17 Burst results for "John Renoir"

"john renoir" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Sell good number eight is the four hundred blows by Francois Truffaut. High also had the poster in my college dorm room. Do you get extra points for that? Because I gotta go back through the lake. Number seven is eight and a half by Rodrico Fellini. I number six is persona by Ingmar. Bergman. I five is the rules of the game by John Renoir. Number four is Russia Mon by Akira Kurosawa? Number three is Tokyo story by ozo-. I haven't watched it. How we've talked about those cool things they do at New York Film festival where like a modern day luminary filmmaker comes and talks about films that influence them. Jim Jarmusch at the one. I went to listed this film as one of his still on my list. But now, we're like shamed. We all have to watch Tokyo story by like next week. I'm generally shaving by this entire brasses. Number two is bicycle thieves. Number one is seven samurai. I. I don't think I've seen it. Now that's a four hour in a lot of. But there's so much samurai action. Yeah. It's so good. I know seen the magnificent seven the remake not there. Yeah. Denzel Washington won in the one from the sixties which any sleep. So what are you guys favorite just around this out? What are you guys favorite for films? Actually breathless is not my favorite good Dr weekend, two or three things I know about her in praise of love breathless is the canonical title. So I could see why it would be there. But I wouldn't have selected that from him. For instance. I think pure food my favorite. Yeah. That's good as well. From that time period, there were sixty seven filmmakers on the list. So there must be multiple titles from almost half of them. So I bet there's more than there. You know? Like, if we went further up on the list, you get to like, your mother Toro, and like pants labyrinth is on there. So like a lot of them are more contemporary. It's just like the classics are, of course in the top twenty. So. Yeah. We have more Bergman on Bergman, persona persona. Not seven seal. I'm surprised. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Love these films are really classic to Johnny. We're seeing those more contemporary ones higher up on the list. I I would say generally that like the cinema scene from Israel in the last twenty years has totally lead only say blown up. It's a bad bed words for Israel. But it has been burgeoning a lot of the shows we like here in the US come from Israeli show is so I would definitely recommend people. Check out some Isreaeli cinema. Any anyone film in particular or nothing coming directly to mind, but I would say generally, I haven't seen like a bad movie out of Israel in the last decade, and there's been a lot. But I think super Indy wise to mama tambien is probably my favorite. I was gonna say I'm shocked by the lack of like Mexican and Latin American presence in the surprising. But yeah, it's done said, I guess like higher like in higher numbers there are, but that's spent one of the top languages. Yeah. This is a massive undertaking. You know, like sorting out the one hundred greatest films of like. Regardless of the fact that their foreign or not it's just like this is the entire world. We're talking about it's not just America. It's and every decade like they didn't even narrow it down. Surprising. How much of the like dominant mid-century thing is still part of the top of illest. That's all it's just interesting that like a whole lot of the ones that were used to seeing there are still up there. Well, I guess that's what makes them classics. Yeah. And then I'm also conduct not see the conformist. Although I wonder what Berta Lucci made it. I'm sure there's a Berta Lucci somewhere in there. But it was kind of surprised not to see that one. I think probably right up the whole list. And while we might not have it by the time this podcast is released. It'll probably go out on Friday. So stay tuned in to that cool and speaking of voting for things you all know by now that we had election day in America this week. There were lots of races all over the country, and there's one I can pretty much guarantee. You heard nothing about, but it's actually relevant. Indie filmmakers, I'm talking about the fight over the congressional seat in west Virginia's third district a rural..

