37 Burst results for "John Paul"

Pope Francis names Washington, DC-area Archbishop first African American cardinal

Morning Edition

02:43 min | 5 d ago

Pope Francis names Washington, DC-area Archbishop first African American cardinal

"Pope Francis is breaking new ground for the Roman Catholic Church in the past week, his voiced support for civil unions for LGBTQ people, and then on Sunday, he named the first African American cardinal Here's NPR's Sylvia Poggioli from Rome. Speaking from his window overlooking ST Peter's Square, Francis announced Wilton Gregory among the 13 new cardinals. He has chosen Monsignor with Gregory. Relativistic over the Washington The 72 year old archbishop of Washington, has been widely praised for his handling of the sex abuse crisis that has rocked the Catholic Church. As head of the U. S Bishops conference in the early two thousand's, he helped develop the church's zero tolerance policy that has set an example for the Catholic Church in the rest of the world. The archbishop has also been praised for his more inclusive treatment of LGBTQ Catholics. An outspoken civil rights activists. The African American prelates, elevation comes as U. S society is reckoning with systemic racism. He's reminded the church that black lives are sacred Father, Brian Massengale, who is black, is a professor of theology at Fordham University. It's a powerful affirmation of The presence of African American Catholics of our faithfulness in the church, and, frankly, that were group who have kept faith with the church That's not often than faithful to US. Archbishop Gregory made headlines this summer when he blasted President Trump's photo opportunity hoisting a Bible at a Washington Episcopal Church. After police and soldiers used tear gas and rubber bullets to clear protesters. And he criticized the president's visit the following day to the Saint John Paul, the second national shrine, saying, quote it's baffling and reprehensible that any Catholic facility would allow itself to be so egregiously misused and manipulated. Bishop sheltered Fabray, one of a handful of African American Catholic bishops has worked closely with Gregory as a black bishop and in the name of black Catholics across the country to know that Someone who looks like us is going to have direct access to the mind and heart of the pope. I think that's a tremendous, tremendous gift. The new Cardinals will be elevated in a formal ceremony at the Vatican on November 28th. You will then be 128 Cardinals Under the age of 80 eligible to elect the next Pope Francis has now appointed almost 60% of them, raising the chances that the next pope will be closely in line with his own policies.

Roman Catholic Church Archbishop Gregory Pope Francis Cardinals African American Catholics Sylvia Poggioli Washington Episcopal Church Washington St Peter U. S Bishops NPR Rome President Trump Fordham University Brian Massengale Donald Trump
Fresh update on "john paul" discussed on What Trump Can Teach Us About Con Law

What Trump Can Teach Us About Con Law

02:09 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "john paul" discussed on What Trump Can Teach Us About Con Law

"Mean I mean really can you just say like this applies in this specific case and that's just the way it is I mean that doesn't seem realistic. It wasn't. It wasn't realistic the moment they wrote it down I mean they tried really hard to say we're only deciding the. Bush versus core dispute. But of course, because it's a supreme court opinion it has been cited multiple times by lower courts. It was just a silly thing to say to say that this is only applies here, and in fact, you know it's one of the reasons the opinions being criticized as being really just naked partisanship right med that the conservative majority just wanted one specific result for one time only. But then there's another part that of the opinion where the majority says in Bush versus Gore, they say, look the individual citizen has no federal constitutional right to vote for electors for the president unless and until the state legislature chooses. So that's the same part of the Constitution I've mentioned earlier that we don't have A. Right to choose the president's up to the state legislature and they have in modern times, decided that the voters can have a say. So some of the other justices in Bush versus Gore. Also writes separate opinions. But one is worth special mention. Three of the conservative justices that's chief justice Rehnquist Justice Scalia and Thomas say there's actually a different problem here when the Florida State Supreme Court ordered a hand recount based on its interpretation of Florida. Law. That itself was unconstitutional. Because these three justices go even further than the majority does and Bush versus Gore they say it's not just that the state legislatures have power. They're saying that when State Supreme Courts are trying to expand voting rights in a way that the state legislature disagrees with that actually violates the constitution. Remember they're going back to this idea that the state legislature is like virtually supreme that they have an all-powerful authority here in choosing electors. So in any event Bush versus Gore happens It is not a unanimous Supreme Court by far and Justice John Paul Stevens famously writes often quoted sentence in his dissent maybe you could read it for us. Okay here it is. Although we may never know with complete certainty the identity of the winner of this year's presidential election. The identity of the loser is perfectly clear. It is the nation's confidence in the judge as an impartial guardian of the rule of law. Not until December twelfth two, thousand that we know definitively who the forty third president of the United States is and the Supreme Court plays a direct role in the election. So I thought it was important for us to talk about it because if you think about it, there are voters in this election this year who were not alive at the time. Of Bush versus Gore, it's important to remember we live through a period of intense uncertainty. I mean granted this was before the existence of facebook and twitter and Instagram Tiktok but we were all pretty much glued to the TV for this entire period of time. Yeah. Yeah. For sure I mean it felt a whole lot different. There was never a question of. The peaceful transfer of power you know and all that sort of thing like there was no notion of that. The temperature was much lower in the nation even though it was a lot of anxiety and I was extremely upset. I. Think that's right. But we've been really anxious. Before I think. and. And much sense..

Bush Legislature Gore Supreme Court Florida State Supreme Court State Supreme Courts President Trump Justice John Paul Stevens Justice Scalia Facebook United States Florida Instagram Twitter Thomas
Happy 40th Kim Kardashian

Daily Pop

06:29 min | Last week

Happy 40th Kim Kardashian

"Hey everyone. It is Kim Kardashian West fortieth birthday. We're kicking off the party right here right now on daily Pop Justin is out today's Morgan and I are joined by Kisha Knight Polio he's an actress kick ass mom and of course you know her from house of pain and as Rudy from the cosby show Kisha we're so happy you're joining us. Thank you so much for having me. We have so much to get to today we're going to be celebrating throughout the entire show you're going to hear from Kim's famous family. We're GONNA read breaking down Kim's most shocking moments and we cannot talk about him without talking about fashion. They go hand in hand the celebration is going on all day here on e- with the keeping up with the Kardashians marathon and Kim's fortieth birthday special that airs tonight at ten PM. The first Kim has always been an open book and she's made plenty of surprising confessions along the way watch this. You should just be who you are say what you want entrepreneur makeup mogul wife's mother and all around boss I'm going to do whatever I want Kim K. West confessed. There isn't anything she's afraid to do and her mind she has done it all and her crazy confessions don't stop there I. Love it during a livestream. Qna Kim admitted problem member of the Mile High Club she wants had sex in a public movie theater she goes commando almost all of the time wave TMI and she's still owns though seventy five, thousand dollar diamond earrings made her totally lose it. We Know Kim has been working on getting her law degree, but it sounds like she's mixing a little business with pleasure in a new questionnaire for e she revealed she likes a shot of Tequila with a cheeser when she said he's life with about being happy and when she's not hitting the books, she's heading gym her morning ritual includes a five fifty am start time to work sweat. Obviously, all that hard work has done a body. Good. It's not easy at all, but it's not all work and no play her favorite thing to do during her downtime. Text people with lots of glitter sparkle emojis. You could probably guess who he's in contact with most family I no matter what Kimmy also confessed she likes to treat yourself to a little. TV. But the mom of four go to guilty pleasures aren't exactly what you'd expect. I need your help help MTV's catfish is at the top of our list or she likes to unwind with some hoarders on a any. Other crazy Kim Confessions. Everything is always so public. She claims her hidden talent is smelling cavities and there's one celebrity whose beauty left her starstruck. No need to share Kim loves you. She's proved over and over and over again it's just a vibe and the confessions don't stop there. Kim told people she has models drowned her clothes so she can plan outfits in advance and she's spray tans her scalp. So her middle part has that extra glow. Oh that's a good ted. Have, for years, wargin timoth favorite Kim moment all my God. This is the hardest question I've been asked all year producers brought this up yesterday I'm like, how am I going choose but I think it has to be and I know Chris over this but it has to be when she's taking fees when chloe is on the way to jail like that's just know psychotic Kim to me it is it never gets old it so delusional and it's just amazing and why we fell in love with her in the first place it's the best it's that's definitely one of my top wants Kisha what am I okay I'm I'm going to go on the other end of the spectrum you know Kim. been doing things for a long time but you know I have to say it's all of the work that she's been doing to get convicted. Felons out of prison. The fact that she's taking a completely different turn and really helped us her platform to to affect people's lives in a positive way. One hundred percent. That's that's a really huge one and I'm going to it back to something a lot more superficial. I got. My favorite moment is when we just saw in that lovely package, Kim crying over her diamond earrings because honestly girls I relate if I had seventy thousand dollars, diamond earrings and I lost one that's probably exactly how I would react I've had mad but got ensure your jewels have to China and. Ensure those goals. All right. Well, caves fashion has changed so much over the years. So we're going to go deep into the archives. Take a look at Kim style evolution Ooh can really I am be our L. Y. Kardashian. K.. A. R. D. A. S. H. I. A.. Look. Very nice where do you win? Gucci and Jimmy, Choo Shoes and Louis. Vitton back to mix it up a little bit him style started out young and fun experimenting with Different Designers Have Wearing A. Skirt and a La Perla top a wonderful. Share. That'd be the not shoes I want to find something that is young and fun and fresh but still you know how classy and conservative this is my. She transformed into a sophisticated ladies setting the trends that posing Christian Louis, Vuitton he also, I'm wearing Eliah and Lorraine Schwartz I weren't accustomed gown I'm wearing our Kardashian collection leggings put this big waistband. To do we have favor Lon Max Mara when she became apparent this hot mama put her curves front and center. This is John Paul Go. Ta and I love her sparkly. It was it is. And you know I love it I just wanted to really go for it and be kind of like a robot a Blinky Sexy Robot I'm wearing address from revolve. Long Sleeve and it's hot out here. But whatever looks good. It was distressed by Rick Win. All made this for me and I love it him. You'll trade who you wearing. Where we wearing this evening, I'm wearing Vivienne Westwood now. has become so economy or calling it the Kim effect. This

