34 Burst results for "John Paul Stevens"

Sen. Mitch McConnell says Senate will vote on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Tim Conway Jr.

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Sen. Mitch McConnell says Senate will vote on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Nominee for this vacancy will receive a vote. On the floor of the Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate will vote this year on President Trump's nominee to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The Senate has more than sufficient time. The process. A nomination. History and president make that perfectly clear. McConnell did not say whether the vote will happen before after the elections. But he says justice is John Paul Stevens in Sandra Day O'Connor, where each confirmed and fewer than 43 days. Democrats say the the next next president president should should pick pick the the nominee. nominee. President President Trump Trump says says he's he's obligated obligated to to nominate nominate a a replacement. replacement.

President Trump Trump President Trump Mitch Mcconnell Senate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Senate Majority Sandra Day O'connor John Paul Stevens
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: US Supreme Court judge dies of cancer, aged 87

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: US Supreme Court judge dies of cancer, aged 87

"The nation is mourning the loss of you, a Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She lost her long battle against cancer on Friday. She was 87. ABC is Aaron Carter Ski looks back at her life. Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a legal pioneer. Long before she was nominated to the Supreme Court in 1993 by President Bill Clinton. I am proud to nominate for associate justice of the Supreme Court. Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg. At her confirmation hearing, Ginsberg addressed head on her support of abortion rights. This is Something central to a woman's. Life to her dignity. Ginsberg was the court's eldest justice and once joked, emulating John Paul Stevens, who retired at age 90, Aaron Carter Ski,

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Aaron Carter Ski Ginsberg President Bill Clinton John Paul Stevens ABC Cancer
Final goodbye: Recalling influential people who died in 2019

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Final goodbye: Recalling influential people who died in 2019

"People like congressman Elijah Cummings who champion for the poor and for immigrants country is that this is the United States of America retired Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens was the leader of its liberal wing and a proponent of abortion rights in consumer protections at the very least I know that learning on the bench has been one of the most important and rewarding aspects of my own experience Ross Perot ran for president in nineteen ninety two he recorded the highest percentage for an independent or third party candidate since nineteen twelve you don't care about anything to make money there will be a job sucking sound going south Lee Iacocca became a folk hero rescuing one of Detroit's big three ally first of this crazy job they were ready to bury Chrysler last year you've made it the fastest growing car and truck company in America and the leader of the Islamic state group was killed a car Albert Daddy is dead I'm a Donahue

Elijah Cummings United States America John Paul Stevens Ross Perot President Trump Lee Iacocca Detroit Chrysler Albert Daddy Donahue Congressman Supreme Court
"john paul stevens" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

"Was in the bridge club and he would never bother to correct anybody or or you know let them know what his day job was. so it really was something that was very true to his personality not just on the bench but in all aspects of of his life but I think you know the practices as you mentioned do demonstrate his humility he he wrote his own first drafts because he believed that was the best way to make sure or he was reaching the correct outcome he cared in particular about the facts of the case he wanted to really grapple with the facts he wanted to understand the facts and you know make sure he fully understood the record in the case and he felt like the best way to do that was to dig himself and to you know right right out that part of the opinion and he he was even known from time to time that he would go into his office to work on his draft and he would emerge having declaring that he had changed his take in the case in possibly even his vote because you know having gone through that process opened his eyes to something new about the case but I think as you know former locklear one of the ways you saw his humility. The most was how when he interacted with us. He just really conveyed to us that he felt like he could learn from us. As much is you know we learn from him which was just ridiculous but I'm very much an evidence. I think again of his humility I think Kate Shaw had a really nice quote in one of the tribute pieces where she said that it was simultaneously Tena Asli terrifying and also unbelievably fortifying for a little kid law clerk essentially to be told like okay it's on can you and that he really did trust his clerks immensely Jim. I wonder if I just mentioned the Cert Pool in didn't explain what it was so maybe explain for a minute what the cert pool is and what it meant that justice. Stevens opted out sure the cert pool is a way for the justices to divide the the politicians or the applications for cases to be heard when I was clerking. It was about eight thousand per year. I think it's roughly the same today and so it's very hard for any individual justice to review all those petitions of course the clerks help out but a practice developed really over the last several decades accolades where all of the clerks who participated in this thing called the cert pool would get on a wheel and just kind of divide the eight thousand petitions among themselves themselves and they would each write a memo that would be circulated to all the other justices chambers talking about whether the the facts of the case whether the case should be granted or not and it was recommendation and each individual chambers could then make their own decisions based on what the pool memos said but they were not the first point of contact each justice. Stevens and not being part of the pool was saying you know I don't want some other justices clerks to be the ones sounds to summarize a cert petition for me. I want that to happen in chambers and in fact when it did happen in chambers he didn't really want his own clerks to summarize the the petitions either. He just wanted us to kind of flag ones that he should read on himself and that really does I think speak to the humility see that we were talking about before which is in any number of practices including writing his own opinions for the first draft including not being in the cert pool including not getting you know elaborate memos from his clerks summarizing the cases the court was going to hear he wanted to make sure that he was arriving at decisions through his own mental process and not being influenced by other people recognizing that that really can change your mind if someone else's takes the first whack at something it it influences you and he wanted to make sure that the decision making was by the person who was confirmed by the Senate and appointed by the president and not by clerks. You're both checking me on this humility thing that I'm saying and I love that. You're both saying no. It is actually the consummate act of humility to say I actually have to make up my my own mind the opposite of what I'm thinking of in terms of very controlling or you know that that I can't be a part of a larger cert pool. Pull your both saying actually this is very emblematic of somebody who really felt as though humility requires him to do the work I would say so so I am hesitating a little bit because he was not a person who lacked self-confidence all right he was when he reached a decision he was he was very often often quite sure he was right but that was because he had taken the time to go through the facts to think it through to get a first impression that wasn't generated by someone else right and so he was confident in his process but he wasn't. He didn't think that he was better than other people. Camila had asked you for a favorite moment from oral argument and you came up with this kind of obscure exchange from Barnard versus Thorsten Justin this is argued in January of nineteen eighty nine here's justice O'Conner chiding a lawyer for calling justices judge. We don't think I think that it would work judge for several reasons. I think were generally call justice. I'm sorry what now keep hosting because here's justice the Steven wants it might be alleviated if we had more lawyers who were actually there judge Justice Stephen but it cannot your mistake judges also so made in article three of the Constitution by the way I so so tell me way too well. What is this when that you pulled for us as something that was representative presentative of something uniquely Stevens Ish why I think it's a couple of things about that clip one is that he's right and the Constitution doesn't say justice does a judge when it talks about the supreme court but it's also that he was kind of simultaneously accomplishing a couple of things he was trying to set the advocate at what s who was clearly nervous and rattled by having been rebuked by Justice O'Connor and saying really don't worry about it but also it was it really was a kind of chiding of justice O'Conner as well but in the most gentle kind of joking way possible and recognizing that it's hard to do that directly he really had a lot of what you might call emotional intelligence. I think he can reader room pretty well and and there are other examples of this and there's one in his obituary by Linda Greenhouse Times where she mentioned his anecdote where there's some some function the justices are having one of the female clerks has been asked to to hand out drinks or something and he takes over for her and says and so I think it's my turn now and I think that's just another example of ways in which as you say he didn't like anyone kind of being talked down to and but he was also very socially aware in a way that not every you know not everyone. has that set of skills sign your thoughts on that yeah. I know that you also have lots of stories about justice. Stevens just being like freakishly sensitive to kind of dynamics in a way that I think so many of the justices sometimes don't necessarily hone in on the most vulnerable person in the room he he did have kind of an uncanny way of doing that right you know he did and I I love that clip that you played because it's it is it's like all of it together like you know so it's kind it's funny and it's super smart all all in one just quick exchange and it just so much about him but he did and it was another way hey where. I think he was a surprise to people use. All this sort of you know reserved midwesterner. Who you know it was the opposite of sort of touchy feely you know hippy or whatever of of the generation maybe that came after him and yet when it mattered when it mattered to having this ability ready to figure out you know the power imbalance or who needed hugh needed a lift or who needed you know the kind word at at the right time he he was really amazing in that way. We're GONNA pause now to hear from one of our sponsors on this week's show and that what is the great courses plus. You know listener what you know stipulated but sometimes you don't know what you do now. Now you with me well. The great courses plus is here to fill in your knowledge gaps. We all deserve to be able to further our knowledge and with at this online streaming service. You never ever have to stop learning. There are thousands of lectures on virtually any topic you can possibly think of and even in some of those you might not think of all presented by top professors in their field so you could dive into topics like the human brain or if you listen to this show the Supreme Court in the Constitution or pirate wars or playing guitars or taking better photos or Taichi. There's a whole world of history knowledge and ideas for you to explore and the great courses plus APP makes it easy for you to watch or listen anytime anyplace.