Bergman Israel Berta Lucci Jim Jarmusch Denzel Washington America Francois Truffaut Tokyo Akira Kurosawa Rodrico Fellini Ingmar John Renoir New York Film Russia west Virginia US Isreaeli twenty years
"john renoir" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Patient tended to by Cameron Diaz lucky man. Don't forget. I was in bed with. He's jealous enough Norman, don't rub it in. That's one of his crushes. You can't read that. Good taste. Good cakes. Thank you. But. Oh, I'm reindeers and I were in bed together. I thought. Maybe we don't have to shoot this. I loved him. But what I found interesting is to act while being bedridden essentially has got to be really tough and blind and blind booth. But I mean you're the idea is you have to project energy for your performance. When you're in a position where normally it's, it's rest. Yeah. And even lethargy. Yeah, but but no, you found that sweet spot in between, you know. What interesting that that was talk of my being nominated for an Academy Award, supporting actor, all that and never happen, but there was talk of it while they should've talked more. Thank you. Which I liked it. I thought it was good nights. Thought. I found him most. Enjoyable. Lovely. Curtis was very special guy. Yes. You're right. A film buff of the highest order who became a very gifted filmmaker. I didn't know he was a film. Oh, yes, absolutely. And then he became honorary chairman of the UCLA film and television archives. So that was a great. They were lucky to have him, and he was a great person to represent them for any of you that don't know if you look up these LA archives. They do fantastic work really, really do. Yeah, they work hard and it shows by very DEA. Dale friend, Bob get is also connected what they all. Yes, he's retired now, but boy, his work lives on all the films. He rescued all the films. He brought back to life plus the archivists the film Graham delusion. It's interesting. Awesome said that if a decree, one, fourth, all foods to be destroyed. The one film that should be preserved his grand Lucien all he wasn't wrong about that. The picture is. On believable if you watch it how he got red wa. Not on the screen. The attitudes. The not only performances, but. The way of life. The people. I mean everything about it is so remarkable and some great performances. Yeah, to be sure of Eric von Stroheim with the whisky and drawing his neck back. He. And for neighbor to my acted in the theatre. Play, call, Noah. Great, ACTA. Great actor for may. And we haven't mentioned the fact that you became very close to John Renoir during his exile here during the war. And then when he moved here permanently the Los Angeles, I love John way. Did. Very proud of the fact that he asked me to directors last picture Corolla. Have you seen? I have not embarrassed to say lizard account role, whom I, what am I foam madly allow. Not alone on that one either. I said, you're not alone on that one either. Oh, God. So beautiful in it and a wonderful person. Oh, eventually move to Europe. And as our grandmother, she moved to Europe to be without grandkids. But she was executed in Corolla as she was. I think it's so many thinks she did. But she was a great favourite of your house. Ause. And. A letter that I think for the record, I should tell you one of my favorite scenes was your own. He was making. Of a picture made he at the southern. And this leads. Zack, Scott and Betty field who was may just on Broadway. There's a scene in that. Well, they are very poor people, but two of them and they have a small patch of land. They have to rage raise vegetables on it and order to eat. And see. Little dog. A small dog gets. Oh, no. In this scene, a cow gets into this piece of land and begins to Trimble on the vegetables. This was life threatening. What did y'all. Was he has a little dog come in. Balk at the cow making the cow run out of the patch and into the river. Which story that follows them into the river. Well. That was a problem. Because they would put the cow into the scene. With all the vegetables and everything. Trample. How would we munching away. They would put it in this puppy who was to frighten the cow to walk into the river. So they put the puppy and. And should stop to shoot the pope is scared to this of the cow, and it runs out of the shot. So they catch it..