Qna Kim Kim Kardashian Kim Confessions Kim K. West Kisha Knight Vivienne Westwood MTV Morgan Kimmy Kardashians Rick Win TMI Rudy John Paul Lon Max Mara China Mile High Club Vitton L. Y. Kardashian
Fresh update on "john paul" discussed on Lars Larson

Lars Larson

01:44 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "john paul" discussed on Lars Larson

"I'm not really analyzing the dates. Honestly, I just find it. Difficult to understand why a law enforcement agency would they didn't want something at first and then take so long to come back to get it. I'm not worried about the kind line what My concern is how long it took time to actually came possession of this computer. I would agree with you there. I was just asking because the fall of 2019 was when the impeachment was going on where there was an awful lot being said about Ukraine. And, of course, some of the e mails I have to do with deals. Business deals that Hunter Biden is said to have had with both of Chinese and with Ukrainians. What's this done to your client? Oh, he's his businesses destroyed. Hey, really soon will have to shut down his shop. Which is unfortunate because he loves what he does. He's a small business owner. He's a He's a patriotic American. He's very, very well known and respected in the community. But the reality is he's 44 years old and unfortunately is going to have to figure out what his next career should be. Which is not a position anyone would want to be placed in. He thought he was doing the right thing, and actually, he knew he was doing the right thing. But unfortunately there are so many people out against him, Andre just making up stories about him, and what I really wanted to do was get the true story about John Paul. And I appreciate that. Because this is a tough thing is you said this is a man who ran a small business who probably a zai understand? Didn't even have to advertise because he was so good at computer repairs of exactly the kind of 100 Biden brought him were, you know liquid had been building a computer that you didn't have to advertise because word of mouth got him all the all the business he needed. And now this is destroying him. Is he facing threats? Absolutely, unfortunately. Oh, and this is something he was concerned about. When he first turned the information to the FBI. I don't I think most people who watch the news I have a little bit of a concern about getting into a situation like this because You could be turned into a nightmare, and that's exactly what he's living. People are sending him death threats. People purposely are trying to destroy his business on Yelp. I'm not sure if he helps still has Everything up, but you can go yourself and see how the horrible things people are saying about. I've received emails myself. Calling him a Communist spy. It's just absolutely ridiculous. And John Paul Couldn't be anything further from a spy he made. He made no money off of this. He did it because he felt like he had a duty to do it. He went to law enforcement and no one should feel Should be afraid to go to law enforcement and unfortunately This is what it what it happened. I'm talking to the lawyer for the computer shop owner, the lawyers Bryan Della Raka, one last thing the fight. Former vice president, now the Democrat candidate for president of the United States, literally said during one of the debates that this was Russian disinformation. I take it. Your client heard that charge. What does he say to that?.

Hunter Biden Business Owner John Paul FBI Bryan Della Raka Vice President Yelp Ukraine United States Andre
"john paul" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

07:46 min | 2 weeks ago

"john paul" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"Me and the man smiled and A Tear came out of his eyes and said my God, I don't believe he's dead. It's still do this today. And I feared I had tears in my eye The Joy was unbelievable. This old man, and I just hugged each other. I embraced I didn't want to let go we had for at least a minute and here I am chance to redeem myself make life. Okay, and here another human beings all that. Hey, if someone is something wrong the human race isn't good race people try and make things right and I felt wonderful every single person I've ever met on I've gone back to make everything right? There's only one that I can't find him. Still looking for Michael Davenport. He'd be about sixty years old now. He wanted to add water Grammar School Washington junior junior high school or Washington Irving Junior High School and partially in Marshall. I won the Navy I'm looking for Michael Davenport. I did it wrong and I cannot find our glass house and something like this one guy. I'm still looking for we can't find him because there's too many Michael Davenport's and you you do believe in the importance of being able to clean that stuff up. I sure do when you definitely gotta go back and clean up you have to and you feel good, but I think it home. On a day-to-day basis like in a salon we play like it's Survivor, you know, I vote you off. My Island in this Salon. We think that we can divide and conquer and and treat people unfairly the same people that we work with on a day-to-day basis and people don't think that it's important to clean up those things. But let's say somebody did take a bottle or two a shampoo off to the shelf right figure out what the retail price would have done that you're surprised where you get it out, you know forty forty 50% off with the retail price would have done then and let's say you did in ten times you can think of let's say $7, right? That's 70 bucks put it in an envelope. Princetown boss is not know what she would say ten bottles of shampoo have been sold over the last year or something. Here's your money. That's all you gotta do and put the envelope white on the desk and just walk away and don't even lay claim to it. And then you just made a mess without having to say I did it. They didn't see it. But the university the University's there's eyes everywhere. Well, well the person saw the most was you have you saw yourself killed, okay, and you know again off You do something for someone else and nobody else knows it and no one else claims them. You're great. The fact that you even did it makes you feel great for me being being happy does not come naturally to me. I have to work at that every single day and I do work at it every day. And and I'm now one of the happiest people that I know cuz I it is a priority of mine. Yeah example for the world Thursday. So optimistic so hopeful and so forgiving of just humankind. Well, I think I've been so down and so down and out of my life so many times that just the blessings and being okay in life makes me feel so good and throughout my life. My mother was very optimistic. I even though we had nothing we grew up in an area that was deprived. We never knew it took us food on the table. Maybe not a lump it was food on the table. There was shelter overhead and we thought we were spying their life. So, you know, there's there's a lot of good things just being alive and there's an old saying that I every now that job Think about I try and share with people and people should think about in the land of the blind. The one-eyed man is King. You can't even see the happening in the manage the land of the blind. The one-eyed man is King. Yeah, your mom you tell this wonderful story about about your mother. You just mention that you woke up with nothing. It was you and your brother and your mom just got three of you storing something about the the steak or something or what I would do is like once a month or something you have a lot of money, but she wanted us off to taste what good food was like so maybe once a month she get a little flaming yawn and we cut it in three pieces my brothers. She and I would have flaming yawn for dinner. Okay, or she by the smallest amount of caviar, you know, we'd have them once a month. We do something really special to taste it. So instead of the inexpensive thing with a more expensive thing. I can remember has toughest likewise and we didn't realize this stuff it was till we were older. I'm I spent five six years. Many years old it was Christmas time and we went shopping. My mom only have so much to shop with and we went downtown LA to the main County which is a stream card down there and there was a Salvation Army lady out throughout their jobs available. And my mom said she gave me my brother and I misled you to hold us together and go over and put it in there and we took the dime we would normally put it in there. Then we said her mom afterwards. Remember in those days off time was likely a few dollars in today. We said mom we know things are you know, we don't have a lot of money but yet you gave a diet she says because those people Salvation Army don't have what we have in life and we wash a little bit with him. I thought that's so awesome. But when you saw some of those work really wow, that's so cool. Mom. Right person was need was so funny to need Mom. We have so little that so much suck out your way back then. Yes, she did and those principles that she taught you are still alive is a part of you and your company announced earlier 11:00 well, What are you most proud of in your career? Oh, I think the fact that not only we made it but we were able to make it in our career and make the world a better place to live because we are here. That's a beautiful combination. I'm very very proud of and occasionally happy keeps me excited and very much in this industry and very much in to continue to do things in life because it's a combination of the two iPads in many others on the planet benefit. And now there's a lot of people that would disagree with me. I must get ten letters a week from Charities or people just want everything in the world and I can't do anymore. I did it for a while off. This is crazy. I'm totally insane. I can't save the world. Right but it our own way we contribute to more than 30 different good causes every year in a few people each year. We do something extra special for that. We do often causes. Are you most passionate about you know, there's so many but I would say things that helped a greater majority of people a group a group of people become self-sufficient or off. World or part of the environment became self-sufficient on their own like helping improves the people learn how to get jobs on their own or helping people with some food of letting them get their own job or helping reforest and there really hasn't been forced but more important helping people understand that this has been cut down. Let's all pitch in a ra4 stood together. I know that a lot of people think that to make a difference in to support all the many different causes that are out there a lot of people look to Big Business. I've been in meetings where people talking well we gotta get the money and people like well, I'm Paula him right the Chuck and people do have that attitude. Well, Coca-Cola should put up all the money or can you talk about more Grassroots and and individuals doing some things the greater question that ever asked me. I'm amazed. Oh never asked that question before if corporations put up all the money and individuals don't put up something. They have just shaded themselves out of home. Wives that are fulfilled think of it this way. There's a lot of people's lives and make a lot of money and same goal gear and save during their lives and then all of a sudden build a big building and name it after them or when they die. They build the temple and named after them, right because I'm here look-at-me. They did enjoy the fruits along the way big corporations. Hopefully is a lot of them contribute to a lot of good causes but it's when human beings in Los Angeles contribute a little bit each themselves, they become part of the solution and they get the joy of giving ending the joy of knowing that look what we did together. Not what we're just sitting on the couch watching somebody else do something people that do that just sit on the couch watch someone else do something and.