Stevens Supreme Court O'Conner Justice Stephen Justice O'Connor locklear Kate Shaw Linda Greenhouse Times Senate law clerk Jim Steven president Camila hugh representative Barnard Thorsten Justin
Justice John Paul Stevens And US Supreme Court discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Justice John Paul Stevens And US Supreme Court discussed on All Things Considered

"Justice John Paul Stevens was mourned by fellow judges and the general public as his body lay in repose at the US Supreme Court has been such a wonderful person in our history on the

Justice John Paul Stevens Us Supreme Court
Trumps pay respects to Justice John Paul Stevens

Ray Appleton

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Trumps pay respects to Justice John Paul Stevens

"Before traveling to pay respects to one of the nation's most liberal Supreme Court justices president trump firing up another tweet in his war boards with four house Democrats but guns to deliver porch while heading to the Supreme Court to pay respects to the late justice John Paul Stevens president trump tweeting a new shot in the future this one is a very racist group of troublemakers who are young inexperienced and not very smart they are pulling the once great Democrat party far left and we're against humanitarian aid at the border and are now against ice and homeland security at about the same time one of the four congresswoman Rasheeda to leave till the end of a C. P. convention in Detroit

Supreme Court Rasheeda Detroit President Trump John Paul Stevens
John Paul Stevens, NPR And Franco discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

John Paul Stevens, NPR And Franco discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

"President trump is paying his respects too late justice John Paul Stevens who died last week NPR's Franco or Daniela's reports this wasn't on trump's official itinerary president trump and the First Lady made a surprise trip to the Supreme Court to pay their respects to the late justice who is lying in repose at the center of the great hall Stephen serve nearly thirty five years on the High Court he was a leading liberal voice on the court until he retired in two thousand ten at the age of ninety Chief Justice John Roberts escorted the president and the First Lady into the hall where justice Stevens coffin was draped with an American flag the president and the First Lady walked hand in hand to the coffin where they bowed their heads in silence they then stopped in front of the late justices portrait they did not share any public remarks Franco or down yes NPR news

John Paul Stevens NPR Franco Donald Trump Supreme Court Stephen High Court John Roberts President Trump Daniela Official Thirty Five Years
Trump, Twitter And President discussed on Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Trump, Twitter And President discussed on Rush Limbaugh

"President trump continues to go after the four congressional freshmen Democrats notice the squad president trump keeping up his attacks on for democratic Congress women all women of color writing on Twitter this morning that they are quote a very racist group of troublemakers who are young inexperienced and not very smart the president writes that the women lawmakers are quote pulling the once great Democrat party far left tweet came just two minutes before the president and First Lady arrived at the Supreme Court to pay their respects to the late justice John Paul Stevens Karen Travers ABC news the White

Donald Trump Twitter President Trump Supreme Court Congress John Paul Stevens Karen Traver Two Minutes
"john paul stevens" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on We The People

"Part. That's you know it was a it was incredibly rushed process right so no really sort of find judicial. <hes> craft is going to emerge from something that is briefed and argued repeatedly over over the course of a few weeks in December <hes> but <hes> but he just says opinion just doesn't stand up to any kind of scrutiny <hes> and that's another one I think he <hes> you know I think he was mostly really able even when he was on the losing end of a five four case that he thought was super important <hes> to kind of put it behind him and just get it the next day and <hes> I extended his colleagues the same sort of goodwill that he always did <hes> and and sort of not even in years when he lost a lot of closed cases that he cared about <hes> not really get served ejected by it or bitter or or anything like that but <hes> and now that he was dejected bitter about these two but I do think that both Heller and Bush versus Gore or cases <hes> that he continued to be deeply deeply troubled by <hes> in for many many years thank you for <hes> noting that justice Stevens did would tell you in the interview that you had the majority opinion in Bush v even worse than I thought it was at the time I read it over more carefully working on the book. I've found that the pain is earned internally inconsistent as well as just not making any sense and then in the book he gives this this remarkable account of how the court made a factual error he says because things move so fast he was unable at the time to point out a serious factual error in its misunderstanding of the different versions of earlier rules that forbade the counting of dimpled dimpled chads. It's an example of a combination of his extraordinary attention to detail and his frustration with the fact that Bush Gore was a result in search of reasoning which only emerged after the decision was this made Dan Citizens United we should talk about he felt that it was unconvincing. Legally as a matter of original understanding unconvincing in terms of precedent given even the extensive congressional statutes regulating corporate speech dating back to the progressive era as well as being unconvincing as a matter of reasoning since he believed that not only the appearance of avoiding corruption but also the desire to equalize candidates. It's election opportunities was sufficient to justify regulation <hes> tell us more about his descendants citizens united and why you care so much about that issue well. I think it's important to remember that he had written the previous a decision McConnell that had a really <hes> taken a completely opposite approach to regulation of campaign speech than citizens united a not only in the specifics of <hes> the the <hes> issue of corporate speech really in the whole approach and he had <hes> gotten justice O'Conner to really join him and provide a majority on all that <hes> so he had all so I think think <hes> also his sense of respect for <hes> president was involved. <hes> in addition citizens united was a case in which <hes> the majority had to really work very very hard in order order to get itself <hes> in a position to be able to make a sweeping ruling because the parties had not asked for that <hes> if there were narrower grounds available and <hes> so it was also a case of <hes> of the court simply kind of flexing its muscles <hes> and deciding to change the law even though it really had nothing to do with the case <hes> or the arguments made by the council in the case before for it <hes> I think that <hes> perhaps <hes> his views on on <hes> <hes> these campaign finance issues can also be tied back to the <hes>.

