19 Burst results for "John Saunders"

Inquiry Slams Security Faults Before Manchester Arena Attack

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Inquiry Slams Security Faults Before Manchester Arena Attack

"An inquiry into the twenty seventeen bombing at the Ariana Grande concert in England is pointing fingers at people other than the person who launched the attack the report finds that there were what it calls serious shortcomings among people who were supposed to be protecting people at Manchester arena the report is being led by retired judge John Saunders and it says venue operators security staff and police each failed in different ways the report says the failures ended up making it possible for the suicide bomber who killed twenty two people to carry out his quote evil intentions the judge says it was distressing to hear that there were multiple opportunities to thwart the bombing but they all fell through the report says while it's likely that the bomb was still would have been able to unleash his explosive attack if some involved with security at the venue had acted differently the loss of life would have been less I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Ariana Grande Concert Manchester Arena Judge John Saunders England Oscar Wells Gabriel
"john saunders" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

The No Limits Selling Podcast

04:51 min | 9 months ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

"Right I mean. Surrogate. Say something I was going to say. To your point about. This. Truth. This moment of truth it is there were some painful moments in these interviews I conducted, but the key is framing these interviews and you sit down at the top client and say, Hey, in this case, a real store when I did Mike I said Mike I really have been so impressed with how union business partners operate run your business over the years. I want to get better at what I do and how I can engage with you and help you grow your business. I'd love to get your feedback on how I operate. So I can improve and that framing completely changes the complexion of the conversation instead of just asking them this sort of awkward questions about yourself. Now they complimenting now you're deepen the relationship and I would argue changing complexion of it forever, and in fact, it did and I'll never forget that very individual asking him. Mike. I remember, I got rid of the so vividly, Mike, what's the best thing about working with my company and I I remember thinking myself this is where he tells me how amazing I am. Can I tell you something and he did not mention my name once in the next two or three sentences that came out of his about and I was blown away blown away. And when I remember driving home a driving out of his office that afternoon. Realizing holy cow. This is what you're brandis. Right. Your brand is what people say that too. You're not around to poke. At that moment brand became very clear to me and that I needed to manage it better with him and all the things done with him and his team over the years and making more aware of it. 'cause it was always my head I knew I did it. But clearly wasn't that evident to him. It was a great brand awareness moment for me. So John when you're writing this book somewhere in the process of writing this book or thinking about it, it's like I wanNA write a book that when. Someone reads it they do X. Like what is the end result you're looking for for let's say twenty percent of the people that read it. If they got this I know I did something amazing. What do you want them to get what you want them to do? Thank you I. Really appreciate that it's this book ultimately is is for leaders and contributors, but I would argue for contributors, it eventually want to become leaders because helping build that mindset what I hope people can do from getting this book is. I build trust that's a huge part of the story from from making this all happened I don't think any of Michael Cabins without building trust. There's a whole chapter dedicated to that Gutu then going out and Dobie, his process system to unleash all of these gives that your team numbers have and make them feel safe to execute on them in and leverage them because if you. Don't create that trust in that safety. It's very difficult for people to break out there their their box, Utah performance or already in that mindset but they're not the usual folks. It's the other end of the middle and end of the Bulker I think need more help as a leader I believe with a few of these states, steps and processes put out you can help make that happen. Brilliant. Because I think at the end of the day, that is what we all want and a lot of people that work for corporations that might actually enjoy going into work do not feel safe and but what I mean by feeling safe is if they think something's going wrong, they don't feel comfortable saying, Hey, I think we're going in the wrong direction because they don't want to be seen as the bad person or be attacked or whatever. If you create an organization where people feel safe saying, Hey, I think we're going the wrong direction then you can have. A conversation I realize oh no, we're not everything. Okay and is settled right in then or you realize John's doing something wrong. You go ahead no idea let's fix that and what I'm describing there seems like commonsense but in most corporations that simply does not happen. What happens is I go to my friends in the company. Can you believe what John's doing they go I can't believe he's doing that and it creates these silos and poor communications and makes the slower than we are. So hats off to you for releasing this book John is going to be available everywhere. It's going to be online in. December seven th the week of December Center. Just around the corner and go out there get this book and drop John. Align, let him know how this book helped you build a stronger organization. John thanks so much being on the show. If you enjoyed this episode. Please go to I tunes of Viva Five Star Rating, and if you're looking for more tools, go to my website at no limit selling dot com I've got free mine training course there. That's going to teach you some insights on the world anura ristic programming, and that is the fastest way to get better results..

John Mike I Mike Michael Cabins December Center Utah Gutu Dobie
"john saunders" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

