13 Burst results for "John Rimini"

"john rimini" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Freakonomics

"That is basically neutral. It's Helen Schwartzman an anthropologist at northwestern university. It's just a place where you come together. You have a problem you solve it. You have a decision to make you make the decision you whatever and when you actually study organizations you find that that's not really the way that it works in one thousand nine hundred nine. Schwartzman published a book called the meeting gatherings in organizations and communities. I would say that meetings are the organization station which is to say that instead of having the meeting as a place to solve problems we need to have problems and crises and decisions to produce meetings. We actually have vastly superior technologies to do exactly the things that people say go on meetings that that is Jen Sandler another anthropologist who studies meetings. She's at the University of Massachusetts Amherst so the question of why we continue to meet becomes really important Horton so one answer to that is that we don't need to and the other entered as that's not what meetings are for that might be what we tell ourselves that therefore and most of us have this experience experience to or we go into a meeting that is ostensibly to make a decision but it's clear that that decision has been made prior to the meeting and then you know we might ask US participants in that meeting and why are we even meeting then we're meeting may be to legitimise that decision were for somebody to say that that was a collective decision. Even though it wasn't okay it may not come as a shock to you. The meetings do not always serve their advertise purpose or there was barely a purpose at all we heard the sentiment and from several listeners including here Michael Conklin who used to work in the oil and gas industry after coming back from short vacation my boss came into my office frantically and said you just missed three meetings in the last two days and I said Oh my gosh I must have missed so much. Tell me all these things that have changed and the boss froze and said well. Nothing really changed. Just keep up. The good work figured that was a pretty good indication. Those meetings meetings did not need to take place so let's hear what the experts say about meeting basics establishing a goal setting an agenda deciding whom to invite even determining the length what would you guess is the average length of a meeting magically. The average length across the world is one hour and there's just no reason for that. This is a modern phenomenon that has emerged due to calendering programs like outlook Google calendar so if you could invade everybody's calendar on earth and have a new preset. That was not sixty minutes. What would it be. I I just want the leader to think about how long the meeting should be so given a set of goals make a decision right. This is particularly important given something something called Parkinson's law and Parkinson's laws this idea that work expands whatever time is allotted to it so if you schedule an hour. It's going to take an hour but if you schedule forty eight minutes it's GonNa take forty eight minutes. If you doubt the legitimacy of Parkinson's law consider this story from a listener named Chad Wiebe. He's a financial planner in Canada so my boss at the time said let's have a four hour long meeting which is excruciating so at the end of this planning meeting we had half an hour still bill to fill and so. I put my hand up and I said you know what I think. You'd be really appreciate it. If we just cut everybody loose a half hour early. Let let everyone get back to the office a little bit earlier and I was met with silence for about ten fifteen seconds before one of my other middle middle managers piped up and said you know what I just brought in a client who is a magician and so we hired a magician for half an hour. It was unbelievable. Here's Steven Rayle Goldberg's advice rather than hiring magicians to fill out your scheduled meeting time set a tight timeframe time frame and use it tightness dear advantage psychological research shows that when you add a little bit of pressure it creates more focus and optimal performance so if this results in you starting your meeting at one twelve pm and ending at one fifty so be it you are in control control make choices we go into autopilot and we follow specific scripts and we don't actually think about asking the first question of meetings which is what is the purpose of this meeting. Preah Parker again. Her book is called the art of gathering so it's our Monday morning staff meeting us our Wednesday afternoon sales meeting that is not a purpose that is the category so what does the primary purpose. What is your desired outcome of the staff meeting if you're having this on a Monday morning. What do you want to be different for this week. If if we weren't to have this Monday morning meeting would anything be different and if nothing would be different scrapped the meeting. If the leader truly recognizes is that they are inherently a stewart of others time they do meetings differently right. They think carefully about what the meetings should cover. They think carefully about how that meeting should be facilitated militated and we do this all the time. When it comes to meetings we have with customers right. When we meet with a customer we think about that in advance but when it comes to employ meetings we just kind of dial it in we rely on habits and a great example is is the research shows that fifty percent of agendas are recycled? We would never do that with customers my biggest piece of advice. Is You know if you're going to get people together. In person wouldn't time is limited and recesses unlimited gather around the things that you can't figure out over email so when you you are thinking about your agenda consider framing it not as topics to be discussed but consider framing it as questions to be answered answered by framing it as questions to be answered. It's easier to determine who needs to be there because the relevant the questions. I feel like every time you call all of meeting. That involves a lot of people from different arenas. You're inevitably asking each of them to waste a lot of time you know meetings are getting larger and larger and larger and this phenomenon is not happening out of bad intentions typically we just don't want to exclude exclude anyone and at the same time technology makes it so easy for us to just hijack so it's calendar and the research shows that larger larger meetings are just filled with additional dysfunction while people generally complain about having a meeting they complain just as much if they are not invited to a meeting given this reality there's a couple of things that we can do so first of all we can actually design the agenda such that part of the agenda is relevant to a large group of individuals and then part of it is relevant to a smaller section of that so a big group attends ends for part of the meeting and then people leave and then it's a smaller group that has additional discussion and what a leader can do is once they start thinking about you. Meeting attendees being core for secondary. That can be a very useful distinction. Most of us have been raised with the age age old adage the more the merrier and for most gatherings unless it's literally a rave a soccer match or a concert. The more is the Harrier or the scarier if you go to those secondary individuals and you tell them hey I'm having a meeting. Here are the topics we're GONNA talk about. If you have any input on these topics please feel free to email me. I will also show you the minutes of the meeting and at any point down the road you WanNa go to future. Meetings are more than welcome and people really really appreciate being given arguably the best gift in the world right now which is time the more specific your purposes the more people could actually see themselves and say what I do is not actually relevant to that so don't make exclusion personal make purposeful okay. I need some personal advice because because I tried to avoid meetings as much as possible so I'm showing my bias. I don't typically enjoy meetings but also because what I do for a living. I just want my days unencumbered. I want my days for reading writing thinking and interviewing people and I don't want meetings so sometimes they're unavoidable and sometimes you know they're great great and useful. I don't I don't mean to rain on them. But one thing I don't like is when you arrange a meeting with someone is usually via email and then they send me a calendar invite right but I don't want somebody else's software living on my computer and then every time there's an update to get another alert. I don't I don't want the distraction action like I took the time to plan the meeting. I know how to plan a meeting. I put it in my calendar. I'll be there. You're not you don't feel my pain. That's okay we can move. I actually think it's actually very deep so we live in an age where you're talking about software but basically we live in a multicultural diverse. Everybody is kind of their own island but also all sorts of other things world and we're all gathering all the time and gathering at some level. Well isn't form of imposition some level at every note sorry yes. Yes sorry no no no well actually what. I love about how you're talking about. It is it should be thought of as is a form of imposition and you only take the meetings or the gatherings where you think that you are willing to tolerate that imposition and what you're talking talking about. Is I actually think your instinct to say I WANNA have my days free. I WANNA think I wanNA right I want to interview is a much healthier instinct because you're raising the bar for anything to get through to you and so for many of the companies and organizations I work with I don't say gather more I say gathered better and in many cases that means gather less coming up after after the break how to gather less and better how to start your meeting had ended and had to make sure that any physical violence is preplanned we basically they said welcome back to the cage match freakonomics radio sponsored by. I planet m John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace experienced technologies landed his company in Michigan because he believes in Michigan Revolution is in the Air Planet Planet m agrees they're working hard to support and grow the state's mobility ecosystem with powerful matchmaking an entrepreneurial resources. The next big thing mobility is happening in Michigan..

Helen Schwartzman Parkinson Michigan northwestern university Jen Sandler Google University of Massachusetts Am soccer Steven Rayle Goldberg US Michael Conklin Preah Parker Canada Chad Wiebe Horton founder and CEO John Rimini forty eight minutes ten fifteen seconds
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Two point two six percents. You're listening to marketplace. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by with Sabi hot cloud storage, thinking about moving your data storage to the cloud was obvious enterprise class, cloud storage, at one fifth the price of Amazon S three and up to six times faster with no hidden fees for egress or API requests was obvious low cost high speed fully secure storage blows away the competition, including Google Microsoft disruption starts here. Do the math for yourself and start a free trial. I was Sabi dot com. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace experience technologies landed his company in Michigan. He said it was because he believes in Michigan revolution is in the air planet, m agrees. They're working hard to support and grow the state's mobility ecosystem with powerful matchmaking, an entrepreneurial resources the next big thing in mobility, is happening in Michigan. Find out what planet m can offer your business at planet dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. This is marketplace. I'm KAI Ryssdal. I myself am a straight up coffee guy, but many others in this economy, tens of millions of others have energy drinks as their habitual. Pick me up and to them, the journal of the American Heart Association has this to say researchers have found a lot of energy drinks, raise blood pressure, and can increase the risk of heart attacks. Marketplace's were not a sago has that one energy drinks are like liquid candy with a kick their sweet and fizzy and quite effective, and giving people like Antoine Smith, the energy boosts, they want and sometimes need after. Shakes within a day. Smith downs different brands popular ones like monster energy, which he considers lightweight Smith started energy drinks eight years ago in college now at thirty five, they're part of his routine thing to do in. I got addicted Smith and others are fueling.