chairman Norman Cameron Diaz Eric von Stroheim John Renoir Europe Graham Curtis LA UCLA Noah Dale Trimble Los Angeles Betty field Zack Bob Scott
"john renoir" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"Some of those bear taste signature things that I like to do, but I also don't feel bound to just keep making the same kind of film time after time. Well, we're kinda, we're kinda headed into the end of our conversation here. So I wanted to ask, we kind of started by talking about what's so different about some of these teenagers. Now, what what is still the same about teenagers from when you were a teenager from your parents, teenagers, like what is still the thing that is just across time, always going to be true of teenagers. I think what's always going to be true is that the teenage years are are years in which so many teenagers are really struggling to kind of figure out who they are and and what they think and what they think about themselves and what they think about their parents and what they think about the world. I think it's why it's both an exhilarate. Eating time, and it can be an incredibly painful time I speak from experience on that one, but I think also the teenage years are characterized by, you know, new things, and whether it's like grant kind of having a crush on the girl in badminton class, and we then see how he awkwardly tries to figure out how he can ask her out. You know, when you see that in in the series, I think black white, whatever you are, however old you are. You will remember what that was like to try and figure out the someone you had a crush on what you were going to try and do about it or not do about it. And I think the series is full of moments like that. We didn't want the kids to just be in the series as sort of props or symbols of race and education. We wanted them to be full blown teenagers who are going through all those classic moment. Of what it means to be a teenager and to show you that. And that maybe part of the part of the revelation for, I think for white viewers in particular is to sort of understanding recognize that is Scillies. This may sound is that a lot of what you felt an experienced as a teenager is felt by these kids as well by kids who are black and by racial, they have other things they're dealing with the you never dealt with, but there are so many commonalities of experience to that you can relate to. And I think that's a good thing people to say. Yeah. Well, we end every episode by asking some of our guests, some of the same questions. So I'm gonna ask you one of those and that is, who is the filmmaker living or dead that you learned the most from? But you've never met John Renoir really? Why's that. Well, I when I fell in love with film, it was back in college when I took a film appreciation class that was in the English department and the the class was focused on great autour 's and I was just falling for film and movies and heard it was a great class and we. So we looked at the work of John Renoir who had never heard of. At that time, and it took me a while to understand what made him so great because Joan Renoir had an incredible kind of artless, but poetic style, right? But once I kind of got a sense of what that was, I was just really struck by his ability to kind of capture the complexity and humor and tragedy of life in narrative cinema and to have all these things happening on so many different levels both thematically and even within the frame that I think that his work had a real profound impact on me when I den did eventually fall in love with documentary, because I've tried in my own work, no matter how serious the work is is to have it had that range of what it means to be human and nobody. There's. No more greater humanist filmaker that I know of than John Renoir. Do you have one of his homes you? Would you recommend our listeners checkout if they haven't while there's a bunch shaklee. But you know, I mean, of course there's rules of the game, an allusion, which are the recognized classics. But you know, films like Buddha saved from drowning is pretty terrific..

John Renoir Joan Renoir badminton Scillies Buddha
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Bookworm

"First of all, describe trouble in paradise as it appeared to you. When you saw it, you were in undergraduate student. Addison Wisconsin Wisconsin was running film society and we showed trouble in paradise and you know, part of the reason he hasn't been as well known as should be. I mean, he was a big name in his time. Here's a household word like Hitchcock. His films became inaccessible for a long time partly because of censorship. Partly because times changed and trouble in paradise reappeared in the late sixties. And I saw this film and I was just bold overnight thought at the time. I've just seen this guy's masterpiece, which is strange feeling because he made seventy two films and what did I know about the other ones. But now I've seen all except one was just rediscovered part of a film called the Rosen tough case. Nineteen minutes were just found, but I've seen. Everything else forty-nine films, which is a pretty good survival read, and it is still has best film. In my opinion, it's it's a, it's the Panama of romantic comedy. I think it's the best of the genre. It's crazy, you're in an invented world. It doesn't have a name like the made up names in his operettas instating place as he quoted in MGM Paris. But, but nevertheless, these are people infant at home cross with their eccentricities in their beauties in their humor's was Paul Gauguin was said about the people he painted that they were Jews wearing jewels and and in trouble in paradise. The characters are jewels wearing jewels and the film's jewel it's jewel I can his precision as jewel thieves and it's it's as somebody. One of Louis colleagues said there is none. Nothing realistic about his films, everything artificial -t's world he created and that's part of what is charming and delightful. It's his world. He invented the early filmmakers were inventing this new medium to and he was a silent film maker and he learned how to use montage on gestures and looks and to tell stories without words, and he voided titles as much as possible in his silent films. You understand very sophisticated films, but as he said, a child could understand them own VO. He made films before those sensors, the Hays office, the bream office came into being. It was the glue film that necessitated sense of he practically Creole designed for living. I believe it was the first film condemned by the legion of decency Menasheh trot. It's very outrageous film even today. It's a hundred films do see in America about of Menasheh trial that people three people love each other very much what knoll coward. Called the play and Lubich is film, I think, improves on the play and is very daring and very sophisticated and the audience loved it. And then very soon the code was imposed thirty four, the real draconian code and they started not releasing his films again. Yes. What MU bitch did even before the Dakota in codes game in was to find a way to sidestep them. So though someone is very decorous -ly closing the door of the bedroom behind which. Are actors, beautiful actors will Frong we know what's going on behind the bedroom door. Not only that in one of the silent films of father peers in through the keyhole to watch his daughter and his rather impressed on her wedding night on her turns to the camera Leers is now I'm impressed and the phase out it's really raunchy. His German films are pretty raunchy. He got more subtle when he came to America. The German films are delightful, but the he was so subtle in Hollywood who Trent as John Renoir said, he, he invented the modern Hollywood, it's how did which do it, which we're talking about. It's a title that comes from sunshine that Billy woundr who took bitch as a mentor and friend wilder headed sign on his wallet, Saul Steinberg did for him. How how would Lubitsch do it? And he said he put it on the wall so that I would never write a sons would embarrass my good friend, Ernst Lubitsch, who he had written description of blizzards eighth wife in the notch, go with an he was his mentor in God. I do each film I saw was heaven can wait is very much based on my father's life for a lot of things about it..

