talking about Michael Thomas. Still bake it. I didn't think choir to this week that I could envision a realistic scenario in which day, you know, Michael Thomas, make you horny. And what were you guys talking about buying a beautiful bouquet of flowers is what we were talking about?.

Cowboys Troy Aikman Michael Thomas Michael Irvin Jerry Jones Joe horn ESPN Jason Witten Jimmy Johnson Tony Romo Dallas Cowboys Michael strahan America moose Johnson Joe buck football Paramount Pictures Mark Jackson LA
"john stevens" Discussed on Hockey Today

Hockey Today

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on Hockey Today

"How are you, sir? I'm good. How are you today? Doing well better than John Stevens let go off Angeles yesterday. And I think I had mentioned to you. I was out in LA last week. I talked to somebody close with the kings about how they were playing. And he said if I didn't know any better, I would think they're trying to get the coach fire. So ironically, wink later, he ends up getting beat. I listen, I always feel bad for any coach that gets fired. There's always more reasons than just the Xs and the os. You've got goaltending issues COPA tars and played. Well, they've had injuries. But how taken aback where you that? He was let go so early in the season. Well, that was the buzz, right? That that they were going to do it last year. We didn't I don't think we had any coaching changes or. Very end of the season. Yeah. So, but that was kind of the buzz. They didn't get off to good starts. They've they haven't played. Just haven't played. Well, I don't know what else to say about it. I mean the theme that's you know, worst goal differential in the National Hockey League right now. So. Arjun oil. You're not behind the scenes in the room. John Stevens been I think he's a good hockey, man. I think he's he's someone that seems better suited as an assistant coach the head coach. I think that's where he's had more success. But that's not to say that in the right circumstances. He couldn't be successful head coach he came into an LA franchise on the other side of their run where they won their two Stanley Cups. This is the slower group it's a top heavy group. And I think this is going to be a challenge for we'll Willie Desjardins in and going forward because it's you know, Johnny quick is out. I think John Campbell orchestra Jack Campbell is okay. But you know, they need exceptional goaltending. I think with the with the roster they have in front of them. It's like I said, it's a top heavy. They're slow on the wing. And you know, maybe just a change in voice. It'll be good. I'm interested on they hired. Marco Sturm is an assistant coach and maybe. See the bigger picture in LA. Isn't Marco Sturm is going to be the head coach that's being maybe next year down the road because willing to Jordan might be just kind of that guy to help transition Marco Sturm into the role because he impressed a lot of people when he was coaching team Germany at the Olympic and appointing over metal there last year. So and NHL experience. I mean, he played the National Hockey League for a long time. So he knows the league. But we'll see we'll see how it goes. But I think it was a tough spot runny coach to come in there because you know, they're the kings high. And as as a franchise were, you know, have receded a little bit as some of these guys have gotten a little older, and they've had some cap casualties that they've had to move guys out. They haven't drafted all that. Well, that's gonna kill you. I mean, that's what it's really about. You can pick up any free agent Yuan. You got to draft. Well, yeah. All in every sport EJ. That's where it really comes down to you can have all the cap space you want to sign a bunch of free agents. But if you can't build a core through the draft, they're just not going to be able to have sustained success in this league. And and. Right. That was a problem for for for the kings for awhile now. So they move on and use your right? Everybody's talking about Marco storm coming out of the Olympics as a possible head coach. And maybe it'll happen all Angeles. How about this? Daddy j Calgary Vancouver. And Edmonton one two and three in the division for the first time since two thousand and nine, and it's amazing that Vancouver just doesn't seem to quit. And this. This Patterson is really starting to make a name for himself. Fear is the clear front runner for the Calder. Yeah. Patterson is the only word I have for him is brilliant..