Bush Gore justice Stevens Dan Citizens United O'Conner Heller McConnell president
"john paul stevens" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on We The People

"<hes> had a very different feeling about than say people of my generation <hes> but <hes> he never really at least at that time <hes> explained to explain the reasons for feeling quite so passionately about it <hes> it was not of course the only time that he disagreed with the majority about a free speech issue but it's the only time I'd that at least I can recall in which <hes> he seemed really kind of emotionally <hes> involved in the position he was taking fascinating. He he talks in his book the makings of a Justice about his views on flag burning he does note that his predecessor Lewis Powell on the one hand was an extremely patriotic veteran of World War Two but on the other hand supported a liberal reading of the First Amendment's wondered whether Powell would have agreed with him about flag burning. I should say that I had an unsuccessful clerkship interview with justice Stevens had written a note. On the unfortunate topic was the flag burning amendment unconstitutional and the justice found it preposterous both at Congress wouldn't have the power to ban flag burning and also that an amendment to the constitution purporting to ban flag burning might violate the natural rights of I've of free speech <hes> Kate <hes> what you read his remarkable book <hes> the makings of a justice there's so much in it and it's just I think the most riveting and candid book by a sitting or retired justice about the inside story of the cases decided during his term what cases and stories leaped out to you as unusually revealing. There's so many we could talk about from Bushby Gorda citizens united but I'll just let you pick yeah I mean I think Bush Gore definitely springs to mind. You know it's a case that listeners will obviously <hes> many will be familiar with right. The court intervenes essentially stop a recount in the State of Florida following the two thousand presidential election <hes> and fines for the Bush campaign basically on equal protection grounds <hes>. I thought there was a lot that was new in the account of Bush versus Gore. <hes> you know the equal protection argument <hes> just having crept in at the eleventh hour he basically says there was equal protection rationale <hes> in the final opinion because there are are there's at least one <hes> intervening <hes> opinion before the court sort of <hes> issues its final opinion in the case but the equal protection argument kind of creeps in at the very end and he says he doesn't think it was even discussed at conference right it just all of a sudden the majority and you know and that's part of <hes>. I think what he finds so frustrating about the case and I think he thinks <hes> you know because he he's got a line that I I think maybe you mentioned <hes> I'm Jeff Peace about it and that he says you know the Corp.. Basically had all this institutional capital that had accrued <hes> <hes> <hes> you know generally but he says specifically the United States versus Nixon when the court unanimously directs President Nixon to comply <hes> with a subpoena for the Oval Office tapes and you know that unanimous <hes> e e zero opinion right includes some Nixon appointees and a bunch of Republican appointees and it just really looked like the court transcended politics <hes> check an abuse of power <hes> and it was I think he thinks shining moment for the court and that in Bush versus Gore the court really squandered that institutional capital it hasn't really recovered from <hes> that kind of self inflicted blow <hes> and I asked him a little bit about in our interview so Taco but more about what it is about those two cases <hes> any says he's the subject matter. It's the you know the court appearing to transcend politics but it's also the quality of the reasoning right. Bush versus Gore says it's even worse than I remembered when I read it for this book <hes> and in part..

Bush Gore President Nixon justice Stevens Lewis Powell Jeff Peace Bushby Gorda Congress Gore. Taco United States Florida Corp one hand
"john paul stevens" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on We The People

"Of the legal of architecture of an opinion in but at least some of the facts to make sure that he really understood them so that he could be confident in output so he really didn't outsource that that first draft away most justices do <hes> and he and he was the only justice at the time who did not participate in the Cert Pool so oh he <hes> you know his law clerks reviewed we divided up and reviewed every <hes> Sur petition and at the time there were eight or nine thousand coming in a year you skim them and you write up memos only on the ones you think he might be interested in <hes> but it was a lot of additional work for his law clerks in for him <hes> but I think he thought it was really important. Just as a matter of kind of the institution it integrity that more than one set of eyes was set on every cert petition and we respected that <hes> a great deal <hes> I remember once lead in the term we were you know jammed with finishing opinions on the search for kind of piling up because you're doing the work as you're doing opinion work and <hes> he sort of wandering the chambers and I've heard he he did this with other law clerks to and he saw the big pile and he said something like you're going to take some of the sports I can. You know I'll just review it myself. No let us do that justice but he didn't think it was beneath him. He didn't think anything was beneath them and I think that that really was the kind of justice and and kind of boss he was wonderful. Stories very striking that for much of his tenure he was the only justice who wrote his own first drafts and for a time the only justice not the cert pool now there are more and those human stories are so vivid. <hes> Christopher is gruber now president of Princeton a former Stevens clerk told the story recently of <hes> Stephen's being in a room and a woman a law. Oh Clark was asked to get coffee and he realized what was going on and he said I think it's my turn to do that. Just an example of his thoughtfulness Dan you were clerking for justice Stevens during his first full term on the court that was a time when the Burger court was <hes> if not divided ideologically at least chafing under the leadership of Chief Justice Burger a discontent that was later aired in the book the brethren in nineteen seventy nine t tell us about what it was like to be with the justice as he joined the Supreme Court and how he got his sea legs on the job <hes> yeah <hes> so I think in many ways the clerkship experience was very similar to what Kate <hes> described <hes> <hes> I think <hes> to the extent that there were differences <hes> I think one of them was just the fact that at at that point in his judicial career <hes> he had not actually we've had any occasion to think about <hes> the constitutionality of the death penalty or of abortion or <hes> many of the other <hes> gerrymandering many of the other issues <hes> that <hes> <hes> <hes> were already coming before the court and so <hes> he was really kind of feeling his way to a certain extent <hes> and a very open to thinking about different approaches of it wasn't at all clear to us for example how he would <hes> come down on the abortion issue <hes> and <hes> I think that that <hes> many kind of an interesting time to see him kind of orienting himself he was expected to be fairly conservative member of the court <hes> and <hes> in the seventh circuit particularly in criminal procedure cases <hes> he had tended to be on the government side <hes> and <hes> so so he was very open he also spent I think <hes> I'm not sure say cates time but <hes> when we were clerking <hes> he was basically in chambers all day every day of the week <hes> or at least <unk> <hes> of the Monday through Friday <hes> and he was constantly popping into the clerk's office <hes>.

justice Stevens Chief Justice Burger Supreme Court Burger court Clark Dan Stephen cates Kate Princeton president Christopher gruber
Pelosi Statement on the Passing of Justice John Paul Stevens

Overnight re-air of day's programming

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Pelosi Statement on the Passing of Justice John Paul Stevens

"Yesterday our country lost a giant of the court and the Clarion for justice equality and the rule of law justice John Paul Stevens a justice Stevens was a true guardian of the constitution he made history not only as the longest serving justice but it's one of its finest country moving from one lying in state Monday the service it's a great loss to

John Paul Stevens
Retired U.S. Justice John Paul Stevens dies, leaving liberal legacy

KQED Radio Show

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Retired U.S. Justice John Paul Stevens dies, leaving liberal legacy