Paul Gauguin America Ernst Lubitsch Wisconsin Hitchcock MGM Saul Steinberg Rosen Hollywood Billy woundr Louis John Renoir Paris Menasheh Leers Dakota Lubich wilder Trent Nineteen minutes
"john renoir" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Kyw newsradio oh one week after a jury found him guilty of three counts of indecent sexual assault bill cosby's wife is out with a statement attacking her husband's accusers the media prosecutors and the court more from kywz suburban bureau chief jim melwert camille cosby calls it mob justice against her husband pointing to what she says is quote judicial executive legislative media and corporate abuses of power she says bill cosby's rights to a fair trial into an unbiased jury were violated by what in her words are the overall media's frenzied relentless demonization of her husband combined with quote unquestioning acceptance of accusers allegations without any attendant proof she says she has publicly asking for a criminal investigation of the montgomery county district attorney arguing criminal charges were the result of what she calls a promise during an unethical campaign for the da's office camille cosby closer statement by saying she believes someday the truth will prevail adding quote it always does at the suburban bureau jim melwert kyw newsradio at the barnes foundation along museum row on the parkway home to the world's largest collection of renoir paintings the artists son is the focus of a new exhbition kyw steve tower reports a visitor becomes immersed in the autistic exchanges between the renowned impressionist masterpieces a goose renoir and his son the celebrated filmmaker john renoir as you pivot between the paintings and cinema actor and the senate boosts play a significant role in this sheet curator sylvie patrice says there are universal themes that play besides how each experimented with new modes of image making an expression how you did with your father especially when.

assault bill cosby barnes foundation john renoir senate sylvie patrice Kyw kywz bureau chief jim melwert executive montgomery county steve tower one week
"john renoir" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"At a new artistic expression dr albert barnes acquired one hundred eighty one paintings by the father john renoir was born in eighteen ninety four and nineteen seventynine steve taiwa kyw newsradio hey whatever they knew time is twelve twenty two it's time for traffic and transit on the twos on the scheduled expressway in both directions we have some construction between south street and the vine street expressway westbound side of things still heavy approaching south but delays are beginning to dwindle so we'll take that now we saw something going out onto oh to it southbound onto to right before route twenty nine the two left lanes are shut down to an accident not giving us any delay really but definitely use some caution as you head on by you're getting by to the far right so we'll keep you posted on that elsewhere in delaware county on i ninety five both directions between the commodore barry bridge and the blue route four seventy six two right lanes are shut down and it is heavy on southbound ninety five approaching four seventy six at this hour so definitely give yourself extra time we do have one bridge note the burlington bristol bridge construction will last until around four o'clock in the morning crews are mid span and their alternating lanes from the trumark financial twenty four hour traffic center where member banking is better banking i'm in toronto this is cbs three meteorologist kate bilo partly cloudy warm and muggy overnight the low sixty seven on friday hot and humid some sunshine the high eighty nine close to the record of ninety one from two thousand one could be a stray late day or evening shower or thunderstorm eyewitness weather updates eight times every hour on kyw newsradio.