Marco Sturm National Hockey League John Stevens LA Patterson Willie Desjardins Olympics COPA Vancouver Edmonton John Campbell change in voice coaching team Germany Johnny Jack Campbell Jordan
"john stevens" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"That is dedicated to. Are good sys- Nikki from Houston. All right. In l. makeup home, they close the town down sale. Count the head, lots on the highway. Limit in sheets of lay. You had a busy there. Oh, my. I love me some Elton. Well, I mean, all right. Well, praise the Lord natives, welcome back to another episode of getting grown, Jason Kidd. I m Kia and pitch, and this is Jay. And she is not, and we are. For another weeks worth of conversation. All about, don't think good people. We will be talking about the test, the trials, the twist, the turns, the temptations, and the taxes of being an adult in the year of our Lord, two thousand eighteen and it's almost. I mean it's like Tober. We are squarely into the last quarter. And what's going on with this? Oh gosh. Just running around like a chicken with my head cut off. I am. I'm okay. I had a really good weekend. It was our good sys- ants when it's birthday on here. Happy birthday and twenty twenty twenty twenty. I love me. Some Antoinette. Make sure you guys check out around the way curls. She's just stunning. And so talented and just just gorgeous the both of Asian Shanti in internet. I love them both. Those. Those are my sisters, but it was internet's birthday in. I had the privilege of speaking at the culture Kahn which was a convention hosted for a young black creatives. It is the it was the second year and it was super, super, super dope Rimma was there John legend, John login? Was there. And Charlemagne. It was a bevy of speakers. It was a bevy of speakers. You guys can check them out on Instagram. I believe it's at the CC NYC, but you can definitely look on my social, but shadow to them is a young group of of black young creatives, who put together a collective, and I went to high school with one of the girls did you? I did. We were in the same, limo in prom. That is. And I saw on Facebook and that's Ashley girl, hey, desolate. Well, so one of the other organizers is my co worker. Small world that all. Nasty broncho. Small world after all. We just like the world is is crazy. Small, it is and what makes it even smaller. So my my coworkers actually one of the one of the organizers will. He is also John legend's first cousin, so him probably got good Baptists abroad show as well. Oh. Pentecostal Pentecostal and be come. He did. He did. He around. It would be. See. See roof for moment would be with the roofer just little sable little from the. We're not gonna talk about John Stevens on my watch because I. I love John which talk about, and he thinks live, and he sounds like his voice has been digitally mastered does. No. It says he sang at the con at the conference who was at our told you. I always tell the story about how I almost got put out of the Mary weather at the concert because I was like, do y'all? Here's Johnny. Johny singing. I don't know what you came to do, but John came to see why showed up. I was like mad if you want to, but that nigga. So ready for me to go. But I was like that lady who was next to my dad at the last Luther con last about to say conference. Last Luther concert that he went to said there was this lady this lady next and my so full disclosure, I am not on pitch key is and so is my father. My father can sing. He sounds like Jeffrey Osborne. My fav-. So can you. One night. I love the string, Joe. Tonight. Sorry, sorry, I have a song my heart, but he was at this Luther concert in. So he was singing along, you know, huge defense. And the lady next thing. As you speak security. Sometimes the spirit just moves you at away what you just have to just give guy the praise right there. That's how. Who should know as you know, singers, people who are even want to say it like that, but there are certain things that people who sing here that I feel like other people don't here and. And. I don't know. It's just like a different. If a different kind of appreciation, I think..

John John legend Joe Jason Kidd Antoinette John Stevens Nikki Elton Facebook Houston CC NYC Jeffrey Osborne Jay Luther Kahn
"john stevens" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

Inappropriate Earl

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

"You know, you wanted to game five and elimination against San Jose a couple years ago, and he had Dwight king and Trevor Lewis for the wings, entree COPA just didn't work anymore. And so rightly so they made it and look, Luke one. One of that job for while he wanted to be the GM when when when back in the day he got, he finally got his weight because of the failure of dean and Darryl. And I think they've done a great job. I really do now. Look, it's only been a little bit over a year. You're and a half since they'd taken vice. But I think they've transitioned this. I think the organization was not on the same page with respect to the GM, the coaching staff and the rest of the team, and certainly team didn't like Darrell anymore. So they were done if you watch the twenty seventeen season two thousand sixteen season. At the end, those last twenty games they quit on. They don't wanna play for data any more and every coach show flight. So I respect the job dean Dowell did I think they could have been here longer and still been in their jobs, they were willing to adapt to what this game is today needed willing to do it and they paid the price. But I think Robin and Luke, it's different. United got to hall of fame players running the show. Right. And I think they respect players more and I think it's a more friendly atmosphere. That's why John Stevens is coach because the players like respect John, not they didn't respect arrow, but it just. It was too much animosity between. You know, Dow was a great coach, but he never took his gas pedal two cups to rings, just relax. Take it easy. You make it easy on the place. He never did. He wasn't his nature John Stevens. He's much more calm. I know that the players maybe don't love him, but they've really like them and they respect him and I just think they responded last bounced back. They played very well. A tough player frowned four, tough games against Vegas, but I really like what you know when Phil and shoots and Dan Becca made the decision to change a top of the food chain in the organization would with Luke and Blake. I think they've done a great job to be honest with you. Oh yeah. And I think you know. I'm a very loyal person in my personal life. You know, people who are good to me. I Amen relationships, but you've been great to me from day one. You deserve it. But I mean, I can't in the technical sense help you in any capacity and you're still nice to me doesn't doesn't matter. And I just, I think that was almost Lombardi's problem. You know, with the Mike Richards thing, maybe bought him out. Agreed. You know the Voinov situation which. I think doesn't get the credit for being the death knell into the the team has we knew a back then because then they had to go out and get revere and then had to play at that stage of your career, maybe a little more than he should have been. I mean, Voinov just there was some bumps in the road, but the thing and we talked about nothing. I'm pretty pretty transparent about it. Now I get that they, you know, there's a faction, maybe new organization wants to bring them back whenever I was like, all right. Can I stop hearing about? Go get another defenseman that's like going off. Go get another top four right hand. The defense would make it trade move. First round, pick move onto your process, whatever. I don't wanna hear that. We miss love of enough anymore. I mean he wasn't. He wasn't true, daddy, Earl, I mean, oh, no, I know. But I heard that excuse for so long. I'm like, make a trade or somebody like that can replace this guy wasn't an irreplaceable asset. I get it. The team wasn't as good, but I mean he his skills were built up to a mythical proportion was like he was like a riccar some like going like, you can't replace this lava avant. You can't replace a right handed top four defenceman then maybe you shouldn't run the team. So I heard that too long. I don't see any scenario way comes back. To Los Angeles. I don't wanna back. Okay, that's good. But I just meant like let's just say crystal ball..