The No Limits Selling Podcast

06:47 min | 9 months ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

"Hello everyone today, I had the privilege of having John Saunders here he's the optimize her and John I need optimizing welcome to the program. Thanks for having me marks for to be here. So you've got this book coming out that that's one of the reasons I wanted to talk to you because ultimately at the end of the day, no matter who you are where you are we're always looking for that edge and how do we optimize ourselves and our organizations so tell me about the book. Sure I just say that my inspiration for. Was Thinking back over my almost twenty five years Working Wall Street and I just saw so many people that had this incredible ability but it was hidden for years and what I found was partially were maybe a little bit complacent and oftentimes more afraid to kind of break out of their shell and think there's a variety of reasons why they are afraid some internal, some extra driven or tab is if you can help unleash that gift and help them think in this optimize their mindset, it can really deliver powerful results for an organization. Absolutely you brought up the word fear and fear is the enemy of success on one hand on ask you a question and answer as best as you can. Sure. That, what is if we have love on one side? What's the other side of that coin? What's the counter emotion? Do you think of love interest in our field at the therapist officer? I suppose hate. Would think that and in mind worldview hate is a symptom I think what's on the other side of that is fear fear is the counterpart of love and then we act out in ways from fear of not committing whatever and the reason I bring that in is this is that when we go to do things to be sales people or leaders or whatever what gets in the ways fear as well, and so it's just kind of interesting that fear is the heart of the human condition that stops us from having those relationships. You want people we care about as well as showing up in this world in a powerful way. It's really interesting point I appreciate that also not limited just a few. I think there's a few other major emotional factors that I talked about the book as well On. Well tell us about those what are the other ones you're up to list them all out fear Moss, and certainty in a really powerful one of doubt Beaupre Brownies made the most famous in chain and just share my thoughts on after minute. One of the things I found in my research just experience over the years was two elements of shame. Shame is a very powerful force that will keep people will stop do they will not do something. Because, they're afraid of feeling a change you tried something you took a risk, didn't work naive to go your boss, your spouse, your partner what have you and tell them you failed and people feel at Shane. That's one that's internal. There's a second one that hasn't gotten a lot of precedent in my view and that is external in you have to lead a big change initiative and I saw this my own life where you're trying to drive change and the messaging on the has to be critically is critical important. You can't commit and say, Hey, the more early been doing the last ten years has been a mistake. And that happens that's how people fame change sometimes as opposed to hate there's extra forces changing industry and we need to head will be done great things for ten years, twenty years whatever. But there's these extra forces taking place we need to address, and therefore we need to all I mean think about their messages. So I'm going to push back on the shame thing because what you said I think is absolutely true that shame can be so debilitating that it stops us dead in our tracks. So there's another gentleman out there his name is Don Jamaica and he's a bunch of books. One of them's called the code of the executive. And he found a manual training manual for the Samurai. Interest. joined. The Samurai and you do all the training and you'll cooling you're ponytail and you got the big sword and everything is like amazing till you go into battle because when everything is just training, you can be pretty brave. But when you go into battle this other Samurai there and a lot of people newbies were run away from the fights and what the uses sham as a motivator to bolster courage that it would be so shameful to run away in battle and they used shame as a way to empower people to be more courageous, which is a just depends as leadership, right? How to use the emotional landscape to create the change that you want kind of any thoughts on that. I mean. So I think the Samurai stories hundreds of years old. Ancient. So I think maybe there's a more modern way to to get through that I would agree I'm a big believer in Iran a sales team for many years that posting the numbers that the scoreboard if you will is is one way I guess to bring about change. Not so subtle. Some people when they're at the bottom of the Board Day get crushed and other people like dammit. I'm number three I need to be number one, and that's a shame gives them the power to move forward. So absolutely, because ultimately the end of the day when you go to business school, teach you all about these are the processes. These are the strategies and that human element what your books about is not really taught or taught well at all and you've been to a lot of people leaders out there in the space and Philip Holt was one of the people that you spoke to. So tell us about up his company and