dr albert barnes john renoir delaware county commodore barry bridge toronto steve taiwa burlington bristol bridge kate bilo twenty four hour
"john renoir" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Kyw newsradio oh one week after a jury found him guilty of three counts of indecent sexual assault bill cosby's wife is out with a statement attacking her husband's accusers the media prosecutors in the court more from kywz suburban bureau chief jim melwert camille cosby calls it mob justice against her husband pointing to what she says is quote judicial executive legislative media and corporate abuses of power she says bill cosby's rights to a fair trial into an unbiased jury were violated by what in her words are the overall media's frenzied relentless demonization of her husband combined with quote unquestioning acceptance of accusers allegations without any attendant proof she says she's publicly asking for a criminal investigation of the montgomery county district attorney arguing criminal charges were the result of what she calls a promise during an unethical campaign for the da's office camille cosby closes her statement by saying she believes someday the truth will prevail adding quote it always does at the suburban bureau jim melwert kyw newsradio at the barnes foundation along museum row on the parkway home to the world's largest collection of renoir paintings the artists son is the focus of a new exhibition kyw steve tower reports visitor becomes immersed in the artistic exchanges between the renowned impressionist master pierre goose renoir and his son the celebrated filmmaker john renoir as you pivot between the paintings and cinema actor the father and the son boosts play a significant role in the heat here raiders sylvie patrice says there are universal themes at play besides how each experimented with new modes of image making an expression how you deal with your father especially when it's ready to major major artist how you find your way how you.

assault bill cosby barnes foundation john renoir sylvie patrice Kyw kywz bureau chief jim melwert executive montgomery county kyw steve tower one week
"john renoir" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on Filmspotting

"To redeem now movie is also the middle of a new argentine series right now they're showing after twelve from 2014 described as a defiantly unsentimental coming of age story it comes from director martin shanley also at movie not part of that series but other offerings include thirteen zanetti from two thousand five occult thriller that won the world cinema grand prize at sundance and then the crime of monsieur lang for nineteen thirty six this is the concluding title in movies genre noir retrospective it's a politically provocative comedy thriller romance set at a publishing firm whose oppressive boss suddenly disappear sounds intriguing we certainly need to do our own john renoir retrospective here on the show we may get to that at some point in the future marathon again our link is phil spotting dot net slash marathons and you can go to movie dot com slash film spotting to start your 30day free trial i have a quick correction josh the cayman in response to our sacred cow discussion of 'bladerunner okay last week with michael phillips who got an email from primo duke la who got his dander up a little bit because we were we were nitpicking one of his beloved films it seems and he did have a very valid point remember when i was talking about how the relationship everything kind of about the relationship with the shaun young character and there's and ford character decker in 'bladerunner didn't work for me quite as well as i remembered at working and i pointed out how even in the scene with leon in the street where leon's attacking decker and then rachel shoots leon it seem completely jumbled in him make any sense how she got the gun in her hands and why she was carrying a gun primo points out that when replicant liane tracks down deckert after he has retired zohra leon bats the weapon out of deckert's hand and goes about giving him a righteous be down just when he's about to kill decker leon his shot an had by rachel she didn't just pull a gun out of nowhere she retrieved it from the street after deckert was disarm so sometimes when something makes no sense in a movie.

martin shanley sundance monsieur lang michael phillips leon decker liane deckert director john renoir rachel 30day
"john renoir" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"john renoir" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The officers are just a like a a trade show of the movie industry get out so there i can't remember i haven't looked it i mean i have and watson oscars in asia's matt did you have some of you wanted to add something it will not really and i wanted to change the subject entirely uh that's a 5 k uh i i wouldn't ask matthew we've got a break coming up this next week and i was i haven't i don't watch a lot of film but i wanted to watch some sort of a historical like him in on game of thrones there will be bloody a history with are you you do like it great they're you're watching with exactly um but i but not sort of that sort of history but american history so closer to home uh i was curious if if you had any general thoughts insertive film history or period pieces a general and if you have any recommendations well i guess in the operational or odd nineteenthcentury america nineteen thcentury america all and a half to give the anchor there's nothing that it comes right off the top of my head i mean what actually is interesting it's been filled themselves inmates at the early 20th century you know there's a lot of it recaptured even in the dramatic films that necessarily at the time work puree thesis uh i don't know if you i don't know if you ever watch them meet john doe that's one of the ones that recommended before that i i think that's an amazing movie about the kind of history of of how fascism was uh understood in this country and that was needed 1941 um that's that's one i can recommend with no qualms whatsoever um go back to go back and look at my list is there some other ones on various maybe not american uh history but uh the grand delusion by john renoir about the uh pow german pow camps french soldiers captured that's another maid thing uh historical film that i think he would probably get some buzz off of from your history buzz the site of your brain.

asia matthew john doe john renoir 5 k