Luke John Stevens dean Dowell Dwight king San Jose Trevor Lewis COPA Los Angeles Mike Richards Lombardi Darrell Voinov United Darryl Robin Earl Phil Dan Becca Blake
Cosby sentenced to 3 to 10 years in state prison for sexual assault: reports

Larry O'Connor

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Cosby sentenced to 3 to 10 years in state prison for sexual assault: reports

"Bill Cosby has been sentenced to three to ten years in state prison following his conviction on sexual assault of Andrea Constand back in two thousand four correspondent Athena Jones says John Steven O'Neill had some harsh words for Cosby as he read the sentence. No one is above the law, and no one should be treated differently or disproportionally. We also know that judge O'neil said that he had given great weight to the victim impact testimony in this case, and he called it powerful. The judge denied bail for Cosby he's in jail this evening, his accuser, Kathy Mckee who is suing for defamation says it was tough to watch today's proceedings in light of an alleged attack on her decades ago. I saw the violence. And Bill Cosby when he attacked me. And. It's hard. It's very difficult. To try to make a

Bill Cosby Kathy Mckee John Steven O'neill Athena Jones Andrea Constand O'neil Assault Ten Years
"john stevens" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on 790 KABC

"The regular season they've been a good road team all season long their record twenty two fourteen and four only three teams have more road points than the kings nashville tampa bay boston and those are the top three teams in the nhl and again the importance of this game the kings are leading anaheim and the race for third place by two points anaheim does have a game in hand kings have four games left anaheim with five left john stevens is the kings head coach and earlier he put tonight's game in perspective playoff game when you think about it and with the implications surrounding it and i think there's been a big group in the western conference have approached every game the last little while here quite a while be honest you probably last quarter of a season where we're all jockeying for play opposition we're gone from third place to ninth place just by sitting idle sometimes we knew that these games would be important down the stretch we knew that the teams that were playing down the stretch all in a position to try and get in the playoffs and we knew that every game would have implications on who was in and it was finished in the playoffs so we've had the same mentality for quite a while now we just worry about each game as it comes because we know what's important we're trying to improve our standing in a playoff position and now you're playing a team that you're in direct competition with with a spot in the division so it's obviously a big game for obvious reasons and i think the guys approach it that way i know as a coach you always liked to look to make things better game after game but the way the team is playing recently are you pleased with what you're seeing.

boston nhl anaheim john stevens nashville
"john stevens" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Roach promotes the whole road trip jonathan quick has been really tremendous i mean he's had i think if my math is corrected nine thirty six april senator over the entire trip he's played all you played all previous six games so uh i think that the king's in pretty good spot right now with their goal tending with the way both miners were playing the king's three in three of those roadtripping quick has been the goaltender this recorded all three victories but yeah darcy kemper i think was the king's best player in that first period with the fifteen saves on sixteen one of shots and and as we all know we we we took a look at the schedule the king's go home tonight it's a long trip home and then they start thursday with a stretch of foreign six nights and usually marches pretty compressed for a lot of teams in the nhl so you're going to need both goaltenders now you absolutely are an and john stevens just seems so confident these guys and and the thing too is they're they're both playing pretty well in and if they i mean if they've had issues they've been able to figure them out i made quick coming out of the road trip i think he was one seven at all when he turned it around real fast on this trip been uh i mean you could make a case that he was the team's best player in chicago last night uh that he was one of the team's best players are really most important player against buffalo because in that third period the sabres even though they were down four nothing at the beginning of the period gone a huge portion quick made some tremendous saves so i think john stevens is really comfortable both those guys and i think it certainly something that i think especially as you mentioned nick with the compressed schedule.