Antoine Smith Michigan Sabi Michigan economic Development KAI Ryssdal founder and CEO American Heart Association Amazon Google John Rimini P. L. A. N. E T m eight years one fifth
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini, founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. To solve the scourge of the car. Maybe we have to go back back to the future from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Jack Stewart info. Molly would. The future of causes always exciting and always just around the corner. Things like self driving cars have been five years away, for I'd say about forty years now, but there are times when pure imagination is exactly what's needed when vehicles have to be as out there as possible nearly incredible. 'cause or a big part of science fiction TV shows and movies. They're often characters themselves, and someone has to make them I went to see some of the creations of writers directors and designers at a new exhibition at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles. It's called Hollywood dream machines. And there cause from Mad Max Bladerunner and the classic Star Wars amongst others. Brian Stevens is exhibition director at the museum, and he started by explaining how a car designer works with a filmmaker in the use of vehicles in Hollywood productions. There are a number of scenarios, one of, which is the need to design a car from scratch to fulfill the vision of the producers of the directors of the film, in many. Cases though. There are pre existing cars that do just that and there's no need to design a car from scratch, and when it came time to create back to the future just so happened, that this very exotic wild stainless steel bodied car existed. In fact, was very much in the public eye. Do some lawsuits at the time which which made it a perfect option for this particular use in this particular film. Doc. Are you telling me that you built a time machine? The way I see it if you're going to build a time machine into a car, why not do it from style now that we are up close, I can see. There are a lot of wires zip ties parts that look almost unfinished. Yes. Which is deliberate in this case, the producers and directors of the film didn't want something polished, they wanted something that looked like it was handmade in a garage. So you worked with designers of some of these actually put this exhibit together. How important, did they say it is to be accurate as opposed to just be entertaining when the coming up with these visions of the future. I think it's a combination of both if you're projecting fifty years in the future. I think accuracy is, is going to be difficult to achieve, regardless of what you what you propose, but they certainly do want some level of realism when you start getting into science fiction films as opposed to Pierce to pure fantasy films. You do want there to be an element of science basis, you want there to be something that seems even somewhat. Ause -able about what you're predicting. So you have kit here, for example, from Knight rider from what the voice of industry thousands microprocessor K IT for easy reference. A can't. If you prefer, do you think that, that was fully autonomous long before most of us had heard of even the concept of self driving, 'cause it's a 'cause like that an inspiration to real engineers and real designers, I think there's no question that when today's designers were children, watching these television shows in these movies that they are even potentially subconsciously gaining inspiration from what they see. And that's probably part of why we see some of the technologies that are shown in these vehicles. Eventually become real Brian Stevens, taking us on a semi nostalgic semi futuristic, look at the cause of Hollywood at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles, fun facts. I learned from him in the early drafts of the back to the future. Script the time machine wasn't built into a cholera toll. It was built into refrigerator. I'm not sure I would have enjoyed the movie. Quite as much. And now for some related links. Check out the exhibition website if you want some inspiration for movies have been Joan this holiday. I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed some of them the Audi r s q concept from I robot made me want to watch that all over again. And I will be streaming the original Bladerunner as well as twenty four thousand nine to see that vision of Los Angeles with spinners in the dark and rainy skies in terms of making these sci-fi visions come true. The Atlantic has a great story with the headline flying cause a real and then not bad for the climate that describes the efforts to build a new type of electric flying machine that isn't a plane and isn't a helicopter but could fly building to building top skipping city traffic. And it's not just frustrated commuters who could benefit as sea levels rise coastal cities, like Miami, a going to have to go to ever greater lengths to mitigate the impacts of climate change. So we'll also link you to a court. Story about developers in that Florida city who are already designing buildings where rooftop observation decks can be converted into flying, taxi poets, if you didn't catch recent marketplace tech series on climate change at up, by the way, it's called how we survive in the podcasts are online to where we're going. Maybe we really need roads. I'm Jack Stewart. And that's today's marketplace tech. This is a PM. I'm Shepard from Lincoln Nebraska, and I listened to marketplace several times, actually every day because it's got the economic news and developments that are important to me. Donate the marketplace, so that it can be available to everyone and asked her hope. You'll join me in this effort. Thanks to join shepherd is a marketplace investor donate online. Marketplace dot org. This Mike in place podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements, evolve evident is bringing confidence and peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Los Angeles Petersen automotive museum Brian Stevens Jack Stewart founder and CEO Hollywood Michigan economic Development Max Bladerunner Michigan P. L. A. N. E T John Rimini Molly cholera Audi Bladerunner shepherd Pierce Mike
Hollywood Dream Machines exhibit explores sci-fi vehicles used on screen