his story. Sure. Phillip was a guy that earlier out working as a kitchen that was one of his first jobs yet a big passion for Food and learned very early on that sooner or later something's GonNa go wrong if his the APP to work in was a owner operator said if you know the guy cooking in the kitchen place and he taught him very early on the. GonNa, go wrong right. You're going to run out of this girl with down or whatever, and you've got to be able to adjust on the fly. So he taught Gary early. Very. Early, on this whole idea, you know if the heat's to bigger kitchen to to get out if you will, and he embraced it and he figured out ways to adapt on the fly, and then he took that knowledge and apply it to a corporate life were you went under the ace for a number of years and then landed a job actually recently is running a big game studio Microsoft. So. Did he tell you about one of his failures like this was going wrong and this is what I learned this high transformed it. Yeah. He he's in the midst of between EA and Microsoft he worked he actually started the company and raised nine million dollars to start a company of Game Company and data and Lettuce Company and a a big lesson humor through that. Was We're starting a company and building a business you have to have focus and he attempted to do early on was run really to companies a data analytics company either gave puppy and Willie investors. He he tried to get money from the didn't that he didn't get mine for said. You've yet to pick on the other and he said I right I got this you know and. Should remember had to shut down one of those businesses and eventually got they didn't quite get it. Needed to be a native, they had to shut it down but I think the big lesson he took away from that was knowing that sometimes you do have to pit.

Microsoft John Saunders John I officer Moss Don Jamaica Willie Iran partner Philip Holt executive Shane Phillip Game Company Lettuce Company Gary
Lexington, Prague and Life inside the US Open bubble

The Tennis Podcast

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Lexington, Prague and Life inside the US Open bubble

"Tennis is back and it is back courtesy of to tournaments in Lexington and Prague. which have taken place over the last week that meant that Katherine Wichita was presenting tennis on television once more Matt's round of applause for Katherine. How good was she? Splendid. You've made me do around of applause well, holding microphone in one hand is difficult but Katherine. Presenting, tabby look very, very easy as she does. Did you do it. Yeah I really did I mean total shock to the system I had to wear non elasticated wastes I had to. Get up before nine am and. Work. That's D Work I mean a lot of that work was watching tennis and talking about it, which is no hardship expertise violins out for me, but it did take. A couple of days of adjustment and I did I did parise my tally wardrobe and veer towards the items that did have elasticated waste say no longer in the suitcase, which now is buying up yet it's been the Kobe. Pack the. Case. To take to St Louis Park. Containing my my tally jvm. Isaac. is any impact through week Stockley Park is where the video assistant referee job isn't it for the football? Yes I've had a va or seminar at Stockley Park. I've you know from? The the BBC. SNOOKA, coverage is coming out of the an adjacent studio at the time. So I was I was mingling with Ken, Doherty and Stephen Hendry all week. So blockbuste-. TENNIS PUNDITS CATHERINE was presenting Amazon prime videos coverage of Lexington We will talk about that. We'll talk about Prague, we're GONNA be talking about the USO and people that are playing people that are not playing other pullouts this week Rossi GonNa talk to Dan Evans. The British number one on life in the bubble he arrived over the weekend. A chat with him last night. So we'll hear from him about what it's like over there. 'cause we can't go this year, which is going to be a bit weird but. At least it looks like it is going ahead from a sports playing tennis playing perspective. At least we'll be something for everybody to watch. But the the event itself in. Lexington am I right in thinking that that was Put. Together in about a month's yeah I believe four weeks. Was the time line. Say, John Saunders, the tournament director over there they had some from Octagon, the management company and they do or they haven't passed hosted a challenger event. So they do have some experience of hosting tournaments but it a very very. legit respect, low level and they they three together this this tool level event four weeks notice. which. ADDS the eyes of the tennis world's on it. The top seed Tennis Club which. Is positioned adjacent to retirement home and with a fairly main road running across the back of the center court. Along which there were. Removals, vans and cement mixes and pickup trucks. Interrupting, interrupting the days tennis frequently. And it was all delightfully quaint and so apt somehow because tennis is more humble. Now upon its return in tennis players are having to be more humble and so it felt kind of really perfect that status his return I know we had Palermo last week in. Pro Pro concurrently, which is a more established tour van but to meet just felt really perfect that it was as as humbling as it was a setting. And even more perfect. He had kind of tennis's biggest superstars at the moment Serena Williams, coca golf and Venus Williams who emerged as they. See Pistol once again,