Michael Davenport people Salvation Army water Grammar School Washingto Coca-Cola Princetown Salvation Army Washington Irving Junior High LA Los Angeles Paula Big Business main County Chuck
"john paul" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

07:19 min | 2 weeks ago

"john paul" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"More and more and you should keep doing that. At least until you have enough money in the bank to pay every bill you down for six months everything from your mortgage to your your rent your car payments or insurance payments your food your gasoline, even the movie theater tickets or the videos that you read everything for six months. So I didn't hear what happened to you. You don't for six months you pay every single Bill and regroup when you do that. Then you start feeling very very secure life for starters. You had given me that advice to pay yourself first years ago and it really didn't make sense to me because you know, you have plug along you plug along and you're thinking wow one of these days at the end of the month after I pay all of my bills rent to keep this business going. There's going to be some money left over in that bank account and that's mine. That's finally profit from these years of hard work that I put into building a company. Well that never happened and then you came along and yep. Me when you have to pay yourself first, like what do you mean by that? You said set yourself up with a salary a dividend, but you pay that before you actually pay your rent and might stop back was well off. If I do that then there won't be enough money to pay the rent and you said trust me on this one. Do it. Anyway pay yourself first and then pay all of your other bills and I tried it and somehow all the other bills got paid. I don't it's this weird phenomenon that all the other bills got paid but now all of a sudden I wasn't angry at my own company for for not providing me with income that I had worked so hard for because I was paying myself first. I've done that years ago when I first started doing it, I thought how am I going to make it all of a sudden money came in we never imagine what he would come in after storing shortly after I started doing this many many years ago when I first started doing it, I walk down the street and I found a $5 bill. I took $0.50 out and saved it to the bank account. I did the mayor and then birth. Years later, I have to stop doing it and I was in debt up to my eyeballs and actually make more money you spend more money a lot of your listeners. I'm sure realized. Oh gosh ten years. I didn't make as much money today. But yet many don't want to make it any ways to pay yourself. First a phenomenal will happen extreme will start flowing you'll start making more money and you can see more of it and you can see more rewards and that gives you on a Financial Freedom fabulous fabulous. Can you talk to our listeners about the importance of integrity and honesty off in business because I'm sure if you ask the average person listening to this, you know, are you an integral honest businessperson and they would say oh, yeah. Absolutely. I am and yet they're cheating on their taxes their naturally claiming everything that they're bringing into the salon which bottom line hurts the beauty industry. It hurts the beauty industry because the government looks at it and says wow hairdressers can only make $30,000 a year when really they're making eighty or more and they're only claiming wage. They're making that amount of money which means they're not paying taxes, but they still drive on my streets and send their kids to the schools that we all taxpayers pay for. Was that a little Soap Box there so often and and kind of how I look at it, you know, I mean, I I believe in common, I believe in cause and effect and I believe that what goes around comes around and I believe that if you'll cheat the government eventually, you'll cheat on your spouse. You'll see your children. You'll treat your friends you'll you'll treat can you kind of talk about the importance of Tegrity and honesty and business? I like to roll that back a few thousand years whether you read the Bible New Testament the Koran The Works of Buddha Confucius, there's always something that says for example pays Caesar that which is Caesar's pay your taxes paid people that what is owed to them and work around and in life that hardest thing to do and believe me. This is tough is to have character character is what you do when dead One else is watching. Okay, cuz think fifty bucks in your pocket update the government. Okay, you know, you can take an extra five jelly beans when you're only supposed to take one handful. Okay, am watching the gas tank the meter didn't work. So I got an extra $2 with the gas and I'm leaving. Oh look, I got my change more than I should get characters what you do when no one's watching if you do the same thing, but no one's watching as if everyone were watching you you feel so good the first time someone gives you more money. You should get back and change and you say Hey, you overpay me. Here's somebody back you walk down to feel like a god like while I watched out for all the children of my planet and you think about it. All of us are like influences of God, no matter what we want to call God. We're all extensions of God. Why not treat our own Planet as an extension of God, not just an eight person who watches out for themselves, but extension of a God that watches out for the whole planet and everybody on it. Hm well off. But you can do it. I'm sure people think well, I'll just take these two bottles of shampoo off the retail shelf, you know, the salon owner. They've got so much of this product and they'll never miss it and they would want me to have it anyway and plus package extra and clean the back room. And so I deserve to have this product so they they don't really think that they're stealing they don't think that they're cheating. They they somehow justify it that that's that's amazing phenomena that takes place off. What's $10 what's 13 bucks? They make so much money and they do it again and again and again without realizing that for $10 I'm making myself into a thief wage and I'm stealing from the person that created a business and that's why I'm here for ten twenty dollars. What is wrong with me that's called petty theft lying that Penny off our life bigger than that. Well good for you with a strong. You know, I've had my bad boy days and then I had quite a few years when I was a real bad bad bad, but why didn't things that were just not so good there was a time in my life. At a three-year-old son John jr. I was in my early twenties. I was riding with the Ron motorcycle gang and I'd have any money and had this little car I had fixed and the engine blew when someone had to fix it and it was $175 to fix it and I didn't have the money. This was back in the 1960s late sixties, so I didn't have the money so I don't buy with my son had someone drop me off home with my son said it's a car fixed. Does it run good the guy go see I still can't thank you for a test drive. Of course, you can I got the car and he had a phony name on me. Anyways, put my son in the car and I drove away and I kept on going I never came back and never paid this bill with John Paul Mitchell Systems. Finally started making a few dollars. I thought if everyone I wronged in my life and I wanted to make amends to make things right. So I'm going back to this place and at that time became an auto-body vendor place was no longer mechanic and I went I said my God more than twenty twenty-five years ago. I was here wage. . There was an elderly gentleman from a foreign country had a an engine repair place. They fixed my car. And now you're like I may have gone to he said boy. Is this your lucky day. He's my landlord. He's retired now and he's here today know I can tell it's true story and the fellow came up. I said sir. I want to take you back to the late nineteen sixties. There was a little sports car here in the office..

John Paul Mitchell Systems Caesar theft John jr Penny
"john paul" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

08:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"john paul" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"Hi everybody. This is Winn claybaugh and welcome to this one General issue of Masters. I am sitting here with an icon a legend an entrepreneur a leader. I could go on and on with as many adjectives as I could think of touch scribe success and envision cuz I'm sitting here with John Paul. Dejoria. Welcome John Paul. Thank you Wes nice to be here with another Master session with you have to say I think the first time that we did a masters interview was in a very very beginning of Master was ten years ago and you along with that the other big names B. So soon Trevor. Sorbie, Vivian mackender were were gracious enough to to lend your name's to this brand new Compaq that I was forming cuz I knew if I could get you to say yes and Vidal Sassoon to say yes, then of course who's going to say no to me after that. I had a company because you guys said yes, so, you know Masters has been a wonderful vehicle for us off. Just spread some great messages and to even create like a history a library because some of our people that we've interviewed have since passed away and yet we have this this library of their voices and other messages and I know that you don't plan to go anywhere. In fact, I think you told me that you have another 20 years in inside of you. I'm hoping have another 40 you're okay. I know for sure. There's plenty make like forty or fifty more when it's off of a Monumental year for John Paul Mitchell Systems because you are now celebrating twenty-five years in business. How does that make you feel makes me feel just wonderful just going back twenty-five years ago. And now my partner are starting this business with $700. Our Dream wasn't only we could do five million a year in business will stay in the professional beauty industry. We make a couple hundred thousand dollars each. We'd be sent to the rest of our lives and we know we can do a lot of good little did we know just how much good we could do and how successful the company would be twenty-five years in business. Did did you and Paul have this Vision way back in, Georgia? That you would hit this Milestone and that you would hit that the volume that you're doing last week. I was there for your grand opening of your brand new Warehouse as an Offices here in Southern California. How bout biggest that place. What's the square footage of print is about a hundred seventy-five thousand square feet just the warehouse alone is a hundred fifty thousand square feet for Tears high. So that is actually 600,000 utilize square feet of just storage space. We built that to be able to Warehouse our needs and our shipping and our infrastructure for the next ten years, but the way we've been growing the last four years, we may outgrow that within seven years that's amazing and people ask me all the time if I can help them get a job at your company. I'm Paul Mitchell. I'm like not that I know of because nobody ever seems to leave and that issue you have people for a long long period of time and and little simple things that you do, for example, I know that you buy their lunch every single day, isn't that true there's three lots of John Paul Mitchell Systems both our executive off. Really? Not sure but can you can you talk about that a little bit about just the importance of establishing loyalty? Because I I firmly believe that when staff stick around customers stick around they sure do. Our company. We know the people are more important than anything. They are the whole is all the people of John Paul Mitchell Systems in our extended family through salons in schools throughout the United States the rest of the world we feel that we must do things for them that makes them special things that would like done for me. I believe in the last twenty-five years my turnovers been fifteen sixteen maybe Seventeen people that took twenty five years, but we still support like I've worked for so many companies in the past myself and a lot of them just didn't really treat you right they looked at something different as a priority opposed to the people which are going to create that priority join. Anyways, one of them was free lunch. There were times when I was growing up. I didn't have any money were lodged. So maybe I'd like Fifty sounds like fine we'll work and you get to talk over fifty cents. So when we first started I knew that wage So she made enough money for sure. Everyone will get free lunch. So we knew for sure. Everyone had a good deal during the day. They feel special. They won't have to bring the lunch to work or if they did they would have to stick in the refrigerator and we have dinner menus and we change it. It's not the same thing every single time. I've been there on your free lunch day, which is everyday and it is good food you cater is not like this little box lunch. That's half stale. So people deserve that. They just need a little more than the norm. If you look at the normal people, but everyone thinks people should get working for an organization and you give them more than the norm they know it and they appreciate and let them know they're extremely special in your life. Sometimes people listening to these Masters series will try to exclude themselves from needing the information that's being shared. So people might be thinking well, yeah, of course if I had this song A million dollar company and had this huge big warehouse and had all the money. Of course, I'd I'd offer those things to my people but people have a circle of influence and I believe that everybody's in business for themselves, even if you're a paid off In a salon you're in business for yourself. You have one employee you and we all have a circle of influence. However, beg yours happens to be, you know, quite large that circle of influence. We all have that Circle of in fact, what advice can you give to us? And also what mistakes are people making in terms of not properly taking care of the people that are in their circle of influence start with lunch. For example, let's say ass alone never has a staff member and maybe their things are really really tight and you have that extra five or seven dollars that you can't do it every day. But once you start off by saying, you know what Saturdays are our toughest day or front is really tough day. We're going to take off that day. We're not going to book lunch. We're going to book an appointment for ourselves. It won't be a regular looking for a customer. So we're going to take a half hour off for lunch and Hyde serves lunch. Even if it's one day a week to start with what does it cost you $7 for you $7 for your staff member and then you can organism two days a week. It's just showing them that they're special and you get a chance to hang out with them. During lunch too. It makes things really really nice. And if you remember that has little as you do or as much as you do the person you're doing is for if it's out of the ordinary knows it's special and really appreciate that and as you grow and things get better, then you could do a little more taking free lunches the example from one day. Maybe you can go to 5 days a week, right and do other things along the way that makes their life, especially feel that if you grow you're not the only one that's benefitting. They're benefiting also does more nice things are coming their way. The one thing that I have always noticed about you is that although you make a lot of money that has a really increased your level of power. So to speak meaning you don't use that power. I I put this chapter in my book being rich not right choice being nice and you've always been nice along the way has it happened that somebody came back to you and said, you know what John Paul you did this or you said this for me ten years ago, and it really really made a difference. I'm sure that you've had those things and and in a surprise you like me doing that or saying that ten years ago made a difference. Well, could you tell us what some of those things are and the reason why I prefaced that that you haven't received let the power you know, you know take over is because I know that you are a humble man. And so to get me to have you talk about these kind of things may not be naturally something that you would do but the people listening may need to hear they they want to hear because they want to do what you're doing when people start saying look at me they may not say those words, but after look at me look how powerful I am. Look how much money I have. Look at my boss. Look at my position. Look at my title. They become jerks first class. Jerk. They they are feeling good that others are respecting them because they have power they have money they have wisdom. They have tons of friends. They have whatever they have. But in reality people say God wanted a jerk. Who does he think this we know who he is, you know, he doesn't have to go around reminders all the time. That's terrible when I share things with people I share wage. I was not just to speak words, but I hope that what I share with them are things that can help them and when someone comes up to me and says whether it's bashing P, you told me stick aside 10% of my income for myself off the bank first just for me. They seem to be a really worth. It makes me feel really good anytime. I can tell somebody whether it's smile at someone looking in the eye and they come back a day a week years later and say gosh it really worked. That's my reward. It makes me feel really really wonderful and I think on the planet Earth we're all here to do something the more we do to make others feel good or learn have a job because of us without asking anything in return. That's where we get the real power in life because his people saying.

John Paul John Paul Mitchell Systems Masters Paul Mitchell Winn claybaugh Vidal Sassoon Compaq Wes Sorbie Trevor Southern California United States partner Georgia Vivian mackender Hyde executive
Sen. Mitch McConnell says Senate will vote on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Tim Conway Jr.

00:42 sec | Last month

Sen. Mitch McConnell says Senate will vote on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Nominee for this vacancy will receive a vote. On the floor of the Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate will vote this year on President Trump's nominee to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The Senate has more than sufficient time. The process. A nomination. History and president make that perfectly clear. McConnell did not say whether the vote will happen before after the elections. But he says justice is John Paul Stevens in Sandra Day O'Connor, where each confirmed and fewer than 43 days. Democrats say the the next next president president should should pick pick the the nominee. nominee. President President Trump Trump says says he's he's obligated obligated to to nominate nominate a a replacement. replacement.

President Trump Trump President Trump Mitch Mcconnell Senate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Senate Majority Sandra Day O'connor John Paul Stevens
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: US Supreme Court judge dies of cancer, aged 87

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

00:44 sec | Last month

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: US Supreme Court judge dies of cancer, aged 87

"The nation is mourning the loss of you, a Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She lost her long battle against cancer on Friday. She was 87. ABC is Aaron Carter Ski looks back at her life. Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a legal pioneer. Long before she was nominated to the Supreme Court in 1993 by President Bill Clinton. I am proud to nominate for associate justice of the Supreme Court. Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg. At her confirmation hearing, Ginsberg addressed head on her support of abortion rights. This is Something central to a woman's. Life to her dignity. Ginsberg was the court's eldest justice and once joked, emulating John Paul Stevens, who retired at age 90, Aaron Carter Ski,

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Aaron Carter Ski Ginsberg President Bill Clinton John Paul Stevens ABC Cancer
Make Your Zoom Meetings Soar  Remote Work  John Paul Mendocha - burst 14

A New Direction

05:46 min | Last month

Make Your Zoom Meetings Soar Remote Work John Paul Mendocha - burst 14

"Doing Zoom and working remotely because that's the world that we're currently living in today, and it's probably going to be the world that we're going to be living in for not just. A short period of time but because we're starting to understand that you know what we can get a lot of work done remotely in very a lot of industries we need to grasp, hold its concept being able to do as zoo meeting and do it right all right, and so we're we're GonNa talk about some of these little pieces here as we finish up here in this hour so. Let's talk about a couple of really we you talked about the green screen, but I think one of the things that two things that we need to talk about is audio and video. And bring up to really fabulous points and I am right on it and Let's. Let's talk about the video portion I, what should we know about video because we can make some mistakes there Why I think the the first mistake that we make is that is that when we get into the whole realm of video. We immediately go. Hey High def right I want high. DEF. and. All that sounds good because of course, we're watching I definitely and television and by the way watching something happened. Is Infinitely more. Is Easier and simpler than you actually making it happen. So you want to look at your resolution and see if you can actually tone down your resolution because. They're probably not gonNA WANNA see four K or whatever. And by the way very few people have the bandwidth to do four K. Right now. So video is important and and you WanNa make sure that you understand how your video works, how how it's going to be put together and you can. You could start out inexpensively and you can go very expensively You can actually get a really decent zoom call out of a iphone or android with with a face with a front facing camera. But what you WanNa do you WanNa get a stand and have this stand hold it instead of you because let's face it. If if you're holding your camera, you know if you're holding like this way you know and you've got this little jitter will cause your hand will get tired and you're doing this stuff You're not going to be not going to be very effective. So just make sure that you understand that and and you know. Test see what is like also, you can make videos on your on your PC, your Mac you know on your laptop makes videos and see what the camera it looks like. Big Mistake that people make is they got nostril cam going that's great. You know which one I'm talking about right. Looks like it looks like Sherwood forest up there but you know you got these guys who they don't even they're clueless by the way if you want to know how to make your laptop, go up up up, I will give you the cheap way to do it. You could go get some paper that would go into your printer and just keep stacking up keep stacking up. Reams of paper until have the right line of sight. So people aren't looking up there and going. I wonder. Don't want them to wonder, hey, how's how's that? For a really inexpensive way to do that and you're right you know you can take books or whatever to raise your laptop if you don't have a separate camera, I think probably you and I, I have a camera on a tripod that's a USB camera attached here so I'm looking right at it, but you don't have to have. That you don't have to spend that money to do that type of thing. So you most as you point out in the book, most of your laptops have a camera in there. Let's get rid of knows. Kim Let's. Let's get some books and let's get that. Let's get that raised there. So we can see you right. Let's talk about audio. Let's talk about audio because I think we we think that because Ron video that audio is not important, but it really is critical. Isn't it? Audio's very important. Now, I I happen to prefer just because of my personal style and what I do is I wear I, wear a gaming headset so you can go buy a gaming headset for seventy. Bucks. Plug into a USB and it does a good job. It it. You know it sounds good by the way it kills lots of surrounding noise and that makes me the MIC stand. You know. So matter how much moving my head and it's funny because I, what I'm. Looking at buying headsets I was talking to. Somebody. Who is really a good audio engineering and we're talking about my problem, which is I had a really nice microphones like Jay has in fact, I have several but the problem is I would come off center. So my volume would keep getting funky and changed and he said, well, tell me how much you move your head and I said, well, it's got like halfway between Ray Charles and Stevie. Wonder. and. Said Okay here's the solution. The solution is you have to be the Mike Stand. So I bought actually have multiple headsets but for for seventy bucks at a best buy, you can buy cheaper but you know you now have this and it's great isolation people are I watch a lot of people who take the little headset that comes with their phone and they have that they're holding the microphone up to them and let's face it a microphone. That's the size of a pinhole. That's that's what your voice is being replicated through. Right so you spend a few bucks you'll get a, it'll be a lot better. Some people don't like to wear these because it makes them look I. Don't know whatever. But you know you gotta think in terms of a good microphone and you can get pretty decent microphones for less than one hundred bucks.