"Retired justice John Paul Stevens served on the Supreme Court for more than thirty years he died of complications following a stroke he suffered on Monday he was ninety nine years old Chief Justice John Roberts announced Stephen's death in a written statement in which he called him quote a son of the Midwest heartland and a veteran of World War two Roberts also said justice Stevens devoted his long life to public service his unrelenting commitment to justice has left us a better nation NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg is on the line with me now good morning and good morning so tell us about John Paul Stevens long life and career Stevens is appointed in nineteen seventy five by president Ford he was a Republican born and bred in Chicago he was a moderate conservative and interestingly president Ford at the time said that he wanted to appoint addresses with no political price because that was just at the beginning of the Ford administration was right after Watergate the resignation of president Nixon and Stevens was a well known very respected appeals court judge in Chicago beloved by his colleagues he was not on the list of likely contenders prior to this but he was a choice of Ford was very happy with spoke with glowingly up until the time of his staff in fact that it decades after pointing Stevens president Ford in two thousand five said you know you you're not usually known by the justice is your point let that not be the case with my presidency for I am prepared to allow history's judgment of my term in office to rest if necessary exclusively on my nomination thirty years of justice John Paul Stevens he has served his nation well at times carrying out his judicial duties as always with dignity intellect and without partisan political concerns and Stevens was a guy who involved right he came in as a moderate conservative but that's not the way he left the court well he would say he didn't involve Ivanov and I actually think he's right he said that he didn't change it was the court the changed he was at the center right of the court when he came on but as more Republican presidents got the opportunity to name Supreme Court nominees and as those nominees were more and more conservative Stephen suddenly found himself at the left end of the court the most liberal and of the court he hated that label because he views himself as a conservative what were some of his notable decisions he wrote about four hundred majority opinion for the court that's a really a lot of majority opinions almost on every imaginable subject from property rights to immigration from abortion to guns to obscenity from school prayer to campaign finance reform from the relationship between the federal and state governments to the power of the presidency I think the decisions that will likely be remembered for are those he wrote about national security and presidential power he wrote the court's five to three decision repudiating George W. bush's assertion of unilateral executive power in setting up war crimes tribunals at Guantanamo bay Cuba and in two thousand four in the six to three decision he wrote that one time detainees could challenge their detention in court and both of those decisions had profound implications for the limits of presidential powers to be clear you know no well bush was not the first president to feel the sting of justice Stevens words he wrote the supreme court's unanimous decision refusing to postpone Paula Jones sexual harassment lawsuit against president Clinton let's take a listen to Stevens summarizing his decision for the venture in nineteen ninety seven and here is dismissing the notion that the suit would be a burden on the presidency in the entire history of the Republic only three sitting presidents have been subjected to suits for their private action as for the case at hand there's nothing in the record to identify any potential harm that might ensue from scheduling the trial promptly after discovery is included you know when did you last talk with John Paul Stevens I talked to him in April for an interview about one of his three Bucks it was a memoir he took the his as I said he'd written three since leaving office he told me that he was still swimming in the ocean in Florida that he was paying a wicked game of ping pong he bragged about it saying it was nobody his aides that he thought could beat him at the at the condo where he left and he said he he traded in his tennis racket for his ping pong paddle in a conversation I was reminded what a kind gentleman he was and what a sweet and understated temperament he had he sent pictures and a video which we posted online of him playing ping pong with a much younger neighbor NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg thanks Nina thank you

John Paul Stevens Supreme Court Thirty Years Ninety Nine Years
The life and legacy of former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens

Steve Cochran

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

The life and legacy of former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens

"Family and friends are mourning the passing of former US Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens Chicago native died yes at the age of ninety nine after suffering a stroke he was the third longest serving member in the high court's history after being appointed to the bench in nineteen seventy five by president Gerald Ford the university of Chicago graduate emerged as the supreme court's leading liberal despite calling himself a conservative until he retired in twenty ten Stevens was a Die Hard cubs fan who was born on the south

President Trump Stevens Us Supreme Court John Paul Stevens Chicago Gerald Ford University Of Chicago
"john paul stevens" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Second Amendment he was ninety seven years old at the time but John Paul Stevens wins mind and his words were still razor-sharp join us now by phone C. N. N. legal analyst and Supreme Court Biographer Joan Bisque Biscuit Pick Joan you know the history. The court has as well as anyone. Let's talk about John Paul. L. Stevens is legacy. You know Anderson just what Pam said right now about how razor-sharp he was. I just talked to him about a month ago. He just finished his latest book and he still wanted to be so much a part of the dialogue dialogue in America and I think one thing he did was offer exhibit A. to the kind of <hes> promise that Chief Justice John Roberts has said there are no such thing as oh Baba judges or trump on judges because and point the public Gerald Ford in one thousand nine hundred seventy five and he certainly couldn't have been predicted as someone who voted along the Republican Party lines he offered such a moderate to liberal leaning view at the end of his life. He wanted to ensure a greater protections for free speech. Although he really thought free speech <hes> he really fought conservative effort to lift regulation of campaign finance he continued to argue for <hes> <hes> narrower gun rights he opposed the Supreme Court's ruling broadening broadening the ability to <hes> have gun ownership rather than regulation so across the board more than thirty years influencing all areas of American life <hes> just an extraordinary legacy again the third longest serving a Supreme Court Justice Joan cubic appreciate it Chris. We'll have more on the life and the legacy of justice Stevens News continues one and handed over crystal Cuomo prime-time Chris. I am Bill Kristol feeling confused about politics..

Supreme Court John Paul Stevens Pam Justice Joan justice Stevens News Chief Justice John Roberts Joan Bisque John Paul Bill Kristol Gerald Ford Chris analyst Republican Party crystal Cuomo Anderson America ninety seven years thirty years
Former US Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens dies

BBC World Service

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Former US Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens dies

"Retired US Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens has died of complications from a stroke he was ninety nine NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that Stevens over saw some of the court's most historic decisions Stevens offered hundreds of majority opinion for the court on almost every issue imaginable from abortion to obscenity from school prayer to congressional term limits but the decisions he likely will be remembered for most are those involving presidential power and national security he wrote the court's decision repudiating president bush's assertion of unilateral executive power in setting up war crimes tribunals at Guantanamo bay Cuba and he wrote the court's decision allowing the Guantanamo detainees to challenge their detentions in the U. S. courts Mister bush however was not the first president to feel Stephen staying Stevens also wrote the court's decision refusing to postpone Paula Jones sexual harassment lawsuit against president Clinton Nina Totenberg NPR news

John Paul Stevens NPR Cuba Mister Bush President Trump Stephen Paula Jones Us Supreme Court Executive Guantanamo Harassment Clinton Nina Totenberg
"john paul stevens" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on KGO 810

"Justice John Paul Stevens has died John Paul Stevens died at a hospital in fort Lauderdale Florida due to complications following a stroke he suffered on Monday Stevens who was a leading liberal during his thirty five years on the High Court played a crucial role in many high profile cases they range from voting to reinstate the death penalty in nineteen seventy six which he later said he regretted to offering an outspoken descent of the court's two thousand ruling in bush V. gore Stevens retired from the nation's highest court in two thousand ten at the age of ninety he died at the age of ninety nine when a Kenyan Washington the house has approved a resolution condemning president trump for what the Democrats have called racist tweets correspondent mother Russia reports most GOP lawmakers were not supportive a number of the public is across the spectrum house Republican Senate Republicans some may not feel comfortable with the president's words but they're making it very clear they do not want to go too far in criticizing this present very few will come out instead of actually done these were racist comments instead some may say that if they wish to focus on something else like talking about their agenda Facebook has come under scrutiny before the Senate banking committee over its plans to offer crypto currency the lack of trust in Facebook was clear from the outset senator Sherrod brown warning it would be crazy to let the company experiment with peoples bank accounts like a toddler who's gotten his hands on a book of matches Facebook is burned down the house over and over in called every arson a learning experience Facebook executive David Marcus said the company would take the time to get security right to prevent fraudulent activity administration officials have expressed concern that the currency could be exploited by money launderers and terrorist financiers jury bowed under Washington on Wall Street the Dow Jones industrial average fell twenty four.

arson executive senator Sherrod brown Senate GOP gore Stevens bush Washington David Marcus Justice John Paul Stevens Senate banking committee Facebook president Russia High Court fort Lauderdale Florida thirty five years
"john paul stevens" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on Here & Now