Tennis Katherine Wichita Stockley Park Dan Evans Top Seed Tennis Club Lexington St Louis Park Serena Williams Venus Williams Matt Parise USO Amazon Prague Stephen Hendry BBC John Saunders Isaac.
"john saunders" Discussed on Swarfcast

Swarfcast

13:48 min | 2 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on Swarfcast

"A literally what the home depot and tried to find a piece of steel which you know is terrible idea but i did you know the the for flute back at the time there is that company emeco so i get like these for flu chinese end bills from encode double sided for like three dollars which is a lot of money in three dollars there's been a you know expensive but yeah and there is no goal you know we were working on the target company anymore we were just we sort of parted ways of me i was just thinking let's make parts let's figure this out 'em you know with no there is no agenda there is no sketch or or i wasn't trying to rush through it a which is good in hindsight because it gave me probably two or three years to really just enjoy it in i burst myself and i would use that machine every night every weekend again a just made all kinds of parts on it so did you have a day job or yeah yeah had a day job in and kept that day job which is the only way i could have been able to take the risks later what were you doing real estate company well that must be really interesting though if if you want it to go back and see you know this time a this process of view learning this passion i dunno i think it might be very interesting to go back in and see so but mainly you were learning about how to run the machines on the web or how how were you earning did you find somebody to come and teach you couldn't and i one of the frustrating and things of that new york was you know you don't have a car so it's even if there was a machine shop you could drive to that would let you come in which they the i don't know why they would i couldn't even do that so i got lucky there were a couple of people on cnc zone who were pretty nice and there were some decent articles but what occurred to me was you know of a web forms great first some specific troubleshooting but video is such a better medium to share and learn so that's what causes meta just try to be the camps i rules you try to leave the place better than when you came so i thought living here it's got got folks were willing to type out to pair got articles on what a recording system is maybe i can make a video for it which is probably a better way to explain that are certainly a different way and then if i go when i have problems right need help on line hopefully all build a reputation as a guy who isn't just coming to selfishly receive information but not participate in the community the rather somebody be viewed as somebody who kind of pays it forward in his passionate about this so that's legitimately why you this is i think you too i probably about you took over four years before you even offered monetization so there is no ulterior motive there other than just being passionate about it so you would experiment which something and then posted on you to but then other people would help you after they saw what you were doing that yeah sure and then after you learn something you said hey everybody this this is what i've learned a and now you can learn from me yes or i'm not sure it was that formulate but that was the general idea that's really interesting then after you became proficient with the machines 'em then what happened so what happened was after some period of time maybe a year to i realize wait a minute here that second version of that prototype we kind of knew what needed to happen and i had somebody original solid models firm the first round so i just started doing it myself and i you know when parts needed changed her tweaked i just did it in then i i just kept thinking all stop when i can't go any further i'll stop when i get stuck i'll stop when i fail i just never failed and i literally bill o'reilly took me six months but i literally built that whole second prototype i couldn't build a couple of the things that were you know larger water jet cars but we then i basically everything i could in my apartment and we literally had the second prototype in her hand which is awesome in everything you've learned was online basically you didn't have anybody come to your place and it was it was really basically learned remotely yeah the only exception would be back at the time of until around her not there is a website called smart flicks which is kind of like netflix but it was dvd's and you could basically get a membership copies of these instructional videos and i don't think there were any on cnc but i did end up renting like there's a guy named daryl hall and who has some manual seeing a manual machining videos in the guy rudy who's kind of famous in the modern world call hotter something so i watch some videos on manual machine but even then i can remember 'cause i'd already been indus cnc and i remember getting the first dvd with the bridgeport and i remember literally i remember being anxious to start the dvd and thinking there's no way they actually turn those machine handles by hand like that's absurd mhm in ends up the there is power fee which i didn't know about switch kind of solve the problem but i still thought my gosh no i want i'm a senior guy so you had built a you would done the prototype 'em on you're seeing see and then a is that when you decided to go back home ohio no no that it was jeez i don't know the exact years but still probably two thousand nine eight time era okay you still were motivated to get a the rifle target product to market that was you're correct so so then what happened so the short version is i then started a i would rent a car and i drove around new england defined different factories the help us produced the target end and a long story short found one who was capable of doing a lot of the different parts different you know different types of technologies process is requirement you'll metal sheet metal am machine in fabrication and so forth and they ended up quarterbacking the whole project which is tremendously helpful so we ended up having a little factory inside a factory where they would keep are in radio sell kind of yeah you could almost call it like turnkey manufacturing where they would sell about everything else and the only reason to this day i believe that's the only reason they took us on was the i showed up having rented a car with a pelican case with the two targets the original one that was built by somebody else in the second version i built myself and i kind of had this i didn't say this but i kind of had this like i'm figuring this out guys were fight which we want someone who gets what we're trying to do here and i think they i think they sort of thought oh my gosh this kids kids willing to go this far 'em give him a shot exactly so then they they started 'em producing the targets employing them and then and then we would travel around to different events and trade shows in a private ranges in public ranges in in shell are targets ten the short answer is there are elements that we did incredibly well we've got some pretty cool government in military customers and contracts but the reality was we never would have gotten the sales to a point where it would justified two of us working fulltime on this business but before that wasn't issue what happened was we were filming a when we go to these events we wanna capture footage 'cause we were going to use you to a i'd already been doing youtube videos for the machine stuff then we knew we wanna use that for marketing further target company so my partner i decided well let's put cameras on the rifles never using or the military is using the police were using you know whatever so we started making a ticket cheney is the rail system this common across lots of different rifles and pistols and so forth so basically started making camera amounts a pitch any camera mass for things like go pro and con tour in tripods and dsl are as an again long story short the camera mouse took off okay you put a camera amount on thee a on the gun correct and nobody had done that before a i wouldn't say that i'm sure somebody had done it but a this was right before gopro kind of became a household name go pros a little bit more niche product back then and in that way you would show the target being hit by having the camera and there it yes you could either face sit down range and they would look as if you were the user operator of the of the firearm which could help people understand what the target does and how it worked in a cool dispatcher folks at her in that world war you catchy pointing back at you and it is a very useful training tool for various different people that are actually doing this professionally so situational awareness how they're moving how they're a coordination there where their hands are a run in team drills there's lots of different stuff that make it useful in the funny thing was we had really struggled but really been through a lot to bring this complicated product to market in that was the target and then all of a sudden we start making these camera amounts that we machined in house a out of a single piece of aluminum an you know it didn't take very long before we realized wait a minute you're making a lot more money selling these cameras then we are targets right right well that we did a story when we were a print magazine about you've heard of the company's kudo no they're one the the big a rig makers for 'em you know for dsl lars another cameras and yeah they used a all kinds of machine shops in united states etc do that a sounds like it's in sort of that neighborhood so the mounts were the first product where you started making money no we made we made money with the targets but new camry mouse where exciting because now all of a sudden we had a product that lots lots of folks were willing to buy we knew you know my first ever fixture that i ever made was for that camera amount we could wrap it prototype we were powder coating in a toaster oven in are basement on you know it was exciting a it was a confluence of you know we had the equipment we had some enough knowledge to get going on we had sales me now we could build up a little website we could do fulfillment 'em an old timey were documenting these things on video for people i didn't i don't think i put a ton of the camera out stuff we never used to channel to sell didn't seem like the right thing to do but if you look at some of the utility is like if you look at a powder coating video i never mentioned it but the product or powder coating is one of the early a gopro mouse right but you were documenting a lot of the processes you were doing on you right right okay andy a and then then the short answer is that business ultimately the partner and i disagreed on the future of the company in a disagreement regular resulted in an honest citing to shut the company down had a good run we learned a lot but i wasn't gonna be wasn't gonna work out so i decided now but i had kind of his free time time to kind of pour myself into a combination of chop shop work as well as just enjoying machining making more videos and i did that for two or three years a again i kept my day job just enjoying it nights and weekends so i didn't have that pressure a per say but really love i love like i at this point how they swap plasma cnc plasma machine ahead lay out of service grinder so here i am like feeling like i could make anything.