Kim Let Mike Stand Sherwood Forest Def. RON JAY Ray Charles Stevie
‘The Bachelorette’ Casting Shakeup Expected for Upcoming Season

Comments By Celebs

03:52 min | 3 months ago

‘The Bachelorette’ Casting Shakeup Expected for Upcoming Season

"And I know we don't normally cover bachelor bachelorette stuff but this one thing kind of just took our interest and personally having watched bachelor in paradise. I have a real liking towards Teixeira. So we just wanted to discuss because I think it's interesting. So. As you guys know Clare Carly was the Bachelorette her season of course was interrupted with the whole Cova situation. And nothing is confirmed with basically the rumor is that she refused to continue shortly after filming began. Because she fell in love with one of her contestants. This guy named Del Moss he's thirty one. You know he there was a little bit of drama I think early on with his social media activity according to reality Steve which I can't speeches reliability but I can say he has been right. A lot of times said the basically she fell in love with him night one she gave him the first impression rose and she you know think about anyone else she felt so hard and she was done. and. So. I guess she really just didn't want to continue filming and so. The producers obviously were freaking out and Teixeira Adams who is twenty nine years old she was on Colton season she was basically the runner up. Her and Hannah after Colton basically quit to get. CASSIE and she was on Bachelor in paradise and she was dating John Paul. Jones. She's just a bombshell. I've always thought she was a class act. She's stunning. She's really good energy. I actually am really surprised that she was not always the choice now that I'm looking back on it although. I. Remember when Clare was initially announced we were thrilled because I think it's really exciting when. The woman is a little bit older maybe want something different in her life at that point whatever. But what's interesting is if you remember when they had done the initial casting, they had to let some people go because they wanted order contestants. So apparently, and again, I can't tell you this designed to present. This is what's being reported apparently, they kind of were calling back on both some of the contestants eight initially lecco because they were too young and also some of the contestants that Clare had eliminated. So I don't know what's going to happen, but you know Franz Verbs, let's just take this as factual. I think it's more fun to analyze it that way. And I have to say like while I'm thrilled if this is the case these I would so much rather watch tasty to be honest I think she's just really fun and lively and I didn't I got a bad taste in my mouth from Clare after initially liking the whole Matt James Situation I just thought that that was a little bit. I don't know I was not into it when she kinda call now for basically doing charity work and like I'm happy that Claire Found love that's going on. But what's the fuck? How many people think they found their person the first night you know what? Yeah. I mean listen I'm not a bachelor watcher. So I don't like there's a lot of I guess. Details and and patterns and things that happen over the seasons like with different people and people who nuclear people don't like I'm not involved in any of that I really don't know I have a very like personal view of the situation but to me I always thought the whole point was to find the person you wanted to be with the bachelor and a lot of people probably knew in the beginning but continued to date throughout the show like I just I just thought that was the point maybe I'm off with all of my lack of experience in the bachelor but from the very beginning watcher beginning understand her it seems like that's kind of the point of the show. No. I mean, yeah you know listen I do believe that there are certain times when you just know and you're like, this is my person and there's two sides to that one one I'm sure one side could say like. She's right. It wasn't paired the other guy she was doing them a favor, but the other side is. Okay fine. You have that in how much better of a story will be that at the end of the day you knew since day one I don't know the whole thing seems weird. If this is really the case, all I will say like of Clare's happy and she's with this guy in their happy he's hot For her but if tastes the Bachelorette, that would be some shit.

Clare Carly Jones Teixeira Adams Del Moss John Paul Steve Clare Cassie Colton Claire Matt James
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 3 months ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
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04:55 min | 4 months ago

Venus Williams - Game Changer

"Hello everyone can t the tennis podcast day. Eleven of Wimbledon relived would have been women's Semifinals Day Wimbledon and would probably have been under the reef because looking out of my window in Putney, which is a? Mile and a half ish down the road from us, W nineteen is in miserable. Say That's great. Thank you, British weather for making some twenty twenty. Just that little bit extra great. But not to worry because. David Matt to talk tennis with. Seven hundred episodes David you just told me. We actually can mark a milestone because we've remembered it before recording rather than fully seconds off the recording. Yeah, we! We've celebrated five hundred, six, hundred one in the past. So yeah I'm fin quite proud. You know it. It draws me when you say it's women's semifinal state today because I'd kind of I'd forgotten that in as much as I'm so used to now talking about classic matches with you both watching them. We've just watched another one to the BBC of. Matches on every day that they're showing Wimbledon doing their own stuff online streaming matches, which is the one good thing I take from this whole period is the suddenly. The vast archive is just being. Put out there for everybody to enjoy, but I had forgotten. That is still Wimbledon and today would have been women's semifinals, and that makes me quite sad, yeah. I, wish I wish I could forget I get the impression that perhaps you haven't forgotten in the optimistic. Every cloud silver lining way that David. I Dunno, I kind of have in a way, I'm just so so invested in what we're doing. The the usual schedule of Wimbledon isn't isn't really in my mind so much. Just me then okay. Trip back to two thousand and five when. Storm strong was winning his seventh consecutive Tour de France title. Yup? The three hundred eighty made its first flight at the live eight concerts. Good friend of mine went to live eight in Hyde Park and she says it was mostly great until sting came on early evening when everyone was pissed in party made and some new material. Juno live eight is when I discovered pink Floyd and realized I two thousand. David Luiz discovered. It's. Matt's now. Sort of got me to to realize that I actually need to listen to albums full of Bruce springsteen and not just judge. We. Born in the USA. Correct. Correct get on that David's It was also the year that Britain implemented. The civil partnerships axe to include same-sex partnerships. It was the year that London won the rights to host the twenty twelve Olympics. And the xbox three sixty was released Oh and Pope John Paul the second died. There's a few. We've already done it two thousand and five much at the French. Open say these are these events that we didn't mention I around, so that was T-, thousand five I was working. My First Wimbledon as an employee I was a bull store assistant. Under the employees of one Derek Dimmer? Who was the head of the bull store at Wimbledon in done that job with his wife? Centuries I think. It was it was a job. which largely comprised heavy lifting and I loved it I couldn't believe my luck that I was working Wimbledon, even they. My primary job was lifting boxes of tennis balls and wandering around the orange practice with bin bag, asking players and coaches. If I could collect, they used balls of the practice, so they could be resolved to charity. I thought that was the best job in the world and I could not believe my luck and I went back the next year as as head bull. Store Assistant I was GONNA. Say You assumed to be promoted? Yeah, that was my first promotion and that I was GONNA. Ask You if you did a good job with whether you got a good review. Turns ends. It did I mean there's not? Much that can go wrong with putting balls and have been bank. But it didn't go wrong, and honestly I just. I thought asking asking. Tim Henman if he was finished with these tennis. Balls are just so. That was the coolest thing in the world. I thought I was the coolest person in the world getting to do that job.

Wimbledon David Tennis David Matt David Luiz Tim Henman Juno Putney Pope John Paul Hyde Park Bruce Springsteen Derek Dimmer London Olympics Usa. Floyd Britain
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 4 months ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
"john paul" Discussed on Killer Knowledge