"I might have been to emotional at times. I know that my tone was sharp and I said, a few things I should not have said, but he went on to say, basically if I serve on the supreme court, I'm going to keep an open mind and and I, I won't be like I was last week in that testimony. Well, it was a very tepid attempt to walk back what he'd said and it was the only time I've ever known supreme court Justice to write an op-ed piece in any newspaper defending his conduct before the United States Senate. But then I never knew have seen a supreme court. Nominee give a a television interview beforehand either. He did a Fox News interview before his testimony right. And then his wit came his testimony, which was this. Sort of. Easy to caricature. As we saw on Saturday Night, Live sort of wild eyed at times, a defense outrage defense, which you can understand for somebody who says he was falsely accused. But at the same time, it was extremely partisan. He accused the Democrats of a partisan hit job. That was the revenge of the Clintons supposedly, I guess, for his service working for special prosecutor, Kenneth Starr during the Clinton investigation, and it was it was so shocking that Justice, John Paul Stevens who's now retired said yesterday that he, he who had always praised Cavanaugh had changed his mind about the nomination which is pretty unusual for it. I again, I don't know of any time. Now Justice Stevens has all his marbles as far as I can tell. But he is ninety eight years old and supreme court justices are not known for their. Particular acuteness when it comes to political evaluations and pure Legal Affairs correspondent Nina, totenberg Nina. Thank you. Thank you. Well, let's get a read on how social media's responding to this and other stories we've femi-. Okay. Host of the stream on Al Jazeera English, and that may stay with Cavanaugh lots of hashtags flying. What are you seeing? Oh, my goodness. We have confirmed cavenaugh now confirm Kevin a- we have a Cavanaugh protest so many, and you can see the bipartisan support coming behind the judge or coming hot behind professor food. One line as we speak as they watching c. span right now, right from President Trump also weighing in on Twitter earlier today, he's always in our social media segments. He tweeted the very rude elevator screamers are paid professionals. Only looking to make senators. Look bad, don't fall for it. Also look at all the professionally made identical signs paid for by Soros as George Soros who's has supported some left-leaning of. Topics. These are not signs made in the basement from love, hashtag troublemakers. Now, the woman who confronted Jeff flake in the elevator, say they are sexual abuse survivors. He listened to them yesterday, certain Senator Orrin Hatch was filmed waving off other women. He was mocking them that went viral. How are people reacting to this allegation from the president that they're not real those women? So Amy Levin says on Twitter, wait, this is really poses account. He's touting conspiracy theories, please for the sake of our great country get a mental health evaluation and put down your phone and in his emoji that looks really shocked. But I have to say underneath the presence tweet, so many people shed it, Reshad it liked it. We're talking about one hundred thousand people all looking at the presence tweet all weighing in one comment in particular stood out because we're talking about perhaps we're looking at a conspiracy theory here that Preston my have and just on underneath that tweet that was the. Left are true evil in America. Why do they hate a country that is thriving, hashtag q., a non I know on here. Now we've looked at this in terms of that that conspiracy theory about the being a deep state behind everything that the president is trying to do. Yeah. Well, so we will put that aside for a second though to take a look at another story that's gone viral and social media, a Colorado woman chimera. Trent defended to Spanish speakers who are verbally attacked in a store by Linda Dwyer. Four, not speaking English. Let's listen. I, it starts with MS Trent. You'll leave these women alone. Get out, go. No, I do not do that. And it was going out sadder. You harass people like this, lose your okay. She says, you will lose your country in moves outside where that woman who was she was verbally attacking the two women who weren't speaking Spanish..

John Paul Stevens president Senator Orrin Hatch Cavanaugh Twitter Fox News United States Senate Jeff flake Trump George Soros Al Jazeera English Nina Kenneth Starr Amy Levin Legal Affairs prosecutor Preston Trent America
John Paul Stevens says Kavanaugh shouldn't be on Supreme Court

KDWN Programming

01:46 min | 2 years ago

John Paul Stevens says Kavanaugh shouldn't be on Supreme Court

"Court and should be confirmed. He was ever selected. I changed my views for for reasons, they have really no relationship to his. Intellectual ability or his record as a federal judge federal judge. Who should have been confirmed when he was nominated? But I think his performance during the hearings caused me to change my mind. I think there's several. Larry fried among pig. Gas tries to. Professor at Harvard. Have written. This is in which they suggest that he has an alien. Demonstrated potential bias involving enough potential Lillian. So you before the court that he would not be able to perform full full responsibilities. I think there's merit criticism. And that the Senator should really pay attention to it. The ninety

Larry Fried Senator Lillian Harvard Professor
Trump blasts Democrats for "rage-fueled resistance" to Kavanaugh nomination

WBZ Morning News

01:19 min | 2 years ago

Trump blasts Democrats for "rage-fueled resistance" to Kavanaugh nomination

"Fuel. Resistance in the battle over cabinet as he stumped for Republicans last night in Minnesota, judge Cavin will protect uphold and defend the constitution of the United States. As cavenaugh has new op-ed out in the Wall Street Journal, entitled I am an independent impartial judge and in this he promises if he's confirmed it'll be the same judge. He's been his entire career more on that from CBS's Bill Rakoff Carbonell all in the op-ed that he was very emotional last Thursday more. So he writes than he has ever been. He said, quote, I might have been too emotional at times. I know my tone was sharp, and I said a few things I should not have said, I hope everyone can understand that. I was there as a son husband and dad, I testified with five people foremost in my mind by mom, my dad, my wife, and most of all my daughter's retired supreme court Justice, John Paul Stevens says judge Cavanaugh is not qualified to sit on the court has demonstrated.

Bill Rakoff Carbonell Judge Cavanaugh Cavin Wall Street Journal John Paul Stevens Minnesota United States Cavenaugh CBS
Counting underway in Zimbabwe's historic vote

PBS NewsHour

02:07 min | 3 years ago

Counting underway in Zimbabwe's historic vote

"He is open to meeting with no preconditions supreme court nominee Brett cavenaugh Juan over one over an undecided Republican today Kentucky Senator rand. Paul said that, he will vote to confirm that's a key endorsement in, this closely divided Senate meanwhile Cavanaugh had his first meeting with a democrat West Virginia Senator Joe. Manchin he is seen as a. Potential swing vote supreme court. Justice Ruth. Bader Ginsburg says she, hopes to. Serve until she's ninety Ginsburg is now eighty-five she told an interviewer on Sunday that quote I think. I have at least five more years on the court. He cited former Justice John Paul Stevens who served. Until he was ninety in Zimbabwe they have begun counting votes after a largely. Peaceful election day it's the country's first presidential election since Robert Mugabe. Was ousted in may he had rule for thirty seven years His former deputy Emmerson Mnangagwa faced opposition leader Nelson Chamisa who. Complained to voting delays designed to undermine his support John Ray of Independent. Television News reports from Harare the capital It Bob wait a historic day worth the early start sunrise and already thousands of queuing patiently many here have waited a lifetime for this moment where we've only known one you now So I think this demonstrates change That has been a joyous energy about. The campaign generated by one man Nelson Chamisa has vowed to. End forty years of one-party rule One. But hopes dashed by defeats might yet be a combustible combination Mistake kingdom confidence all the excitement around Nelson to me he says he. Will, not accept defeat makes this a dangerous moment has in Bob we if you do not win this election trouble.