three dollars three years four years six months
"john saunders" Discussed on Swarfcast

Swarfcast

13:48 min | 2 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on Swarfcast

"A literally what the home depot and tried to find a piece of steel which you know is terrible idea but i did you know the the for flute back at the time there is that company emeco so i get like these for flu chinese end bills from encode double sided for like three dollars which is a lot of money in three dollars there's been a you know expensive but yeah and there is no goal you know we were working on the target company anymore we were just we sort of parted ways of me i was just thinking let's make parts let's figure this out 'em you know with no there is no agenda there is no sketch or or i wasn't trying to rush through it a which is good in hindsight because it gave me probably two or three years to really just enjoy it in i burst myself and i would use that machine every night every weekend again a just made all kinds of parts on it so did you have a day job or yeah yeah had a day job in and kept that day job which is the only way i could have been able to take the risks later what were you doing real estate company well that must be really interesting though if if you want it to go back and see you know this time a this process of view learning this passion i dunno i think it might be very interesting to go back in and see so but mainly you were learning about how to run the machines on the web or how how were you earning did you find somebody to come and teach you couldn't and i one of the frustrating and things of that new york was you know you don't have a car so it's even if there was a machine shop you could drive to that would let you come in which they the i don't know why they would i couldn't even do that so i got lucky there were a couple of people on cnc zone who were pretty nice and there were some decent articles but what occurred to me was you know of a web forms great first some specific troubleshooting but video is such a better medium to share and learn so that's what causes meta just try to be the camps i rules you try to leave the place better than when you came so i thought living here it's got got folks were willing to type out to pair got articles on what a recording system is maybe i can make a video for it which is probably a better way to explain that are certainly a different way and then if i go when i have problems right need help on line hopefully all build a reputation as a guy who isn't just coming to selfishly receive information but not participate in the community the rather somebody be viewed as somebody who kind of pays it forward in his passionate about this so that's legitimately why you this is i think you too i probably about you took over four years before you even offered monetization so there is no ulterior motive there other than just being passionate about it so you would experiment which something and then posted on you to but then other people would help you after they saw what you were doing that yeah sure and then after you learn something you said hey everybody this this is what i've learned a and now you can learn from me yes or i'm not sure it was that formulate but that was the general idea that's really interesting then after you became proficient with the machines 'em then what happened so what happened was after some period of time maybe a year to i realize wait a minute here that second version of that prototype we kind of knew what needed to happen and i had somebody original solid models firm the first round so i just started doing it myself and i you know when parts needed changed her tweaked i just did it in then i i just kept thinking all stop when i can't go any further i'll stop when i get stuck i'll stop when i fail i just never failed and i literally bill o'reilly took me six months but i literally built that whole second prototype i couldn't build a couple of the things that were you know larger water jet cars but we then i basically everything i could in my apartment and we literally had the second prototype in her hand which is awesome in everything you've learned was online basically you didn't have anybody come to your place and it was it was really basically learned remotely yeah the only exception would be back at the time of until around her not there is a website called smart flicks which is kind of like netflix but it was dvd's and you could basically get a membership copies of these instructional videos and i don't think there were any on cnc but i did end up renting like there's a guy named daryl hall and who has some manual seeing a manual machining videos in the guy rudy who's kind of famous in the modern world call hotter something so i watch some videos on manual machine but even then i can remember 'cause i'd already been indus cnc and i remember getting the first dvd with the bridgeport and i remember literally i remember being anxious to start the dvd and thinking there's no way they actually turn those machine handles by hand like that's absurd mhm in ends up the there is power fee which i didn't know about switch kind of solve the problem but i still thought my gosh no i want i'm a senior guy so you had built a you would done the prototype 'em on you're seeing see and then a is that when you decided to go back home ohio no no that it was jeez i don't know the exact years but still probably two thousand nine eight time era okay you still were motivated to get a the rifle target product to market that was you're correct so so then what happened so the short version is i then started a i would rent a car and i drove around new england defined different factories the help us produced the target end and a long story short found one who was capable of doing a lot of the different parts different you know different types of technologies process is requirement you'll metal sheet metal am machine in fabrication and so forth and they ended up quarterbacking the whole project which is tremendously helpful so we ended up having a little factory inside a factory where they would keep are in radio sell kind of yeah you could almost call it like turnkey manufacturing where they would sell about everything else and the only reason to this day i believe that's the only reason they took us on was the i showed up having rented a car with a pelican case with the two targets the original one that was built by somebody else in the second version i built myself and i kind of had this i didn't say this but i kind of had this like i'm figuring this out guys were fight which we want someone who gets what we're trying to do here and i think they i think they sort of thought oh my gosh this kids kids willing to go this far 'em give him a shot exactly so then they they started 'em producing the targets employing them and then and then we would travel around to different events and trade shows in a private ranges in public ranges in in shell are targets ten the short answer is there are elements that we did incredibly well we've got some pretty cool government in military customers and contracts but the reality was we never would have gotten the sales to a point where it would justified two of us working fulltime on this business but before that wasn't issue what happened was we were filming a when we go to these events we wanna capture footage 'cause we were going to use you to a i'd already been doing youtube videos for the machine stuff then we knew we wanna use that for marketing further target company so my partner i decided well let's put cameras on the rifles never using or the military is using the police were using you know whatever so we started making a ticket cheney is the rail system this common across lots of different rifles and pistols and so forth so basically started making camera amounts a pitch any camera mass for things like go pro and con tour in tripods and dsl are as an again long story short the camera mouse took off okay you put a camera amount on thee a on the gun correct and nobody had done that before a i wouldn't say that i'm sure somebody had done it but a this was right before gopro kind of became a household name go pros a little bit more niche product back then and in that way you would show the target being hit by having the camera and there it yes you could either face sit down range and they would look as if you were the user operator of the of the firearm which could help people understand what the target does and how it worked in a cool dispatcher folks at her in that world war you catchy pointing back at you and it is a very useful training tool for various different people that are actually doing this professionally so situational awareness how they're moving how they're a coordination there where their hands are a run in team drills there's lots of different stuff that make it useful in the funny thing was we had really struggled but really been through a lot to bring this complicated product to market in that was the target and then all of a sudden we start making these camera amounts that we machined in house a out of a single piece of aluminum an you know it didn't take very long before we realized wait a minute you're making a lot more money selling these cameras then we are targets right right well that we did a story when we were a print magazine about you've heard of the company's kudo no they're one the the big a rig makers for 'em you know for dsl lars another cameras and yeah they used a all kinds of machine shops in united states etc do that a sounds like it's in sort of that neighborhood so the mounts were the first product where you started making money no we made we made money with the targets but new camry mouse where exciting because now all of a sudden we had a product that lots lots of folks were willing to buy we knew you know my first ever fixture that i ever made was for that camera amount we could wrap it prototype we were powder coating in a toaster oven in are basement on you know it was exciting a it was a confluence of you know we had the equipment we had some enough knowledge to get going on we had sales me now we could build up a little website we could do fulfillment 'em an old timey were documenting these things on video for people i didn't i don't think i put a ton of the camera out stuff we never used to channel to sell didn't seem like the right thing to do but if you look at some of the utility is like if you look at a powder coating video i never mentioned it but the product or powder coating is one of the early a gopro mouse right but you were documenting a lot of the processes you were doing on you right right okay andy a and then then the short answer is that business ultimately the partner and i disagreed on the future of the company in a disagreement regular resulted in an honest citing to shut the company down had a good run we learned a lot but i wasn't gonna be wasn't gonna work out so i decided now but i had kind of his free time time to kind of pour myself into a combination of chop shop work as well as just enjoying machining making more videos and i did that for two or three years a again i kept my day job just enjoying it nights and weekends so i didn't have that pressure a per say but really love i love like i at this point how they swap plasma cnc plasma machine ahead lay out of service grinder so here i am like feeling like i could make anything.