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:33 min | 2 years ago

Hollywood Dream Machines exhibit explores sci-fi vehicles used on screen

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini, founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. To solve the scourge of the car. Maybe we have to go back back to the future from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Jack Stewart info. Molly would. The future of causes always exciting and always just around the corner. Things like self driving cars have been five years away, for I'd say about forty years now, but there are times when pure imagination is exactly what's needed when vehicles have to be as out there as possible nearly incredible. 'cause or a big part of science fiction TV shows and movies. They're often characters themselves, and someone has to make them I went to see some of the creations of writers directors and designers at a new exhibition at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles. It's called Hollywood dream machines. And there cause from Mad Max Bladerunner and the classic Star Wars amongst others. Brian Stevens is exhibition director at the museum, and he started by explaining how a car designer works with a filmmaker in the use of vehicles in Hollywood productions. There are a number of scenarios, one of, which is the need to design a car from scratch to fulfill the vision of the producers of the directors of the film, in many. Cases though. There are pre existing cars that do just that and there's no need to design a car from scratch, and when it came time to create back to the future just so happened, that this very exotic wild stainless steel bodied car existed. In fact, was very much in the public eye. Do some lawsuits at the time which which made it a perfect option for this particular use in this particular film. Doc. Are you telling me that you built a time machine? The way I see it if you're going to build a time machine into a car, why not do it from style now that we are up close, I can see. There are a lot of wires zip ties parts that look almost unfinished. Yes. Which is deliberate in this case, the producers and directors of the film didn't want something polished, they wanted something that looked like it was handmade in a garage. So you worked with designers of some of these actually put this exhibit together. How important, did they say it is to be accurate as opposed to just be entertaining when the coming up with these visions of the future. I think it's a combination of both if you're projecting fifty years in the future. I think accuracy is, is going to be difficult to achieve, regardless of what you what you propose, but they certainly do want some level of realism when you start getting into science fiction films as opposed to Pierce to pure fantasy films. You do want there to be an element of science basis, you want there to be something that seems even somewhat. Ause -able about what you're predicting. So you have kit here, for example, from Knight rider from what the voice of industry thousands microprocessor K IT for easy reference. A can't. If you prefer, do you think that, that was fully autonomous long before most of us had heard of even the concept of self driving, 'cause it's a 'cause like that an inspiration to real engineers and real designers, I think there's no question that when today's designers were children, watching these television shows in these movies that they are even potentially subconsciously gaining inspiration from what they see. And that's probably part of why we see some of the technologies that are shown in these vehicles. Eventually become real Brian Stevens, taking us on a semi nostalgic semi futuristic, look at the cause of Hollywood at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles, fun facts. I learned from him in the early drafts of the back to the future. Script the time machine wasn't built into a cholera toll. It was built into refrigerator. I'm not sure I would have enjoyed the movie. Quite as much. And now for some related links. Check out the exhibition website if you want some inspiration for movies have been Joan this holiday. I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed some of them the Audi r s q concept from I robot made me want to watch that all over again. And I will be streaming the original Bladerunner as well as twenty four thousand nine to see that vision of Los Angeles with spinners in the dark and rainy skies in terms of making these sci-fi visions come true. The Atlantic has a great story with the headline flying cause a real and then not bad for the climate that describes the efforts to build a new type of electric flying machine that isn't a plane and isn't a helicopter but could fly building to building top skipping city traffic. And it's not just frustrated commuters who could benefit as sea levels rise coastal cities, like Miami, a going to have to go to ever greater lengths to mitigate the impacts of climate change. So we'll also link you to a court. Story about developers in that Florida city who are already designing buildings where rooftop observation decks can be converted into flying, taxi poets, if you didn't catch recent marketplace tech series on climate change at up, by the way, it's called how we survive in the podcasts are online to where we're going. Maybe we really need roads. I'm Jack Stewart. And that's today's marketplace tech. This is a PM. I'm Shepard from Lincoln Nebraska, and I listened to marketplace several times, actually every day because it's got the economic news and developments that are important to me. Donate the marketplace, so that it can be available to everyone and asked her hope. You'll join me in this effort. Thanks to join shepherd is a marketplace investor donate online. Marketplace dot org. This Mike in place podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements, evolve evident is bringing confidence and peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Los Angeles Petersen Automotive Museum Brian Stevens Jack Stewart Founder And Ceo Hollywood Michigan Economic Development Max Bladerunner Michigan P. L. A. N. E T John Rimini Molly Cholera Audi Bladerunner Shepherd Pierce Mike
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the university of Florida Warrington college of business transform your future with an MBA from one of America's top ten universities. Learn more at Warrington dot ufl dot EDU slash NBA. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet platinum dot com. That's P. L. A. N E T, M dot com. The effect of wall way of China on the wider stock market. I'm David Brancaccio in New York. Now, the telephone equipment maker alway of China is on the US Commerce Department's list of companies banned because of national security concerns. The reverberations are being felt in a long chain of global companies that supply while way in many of those stocks are dropping this morning. Let's check in with the communist. Julia Coronado at macropolicy perspectives. Good morning. Good morning. Now, some of this has to be the US official list while way of China now on it. And this is showing up in share prices today. Absolutely. It's a little bit of a delayed reaction. But definitely the announcement the inclusion of wow way and then it has real consequences for real companies and the broader backdrop of the escalation and tariff looks like it's going to stay in place. It's remarkable the shift in mood from last. Thursday, for instance, I mean, anyone paying attention new the trade war was getting more, intense, yet, the seems to be a greater realization of that this morning ES the whole trade negotiation has been a whips offer markets. They're used to getting bad news. And then the bad news just going away. It's been very erratic the policy move, so it's been hard for the market, just sort of react consistently. But I think that what's culminating here is a very real impact. That's looks like it's going to last for the foreseeable future just sentiment but on actual corporate bottom lines. Julia Coronado at macropolicy perspectives. Always good to talk to you. My pleasure. There's news this morning. Ford is ending the employment of seven thousand white collar workers, worldwide twenty four hundred in North America by the end of August. It's ten percent of its salaried workforce. This is designed to save money and Ford. Stock is down four tenths percent in India. The competition is epic to get into elite engineering schools of the sort, the Google CEO, Sundar Pichai attended access is limited for so many of the country's six hundred million people who are under twenty five my marketplace colleague, the BBC's anew on reports from New Delhi, getting into college isn't just about getting good grades in India. It's about getting the best grades to do that. Family, spend thousands of dollars, sending their sons and daughters away from home to towns, dedicated to helping students cram for the highest possible exam scores ninety five percent or higher the coaching industry here is expected to be worth twenty six billion dollars by next year. According to government data sixteen year old Abair is similar. Painlessly finishing high school and cramming for university entrance exam. He wants to work in computer science, because it pays high salaries achier. Study thirteen hours a day to get into my first choice university, I need to rank in the nation's top hundred fifty students for exam schools. The chances are a fraction of one percent in two thousand fourteen the last government statistics showed more than twenty four hundred young people took their own lives specifically because of exam failure. So why does a country with such a large population and a growing economy, not have enough schools and universities? Anew rug Bihar is CEO of the Zine Premji foundation in Bangalore, which works on public education. We have to have dramatically higher public investment. We have to reconstruct our education system because unless your training your teachers properly, however, you want to have good education. He says, not only public education good for the economy. It's something vibrant democracy depends on in New Delhi, on the BBC's unin marketplace. Hi, I'm Zach and I listened to marketplace in Arlington Virginia. I think what I appreciate the most about marketplace's their ability to take the economic news of the day issues such as tariffs rate hikes and tax reform cut through the political noise, and clearly and concisely explained not only how these issues affect our country and the rest of the world. But how they impact people like me. I hope you'll consider joining me as marketplace investor and donate today at marketplace dot org to help make their work possible. That's marketplace podcast is brought to you by Kronos. Cronos knows that hiring and retaining a modern, workforce of salaried hourly full and part-time workers can be challenging, especially in today's competitive job market. That's why Kronos, puts HR payroll talent and time in one place. So HR professionals supporting a blended workforce have all the tools they need to engage and motivate their people every step of the way. Learn more at Kronos dot com slash HR swagger. Kronos, workforce innovation that works in twenty sixty in the federal government held a contest. The transportation department offered money to American cities to develop smart technology that helps people move more efficiently down the road. W O issues Dora. Nagada reports from Columbus, Ohio, which got forty million dollars for this. A free driver shuttle pulls up to a bus. Stop in downtown Columbus because its all electric it's silent. Unlike a noisy diesel powered bus John Hargrave is an operator although he's not driving. He's ready to take over from Maria as the shuttle is called in an emergency. She can operate the whole route. Herself MC turns flow through traffic, stop at traffic lights fall in and out of her stops smart, Columbus is the public private partnership. The city form to drive this effort. Mark patent is the CEO overseeing the forty million dollars in federal funds the city received and another ten million in private donations. His goal is to make a ton of shuttle's electric vehicles scooters and bikes part of the daily commute here in Columbus. The first step making sure people can charge their vehicles. He's going to buy an electric vehicle. They don't think they can get charged. That's my smart, Columbus plans to install one thousand electric vehicle charging stations throughout central. Hi. Oh,

Columbus CEO China Kronos Julia Coronado New Delhi founder and CEO BBC Kronos dot David Brancaccio Michigan Ford university of Florida Warringt Michigan economic Development New York India P. L. US Commerce Department John Rimini
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:05 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the university of Florida Warrington college of business transform your future with an MBA from one of America's top ten universities. Learn more at Warrington dot ufl dot EDU slash NBA. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet platinum dot com. That's P. L. A. N E T, M dot com. Bottom line on aging and financial vulnerability. The tech support and gift cards scan that unfolded over two weeks. I'm David Brancaccio in New York. I want to introduce you to a seventy nine year old nurse who fell into a financial nightmare were adding losses on a financial statement, plus till is twenty six plus two is twenty eight plus three is thirty one plus one is thirty two Judy fern as you can hear does math in her head just fine. Forty three forty five. Forty five thousand dollars of gift cards Judy Judy Judy. This is only a one bang. It's the Leo web Bank on one credit card. It gets worse for Judy who, as she approaches eighty is still working as a substitute school, nurse her small house, just in from the jersey shore is tidy. She goes to Pilates twice a week yet scammers nearly bled her dry. I just don't think I was thinking was like a robot this week on marketplace. We're looking into evidence that as we get older, we become more vulnerable to financial exploitation by strangers or even by family. The danger is obvious in cases of dementia, but doctors are studying older people who were on the ball a-ok, but who may be at special risk. There's brain research about this as we'll learn doctors and advocates say now's the time for a national conversation about protecting the money of older, people people like Judy home alone over a holiday in late twenty seventeen her husband had died years earlier. She'd lost her daughter to cancer thanksgiving weekend. On. I was just hanging around the house answering the phone like a full. It's some company calling saying, there's a computer problem virus firewall, blah, blah and Judy. Let's the caller take control of her system that year. Microsoft, had compiled one hundred fifty three thousand complaints about tech support scams from all over the world. One in seven lost money. Judy says using her screen the guy shows her what looks like one of her Bank accounts that should have had about thirty thousand dollars in it. She freaked when it looked drained down to nothing. He wanted to show me it was zero zero zero and you can make it up. If you do it, I say, there's an intricate way to create that allusion but I won't go into it. Here point is Judy was led to believe if she gave the caller more money. She'd get all of it back. She said to him. You happy that you've totally wrecked my life. And what would you say? Oh, I didn't wreck your life. You just have to do it. I tell you, and you'll get your money back ten thousand dollars out of her will. Fargo then a forty five thousand dollar transfer to some Bank in Nepal. I've seen the paperwork Katmandu and then the scratch off department store gift cards, two dozen trips to WalMart and a target for cards worth at least one thousand dollars each. I was driving like this. I was driving clenching the wheel on so mad. And I couldn't figure out as I thought about it for mad at him or mad at me. No kidding. I mean, why am I at here on this freakin road? Again, driving all the way out to WalMart added the receipts. One hundred sixty six thousand dollars in gift cards. But why did you to keep at it for two full weeks? Something called decision theory could be part of this the way people calculate, what it's worth to put more money in, if there's a chance of getting money back. There is fear. Judy says there were threats against her family. Now, maybe this could happen at any age but it's possible there's something else scam victims like Jew. Duty are of special interest to neuro the most frustrating people in my science, and in my clinical practice, or people who test up and down neuro-psychological normal. I mean, they've had the million dollar neurologic workup and yet they still give away the farm in ways that they would not have when they were younger, Mark lacks is a nationally known geriatrician at New York's Weill Cornell Medical center. He and his colleagues have put a label on it age associated financial vulnerability. The eighty year olds have slower finishing times in a New York City marathon than the twenty year olds and that's just a of physiology in physics while experts believe wisdom, and life experience, can help counteract age related changes. There's neuro science and psychological, data showing normal people's ability to detect and face down a scammer can decline, and it's not just the brain mardi d'alema's a research scholar at the Stanford center on longevity. It also. Involves all of these other social, and environmental factors lake social isolation, lake, cultural factors, and societal factors like older. Adults having more wealth compared to younger generations with an aging population. This is an elder Justice issue, a personal finance issue, and a public policy issue. I just must insert here that nobody could be mad at me than knee. I put, judy's total loss in this mess at one hundred ninety six thousand dollars. Tomorrow. What's this brain research, associating financial vulnerability in aging, marketplace dot org has suggestions for help, and listen for our one hour special brains and losses in the coming days, on many public radio stations nationwide. This