Nelson Chamisa John Paul Stevens Bader Ginsburg Justice Ruth Senator Rand Robert Mugabe Brett Cavenaugh Juan Senator Joe Manchin John Ray BOB Kentucky Cavanaugh Senate Zimbabwe Virginia Emmerson Mnangagwa Television News
Ruth Bader Ginsburg aims to serve "at least five more years"

Charlie Parker

02:39 min | 3 years ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg aims to serve "at least five more years"

"Sunday said. He believes Michael Cohen was once a good attorney but recording clients is a dish bobble. Offense obviously obviously I knew that I would never send him as. A reputable lawyer I just said he was a scoundrel Giuliani s said that violates attorney client privilege but Coen's attorney Lanny Davis said in, just talking about the case Giuliani has violated it. To Giuliani says they can. Address it and has been very helpful to us because. Now we've been able to put out the whole. Transcript with contradicts several things that Lanny Davis says the president re tweeted an. Old post Sunday in which Cohen called him, honest and. Transparent supreme court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she hopes, to serve at least five more years on the cord Ginsberg spoke. Out yesterday after attending a play in New York about, the late Justice, Antonin, Scalia she noted that she is eighty-five and would like to, stay on. The, court until she's Ninety the courts oldest Justice pointed out that former Justice John Paul Stevens left the court when he was ninety Ginsburg said based on that she has about at least five more years and she's already hired, law clerks for at least two. More terms a police are investigating an apparent murder suicide that left five people dead near Corpus Christi police in Rob's down responded to a shooting at a nursing home Friday evening and. Found three people shot to death Erasmo floor is is the Rob's town chief of police To a room were Mr. story was Also located were inside the room near the suspect They've been, identified as, sixty, year, old Richard story the shooter, his stepmother Thelma Montalvo and his eighty-five year-old. Father Ernest story at the elderly couple's. Home nearby two more people were found shot dead they're identified as Montale those forty one year old son and, the couple's adopted thirteen year. Old. Side right now no motive has been established awesome city officials. Are being told to consider changing their city's name a new report by Austin's equity office identifies confederate monuments in the city as well as. Streets and neighbourhoods named after confederates and slave owners the report points, out that Austin is named after Stephen f. Austin the father of Texas and notes that. He opposed efforts to abolish slavery, in the state also on the list of locales it'd be possibly renamed peace park the Bouldin creek neighborhood. Barton springs and ten streets named for William Barton the Daniel. Boone of Texas who was a slave owner renaming the capital of. Texas would likely require a citywide election w away I news Eight thirty seven. Traffic and weather together in a minute but first, check of, your money, in, the, world of business has tradings, already underway this report service I mart credit..

Michael Cohen Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lanny Davis Giuliani Texas Austin Scalia Barton Springs John Paul Stevens Attorney Father Ernest ROB William Barton Corpus Christi Thelma Montalvo New York Murder Boone Confederates Coen
"john paul stevens" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"The days of being able to say well we don't know what's going to happen with this particular justice like happened with john paul stevens and like happened with david suitor are over and you'll see on tv from time to time over the next couple of months a person by the name of leonard leo who is at the federalist society top official at the federal society who helped to put together this list of twenty or twenty five people from which donald trump selected his first and now his second nominee to the supreme court who've been vetted very carefully even though there might not be particular opinions on every single hot button social issue that the federal society cares about they've been vetted and screen very carefully the federal society and a certain brand of conservative have made it a point very clearly and very stridently for a number of decades the important result that they want through the courts because they haven't been able to do it through the congress through the states because the supreme court has not allowed them to is to overturn roe v wade that's just a fact they want roe v wade overturned and so now when donald trump nominate someone like brad kavanagh i hear people like leonard leo getting on television and saying things like well democrats saying that rose gonna be overturned that's a scare tactic we don't know there's no litmus test we didn't ask the particular question and the bizarre thing to me is it's a little bit rich that you have a person in the form of leonard leo and others who have made it a point to raise money on and pursue an agenda of overturning roe v wade i don't know how you go around the country saying everything we care about is is the court and one thing we want the court to do is overturn roe v wade and now the president has adopted our view of who should be on the court when someone says roe v wade is in jeopardy that's a scare tactic that doesn't compute all right let's get to your questions here's an email from marianne from ithaca given the judge cavanaugh seems very well qualified to serve on the supreme court what is your opinion on whether one should oppose him based on disagreement with his past or future potential decisions like on abortion like everyone else who writes in love your show thanks very much i appreciate it marianne so this is the age old question that we've had going back decades and decades you know there was a time when there are no confirmation hearings for supreme court nominees that began i think in the nineteen twenties as time has gone by and as a lot of issues legal issues social issues have become more and more fraud and more and more politicized on both sides by the way people have taken more seriously the content of particular supreme court nominees substantive us on issues that will affect people's rights liberties economic status and whether you like it or not and whatever rhetoric that senator spout and president spout or not that's the world we're living in now some people dated back to the confirmation battle with respective robert bork people have had the same view when there have been democratic nominees as well in the matter what mitch mcconnell says no matter what any democratic senator you know said in the past we are long past the time when people really believe honestly believe that nothing should be considered other than the credentials and genteel temperament of the candidate now the hard part is to figure out how to find out those views and the way people get around answering the question what are you gonna do in about a particular case is to say very short legitimately that i don't want to answer a question on something that's gonna come before the court now it turns out that in recent times supreme court nominees have become more and more and more averse to answering questions i sat there for the robert hearing in john roberts didn't answer a lot of questions but he's still answered more questions than neal gorsuch did just last year people up to site to something called the ginsburg precedent when ruth bader ginsburg in nineteen ninetythree had her hearing and a lot of questions she said well that issue my come before the court so i'm not going to answer what people forget is there are lots and lots of things that she did talk about and the might come before the court including issues relating to.

john paul stevens
Kevin Spacey Accused Of Sexual Assault By 3 More Men

Armstrong and Getty

01:43 min | 3 years ago

Kevin Spacey Accused Of Sexual Assault By 3 More Men

"Represents thousands of construction workers in the plumbing pipe fitting and hvac dash our service technician field throughout the south bay they have been building it right the first time for over one hundred ten years stories we're following on k g o eight ten republican senator is warning president trump not to repeat the mistakes of past republican presidents by picking a supreme court nominee who turns out to be insufficiently conservative senator ted cruz of texas says fellow senator mike lee from utah would be a sure thing he cited former justices william brennan paul john paul stevens and harry blackmun who authored the rovigo wade decision that established a woman's right to choose all three were nominated by republican presidents three more accusations of sexual assault or assault are being investigated by british police against oscar winning actor kevin spacey jim roope reports police in britain don't name suspects until they're charged so all london's metropolitan police force will confirm that it was a vesting a total of six allegations against a man british media reported earlier this year that police were investigating three allegations against spacey dallas reporting three more to sexual assault one assault spacey's been accused of sexual assault or misconduct by several men says actor anthony rapp accused spacey of assaulting him when rapp was just fourteen if you drive in san francisco you know making a left turn on van as has always been a challenge and starting tomorrow vanessa will be losing the left turn lane at hayes street drivers will only have two places to go left northbound at lumbar and southbound at broadway all part of sf mta's three hundred sixteen million dollar then vanessa improvement project which will put muny and golden gate transit buses in.