Killer Knowledge

03:40 min | 5 months ago

"john paul" Discussed on Killer Knowledge

"Answer is. <Speech_Male> B.. <Speech_Male> He <Speech_Male> built his fortune <Speech_Male> as president <Speech_Male> of the Getty Oil <Speech_Male> Company. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> This is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also why the Italian <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> press called <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the young getty <Speech_Male> the oil <Speech_Male> prince. <Speech_Male> To Lie Tenth <Speech_Male> Nineteen seventy-three. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> John <Speech_Male> Paul Getty the third <Speech_Male> was walking drunk <Speech_Male> through Piazza in <Speech_Male> Rome at three <Speech_Male> am <Speech_Male> when he said a white <Speech_Male> car pulled up next <Speech_Male> to him with four <Speech_Male> men inside. <Speech_Male> They took <Speech_Male> him at gunpoint <Speech_Male> and sent a <Speech_Male> ransom note to his <Speech_Male> family. <Speech_Male> Question number <Speech_Male> three. <Speech_Male> How much did the <Speech_Male> kidnappers initially <Speech_Music_Male> asked <Speech_Music_Male> for? <Speech_Male> A <Speech_Male> seven million <Speech_Male> dollars <Speech_Male> be <Speech_Male> seventeen. <Speech_Male> Million Dollars <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> see <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> twenty <SpeakerChange> seven <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> million dollars. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> The correct <Speech_Male> answer is. <Speech_Male> B <Speech_Male> Seventeen <Speech_Male> million dollars. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But despite <Speech_Male> being his grandfather's <Speech_Male> quote <Speech_Male> favourite, <Speech_Male> the Getty Patriarch <Speech_Male> famously stated <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> have fourteen <Speech_Male> other grandchildren, <Speech_Male> and if I pay <Speech_Male> one penny now, <Speech_Male> then I'll <Speech_Male> have fourteen <Speech_Male> kidnapped grandchildren. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> While they <Speech_Male> made numerous threats <Speech_Male> and asked <Speech_Male> for lesser amounts, <Speech_Male> ransom <Speech_Male> the kidnappers <Speech_Male> up their game <Speech_Male> in November nineteen <Speech_Male> seventy-three. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> when they sent <Speech_Male> an envelope to <Speech_Male> a daily newspaper. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Question <Speech_Male> Number Four. <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> was in the <Speech_Male> envelope <Speech_Music_Male> a <Speech_Music_Male> Paul's <Speech_Music_Male> ear? <Speech_Music_Male> Be. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Paul's Finger. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> See. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> Paul's <Speech_Music_Male> Toe. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> The correct <Speech_Music_Male> answer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> A <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Paul's <Silence> <Advertisement> ear. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The envelope <Speech_Male> also contained <Speech_Male> a lock of <Speech_Male> hair <Speech_Male> no threat to hurt <Speech_Male> him even more <Speech_Male> if they weren't <Speech_Male> paid. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It was <Speech_Male> after the ear <Speech_Male> was mailed that his grandfather <Speech_Male> agreed <Speech_Male> to pay <Speech_Male> though with <Speech_Male> stipulations, <Speech_Male> he <Speech_Male> loaned eight hundred <Speech_Male> thousand dollars to <Speech_Male> his son with <Speech_Male> agreement. It had <Speech_Male> to be paid back <Speech_Male> with interest. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The remaining two <Speech_Male> point, two million dollars <Speech_Male> that went to the ransom <Speech_Male> would <Speech_Male> come from his own <Speech_Male> pocket, <Speech_Male> but question <Speech_Male> number five <Speech_Male> to end this episode. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> What was significant <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> two point two million <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dollar figure? <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It was. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> A. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Tax <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Deductible. <Speech_Music_Male> Lee? <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> His <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> grandson's <Speech_Male> inheritance. <Speech_Male> See <Speech_Male> borrowed <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> from friends. <Speech_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> BURP. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> The correct answer <Speech_Male> is A. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It was the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> maximum amount <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of money that was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> tax deductible. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> On December <Speech_Male> Fifteenth <Speech_Male> Nineteen, seventy-three <Speech_Male> Paul <Speech_Male> was found alive <Speech_Male> at a gas <Speech_Male> station shortly <Speech_Male> after the ransom <Speech_Male> was paid. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Over time, <Speech_Male> Paul developed <Speech_Male> a drug and <Speech_Male> alcohol addiction. <Speech_Male> In <Speech_Male> nineteen eighty one <Speech_Male> he <Speech_Male> suffered a drug <Speech_Male> induced stroke, which <Speech_Male> left him a quadriplegic <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> without the ability <Speech_Male> to speak. <Speech_Male> He <Speech_Male> died in two thousand <Speech_Male> eleven <SpeakerChange> when he <Speech_Music_Male> was fifty four <Music> years old. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> To

Paul Getty Getty Oil president Piazza Rome
Religious leaders condemn Trump photo-op amid unrest

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

Religious leaders condemn Trump photo-op amid unrest

"Tonight president trump is taking credit for what he calls the domination of DC streets by police and military forces earlier he made another visit to a prominent place of worship and for a second straight day drew a sharp rebuke from religious leaders CBS is Paula Reid is at the White House tonight Paula nor those religious leaders accuse the president of using houses of worship for photo opportunities while not addressing the larger social justice concerns that have set off protests across the country president trump was met with more protests on his only outing of the day to a Washington shrine honoring pope John Paul the second's archbishop Wilton Gregory issued a rare public rebuke of the visit citing last nice use of force to clear protesters he called it baffling and reprehensible that any Catholic facility would allow itself to be so egregiously

Donald Trump Paula Reid White House President Trump Pope John Paul Wilton Gregory Washington
President Trump's visit to a Washington church sparks outrage

Mark Levin

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

President Trump's visit to a Washington church sparks outrage

"President trump has gone to another church as demonstrations continue around the country president and First Lady went to the Saint John Paul the second national shrine in Washington a Catholic facility and sort of think tank but the archbishop of Washington Wilton Gregory called allowing the visit baffling and reprehensible John Paul certainly would not condone the use of tear gas and other deterrents to silence scanner or intimidate protesters what happened when the night with the National Guard leading the charge to clear Lafayette park is also baffling to DC mayor Muriel Bowser I didn't see any provocation that will warrant the deployment of munitions especially for the purpose of moving the president across the street the president is trying to get governors to use guard members to crackdown on protests

Donald Trump President Trump Saint John Paul Washington Washington Wilton Gregory John Paul National Guard Lafayette Park Muriel Bowser DC
Washington archbishop denounces Trump visit to Catholic shrine as 'baffling' and 'reprehensible'

Phil Valentine

00:44 sec | 5 months ago

Washington archbishop denounces Trump visit to Catholic shrine as 'baffling' and 'reprehensible'

"Some Republicans have joined church leaders in condemning last night's decision to clear up protesters in Washington so president trump could walk to a nearby church and pose with a bottle but today another controversial visit to the president and First Lady went to the Saint John Paul the second national shrine in Washington but the archbishop of Washington Wilton Gregory called allowing the visit baffling and reprehensible John Paul certainly would not condone the use of tear gas and other deterrents to silence scatter or intimidate protesters what happened when the night with the National Guard leading the charge to clear Lafayette park is also baffling to DC mayor Muriel Bowser I didn't see any provocation that what warrant the deployment of munitions the president is trying to get governors to use guard members to crack down on protests

Washington Donald Trump President Trump Saint John Paul Washington Wilton Gregory John Paul National Guard Lafayette Park Muriel Bowser DC
Embracing religious themes, Trump visits John Paul II shrine

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Embracing religious themes, Trump visits John Paul II shrine

"Tokyo's president trump governor continues is taking embracing action religious themes following worries as the nation over a resurgence faces more of widespread infections unrest only a week the off president to a state and First of emergency Lady visited ended the Saint John Paul the government the second has issued national a Tokyo shrine a looked here in Washington after thirty four that new came cases a day after were confirmed he walked to in the a city damaged church welcome near from the White infections House and slowed minutes after to a few authorities per day forcefully in late cleared may peaceful the idea protesters of the alert from its path is to inform at people the church of the status the president of infections held a Bible and provides up for cameras caution drawing lighting criticism on Tokyo's from democratic rainbow foe bridge Joe Biden will be changed I just from wish rainbow she opened colored it once in to awhile read as GOP a sign of senator a lot Ben Sasse however says the internet he's against does not mean the president restrictions using the Bible just cookies as a prop will be reimposed Washington's immediately archbishop experts says he's say baffled the rise by in two new days cases visit reflect to the shrine the increased movement say the of late people pope since would mid not may have condoned I'm using Charles tear the live gas this month to intimidate people near a place of worship Sager mag ani Washington

Tokyo President Trump John Paul Washington White Infections House Joe Biden GOP Senator Ben Sasse Bible Charles Ani Washington
Embracing religious themes, Trump visits John Paul II shrine

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Embracing religious themes, Trump visits John Paul II shrine

"President trump continues embracing religious themes as the nation faces more widespread unrest the president and First Lady visited the Saint John Paul the second national shrine here in Washington that came a day after he walked to a damaged church near the White House minutes after authorities forcefully cleared peaceful protesters from its path at the church the president held a Bible up for cameras drawing criticism from democratic foe Joe Biden I just wish she opened it once in awhile GOP senator Ben Sasse says he's against the president using the Bible as a prop Washington's archbishop says he's baffled by two days visit to the shrine say the late pope would not have condoned using tear gas to intimidate people near a place of worship Sager mag ani Washington

President Trump Saint John Paul Washington Ben Sasse White House Joe Biden GOP Senator Ani Washington
Retired pope suggests St. John Paul II be called "the Great"

John Williams

00:20 sec | 6 months ago

Retired pope suggests St. John Paul II be called "the Great"

"And emeritus pope Benedict is honoring ours hoping that pope John Paul the second might be named to John Paul the great only two other popes have had such a distinction they were the fifth century pope Leo the first and sixth century pope pope Gregory he's making the sex sex suggestion on the centennial of John Paul the