Judy Judy Judy Judy fern WalMart New York university of Florida Warringt founder and CEO David Brancaccio Michigan Michigan economic Development America P. L. John Rimini Leo web Bank social isolation Microsoft Fargo Weill Cornell Medical center
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the university of Florida Warrington college of business transform your future with an MBA from one of America's top ten universities. Learn more at Warrington dot ufl dot EDU slash NBA. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet platinum dot com. That's P. L. A. N E T, M dot com. To get into one of India's elite engineering schools, like the one Google CEO sooner Pichai went to you. Gotta start early. Savannah temperature. I wake up at six thirty exercise thirty minutes, and then studied thirteen hours, every day from India's capital, New Delhi. This is a special marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service. I'm the good morning last week. We talked about the jobs crisis in one of the world's fastest growing economies today. It's the crushing battle for a seat at one of the country's universities, which leads to those precious jobs, the economies of whole neighborhoods in towns are dedicated to helping students get the highest possible exam scores. I wandered into the tight alleys behind IT deli, one of India's top universities to see for myself. This residential neighborhood in south Delhi is part of an industry. Expected to grow to twenty six billion dollars by twenty twenty according to the government, every building here caters to students homes have been converted into boys, only and girls only hostels eateries deliver hot cooked meal straight to their desks, and endless so-called coaching centers advertise. Their star students a shade Jane is a local journalist, according to Android, basically, of cram into all students are preparing for competitive exams in India, everything from engineering entrance exams to exams for government jobs to school exams, students come from across the country. Their aim is to do nothing but study everyday for year to achieve the highest possible exam results ninety five percent. Or more sixteen year old Abair. Tells us he's simultaneously finishing high school and cramming for university entrance exams. He wants to work in computer science. He says, because it pays extremely well savannah temperature. I wake up at six thirty exercise thirty minutes, and then study thirteen hours every day to get into my first choice university, I need to score high enough to be in the nation's top hundred and fifty students the chances are a fraction of one percent. That's why I need to concentrate will all this pressure has real consequences in twenty fourteen. The last official government statistics show more than twenty four hundred young people took their own lives specifically because of exam failure. So why does a country with such a large young population and a growing economy? Not have enough schools in universities. Underdog Bihar is CEO of the Zine Premji foundation in Bangalore, which works on strengthening public education. In, in some of the country's most disadvantaged states, re have made dramatic progress over the past seventy s but we have to have dramatically higher public investment. We have to reconstruct our teach education system because unless your chaining your teachers properly, how are you going to have good education? We need more schools. We just need much higher access, Anita Bihar, India needs capacity for forty million people to learn vocational skills. That's according to the government's owned India brand equity foundation. There are also too few women in the workplace. So to understand these two challenges skills and gender. I visited a nonprofit called Gama Leney, and it's new vocational skill center in Haryana in north India a state with some of the worst gender equity indicators in the country. Jackson. How do you Ana is infamous for gender inequality? More baby, girls are aborted here than anywhere else in India. Because people prefer sons the state topped the list in two thousand sixteen for the number of gang rapes, fewer women here work than in the rest of the country. So for the six women enrolled in this, beauty course, the simple act of leaving home every day is revolutionary. Mumtaz is seventeen four years ago. Her family married. Her off now she has two daughters. Maybe more meekly feel worke. My mother felt terrible, which I've never had a chance to learn anything. So she enrolled me on this course so that I could be more independent. I took a bus by myself for the first time recently with my daughter. I can't tell you how great that felt in tag reports jasmine Joe's commonly news program development officer says it's taken five years of outreach to convince these women's communities to let them enroll that first begins with approaching the local community leaders, these, these are mostly men, then we approach the family and we tell them about the whole aspect of training and wise at required. And what is the importance of it nor only for the woman, but for the family as well? So please take advantage of the facility that is being provided female participation in India's. Workforce has been falling and lags. Behind other Asian nations when women don't work. It increases economic inequality. This is a problem for them. But also for developing nation like India as a whole. So what happens once the women at Comellini finished their courses not far from the training center. I'm meet Nisha. Andrea, both did a tailoring course both were offered jobs and both were forced by their families not to accept as a compromise. They were allowed to open their own shop, in Rica's, family home Aikman. Our this SHA tells me we opened a month ago there was a wedding in our village. So we got orders for twenty nine dresses in our first month. We earned one hundred seventy dollars and everyone saw our work on display. So we got even more orders Rica ads where a success that I get Syria. Nisha Andrea, there, some of the few women in Haryana being able to work finally. We've been talking about the intense academic expectations here in India. Well, Adelie mother made national headlines this month when she praised her son on social media for not getting top scores bundle coach wrote. Yes. It's not ninety percent. But that doesn't change how I feel about my son. India's election results are out this Thursday. Catch photos from all of today's stories on our Instagram and Twitter feeds at BBC almond. And at Victoria, Craig in Delhi. I'm on with the marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service.