VAN Britain Jim Roope Kevin Spacey Wade John Paul Stevens William Brennan Senator Ted Cruz President Trump Technician Vanessa Senator San Francisco Anthony Rapp Dallas London Oscar Assault Harry Blackmun Utah
"john paul stevens" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"You also have an individual right god given right to protect yourself whether it's a tarantula government more bear coming at right or your neighbor coming at your credit any threat you have that individual right and that is so critically important and the fact is when somebody like john paul stevens when he wrote about it that way to me they're being disingenuous what they're saying is now that's antiquated and you shouldn't have that right that the state should be in control of everything that you don't have an individual right to self protection you want dangerous thought you want a dangerous mindset it's that of john paul stevens yeah that's a dangerous mindset when you start telling people in the united states of america they you don't have a personal right to self protection i i say in the united states of america it's dangerous anywhere in the world when you tell an individual that the state can control you to the point where you can't defend yourself against other threats that come at you and when you're a totally completely law abiding citizen to that's the whole point your lawabiding citizen and they say you can't be trusted well you know something you know this nation is great today this nation's great because we do trust the individual that's why it's great we're great nate you want to know why we have american exceptionalism it's because we trust the individual it is the individual that we care about it is the individual that we look at in the highest esteem the individual and the individual rights had come from it because society is built by individuals by responsible law abiding individuals who understand that their role in the success of a society like the united states is as great as any police officer or any politician out there and when you move away from that that's extremely dangerous now you can't be trusted with it now there is no second amendment right we the people on the hill we the people in the mansion's we the people with our armed security living in are gated communities we will tell you how to run your life that is the ultimate in elitism you want the ultimate of elitism right there john paul stevens there there yes that is that the you are not to be trusted the individual because if you extrapolate that out you.

john paul stevens united states america officer
"john paul stevens" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"That you also have an individual right god given right to protect yourself whether it's a tarantula government more bear coming at a threat or your neighbor coming at your credit any threat you have that individual right and that is so critically important and the fact is when somebody like john paul stevens when he wrote about it that way to me they're being disingenuous what they're saying is now that's antiquated and you shouldn't have that right that the state should be in control of everything that you don't have an individual right to self protection you want dangerous thought you want a dangerous mindset it's that of john paul stevens that's a dangerous mindset when you start telling people in the united states of america they don't have a personal right to self protection i say in the united states of america it's dangerous anywhere in the world when you tell an individual that the state it can control you to the point where you can't defend yourself against other threats that come at you and when you're totally completely law abiding citizen to and that's the whole point your lawabiding citizen and they say you can't be trusted well you know something this nation is great today this nation is great because we do trust the individual that's why it's great we're great you want to know why we have american exceptionalism is because we trust the individual it is the individual that we care about it is the individual that we look at in the highest esteem the individual the individual rights have come from it because society is built by individuals by responsible law abiding individuals who understand that their role in the success of a society like the united states is as great as any police officer or any politician out there and when you move away from that that's extremely dangerous now you can't be trusted with it now there is no second amendment right we the people on the hill we the people in the mansion's we the people with our armed security living in are gated communities we will tell you how to run your life that is the ultimate in elitism you want the ultimate of elitism right there john paul stevens there yes that is that the you are not to be trusted the individual because if you extrapolate that out you.

united states america officer john paul stevens
U.S. Appeals Court Judge Reinhardt known as the 'liberal lion', dies

Mike Gallagher

02:56 min | 3 years ago

U.S. Appeals Court Judge Reinhardt known as the 'liberal lion', dies

"This isn't a retirement this is an an appointment this was a decision made by god because one of the most liberal if they the most liberal circuit judges in the country has died judge stephen reinhardt of the us ninth circuit court of appeals passed away he died of a heart attack during a visit to a dermatologist in los angeles so he was eighty seven years old so judge stephen reinhardt will be replaced because of his passing eric garcetti incidentally the mayor of l a called reinhardt one of the greatest jurists of our time a searingly brilliant angelino and true progressive icon no question he was a progressive icon and he is no longer with us so we'll see this is this is again why the trump election is so important when you consider justices appointed to the federal bench all over the country we're seeing conservatives replace justices like stephen reinhardt but back to this tyranny line for just a moment because most of a c the attempt to repeal the second amendment as tyranny and i believe with all of my heart this is the galvanizing motivating act salute homerun for people to go to the polls this this november consider this john paul stevens writes an op ed in the new york times saying that the answer to violence in school shootings in america is to repeal the second amendment how much pushback if you heard from democrats how many democrat leaders have you heard say that's wrong how many democrats have denounced retired justice john paul stevens they're not denouncing him because it's how they feel they don't want to come out and say it but they it's absolutely what they believe and it's not just it's just not just politicians you know i grew up as a kid listening to larry king larry king was one of my heroes he used to have an overnight show on the mutual broadcasting network and as a kid growing up in ohio when i knew i wanted to do this for a living he undoubtedly helped pave the way in terms of my thought process of what i wanted to be when i grew up and at night i would have a transistor radio literally under the covers because my mom would want me to be up at late and i would listen to larry king late at night he went on of course to host the.

Stephen Reinhardt John Paul Stevens New York Times America Ohio United States Los Angeles Eric Garcetti Larry King Eighty Seven Years
"john paul stevens" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Doc cnn's chris cuomo and former donald trump campaign manager corey lewin douse key got into their own verbal sparring session on wednesday over and op ed piece that former supreme court justice john paul stevens wrote for the new york times entitled john paul stevens repeal the second amendment you got the president of the united states this morning tweeting that the second amendment will never be repealed we must have more republicans repeal amendment i'm sorry i think i forgot to mention the title of the piece john paul stevens repeal the second amendment who's calling for justice stevens did not it was in the context of a conversation about the fastest routes illegal change big block letters right across the top of the page there john paul stevens colon repeal the second amendment of course if didn't have a second amendment you wouldn't have it would be easier to change the laws very bold font might have been times new roman maybe futura john paul stevens repeal the second amendment but this little incident aside i do like chris cuomo great deal good journalists very punishable face and finally some sad news today frank averick who played the character of bozo the clown passed away last week the character debuted on a local television station in boston back in the nineteen fifties boston's channel five w h d h tv boy there's a guy who's excited about his job boston's channel five w h t h tv all right kids time for bozo boston's channel five w h h tv yeah bobby maybe you could do that with a little more enthusiasm boston's channel five w h t h tv yeah just really get into it and i mean just sell the heck out of the thing boston's channel five w h d h tv what maybe tried standing up boston's channel five w h d h tv yeah that's great that's that's the one and then what you're always says always.