Pope Benedict Pope John Paul Pope Gregory
Innovation and the Clich

LensWork

09:35 min | 6 months ago

Innovation and the Clich

"Years the editor of Lens Work Publishing Brooks Jensen as an introduction to this topic. Let me begin with a little bit of inside baseball as they say. Did describe how it is that these podcasts come about. Oftentimes they're sparks from something. I read or something someone says to me or an idea. Get an e mail. Sometimes it's ideas that just bubble up out of nowhere. As I've often mentioned this happens a lot in the shower for some reason so I actually have a divers where I can jot down ideas before I forget them while. I'm still in the shower. And that's what happened this morning at phrase occurred to me out of the clear. Blue Sky jotted down. I had no idea where it was going. But I've been thinking about it all day in it's led to a very interesting train of thought. I WANNA share with you. The phrase is as a pursuit in life. The creation of art seems to be a dance between innovation an execution dance between innovation and execution. And here's what occurred to me while I was thinking about this. I've been listening to two different kinds of music of late. I've for reasons I can't explain really gotten into the piano concertos of Rachmaninoff. And I've mentioned that these are available on Youtube Etcetera. Play by this brilliant Chinese Pena's named Eugene and by sheer coincidence. I've also discovered a composer. Young woman who is very talented at composing classical music. And she's been exploring lots of other genres of music are names Nari Soul and she has been discussing of late in some of her Youtube Videos John Cage and his work. With what's called a prepared piano. He would take an open up a piano and attach things to the strings. like paper clips and whatnot and and the piano would make very funny noises and oftentimes. He would not really play music. He would just play notes and things and very innovative very creative. Very modern very sort of avant garde out there and she's been exploring some of his ideas so I I had these two things that are clashing in my brain the extreme precision and accomplishment of the execution of Rachmaninoff by Eugene Dong and John Cage and is prepared piano as explored by Nari Soul. I think these two extremes are what got me thinking about the dance between innovation and execution. LemMe ask the question. This way in terms of piano music which is a higher form of accomplishment. The extreme innovation of John Cage thinking way outside the box not only thinking outside of meter and normal harmonies and progressions but thinking about outside normal instruments. And how they can be modified in played with talk about innovation way out there so we applaud that to some degree and then at the other end of the scale is you. Juwan and her unbelievably precise playing Rachmaninoff. And the the execution that she brings to his scores are not only extremely high in terms of technical proficiency but also in terms of emotional content. So that's a very high measure of success. But can't we agree that these two are at essentially completely opposite ends of the creative spectrum? Both forms of music can bring out emotions. Strong positive and negative is zoom and both of them can be seen to fall in some sort of competition or scale of things. And which do we appreciate more? Well obviously the reason I bring all this up is because I'm thinking about this relative to photography to what's more important in photography extreme innovation here. I'm thinking of the inventive work from the imagination of photographers like Jerry. You'll Zeman or John Paul Capela Negro or Huntington Witherell or dominic rouse or the incredibly precise execution on very traditional lines. And here on thinking of Bruce Marne bomb and John Sexton and and even people like Steve McCurry. Which do we value more? The key idea here seems to me to revolve around our expectations. If we go into a piece of artwork with the assumption that what we're looking for is incredibly talented sensitive execution and we see something like the prepared piano of John Cage or the innovative of Jerry yells men or someone we might say. Well that's not what I call a picture because it doesn't look like what we expect a fine art photograph to look like on the other hand if we go in assuming that what we value. Is something really innovative? Something we've never seen before then we can look at work like. Oh maybe even Louis Balsam Robert Atoms and Lee friedlander Gary Winner. Grand and say well. That's that's not what I call a picture. But wow is that fantastic. Because it doesn't look at all like we expect a fine art photograph to look. I think it's easy for us to appreciate the fact that there are two camps. It's perhaps even easier to fall into one of those two camps without even realizing it if we're a traditionalist we're gonNA look at the innovative and the Avant Garde is being weird and certainly when people look at oh do sharp or Mcgraw eat they might look at those paintings and say that's weird. That's you know. Because it doesn't look like Rembrandt Raphael. On the other hand if greet and duchamp painted like Rembrandt and Rafael. We might look at it and say well. That's boring because it's not innovative so therefore it doesn't seem to add much to the history of painting and so we're not interested in it. Well we can do exactly the same thing in photography. How do you evaluate work when you look at it? Do you evaluate it based on its execution and how well it conforms to the cliche or do you evaluate it based on its innovation and how different and unique it is. There is a position in the Middle. Which gives me pause for concern. Because if what we're trying to do is have the best of both worlds have innovation and traditional execution for example. Then the only thing that's left is what you point your camera at that is to say trying to find something that hasn't been photographed as artwork before and turn that into your bailiwick or your creative vision. In hopes that people would look at it and say beautifully done traditionally printed man fantastic execution of something. That's never been photographed before and isn't that Nice. Do you realize that that's exactly what happened? In the early history of painting this has been discussed by lots. And lots of people. Certainly not a unique idea. And certainly not my own but basically the idea's this for generations for literally. Hundreds of years painting was of the human figure primarily religious pictures descent from the cross kinds of things but usually what happened in those paintings as they had to be set in some kind of scene and so there would be introduced in the background. Some little bit of a tree or a little stream or a building or something and with enough passage of time and hundreds of years. Painters started saying to the figure move over. We're we're more interested in what's going on in the background than we are in the human figure or the story and landscape painting was born but when landscape painting was born that way there were probably lots and lots of people around who said well. That's not what I call a painting because whereas the people this is just a bunch trees that's not very interesting so it was innovative but it wasn't traditional and it certainly didn't measure up to the kinds of execution that were expected in a portrait of a person or the painting of a of a story seen or some such thing

John Cage Rachmaninoff Avant Garde Youtube Baseball Eugene Dong Lens Work Publishing Editor Jerry Nari Soul Brooks Jensen John Paul Capela Negro Juwan Steve Mccurry John Sexton Pena Dominic Rouse Bruce Marne Mcgraw
Man Who Bought $10,000 Worth of Toilet Paper and Hand Sanitizer Denied Refund

Tim Conway Jr.

00:23 sec | 7 months ago

Man Who Bought $10,000 Worth of Toilet Paper and Hand Sanitizer Denied Refund

"I'm in Australia who bought about ten thousand dollars worth of toilet paper and hand sanitizer is stuck with it a hundred and sixty packets of thirty two pack toilet paper and one hundred and fifty units of one latest Senate Taza grocery operator John Paul Drake says the man went to his store this week and wanted a refund J. gave the man the finger instead he says the man wanted to sell the stuff on eBay but his site was

Australia John Paul Drake J. Ebay Senate Taza
Progressives propose Medicare for the Uninsured

Medicare for All

05:53 min | 7 months ago

Progressives propose Medicare for the Uninsured

"Let's talk about the news of the week. The fight for having a relief. Bill that actually addresses what is going to be a massive health insurance crisis on So we had a bill introduced by Representative John Paul and Bernie Sanders in the Senate and then just Today actually as we're recording this this'll be yesterday as you're listening. Nancy Pelosi and House Leadership Democrat leadership in the House came out with a different proposal. We haven't seen language yet but this is clearly going to be the two kind of competing visions for next relief bill from the Democratic side so far icy silence from the Republican side. We don't even know if they're going support another relief bill at all Although I think the pressure is just going to become a hard to avoid once all of this unemployment leads to lack of insurance soon So the basic overview. Let's let why don't we start with the Sanders? John Paul Bill since that came out. I What they've proposed these of course are the lead sponsors of the Medicare for all legislation in the House and the Senate And this is not a medicare for all proposal. But it's kind of a stopgap proposal during the credit crisis. So what they've said is that Medicare should cover everyone who does not have health insurance And that Medicare will cover all co payments deductibles and cost sharing for everyone else. That's where people who have private insurance who have public insurance Like Medicaid or the Veterans Administration Or Medicare for that matter And that that will Last in effect until a vaccine is widely available to the public And the thinking of course is that we literally just cannot address this pandemic without everyone having access to healthcare Otherwise everyone who slipped through. The cracks of the healthcare system is going to be Is going to be unable to access. Care avoiding care when they need it and more likely to spread The contagion so Stephanie. What do you think about proposal? That came out of Japan. Senator Sanders Office. Well when I first heard about this proposal I thought it was perfect because it gives us a way to sort of expand public health insurance and it also fulfils the moderate concerns about allowing people to stay on their health insurance and all the stupid rationales for supporting a public option versus Medicare for all and that has always been the moderate case against Medicare for all right it's too disruptive maybe amid Medicare for all is in theory better but people are just so happy with their private insurance. Who Am I? Who are we to argue with them? And maybe they need a chance to try it out. And that's the impetus behind the whole public option. And you know they always say that. The of course. The goal is universal healthcare. But what the pathway. How do we get there? You know the details matter well. Here's your chance you know. Millions kicked off their insurance by no fault of their own at a time. When it's not actually safe to go outside but as far as I know no other members of Congress besides Sanders and Paul have supported this plan. Yeah I don't even know if it's been you know. They've barely rolled it out. It just came off the shelf. So we're us. The movement are going to have to build support for this bill. And you know it's interesting because this plan is kind of like some of the competing plans that you know. The centrists who were running for president were running on This doesn't resemble like the Biden plan but it is kind of what like Baidoa Rourke was was backing. It's a little bit like will cover everyone with the public plan. But we'll keep somehow the private health insurance in the workplace health insurance And I think the reason it's important to acknowledge why this is not a replacement for Medicare for all it needs to be. Temporary is the cost right. The the downside of doing it this way is that you don't get most of the savings that you get from Medicare for all system which really comes from like simplifying the system and you're cutting out all this administrative waste hospitals and doctors only have to deal with one pair they don't have to deal with fifty different payers. And that's how Medicare for all works by creating although savings you can afford to cover everyone else afford to have no co payments and deductibles. It is much more expensive to do it. This way to keep the private insurance companies in their keep all this complication waste in the system and expand coverage to everyone But I think you can do it temporarily as a stopgap measure And so I think it would be a good stepping-stone and people we literally cannot address this crisis with more and more people losing access to health insurance so I think it'll be an interesting fight. Yeah and it could arguably be even less expensive than giving subsidies to private health. Insurers who who made just end up pocketing. Well obviously we'll end up pocketing the profits but also will not be actually giving out any care outside of probably a lot of corona virus care because people aren't actually going to the doctor for anything else right now that's a fact that's not arguably that's it would definitely be cheaper to cover people through expanding medicare than it would be through throwing money at private

Medicare Bernie Sanders John Paul Bill Senate Nancy Pelosi John Paul Representative Japan Stephanie Congress Veterans Administration Baidoa Rourke President Trump
"john paul" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

01:32 min | 10 months ago

"john paul" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

"All right well. Next week's Bachelor Episode Looks Juicy. You know tears tears tears. The season long doc preview looks dramatic of course most dramatic season. Never I don't know they haven't been teasing it like that so possibly not. I have to say there's one little thing that we must discuss about the teaser before we leave. You seem very enthused by that Peter. Not only. Here's from Chris Harrison. Then like this big breaking news but then after that moment we see him lying on a bed with like ice on his head talking about how he feels like. He's GonNa Faint Do you think that has to do with the final rose. I have no idea but you deal I. I don't see again. We've learned that Pete has a hard time saying no to people May. Maybe maybe everyone's coming after just having a hard time handling the rejection Off All right. Well you guys send your thoughts about what you think Chris Harrison tells him at that podium and what he possibly might faint over. Email your thoughts to Ben and Ashley at Iheartmedia Dot Com and of course right up all your theories on the message boards. We read them all right. Love Love you guys. Thank you so much John. Follow me things joining us. This has been the Ben and Ashley Almost podcast with John Paul Jones. I've been Ashley Ashley I've been. John followed the obviously. I.