India India brand equity foundation BBC World Service Nisha Andrea CEO founder and CEO university of Florida Warringt Michigan economic Development New Delhi Michigan Google America P. L. south Delhi John Rimini Pichai Anita Bihar Abair Bihar
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at platinum dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. Startups looking for funding. Have a lot more options lately from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Molly would. Venture capital firms that were invested in lift Uber. And Pinterest just got paid when those companies went public and the banks foundations and pensions that fund, the venture capital funds, we'll get a lot of money too. So, yeah, these big firms will now have more to invest and they'll get more powerful, but the venture industry is changing. There are lots more smaller players like angel investors. Usually really rich people who want to help fund companies and increasingly even everyday investors. Have more ways to get in on the next pre IPO tech unicorn, Jason Calcutta's is a tech entrepreneur and angel investor who got in on Uber when it was still a pipe dream. I asked him how VC is evolving. There are the funds that have been around for decades like sequoia, Kleiner Perkins or benchmark, and those firms have partners who may stay with them for multi decades, and they are the first stops when a founder comes to Santo road or San fr. Francisco. And then there's a new crop of angels. And I went from being essentially a nobody or somebody who was kind of annoying in the industry. This journalist entrepreneur with a big mouth and a big social media following in a podcast to now I'm the first stop were in the first two or three stops for angel investing. I'm the most successful active angel investor in Silicon Valley. So then let's talk about the industry. I mean, we know that these exit is big unicorns. Going public is important for the firms that have funded them and the angel investors that funded them, and how might that money then get funneled back into new startups. Like how important is it to that future person with a PowerPoint injury? It's critically important. I'm in Bolden. Now, having had a couple of grade exits to put more money into my own funds, and put more money to work. So that is a specific phenomenon that occurs, which then benefits the next generation of founders, and we saw that with people who made a lot of money off of Google than invested in Facebook and Twitter, the Facebook and Twitter. Folks, obviously invested in Airbnb and Uber. Yep. One complaint. I have heard actually about venture capital right now is that there's a lot of the same money going into the same big companies and there's maybe not as much diversity. Is it possible that the inflow of money could change that dynamic, and introduce some more innovative investing the venture firms have raised bigger and bigger funds? So the VC's are looking for companies that have a lot more traction, a lot more revenue fuller management teams. So the world's changed the markets are much more efficient, but they're private and this is where the SEC and the investment rules for private companies have to evolve, and we're starting to see that with equity crowdfunding where civilians non accredited investors people with under a million in net worth under two hundred thousand a year in income are being able to write small checks through platforms like Sede invest and Republic. So that's going to be I think the future. And that process is just starting. Ng Jason Kao. Kansas is a tech entrepreneur and angel investor as the number of angel and nontraditional investors in the US has increased. So has the percentage of female investors from five percent in two thousand and four two more like twenty six percent as of two thousand sixteen. And now for some related links. There's a link to a story in entrepreneur magazine on our website marketplace tech dot org. It has the data I mentioned about female angel investors, and actually Alex Conrad over at Forbes, who's also very funny on Twitter has a good piece about how Facebook and its soaring stock over the years has produced a new generation of investors like Jason Calcutta's was talking about, and in fact, lots of them are women who are funding women run businesses who then hire women who might get big payouts if their companies go public or get sold and then might also turn around and become more diverse investors. However, I am definitely aware that a lot of times when we talk about diversity in venture capital. We're talking about adding more white women, so to that effect. There's a good story in fast company about an organization called pipeline angels. It's a boot camp for would be angel investors, and it focuses primarily on. Inclusively meaning, people of color, women non binary end geography. It has training cohorts in Montana. Idaho, Ohio Texas, North Dakota and Minnesota among others. I'm Molly would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements of all evident is bringing confidence in peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Twitter Facebook Jason Calcutta Molly founder and CEO founder entrepreneur magazine Michigan economic Development John Rimini Airbnb Jason Kao Michigan Silicon Valley P. L. A. N. E T SEC Pinterest sequoia
Startups looking for funding now have more options

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:02 min | 2 years ago

Startups looking for funding now have more options

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at platinum dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. Startups looking for funding. Have a lot more options lately from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Molly would. Venture capital firms that were invested in lift Uber. And Pinterest just got paid when those companies went public and the banks foundations and pensions that fund, the venture capital funds, we'll get a lot of money too. So, yeah, these big firms will now have more to invest and they'll get more powerful, but the venture industry is changing. There are lots more smaller players like angel investors. Usually really rich people who want to help fund companies and increasingly even everyday investors. Have more ways to get in on the next pre IPO tech unicorn, Jason Calcutta's is a tech entrepreneur and angel investor who got in on Uber when it was still a pipe dream. I asked him how VC is evolving. There are the funds that have been around for decades like sequoia, Kleiner Perkins or benchmark, and those firms have partners who may stay with them for multi decades, and they are the first stops when a founder comes to Santo road or San fr. Francisco. And then there's a new crop of angels. And I went from being essentially a nobody or somebody who was kind of annoying in the industry. This journalist entrepreneur with a big mouth and a big social media following in a podcast to now I'm the first stop were in the first two or three stops for angel investing. I'm the most successful active angel investor in Silicon Valley. So then let's talk about the industry. I mean, we know that these exit is big unicorns. Going public is important for the firms that have funded them and the angel investors that funded them, and how might that money then get funneled back into new startups. Like how important is it to that future person with a PowerPoint injury? It's critically important. I'm in Bolden. Now, having had a couple of grade exits to put more money into my own funds, and put more money to work. So that is a specific phenomenon that occurs, which then benefits the next generation of founders, and we saw that with people who made a lot of money off of Google than invested in Facebook and Twitter, the Facebook and Twitter. Folks, obviously invested in Airbnb and Uber. Yep. One complaint. I have heard actually about venture capital right now is that there's a lot of the same money going into the same big companies and there's maybe not as much diversity. Is it possible that the inflow of money could change that dynamic, and introduce some more innovative investing the venture firms have raised bigger and bigger funds? So the VC's are looking for companies that have a lot more traction, a lot more revenue fuller management teams. So the world's changed the markets are much more efficient, but they're private and this is where the SEC and the investment rules for private companies have to evolve, and we're starting to see that with equity crowdfunding where civilians non accredited investors people with under a million in net worth under two hundred thousand a year in income are being able to write small checks through platforms like Sede invest and Republic. So that's going to be I think the future. And that process is just starting. Ng Jason Kao. Kansas is a tech entrepreneur and angel investor as the number of angel and nontraditional investors in the US has increased. So has the percentage of female investors from five percent in two thousand and four two more like twenty six percent as of two thousand sixteen. And now for some related links. There's a link to a story in entrepreneur magazine on our website marketplace tech dot org. It has the data I mentioned about female angel investors, and actually Alex Conrad over at Forbes, who's also very funny on Twitter has a good piece about how Facebook and its soaring stock over the years has produced a new generation of investors like Jason Calcutta's was talking about, and in fact, lots of them are women who are funding women run businesses who then hire women who might get big payouts if their companies go public or get sold and then might also turn around and become more diverse investors. However, I am definitely aware that a lot of times when we talk about diversity in venture capital. We're talking about adding more white women, so to that effect. There's a good story in fast company about an organization called pipeline angels. It's a boot camp for would be angel investors, and it focuses primarily on. Inclusively meaning, people of color, women non binary end geography. It has training cohorts in Montana. Idaho, Ohio Texas, North Dakota and Minnesota among others. I'm Molly would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements of all evident is bringing confidence in peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Twitter Facebook Jason Calcutta Molly Founder And Ceo Founder Entrepreneur Magazine Michigan Economic Development John Rimini Airbnb Jason Kao Michigan Silicon Valley P. L. A. N. E T SEC Pinterest Sequoia
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Coming up. Little store, but it had everything a local supermarket gone, but not quite forgotten. I though, it's do the numbers. Now industry was down ninety eight points. This Friday three tenths percent twenty-five thousand seven sixty four the NASDAQ eighty one point about one percent seventy eight sixteen. Yes and p five hundred sixteen points, a half percent twenty eight and fifty nine for the week, the Dow gave back six tenths percent. The NASDAQ down one point two percent the S and P five hundred shed seven tenths of one percent, sensitive to the trade war company. Dear plunged seven point six percent today. The heavy equipment maker reported lower quarterly profits than expected as Keith mentioned. Pinterest is out with its first quarterly report since going public in April the bottom line, a forty one million dollar loss. Pinterest shares off thirteen point four percent day. You're listening to marketplace. Hey, it's Molly would here and you've got to listen to this week's make me smart. It's all about climate adaptation. The idea that climate change is here and not in some far future. And so we have to start living with and adapting to the realities of it while also trying to fight it. So what does that all cost operation and maintenance costs of all the things you've already decided to do the current economies already doing those have just gone up? So you're playing more defense, and that we'd see with fewer resources to move forward and innovate make me smart finest wherever you listen to podcasts. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the university of Florida Warrington college of business transform your future with an MBA from one of America's top ten universities. The UF NBA offers full-time professional and online programs for an educational experience tailored to your schedule and career goals. Learn more at Warrington dot ufl dot EDU slash MBA. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace experience technologies landed his company in Michigan. He said it was because he believes in Michigan revolution is in the air planet him agrees. They're working hard to support and grow the state's mobility ecosystem with powerful matchmaking, an entrepreneurial resources the next big thing in mobility, is happening in Michigan. Find out what planet can offer your business at planet dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. This is marketplace. I'm KAI Ryssdal. In case you missed the sad news this morning. Grumpy cat is dead. The grumpy looking cat that spawned one of the best known memes out there passed away from complications from a urinary tract infection at the age of seven some days owners road on Instagram or Grumpier than others. Grumpy cat was an empire. Shed an agent merchandise even a movie and as marketplace's remain issue, a report that is getting harder for a mean to do tartar sauce was born in Arizona. Back in two thousand twelve she had a permanent. Frown feline dwarfism. And when a photo was supposed to have her on Reddit grumpy cat. The star was born struck a chord, Christina hung on brush, is associate professor at the university of the sciences, physical appearance. So defection of you know that we felt this only bonded, and I'm thinking that she was free to dress, a negative emotion that we are not usually free to share within a year. Grumpy cat had a. Book and was on the cover of New York magazine she had licensing deals royalties. Eventually a movie grumpy cat's fame came at a time when the internet was perhaps a little less saturated. Michael SoHo is a senior lecturer at the university of New Hampshire. I think there was a lot more positive excitement in almost getting us around social media. This thing that we could share. So who says it'd be harder for one specific meme to get that same level of recognition today? They're just a lot more healthier happening today online. And I think it's a little bit less novel, memes are also harder to monetize today. Nick become very, very fem real Kate McKean, vice president, at the Howard, more Heim literary agency, me and can last twenty four hours a week and a half, and that's the life of that. Neom. So by the time brand has geared up to profit off of a mean these days, the memes done back then memes stuck around longer. Plus grumpy cat was an actual cat who could make real appearances McCain says she straddled the line between name an influence or early on in. There's kind of taken faces that means used to monetize and have changed the game. Grumpy guts owners haven't said, how much wealth she brought in during or seven years, but after a lawsuit a coffee company that had used the cats image for marketing without permission had to award grumpy gets owners seven hundred and ten thousand dollars in New York. I'm super Benesch. Sure for marketplace. Consumers in this economy can be interesting. We are price sensitive, but brand loyal we like new options, but always come back to the familiar, and that love of what we know can really linger, consider the supermarket any wagmans devotees out there trader Joe's aficionados or from history. How about the AMP in the upper midwest as marketplace's, we're not a sago reports. People still pine thirty years on for chain called red owl. Right now read as in the color, and Al, as in the bird will start at by investors linked to general mills in nineteen twenty two back then it sold groceries dry, goods and call. It's original slogan was be wise. Burn red alcohol tiny, Stewart, Minnesota had those little store, but it had everything that's thirty four year old Jim Pesic of Stuart. We're standing outside the old rebel, the one he wants you. As a child. Oh, we could pop up here. Or did he had a comic book crack had always, you know, get comic books to, and some other local history? Buffs bought the old red owl building back in twenty thirteen four thousand dollars. They're raising money to turn part of it into a rebel museum. He's got a storage space down the street full of products. He's collected from old employee's in EBay cheer. It all Honey Graham crackers. Red old pudding red L coffee, riddle brand, pop stuff. We wanted to display in the museum and local businessman named William Sunday, open Stewart's read, Al franchise in nineteen thirty nine with a six hundred dollar loan and cash. She got from selling an old car. A pair of hit boots and a gun Stewart's, red owl, was one of more than four hundred that we're operating before the change shutdown stores position themselves as guardians of low cost food as you can hear in this radio spot from the bicentennial year of nineteen seventy six featuring, Johnny cash. Imitator. The red culture and play chin hayme. Everybody said it's too tough a pain L pope don't. That's right there rebels. Just begun. An Al stores feature distinctive logos. The final version was a bright red owl. Head with giant black is the stores made a Mark on Minnesota culture. The opening sequence to the classic Mary Tyler Moore TV show. There's all Mary, tossing some meat into our card at arou-. Looking a little unhappy with the price Minnesota filmmakers, Joel and Ethan Cohn included scenes of rebel in their work a couple of times, but I'll once dominated with more than fifty percent of the twin cities, grocery market. So they're still allot of people around work there in a suburb of Minneapolis. Former red Al cash years, produce, managers, I'm going to get together over lunch, at least once a month to reminisce. I met up with them at one of their out of.