three dollars three years four years six months
"john saunders" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Got a good ending billy ray cyrus eulogize says joe sanders i think more what i wasn't ready for was the news that you just broke about john saunders i'm a huge fan and quite frankly i was so excited i'm sitting here in studio and i've seen your name coming up and i'm like man i love this guy who loved the show listen to you on the radio the tv show when you're with your dad and all the time when you said jon sanders fell to the floor and now quite frankly i can't even i can't even move to the other stuff because i love john fodders billy ray let's do this 'cause i've already made this clunky and awkward enough let's reschedule with this and let's let's i do wanna talk to you let's talk another time let's talk later this week when we don't have this in the middle of our conversation is that right can we do that do is you just keep what i just said and and that's i think we just did the interview not sure anytime i'll i'll i'll put with you guys any anytime please keep my tribute to john saunders all right season one finale of still the king central you can also get his new album thin line september ninth and i'm sorry i am someone who will laugh at the eulogy laugh at the wake that's one of the most awkward things we've ever done as a radio show all of it right there this got tears in my eyes i'm watching the television i don't think that's ever happened to me before while doing the show where we get a bit of news that comes through that that is heartbreaking nba journeyman and fill in host ryan holiness as actor josh do mail if they transformer movies races josh you're going to have to forgive me for this because this hurt my feelings as a real fan and i know that it wasn't meant to be taken in this way but i felt like in the transformers before there were some robots that as an african american male i felt says some taken as racist and edgy things are just the way that they spoke maybe what you're saying yeah.

joe sanders john saunders jon sanders josh billy ray nba
"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"A good ending billy ray cyrus eulogize joe sunders i think more what i wasn't ready for was the news that you just broke about john saunders i'm a huge fan and quite frankly i was so excited i'm setting her in the studio and i've seen your name coming up and i'm like man i love this guy who loved the show listen to you on the radio the tv show when you're with your dad and all but when you said john sanders hundred fell to the floor and now quite frankly i can't even i can't even move to the other stuff because john fibers billy ray let's do this 'cause i've already made this clunky and awkward enough let's reschedule with this and let's let i do wanna talk to you let's talk another time let's talk later this week or when we don't have this in the middle of our conversation is at all right can we do that to do you just keep what i just said and and that's i think we just did the interview and i sure i'll come back anytime i'll i'll put up with you guys anytime please keep my tribute to johnson all right there you go billy ray cyrus the season finale of still the central you can also get his new album thin line september ninth and i'm sorry i am someone who will laugh at the eulogy laugh at the wake that's one of the most awkward things we've ever done as a radio show all of it right there okay and let's say and i'll tell you a friend of john chandra's he would want me to laugh at that because that was absurd everything that just happened there all all of it like just to start just the starting i mean this all of it i got tears in my eyes i'm watching the television that ever happened to me before while doing the show where we get a bit of news that comes through that that is heartbreaking nba journeyman and fill in host ryan holdings as actor just do meal if they transform movies raissi's josh you're going to have to forgive me for this because this hurt my feelings as a real fan and i know that it wasn't meant to be taken in this way but i felt like in the transformers before there were some robots that as an african american male i felt said some taken as racist edgy things are just the way that they spoke maybe can you break that down i'm sure you've heard about in two or had some you know possibly some small backlash from it oh come on man we're talking about robots how could we possibly make this racist what i'm saying is every robot every character to pick something or somebody you know even the you know the way you was taking i understand i do understand what you're saying and yeah you know there's there's there's there's you know that's a question for michael i think that you know there are certain sort of inflections in certain voices and whatever that could have been taken as okay now you're generalizing yeah so i understand that you know but i don't think it was ever meant to be taken personally or or or anything like that but you know i'm sorry if you're offended ask great rally son if it's height are you distracted because this happens sometimes with you when you come on with us you i feel like you've got a little bit of a add during radio interviews maybe only are you distracted what's happening are you are you doing that out express thing where sometimes you float off because you smoking that chiba no i'm not distracted okay very good it's still got stuck seeing to michelle beedle chess gotta say down to and.

john saunders billy ray
"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"I got time to bleed why do you in chris love so much the blackjack dealer that i did they're just weird go to move for you with you yes when i literally dismiss someone named guess that's you pulling the parachute yeah awkwardly as always advance auto parts going on a road trip this weekend but it pop into advance on parts i make sure your car running right before you head off on a big trip that billy ray cyrus is amazing it is amazing and it's discomfort you guys just keep that in the capsule that's the eulogy of john saunders it's the last thing that needs to be said on this subject and then we never speak to him and get i mean maybe something weird happened on this show but i defy you to come up with it advance auto part let me know i dispute that put it on the poll what's crazier the lemme interview everything have ability race every wants to god's ear support for the dan lebatardshow podcasts comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life rocket mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home or refinancing your existing home loan with rocket mortgage you can apply simply understand fully so you can mortgage confidently to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash stu gods as t g ot's e equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and mls consumer access dot org number thirty thirty donlevatar sanders is the best to.

chris billy ray cyrus john saunders sanders
"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"He's got a good ending billy ray cyrus eulogize is joe sunders i think more what i wasn't ready for was the news that you just broke about john saunders i'm a huge fan and quite frankly i was so excited i'm sending her in the studio and i sing your name coming up and i'm like man i love this guy i listened to you on the radio the tv show when you're with your dad and all time but when you said john fodders dot my heartfelt to the floor and now quite frankly i can't even i can't even move to the other stuff because i love john fibers billy ray let's do this because i've already made this clunky and awkward enough let's reschedule with this and let's let i do wanna talk to you let's talk another time let's talk later this week when we don't have this in the middle of our conversation is at all right can we do that to do you just keep what i just said and and that's i think we just did the interview and i thought for sure you come back anytime i'll i'll take with you guys anytime please keep my tribute to john saunders billy ray cyrus the season one finale of still the king central you can also get his new album thin line september ninth and i'm sorry i am someone who will laugh at the eulogy laugh at the wake that's one of the most awkward things we've ever done as a radio show all of it right there okay and that's saying a lot and i'll tell you as a friend of john chandra's he would want me to laugh at that because that was absurd everything that just happened there all all of it like just to start just the starting all of it i got tears in my eyes i'm watching the television i don't think that's ever happened to me before while doing the show where we get a bit of news that comes through that that is heartbreaking mba journeyman and fill in host ryan holdings as actor josh do meal if they transform movies races josh you're going to have to forgive me for this because this hurt my feelings as a real fan and i know that it wasn't meant to be taken in this way but i felt like in the transformers before there were some robots that as an african american male i felt said some taken as racist in edgy things are just the way that they spoke maybe can you break that down i'm sure you've heard about in two or had some you know possibly some small backlash from it oh come on man we're talking about robots how could we possibly make this racist what i'm saying is every robot every character to pick something or somebody you know even the you know the way you was taking i understand i do understand what you're saying and yeah you know there's there's there's there's you know that's a question for michael i think that you know there are certain sort of inflections in certain voices and whatever that could have been taken as okay now you're generalizing yeah so i understand that you know but i don't think it was ever meant to be taken personally or or or anything like that but you know i'm sorry if you're offended ask great rummy son if it's height are you distracted because this happens sometimes with you when you come on with us you i feel like you've got a little bit of a d during radio interviews maybe only are you distracted what's happening are you are you doing that express thing where sometimes you float off because you smoke in that chiba no i'm not distracted okay very good it's still got stuck seeing to michelle beedle chess i've gotta say you got down there too and.