Doc cnn chris cuomo john paul stevens the new york times president united states frank averick boston donald trump corey lewin five w
"john paul stevens" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"That you also have an individual right god given right to protect yourself whether it's a tarantula government more bear coming at a threat or your neighbor coming at your credit any threat you have that individual right and that is so critically important and the fact is when somebody like john paul stevens when he wrote about it that way to me they're being disingenuous what they're saying is now that's antiquated and you shouldn't have that right that the state should be in control of everything that you don't have an individual right to self protection you want dangerous thought you want a dangerous mindset is that of john paul stevens that's a dangerous mindset when you start telling people in the united states of america they don't have a personal right to self protection i i say in the united states of america it's dangerous anywhere in the world when you tell an individual that the state you can control you to the point where you can't defend yourself against other threats that come at you and when you're totally completely law abiding citizen to and that's the whole point your lawabiding citizen and they say you can't be trusted well you know something you know this nation is great today this nation is great because we do trust the individual that's why it's great we're great nate you want to know why we have american exceptionalism is because we trust the individual it is the individual that we care about it is the individual that we look at in the highest esteem the individual the individual rights had come from it because society is built by individuals by responsible law abiding individuals who understand that their role in the success of a society like the united states is as great as any police officer or any politician out there and when you move away from that that's extremely dangerous now you can't be trusted with it now there is no second amendment right we the people on the hill we the people in the mansion's we the people with our armed security living in are gated communities we will tell you how to run your life that is the ultimate in elitism you want the ultimate of elitism right there john paul stevens there yes yes that is that the you are not to be trusted the individual because if you extrapolate that out you.

united states america officer john paul stevens
"john paul stevens" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"And establishing more comprehensive background check all those can be done under heller is that what you're saying yeah that's exactly right i mean justice scalia wrote the majority opinion intel are included affectionate part three of the opinion that goes out of its way to say that virtually all these words but the import is virtually all commonsense prevention measures remain constitutional and there's a framework fair to uphold the agenda of the brady center brady campaign and the parkland students i mean the the ban of salt lapis is a great example there have been a number of legal challenges brought against state assault weapons bans every single one of them as the courts across the country have held those bands are constitutional and there is not a second protection for military style salt weapons and i think universal background checks because even more clearly so when justice john paul stevens says it he's repeal the second amendment that the a decision which i remain convinced was wrong and certainly was debatable has provided the nra with the propaganda weapon of immense power would you not agree with that i agree and i disagree i mean the fact is the nra would use the second amendment as a propaganda piece and mislead the american people use it regardless of what the interpretation is if the heller decision went the other way the nra would certainly use that as a huge rallying cry propaganda piece if it was repealed they would use it as well so i don't think that the problem of the nra goes away if you change the second amendment i mean the one kathy out i would give to all this is i'm assuming that courts will continue to interpret the second amendment as they have in the ten years since the heller decision it's possible that if donald trump remakes the supreme court that that could change and if you had a supreme court that began interpreting it in the extremists way that the nra would like then that would be a serious problem but we don't have that but the amazing thing about the nra is when these mass massacres these mass shootings take place like columbine sandy hook and now the parkland florida high school they le lay low don't say anything now they're saying some snarky things about the students.

heller justice scalia intel brady center assault nra donald trump parkland florida high school john paul stevens ten years
"john paul stevens" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And ever since then we've had this absolute consensus in the united states g we should have a standing army and we have had a standing army now we still have state militias they're called you know national guards and you know they play a role in an important role and you could argue that the second amendment should protect national guards but up until two thousand eight that was the agreement that everybody had been in two thousand eight and a decision call washington dc versus eller guy by the name of dick heller who lived in dc wanted to be able to take was a security guard he wants to be able to take his home which was illegal in dc the only way you could have a gun in your home was was it was unloaded and basically disassembled and so he sued well actually the nra and their friends and you know so and and in that decision antonin scalia absolutely twisted logic inside out and upside down which john paul stevens in dissent just takes apart point by point by point in fact the descent john paul stevens descent in the heller case is so readable it's like it's like you know when you print it out it's like fifteen pages long it's not huge it's very thoughtful and it's very readable that i encourage you if you want to know anything about the gun debate to to find the john paul stevens descent in the heller case in read it so anyhow his dissent continues to this day in the new york times he says the demonstrators he's talking about the the you know the the kids who are marching over the weekend and how wonderful it was and he said they read reveal broad public support for legislation and minimize the risk of mass killings of school children and others in our society is but the demonstrators should seek more effective and more lasting reform they should demand a repeal of the second amendment it's a relic of the eighteenth century he writes in two thousand eight the supreme court overturned chief justice burgers and others longsettled understanding of the second amendments limited reach by ruling in.

united states dick heller dc nra antonin scalia john paul stevens new york times
"john paul stevens" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"To eight eight nine two two seven so the this justice john paul stevens writes on it says overturning that decision via constitutional amendment to get rid of the second amendment would be a simple thing and would do more to weaken the nra to weaken the nra i want you to think about that weaken the nra's ability to stymie legislative debate and blocked constructive gun control legislation that any of them than any other option any other available options he wants to weaken us not the nra the lie is that the problem is the ira the problem is not the nra the problem is us there's too many of us and we may not be members of texas lawshield the we may not be members of the nra but there's too many of us that support our second amendment rights and we're everywhere we're all over the country it's not just texans so we're the problem along with that comes another column in the dallas morning news today from guy who a staff editor columnist for the dallas morning news and he says he's going to little far and calling for the end of the second amendment but he's got some great points and the iron is hot this is our moment strike this is our moment he says he says in the face of such dim prospects activists and others have renewed calls to repeal the second amendment he talks about the heller versus district of columbia versus heller decision listen to this i didn't even know this listen this is going to blow you away listen to what this court decision was before it was struck down with the supreme court this is amazing listen the law in dc had been so restrictive that even residents licensed to carry guns such as police officers and.

john paul stevens nra dallas morning news heller columbia dc texas editor
"john paul stevens" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"You want us former us supreme court justice john paul stevens literally shocking people coming out and saying that the second amendment should be repealed did you ever think you would see somebody let alone a former supreme court justice say the second amendment should be repealed it's very interesting because antigun people are going to know this is to know is what they want it's just it's the whole boil a frog and water thing you know they they can't come out say it they never get this far the shell fast whole gay marriage and transgender crap happened one after the other if they would've told you that's what was going to happen there that's what they were gonna and where this would lead to and if you would have seen stuff you'd be like whoa this is way worse on this is a constitutional amendment wow we are at the point now where the very founders of this country were wrong and they say no no no no no they they were visionary they were right at the time but you know we have evolved it's so different now our government is not tarantula it's not going to be tyrannical you know we don't need that this is from muskets all that kind of stuff they say we are now at the point where we have so enlightened and we are so far advanced from where we were that i mean we know so much better which which is better than this you know this is this is really a snow old vestige of who used to be and it was good then but there this is this is ridiculous our government would never do this to us there's no need for this our government protects us and that's kinda the gist of it that justice john paul stevens says i'm gonna share with you handful of highlights from his column today he talks about you know in my lifetime i've never seen this type of civic engagement he's really happy that all the young are doing this he says there is now broad public support for legislation to minimize the risk of masculine broad public support for this he says this support is.

john paul stevens
"john paul stevens" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"john paul stevens" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Has no longer justice he is currently ninety seven years old isn't that right i think it's ninety seven years old well today john paul stevens he retired from the court sometime ago he was appointed to the court by gerald ford who was a republican john paul stevens colon they love their colin's repeal the second amendment rarely in my lifetime have i seen the type of civic engagement school children and their supporters demonstrated in washington and other major cities throughout the country this past saturday john paul stevens writes these demonstrations demand our respect they reveal a broad public support for legislation to minimize the risk of mass killings of school children and others in our society now again this i was reading the list of people and organizations behind the efforts you know it's not a bunch of high school children that pulled this off and what was it four weeks and three days or five weeks and three days something like that it's not a bunch of seventeen year olds bunch of professional community organizers and big money hollywood new york lefties that that don't have any interest in saving the lives of children let's just leave it at that that support as a clear sign john paul stevens rights to lawmakers to enact legislation prohibiting civilian ownership of semiautomatic weapons so that would include everything but wild west pistols i guess increasing the maximum age to buy a gun from eighteen to twenty one years old forget about serving.

john paul stevens gerald ford colin washington ninety seven years three days twenty one years seventeen year five weeks four weeks