red owl Minnesota Stewart Michigan Al Pinterest Mary Tyler Moore urinary tract infection KAI Ryssdal Keith university of Florida Warringt New York NBA Arizona Minneapolis Molly founder and CEO
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

08:25 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini, founder and CEO of airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air by now what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's P. L. A. N T, M dot com. There's an interesting observation to be made here about the global economy, things that usually happened really, really slowly. Until they happen. Really, really fast. Oh, explain from American public media. This is marketplace. In Los Angeles. I'm KAI Ryssdal. It is Thursday. Today, the sixteenth of mega is always to have you along, everybody. We begin today with this ten days ago, Amir week and a half. Every indication was that the trade mad disagreements between the United States and China were all but solved couple more meetings, a quick Trump's, she phone call done and done. Now. It's tariffs as far as the I can see. And as of yesterday quite possibly a breakdown in the heavily, integrated and extremely globalized technology supply chain, we refer here, of course, to the Trump administration, effectively blacklisting, the Chinese technology, giant hallway, which will cut that company off from its American suppliers, chips, from Qualcomm and phone software from Google to name. Just a couple. You're all that in with bands on while way in other countries. And as marketplace's Scott Tong reports now from Washington, there does seem to be something of a digital iron curtain descending if the US shoe. Hallway, it also hits its own foot inside while we gadgets are innards from firms, like Intel, oracle and Western Digital but tech firms sensing the crossfire are trying to get out of the way and avoid partnering with companies subject to bands in retaliation says Linley Gwen app of the Linley group. I think that companies are trying to reduce their exposure to the band, and by fewer components from countries that could be affected the word decoupling is being whispered in the US and China that is each country may develop its own separate supply, chain, while we has long been on Washington's hitlist and is trying to make parts semiconductors in house. Business professor at ten Wong judge young university has a new book on wall way. He says the company can be self sufficient that can make it south. Maybe he's not as good as the US components, but it's not much worse. They still can't sell products so that prepare for these more than ten years, while ways, DIY project. Could accelerate Chinese innovation? And in areas like wireless, five G many see hallway as already ahead. So the US might not want to cut itself off says, political scientists Abraham Newman at Georgetown, France in the nineteen eighties tried to develop its own internet, and it was kind of ridiculous, and the risk is that we end up with a new version of that a lesser. They un-filed g network. He says the US is weaponising interdependence and could unravel a global tech supply chain that took a generation to come together. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. You can argue till the cows come home about tariffs who wins who loses who pays wait. No, you can't consumers pay and nobody wins. But there is at least one agreed upon reality. When it comes to what tariffs due to an economy, the way things normally work don't work anymore. Marketplace's refinish your explains that one I don't know if you've ever grown plants in a terrarium they love it in there because they're protect. But when you take them, out and expose them to the outside world, they don't always do out there, not strong. It breeds a kind of laziness here Simon Lester is with the Cato Institute and he's not talking about terrariums. He's talking about tariffs tariffs that protect some US businesses from foreign competition. You don't have to compete with the best in the world, just sort of relax. You don't have to work that hard, you're not gonna face any competition. US steel companies, for example, don't face as much pressure to upgrade plants now they can in our raising prices without competition from foreign steel producers. Ultimately, I think if you want to sessile businesses, you want them competing in order to, you know me as a fishing has possible Chinese goods. Don't usually compete with US goods head on. We don't make a lot of the same stuff, but many goods that are made in America are made with Chinese parts tariffs. Make those parts more expensive Tim Keough teaches economics at the university of Minnesota gonna make things to the US shell the rest of the world. Be more expensive than we're gonna lose market share because of that. But the. Disadvantages go beyond that, take the tariffs on steel aluminum. The metal that would be going into the US now goes to global markets increasing supply and depressing prices outside the US Rufus York's is president of the national Foreign Trade Council. Many of my manufacturers say that this has a direct impact on their competitiveness. Not only because their costs go up, but actually their foreign competitors costs. Go down your says the morn industries protected the less productive, it's likely to become in New York. I'm Sabrina sure for marketplace. In higher education news on this Thursday, three much reviled letters. S A N, t the college board purveyor of the aforementioned exam is adding a new score to it math, reading, and writing the optional essay and now adversity as in the hurdles like neighborhood crime, and poverty, that students might have dealt with getting into college. It's yet another attempt by the college board to keep its core product, the SAT, relevant as the idea. Of who gets in wear gets more attention. Marketplace's Amy Scott has more on that when Scott vers, I'll was weighing student applications. This college admission season he had another tool to consider. He's dean of undergraduate admissions at the university of South Carolina, along with grades and essays and test scores and environmental context. Dashboard. Offer details like family and housing stability access to AP classes and neighborhood poverty, and crime. And that did help us find some students that we would probably would otherwise not considered the university was one of fifty testing out the dashboard. This year, the college board will roll it out to all schools next year, and it'll be free, but SAT critic Robert Shafer with fair test says it's a business move with selective colleges under pressure to admit more students of color and low income students. More of them are making standardized tests. Optional people have long known that head scores were a excellent. Mega of accumulated advantage. And now, the college board is going to admit it by thing. You can't use raw scores. You have to examine them in context. The college board has tried something like this, in the past in the late nineteen nineties, it's so-called strivers program aimed to take socioeconomic factors including race into account. But Shaffer says critics accused the college board of back door affirmative action, and the program was dropped Tiffany Jones directs higher, Ed policy at the education trust advocacy group. She says the dashboard doesn't include race without looking at race explicitly. It's very difficult to try to account for racial inequality. Students also won't know their scores adding another layer of mystery to the college admissions process. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. There was a fairly brief, but all important announcement from Boeing today, a quick four paragraphs, the first sentence of which read Boeing has completed development of the updated software for the seven. Thirty seven max, which is big the company says it's working with the FAA to get the planes back in the air. Investors were reassured Boeing shares up two point three percent day. The broader markets up as well. Not as much though. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Hollywood