john saunders billy ray joe sunders
"john saunders" Discussed on The Sports Reporters

The Sports Reporters

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Sports Reporters

"Beer sports terms and conditions apply in honor of our late great friend john saunders we're talking hockey today and we absolutely have to because because mitch and jordan the las vegas nights by making it to the stanley cup finals have established themselves as one of the great single season sports stories of all time whether they win the cup were not this they have not only open become a gateway to all the other sports are going to end up in vegas eventually but they have they have staggered the rest of the sport by doing what they've done with with a team that they threw together a year ago it is it could only happen in hockey hockey is a sport of the improbable and the tip of a park or abouts off a skate or one crazy play determining its championship it has a number eight seed this decade the number eight seed winning the whole stanley cup when la did it it has a history of number eight seed getting all the way to the stanley cup final but an expansion team that was thrown together mostly with castoffs from from everybody else's team with a guy who's coaching them i used to cover back with the red wings gerard golomb we used to call them spuds i i mean that was that was his nickname can't believe it a guy named pudsey is now in the in the stanley cup finals and it's in a city where let's not forget it was only a blink ago that no sports league would even consider a team in las vegas and now here we are with the team in las vegas that could win the stanley cup and a supreme court that determined that it's okay to bet on games if you want to if you're an individual state so the whole world.

john saunders hockey mitch pudsey las vegas jordan
"john saunders" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"You know steak and lobster would definitely be there the final meal but of course it would be watching college football day from eight am all the way hoping that hawaii has got a home game so could stadium execution a little bit longer but i just love john i know you do too and you know you played football but you know when you were injured at fordham and couldn't go on and prolong your career you stayed with it it was something you wanted to do and folks don't understand your background you were somebody and i'll let you tell people but you are somebody that helped out the big guys that look great the most burgers and those people you were there stat guy i was a member of the college football studio show for abc sports for about nine to ten years so work with the late john saunders and that's how coach bowden i became friends back in two thousand one when he was out of football and he was the color analyst for the studio show so guys like greasy back for abc todd blackledge are what they used to call the sandbox two guys that used to break down the statues for the studio show a more importantly the broadcasters on the road they would relate to guys like us they really get the stats and really find out what was going on in the game so that they could broadcasted on air and and give color towards that particular game or context a lot of people don't understand i mean when you're doing the play by play you're able to hear a spotter sometimes we'll say fifty three fifty three with the tackle fiftythree assisted by thirty seven and so you have your depth charts there and you know a lot of the guys you're going to have especially if it's the middle of the season you're going to have them down but there's a lot of guys that don't.

hawaii football fordham john saunders analyst todd blackledge abc ten years
"john saunders" Discussed on ESPN Pittsburgh

ESPN Pittsburgh

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on ESPN Pittsburgh

"A thank you for joining us my pleasure german how you don't buddy i'm good i'm good i've got as his davila ito one thing i marvel at home your ability to work and to warn kirk in work and work the tv show every day the radio show every day how do you keep up the pace well first of all the good number one obligations the love which do of two it's not just a job as a lifestyle per se um grown up loving sports watching sports the way that i do that plays a significant role because i never feel like on punching the clock i don't feel like i'm working actually love what i do that's number one number two um the the people in the industry you know people like yourself the gray bob lee and worked did you guys do an outside the lines of various others you know the the the john saunders of the world god rest this oldest wisconsin of the world god rest too so individuals that have paved the way along the way you know the great bryant gumbel than other people will you see people that us successful uh they take their jobs very very seriously uh they don't clock out you know once the you know figured of workday is supposed to be over or anything like that it's about doing the best work you possibly can do it's about getting it done and part of getting it done is showing the world the german credibly passionate about what you're doing because if you're not interested in what you're doing why you asking them to be interested in what you're doing so i take all things into consideration and and last but not least i reflect on a connell korea that i've had you know be an upbeat ride in the newspaper industry for seventy years being on a roll two.

kirk bob lee john saunders wisconsin bryant gumbel seventy years
"john saunders" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"Pleasure german how you don't buddy i'm good i'm good i've got as his davila 80 one thing i marvel at your ability to work and war kirk in work and work the tv show every day the radio show every day how do you keep up the pace while first of all the good number one obligations the love what you do of two it's not just a job as a lifestyle per se um grown up loving sports watching sports the way that i do that plays a significant role because i never feel like punching the clock i don't feel like i'm working actually love what i do that's number one number two um the the people in the industry you know people like yourself the gray bob lee and worked did you guys do an outside the lines and various others you know the the the john saunders of the world god rest as though this was costs of the world god rest too so individuals that have paved the way along the way you know the great bryant gumbel and other people when you see people that are successful they take their jobs very very seriously uh they don't clock out you know once the you know figurative workday is supposed to be over or anything like that it's about doing the best work you possibly can do it's about getting it done and part of getting it done is showing the world the german credibly passionate about what you're doing because if you're not interested in what you're doing why you asking them to be interested in what you're doing so i take all things into consideration and and last but not least i reflect on a connell korea that i've had you know be an upbeat ride in the newspaper industry for seventeen years being on a roll two.