Roach jonathan senator nhl chicago buffalo sabres john stevens nick
"john stevens" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on 790 KABC

"This really business being a solid all contributor and when when john stevens has asked that anti andrew i think with you dick that ask them about andy andrea and about the line specifically that andy andrea operas on you basically point out that all those guys happens scores at some point between johnny brzezinski michael audio andy andrea off and they can create offense and when you have essentially your depth players playing like this and you're seeing just the king's depth right now and their performance versus chicago blackhawks team that has struggled to kind of replenishing replace the depth after all those stanley cup runs it has distorted give you hope in the sense that this this key stepped can score which is a really big marker for some of the more successful teams yeah andrew odds goal set up by brodsky and dimaggio the linemates clicking late in the first period gosh cooper the insider joining us here between periods follow him la kings dot com thanks josh thank you we have the second period here at the united center to nothing the king's with the lead mitchell andrea off with goals we'll be back king sake brought to you by morongo casino resort and spa good times anytime times all the time my name is ruth roussy i'm a retired teacher i'm ninety one years old and this is how i live united i say retired but not really once a week i read books to children as part of united way's education program reading to a child creates links between language and literacy it creates a bond between grown up and child and believe it or not it prepares them for a better academic future oh we.

andy andrea united center morongo casino resort ruth roussy john stevens andrew johnny brzezinski chicago blackhawks brodsky dimaggio ninety one years
"john stevens" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Go our production assistant is jeremy while housing thanks also to candace griffiths and the listeners of the film spotting advisory board and special thanks to everyone at wbz chicago more information is available at wbz dot org all right take a moment right now the end of the show please give us a rating or a review on apple podcast it won't take too much of your time and it really does help us reach new listeners are music this week is by suv john stevens including his single tonya harding i would argue and even more empathetic exercise arrival cetering tonya harding then i tanya more information is at suv john stevens dot com for films buddy nine josh larson i met him combine our thanks for listening this conversation can serve no purpose anymore barn i don't wanna see your predictable josh because sometimes you surprised me but i had your review or at least a rating which is all i know of i tanya pegged weeks ago that i'd be mad i knew it just wasn't going to go out will a what would you witted you rate at did you ever and of giving it uh i did i headed a three and a half and actually now costa four for me i'm a fan of it it's in my top twenty or at least 25 of the year it was certainly fawn i there is a lot of stuff i liked about as an enjoyable watch i just i think i was partly reacting to coming to it after what was at golden globe stops to somewhere i was seen you know was harding at the golden globes is that part of it i kinda half watched those i was doing something else and it was on in the other room and just hearing about this at hearing about it being categorized as this you know this huge rid and region this redemption story her reclaiming her and and i think it it is effective in doing that but mostly because of margo robbie's performance she is phenomenal great that scene in front of the mirror is.

production assistant advisory board josh larson margo robbie candace griffiths chicago john stevens tonya harding tanya
"john stevens" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"john stevens" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Specialties the last couple of games the the kings of one especially team that only take it three penalties and that'll be akiga the oilers strengthen the orders they've got great players that can excel with the man advantage against the vancouver could actually yesterday the king's wanna special teams battle the end up winning a hockey game the oilers pelley kill 31st in the nhl seventy one point eight percent overall here on home ice even worse they've given up twenty five goals in fifty seven pelly fifty six percent killing deficiency the kings have to try to expose that approach the power play with a shot mentality but when the king's rhonda parkway one thing they do have to be aware of the oilers your ability to be able to counter and come back its core shorthanded goals buehler's your team that have seven shorthanded goals on the season because of the speed that they have witnessed specially balance that i i think get you the two points come the end of the game and do you look at the both the killing records on these two teams the king's best in the nhl they've been at or near the top all seas along it has darrell mention the orders are dead last in that regard again the first match up this season now meet four times longtime division rivals what does john stevens expect here's the king's head nick disappointing loss at home so i think you're going to get probably their best game i think they're gonna commodity hungry with the team and their division minority dogma division they and tonight i think their duty my of and watched him enough to know why they struggled but i still think they're really good team in the size the government's physicality in their line of the get some highend offense employers know the get one of the best offensive players in the world if not two or three of them saw their wares were clearly going to have to do good job without the park and jackson match the park the not give them may uh a large number of scoring opportunities such and they can really urgent head coach john stevens of the king's on what he might expect here tonight as the edmonton oilers and the king's hit the ice aaron rogers place take a look at the starting lineups brought to you by.

oilers vancouver buehler nhl john stevens edmonton oilers darrell jackson fifty six percent eight percent