United States Scott Tong Amy Scott Michigan founder and CEO KAI Ryssdal P. L. A. N T Boeing Michigan economic Development Los Angeles China John Rimini FAA Qualcomm Amir New York university of Minnesota Google
"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

08:25 min | 2 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini, founder and CEO of airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air by now what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's P. L. A. N T, M dot com. There's an interesting observation to be made here about the global economy, things that usually happened really, really slowly. Until they happen. Really, really fast. Oh, explain from American public media. This is marketplace. In Los Angeles. I'm KAI Ryssdal. It is Thursday. Today, the sixteenth of mega is always to have you along, everybody. We begin today with this ten days ago, Amir week and a half. Every indication was that the trade mad disagreements between the United States and China were all but solved couple more meetings, a quick Trump's, she phone call done and done. Now. It's tariffs as far as the I can see. And as of yesterday quite possibly a breakdown in the heavily, integrated and extremely globalized technology supply chain, we refer here, of course, to the Trump administration, effectively blacklisting, the Chinese technology, giant hallway, which will cut that company off from its American suppliers, chips, from Qualcomm and phone software from Google to name. Just a couple. You're all that in with bands on while way in other countries. And as marketplace's Scott Tong reports now from Washington, there does seem to be something of a digital iron curtain descending if the US shoe. Hallway, it also hits its own foot inside while we gadgets are innards from firms, like Intel, oracle and Western Digital but tech firms sensing the crossfire are trying to get out of the way and avoid partnering with companies subject to bands in retaliation says Linley Gwen app of the Linley group. I think that companies are trying to reduce their exposure to the band, and by fewer components from countries that could be affected the word decoupling is being whispered in the US and China that is each country may develop its own separate supply, chain, while we has long been on Washington's hitlist and is trying to make parts semiconductors in house. Business professor at ten Wong judge young university has a new book on wall way. He says the company can be self sufficient that can make it south. Maybe he's not as good as the US components, but it's not much worse. They still can't sell products so that prepare for these more than ten years, while ways, DIY project. Could accelerate Chinese innovation? And in areas like wireless, five G many see hallway as already ahead. So the US might not want to cut itself off says, political scientists Abraham Newman at Georgetown, France in the nineteen eighties tried to develop its own internet, and it was kind of ridiculous, and the risk is that we end up with a new version of that a lesser. They un-filed g network. He says the US is weaponising interdependence and could unravel a global tech supply chain that took a generation to come together. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. You can argue till the cows come home about tariffs who wins who loses who pays wait. No, you can't consumers pay and nobody wins. But there is at least one agreed upon reality. When it comes to what tariffs due to an economy, the way things normally work don't work anymore. Marketplace's refinish your explains that one I don't know if you've ever grown plants in a terrarium they love it in there because they're protect. But when you take them, out and expose them to the outside world, they don't always do out there, not strong. It breeds a kind of laziness here Simon Lester is with the Cato Institute and he's not talking about terrariums. He's talking about tariffs tariffs that protect some US businesses from foreign competition. You don't have to compete with the best in the world, just sort of relax. You don't have to work that hard, you're not gonna face any competition. US steel companies, for example, don't face as much pressure to upgrade plants now they can in our raising prices without competition from foreign steel producers. Ultimately, I think if you want to sessile businesses, you want them competing in order to, you know me as a fishing has possible Chinese goods. Don't usually compete with US goods head on. We don't make a lot of the same stuff, but many goods that are made in America are made with Chinese parts tariffs. Make those parts more expensive Tim Keough teaches economics at the university of Minnesota gonna make things to the US shell the rest of the world. Be more expensive than we're gonna lose market share because of that. But the. Disadvantages go beyond that, take the tariffs on steel aluminum. The metal that would be going into the US now goes to global markets increasing supply and depressing prices outside the US Rufus York's is president of the national Foreign Trade Council. Many of my manufacturers say that this has a direct impact on their competitiveness. Not only because their costs go up, but actually their foreign competitors costs. Go down your says the morn industries protected the less productive, it's likely to become in New York. I'm Sabrina sure for marketplace. In higher education news on this Thursday, three much reviled letters. S A N, t the college board purveyor of the aforementioned exam is adding a new score to it math, reading, and writing the optional essay and now adversity as in the hurdles like neighborhood crime, and poverty, that students might have dealt with getting into college. It's yet another attempt by the college board to keep its core product, the SAT, relevant as the idea. Of who gets in wear gets more attention. Marketplace's Amy Scott has more on that when Scott vers, I'll was weighing student applications. This college admission season he had another tool to consider. He's dean of undergraduate admissions at the university of South Carolina, along with grades and essays and test scores and environmental context. Dashboard. Offer details like family and housing stability access to AP classes and neighborhood poverty, and crime. And that did help us find some students that we would probably would otherwise not considered the university was one of fifty testing out the dashboard. This year, the college board will roll it out to all schools next year, and it'll be free, but SAT critic Robert Shafer with fair test says it's a business move with selective colleges under pressure to admit more students of color and low income students. More of them are making standardized tests. Optional people have long known that head scores were a excellent. Mega of accumulated advantage. And now, the college board is going to admit it by thing. You can't use raw scores. You have to examine them in context. The college board has tried something like this, in the past in the late nineteen nineties, it's so-called strivers program aimed to take socioeconomic factors including race into account. But Shaffer says critics accused the college board of back door affirmative action, and the program was dropped Tiffany Jones directs higher, Ed policy at the education trust advocacy group. She says the dashboard doesn't include race without looking at race explicitly. It's very difficult to try to account for racial inequality. Students also won't know their scores adding another layer of mystery to the college admissions process. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. There was a fairly brief, but all important announcement from Boeing today, a quick four paragraphs, the first sentence of which read Boeing has completed development of the updated software for the seven. Thirty seven max, which is big the company says it's working with the FAA to get the planes back in the air. Investors were reassured Boeing shares up two point three percent day. The broader markets up as well. Not as much though. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Hollywood

United States Scott Tong Amy Scott Michigan founder and CEO KAI Ryssdal P. L. A. N T Boeing Michigan economic Development Los Angeles China John Rimini FAA Qualcomm Amir New York university of Minnesota Google
"john rimini" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