kirk bob lee john saunders bryant gumbel davila seventeen years
"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Half the visit lawyer williams muhtar levin that's going to be a so that's what we got the pre show meeting and it was a good 10minute rent there but it was you know after about the first two minutes ago find it up and you'll hear it up you were like this election show which took you along to know what you're right that other topics and other things going on the spot while i took a way too much of the year of the meeting talking he asked mclaughlin you know i can't unsee remember if i watch this election show last year because with online i i don't even i might be one of the many people turned away from it just gets it on my computer hm i think i watched a little bit of it but it took too long to get night that was even quicker with the 37 minutes but the i think i was maybe a little bit dazed from two years ago and i burned by two years ago zongo gosh this is forever and i remember when we worked at the mothership that they were so proud in trying to get an almost exactly when cbs would reveal the because they they bought the rights to it an espn was doing their own selection show and you'd have john saunders in there and you've add crisp foward digger phelps addict by town and now now you can do that show i don't does he s p and still do it a selection show or did they lose all rights to this i'm going to guess if you spend ten billion dollars on march madness you should get all of it yup all they have to react after tbs in cbs so they the first time you're going to glimpse the bracket will be tbs cbs.

williams muhtar levin mclaughlin cbs espn john saunders two years ten billion dollars two minutes 37 minutes 10minute
"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"And who is mike who is the biggest victim who are some of the biggest victims this is the suicides are our oscars we just sort of celebrate a year in review here and this sui category is uncomfortable moments hold on and we are so good at those and vital good at those timing so bad at those out but we don't mind thinking ended discomfort who's going to take the worst beating here at when you guys were listening without giving too much away my give me some of the discomfort that was caused wow you simply listen because there's some cringeworthy stuff here and we we don't mind lending you look behind the curtain and seeing when we are sinking are drowning areas i think dan dean's awkward as it is so awkwardness tends to follow dan and inevitably sodas discomfort so dan's ice obviously tan show so he's involved in most of these i will say there was a tragically when john saunders past we learned of it while we were on the air and we were doing an interview at the time oh my god that was with only race i only know that the only thing i think you know an ever i think a mildly sirens are billy ray cyrus i'll ldl in order to win their old building laid aside how can anything we better then my friend john saunders passing and main continuing the thunder with a renaissance interview that guy.

dan dean john saunders
"john saunders" Discussed on The Morning Roast

The Morning Roast

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Morning Roast

"He's john you bacon is the author of playing hurt my journey from despair to hope is the memoir of john saunders whom we all watch for many years on this family of networks thanks jon thank you clinton you know the thing about john saunders overall is that he was really in its it's particularly touching me now that were here at any bj and you think about some of the faces that have come through not just this network but the sports broadcasting in industry in general and while we've had a lot of people whom have been very famous we will just lucky enough to toppled gus johnson you know people who have been in my life the mike wool bonds of the world and so many different folks who have sort of walk through here in in general in this business john really was what i would call it a tight and and my words getting short here because it's just sort of occurred to me how much of a hold his absence his met for noxious sports fans in his business but for young black kids who grew up watching tv hoping was may be some chance that you could find your way into the industry in the sea of faced leg johnson he wasn't loud scream in on the black guy eating didn't have some you know joe keep persona that forced people to believe a certain thing about what we do and who we are he was.

john saunders gus johnson joe jon clinton
"john saunders" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"He's john you bacon is the author of playing hurt my journey from despair to hope is the memoir of john saunders whom we all watch for many years on this family of networks thanks jon thank you clinton you know the thing about john saunders overall is that he was really in its it's particularly touching me now that were here at any bj and you think about some of the faces that have come through not just this network but the sports broadcasting in industry in general and while we've had a lot of people whom have been very famous we will just lucky enough to toppled gus johnson you know people who have been in my life the mike wool bonds of the world and so many different folks who have sort of walk through here in in general in this business john really was what i would call it a tight and and my words getting short here because it's just sort of occurred to me how much of a hold his absence his met for noxious sports fans in his business but for young black kids who grew up watching tv hoping was may be some chance that you could find your way into the industry in the sea of faced leg johnson he wasn't loud scream in on the black guy eating didn't have some you know joe keep persona that forced people to believe a certain thing about what we do and who we are he was.

john saunders gus johnson joe jon clinton
"john saunders" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"john saunders" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"And all that and i and i love the fact that he's obviously a conservative one of things i liked about dunkirk is that it is an openly patriotic film although they never mention it starts out with a things as the enemy has pushed the troops to the scene you think the enemy on would be the germans will be there with religion enemy at a name but he doesn't do any of that but it is an openly patriotic and openly prowestern fell minutes at that i like that was a good movie it's a good movie but it is kept from being a great movie by a problem no one has with his sterile approach to humanity and he does not he has not yet learned to tell the story about the way people feel about each other and that's what stories or about me stories are not just about this guy did the with you know what this was was like dramatize documentary the dramatize documentary so dramatize so anyway if if you wanna see a while since we're talking about stuff i like i think of recommended this once before but it's were saying to get you wanna see a really fine film about war take a look at the dawn patrol nineteen thirty eight this is a that basil rathbone david niven and errol flynn errol flynn is the big star of this it was written by a guy who was an american writer john saunders who were said to the fact that he couldn't get into combat as a flyer with the us air force will he wrote about this and what i've always loved about this film is it's it's it's almost a comedy about the facts world war one people flying world war one and the fires in world war one liquid would just get shot out of the sky.

errol flynn john saunders us world war david niven writer