Layers of Learning Podcast

13:44 min | 3 years ago

"john rimini" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

"Everything that can be really discouraging for them. But there are times when we do sometimes during that conference, I actually type for them, and I type it out, and we can print it as a book format, or as you know, depends on what it is. If it's a poem. It's just gonna be a stands in the center of the page. They can illustrate around or something, but I will often type for them. But there comes a point in time where kids need to do able to do. Yeah. The the entire job of it. And they're also is really a place for even with my little ones. We have all these pre bound books that we use a lot. And then they'll take everything that they had perfected and we edited and all of that. And then they put like a sentence on each page of the book and then illustrate their story. That's a lot of work, and it it takes time to do all in one day. Like, you let it right? I let that bleed over into however, many days, they need, you know, they've got we've got a month that we're working on this. And they only. You have to take one piece through the whole writing process. So you're pre bound book are those books that you make or do you buy them or what where do you get those? So I buy them when I see them like target often has them in their little. Bins. There discount bins at the front during school supply season. So I buy a bunch then and then like oriental trading company sells board but versions and and several versions of them that you can get, but I also just take card stock and then typing paper the printer paper enter paper told in half like hamburger style. And so it up with the sewing machine in the middle Staples, or staple it. Yeah. Yes. So we have a whole bunch of them in all different formats. And so quite honestly, you need to remember. They might make ten pre rights four drafts. Revise one at at one published one. No that that's how writers tend to work. They don't take every single thing. They pre right all the way through the writing process. That's fine. You just need to do at least one that wondering the month is a completely gone through the entire writing process, but others may be kinda halfway or you're just journaling because you had a good. Idea or you wanted to do this store, your this poem or this rap out environment. Whatever whatever you want. You are the writer, you're learning skills. And that's what that monthly assignment is for. But you still have a whole bunch of options to do more things. We'll have more writer's workshop podcasts, and and ideas, but do you have other questions about the basics? So my biggest struggle with writing. And my kids is just that they played hate it. And actually this last year when we were doing writer's workshop I saw that turn around a lot. But how do you make it? So your kids actually like writing I really think a lot of it is in allowing for more choice and requiring a little bit less. So it's not that my kids aren't capable of sending more than one a month through the writing process, but that would leave them no time for their own choices when you start with that. Blink writer's notebook at the beginning of the year. And you just give them blanks. Got nothing. But after you've done a couple of units, and they've learned this pre writing technique, and they've practiced drafting, and they've got some ideas, all of a sudden, they have some things that they want to do on their own that they know are not going to be graded. So I would say. I don't know seventy percent of the work that my kids do is not graded in writing. And that helps be a little bit more fun there, and knowing they're not gonna have to rewrite it over and over like they have control. Also that blink notebook that I started with we still use that we have a composition book or something similar. That's the writers journal anything. That's in their journal is off limits to me and less. They asked me to read it that's private. That's there's I never open it with the idea. Yes. Very often. My kids come to me. And they say I want to turn this into a story. Can you read it and help me or something like that? And then I will read what's in their in their journal, if they asked me to, but that's that's there's and even if they asked me to know, red, pens or corrections are allowed in it. So that gives them some freedom to know that spelling doesn't count their grammar doesn't count there. This idea book, and then they can take those ideas and take them through the writing process, and that's where we work on the mechanics. Spelling so it gives a little bit more freedom. I don't know if that answers your fun question. But that's what keeps my kids writing. It's not that it has to be like entertainment style fund like amusement that my kids be absolutely hated writing. I mean, the hated it. It was like the worst thing in the world. And I wanted it to be you wanted polish pieces. Probably I think what I was doing is. I was focusing so hard on the editing that I was stifling all of their creativity. It was gone like miserable because I was expecting them to be college level professors. Like, I guess I was too negative. I didn't know how to say positive things if there was a mistake anywhere in the paper. Do you know what I mean? Like I had to learn that. And I'm still learning that getting better at it. But I think it was really an attitude change that I needed to make I never learned these stages of writing in the writing process, I guess in school, we did them in some form or another. But it was never laid out for me. I did not know this. When I was in college. I would write all of my college papers single draft done. I've never even go back and look at it again. I never revised. I never edited. I just wrote it all out at once because I'm a natural writer. I didn't have a problem. I was able to organize all of the thoughts in my head and just put it on paper. And I think I kind of expected my kids to be able to do that. And most people can no. But I could I I did major researching papers in college that way. I hardly ever looked at anything. I didn't do much pre writing. I just I don't know wrote just wrote. It was easy is just easy for me. And that has made me very very poor writing teacher if you can start to value the word cloud that you did for a pre right as heavily as the finish published piece. It will change things for your kids. They get to enjoy the process a little bit more instead of just focusing on the red pen and the the mistakes. Yeah. I think that's what I had to learn how to be positive. They enjoy it win. They're successful kids. Enjoy things that they're six people. Enjoy that is the other part of having it be fun. You said that you loved it. Or that your kids loved it when they laughed in the right places. Right. So an important part of the publishing stage is the sharing of it. If you published a book, and you never put it out for anyone. That's not really publishing a book. It's not very. Rewarding at all you have to give them a platform for sharing this whatever the format is if it's a story, they get to stand up and read it out loud. Or if they wrote a rap, they should absolutely wrap it, oh, you know? With with full beat box in the background. But I was going to try to beat bucks. But then I'd thought better of it. I had my hands up by my mouth and everything. And I thought no, no we shouldn't. I need my kids to come in and do that. But that is part of the publishing that makes it fun is by the time. You get to publishing you have to be very clear with the audience who is hearing it that we are not at the revising stage right now, this is the time to celebrate not the time to suggest your or comment or correct done at that point. Yeah. Again, you have to teach that culture and the the right to hate etiquette. Your other kids the etiquette. Yeah. At each stage like how if someone is sharing something and revising stage. Okay. We can give comments, but they should be positive, right? If someone is sharing something the publishing stage, we just clap at the end right there. There's no there's no feedback there because they're done some sometimes actually sometimes in the publishing stage. If we do an oral presentation we have a question period where you get to ask the question. Yes, we we do that. So so that would be the only feedback type thing, but but you're not going to say, oh, you should have ended at differently or something. Like that that that's not the place for that. So when they're celebrated that helps it to be more fun. You know, they want to do it. The last thing that you need to recognize when you're first starting out is that there is no place in writer's workshop for slapping, great on a paper. When I was a freshman. I wrote a paper, and I gotta be on it a b plus and then I change schools in the middle of high school. And when I was in my junior year, I turned in the exact same paper didn't even change a word just print it out. Again. I think I changed the teacher's name and the date. Way to make an change that heading I turned it in. And this was a junior honors English class at my new high school, and I got an AA on it. How did that happen? I didn't even have my freshman English paper be and then my yeah. The papers get an A. And it's because you turn it into a different teacher. Right. Grades are meaningless in writer's workshop. That's ridiculous. You don't slap a or a b your C or anything on paper. Instead, you give actual feedback. So that yes that was the first time. I was like, oh, that's what a paper is supposed to be like like it helps me to see. So we we will link to that that rubric. So that you can see it on on our website. Yeah. In the show notes, you're evaluating it on their ideas and content, and it has some descriptors about how to evaluate that on the rubric. And then they're orgnization sentence. Fluency word choice convention. And voice. Those are the end the way you're not going to be different depending on the John that you're writing in. Yes, everyone is going to be different. But it gives you some guides on that rubric. So that you talked about that before your kids begin the project. So they know what you're expecting exactly that. That's where the expectations in the in the John Rimini lessons come in. You can see these are the things that are required in this kind of writing. So this is what this is what you're going to need to do. But that gives actual feedback instead of a meaningless grade, which is going to be totally subjective depending on who's reading it. So if they get the actual feedback. They can see my mom likes me to know where to put commas now. So I'm going to have to up my game on the conventions. Yes. And I always tell my kids if you gave J K Rowling, the manuscript of the entire Harry Potter series and said, you know, let's do one more draft of it like one more edit this over she would make changes. It doesn't matter. How good you are how successful. So you are there's always something that you can change and make more effective in writing. There is never a writer who couldn't make something better. There's never writer that feels like this is perfect finished. Yeah. I mean, she still has an entire Potter more website where she has developed the stories more completely and the characters, and you can learn all kinds of things that she didn't include. She she said she wanted to include huddle puff like Harry going into huddle puff house. And he never did. 'cause he went to the other two. Yes. Yes. So, you know. Know, it doesn't matter. How good you are writing is a process, and it's a process that you can do over and over and over again in develop, and that's what this writer's workshop is it's teaching kids the process in a very natural organic way instead of having a workbook where you check off the grammar skills. So you will through your mini lessons check off the grammar skills. But that's not what the program is about. It's about writing the ideas come first the conventions are just like this little part of it. So even though I've only been doing this like full-on for a year. It has really completely changed. My kids attitude already, even though I feel like I'm still not that good at it went from hating writings, they actually like it and CJ the one who was like mom, you're being too critical of my writing he now he likes ready he enjoys that part of the day. And that's true all of my kids, complete turnaround and ninety percent of that was my attitude and then at ten percent of it was understanding the stages of the writing process, and and the rubric there's a lot more to it. Than just commas in the grammar by in the work. Right. So I think so much of it was my attitude. The writer's workshop process helped me develop my attitude like understanding how to great now evaluate that helped me develop my attitude, and it was the weight the language is using with my kids as one eighty and that has really changed how they've you writing. And how they themselves as writers it's helped so much and I'm sorry for ruining your early writing life children. Still still growing and learning as a whole school or so, well, I could talk about this forever. I don't want to bore anyone too much. I do have quite a few articles on a writer's workshop page. I'm always adding more to it. And like I said I am working on a little bit more of a written guide for people who want to have that on hand. Because you don't don't remember everything from podcast in in quite the same way. So anyway, I'm working on that. But please feel free to shoot me any questions. Ask me anything I love answering about writing because that's one of my favorite things to teach actually. So thanks for listening. And let us know what are the questions you have? Thank you. Karen? Bye. Bye. Thank you for joining us today. Come and visit us at layers learning dot com and on our Facebook group, make sure to tune in next month for new podcast. In the meantime, we wish you happiness in your home school have fun learning.

writer Facebook Harry Potter J K Rowling Karen John Rimini seventy percent ninety percent ten percent one day