Ashley Ashley Chris Harrison John Paul Jones Ben Iheartmedia Dot Com Pete Peter
"john paul" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

01:32 min | 10 months ago

"john paul" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

"All right well. Next week's Bachelor Episode Looks Juicy. You know tears tears tears. The season long doc preview looks dramatic of course most dramatic season. Never I don't know they haven't been teasing it like that so possibly not. I have to say there's one little thing that we must discuss about the teaser before we leave. You seem very enthused by that Peter. Not only. Here's from Chris Harrison. Then like this big breaking news but then after that moment we see him lying on a bed with like ice on his head talking about how he feels like. He's GonNa Faint Do you think that has to do with the final rose. I have no idea but you deal I. I don't see again. We've learned that Pete has a hard time saying no to people May. Maybe maybe everyone's coming after just having a hard time handling the rejection Off All right. Well you guys send your thoughts about what you think Chris Harrison tells him at that podium and what he possibly might faint over. Email your thoughts to Ben and Ashley at Iheartmedia Dot Com and of course right up all your theories on the message boards. We read them all right. Love Love you guys. Thank you so much John. Follow me things joining us. This has been the Ben and Ashley Almost podcast with John Paul Jones. I've been Ashley Ashley I've been. John followed the obviously. I.

Ashley Ashley Chris Harrison John Paul Jones Ben Iheartmedia Dot Com Pete Peter
"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

14:39 min | 1 year ago

"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Visiting Fetzer Dot Org I'm Krista Tippett up next my unedited conversation with artistic conflict transformer John Paul let Iraq and conflict Geo tag fourteen forty days seven high coups numbered one stop sit light wine bread tender sharbat shallowness braided as we are who proximate to pain experiential divides demand are fierce love three wild and unruly quiet enough to be held silence between words number four today wideawake America patients you America patience you spoke and blessed me fife when shards flying flea supple- hearts forests NC's hold space for babies.

Fetzer Dot Org Krista Tippett John Paul Iraq America NC fourteen forty days
"john paul" Discussed on Catholic Culture Audiobooks

Catholic Culture Audiobooks

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"john paul" Discussed on Catholic Culture Audiobooks

"There are perhaps relatively few people throughout history who have had a letter addressed to them from pope much less a saint with today's reading the artists in our audience can take note on Easter Sunday nineteen ninety nine Saint John Paul the second penned a letter addressed to them and as if his being a pope and a saint weren't off of credential Carava Teela as he was known prior to his election to the papacy was an artist himself a poet playwright and an actor often overlooked for his many contributions elsewhere with letter to artists however it seems clear to me that Saint John Paul remained an artist at heart to the and of his life and this letter holds interest not just for artists but for the whole Church as Saint John Paul points out the church needs artists end artists need the church if you're an artist yourself or if you have an artist in your life or simply appreciate the many contributions that artists make to culture and to the church than this letter is well worth listening to I should also note that we've chosen to abridge this letter somewhat slow lately throughout the letter Saint John Paul includes many examples sometimes entire lists for each of the artistic periods to which he alludes and wile we've included this art history overview we've chosen to include only a few of these specific examples given this is perhaps most notable on the on humanism and the renaissance where we've forgotten a rather lengthy explication of some of the Vatican's artistic treasures the full text of this letter can be found at the Vatican website linked to missile episodes.

Saint John Paul Carava Teela
"john paul" Discussed on Hostage

Hostage

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"john paul" Discussed on Hostage

"This is hostage apar- podcast original every week. We tell the stories behind the most captivating hostage situations and the people inside them. We'll also cover the psychological psychological tactics used in kidnapping situations and with the human brain does when held captive I'm Irma Blanco and corduroy you can find episodes episodes of hostage and all other park has originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream hostage for free on spotify just open the APP and type hostage in the search bar par cast. We're grateful for you our listeners you allow us to do it. We love so let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening. It really does help. This is our final episode on the kidnapping of sixteen year old oil heir j Paul Getty the third on July rely ten nine thousand nine hundred seventy three at the end of a night out in Rome. The teenaged partygoer was grabbed by members of the Collaboration Crime Organization. Shen known as the in-drug Etta and driven into the rugged mountains of southern Italy days before anyone would take Paul's disappearance seriously slate even after the Ndrangheta demanded seventeen million dollars in ransom in the following months as negotiations dragged on Paul found himself at the mercy of brutal and desperate men willing to do anything to get their pay out last week. We got to know the young John John Paul Getty the third and the famously wealthy getty family we looked the turbulent socio political situation in Italy in the late sixties and early seventies and the end genres rise to prominence this week follow Paul's months of captivity in the collaboration mountains. We'll take a look look at the different players involved in negotiations examine why the kidnapping was initially believed to be a hoax and dig into the media circus that surrounded the case.

Paul Getty kidnapping John John Paul Getty Italy facebook Irma Blanco spotify Collaboration Crime Organizati Rome Shen Instagram Etta Ndrangheta seventeen million dollars sixteen year
"john paul" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"john paul" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"How about this Weekend College Games football wise and the PRO Games. What do you like what don't you like. Where would you stay away. What would you take a look at sure so are we. I kind of like the raiders colts matchup this weekend and it's free for all years ago. Check that one out there bike. We've he's got the colts as a three-star play which may fairly confident and online that line is currently at six and a half our in house models. He's at nine and a half game so we think the coach it should be favored by more than they actually are so I would consider taking the colts and at home against the raiders personally our model side. I really liked that. West Coast Team in Oakland implying an early game on the East Coast or eastern time that usually doesn't end ball for the West Coast team in terms of college a little one of the ACC t match ups that I kind of like our model likes to DC versus wake you've got Boston. College is a six and a half point dog. I think that's an overreaction to their loss against Kansas personally. I think if they won that game design is way different so I think this is kind of an over correction and our model agrees with that too That's a six point underdog. We we have that more like it. Come game and so if you can get six points on that which we think we can. I'm going to be taken. BC So walked into the offices of Bet Q. Al All do I do. I have just a bunch of brainiacs going through like all kinds of algorithms to make sure that they're getting the right bed out. I have basically you're going to find the scientist and a bunch of working on the APP and then yeah that's that's a great way to the reigning accident..

colts raiders West Coast Team East Coast Bet scientist Kansas Oakland DC Boston ACC
"john paul" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"john paul" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"Welcome back to this episode of Reality Life With Casey. Hope that you guys are having a great week that you I would agree weekend. I had a million sports practices and as you've probably seen my instagram page one of my daughters I usually call my one child gives thirty percent but this one probably gives twenty percent and she barely kicked the ball to soccer game so she might not be Mia Hamm. I'll just put it that way. I've been trying to to catch up on a bunch of different shows. I need to get back into love after lockup and I had a conversation with Steve Stop this weekend. We've decided we're going to dip in and watch an episode and we are going to let you know what we think. Ninety Day fiance a half to say guys. I feel like it's jumping the shark. I don't think that this pillow talk show is funny or interesting because they see diabolical people like Colt with his gross t-shirts drinking juice boxes and he thinks he's a superstar of the world and I'm afraid that we've made them that away. At least I'm not but the people that watch the show and get crazy about ninety day fiance. I feel like we're creating monsters so I don't know if I can watch it because it it just makes me grossed out and then I also read an article about ninety day fiance the other way and it seems like Jenny and sumit had ulterior motives I saw there's a new documentary on HBO that just came out called in the shadow of the towers about the students that had started their day out of school right it outside the World Trade Center blocks from the World Trade Center and it offers a unique eyewitness perspective on that tragic day and the aftermath from the former students so that's on HBO. It's called in the shadow of the towers and I will be watching that we had the season premiere of dancing with the stars and Christi Brinkley's already out and her daughter just conveniently jumps in now I'm like is this really a setup because I feel like she's been trying to make Taylor Cook a thing and this seems like a convenient way to get her on the show because they probably like ooh Christie Brinkley she fits that target area of audience and now her daughter's on and now we're going to be convinced that she should be the next superstar of the world and I have crisper Joola who's going to be reviewing that show at the end of the week this episode in an interview with John Paul Jones who I have such an affinity for I think he is absolutely funny. On Tele Television he he so matter-of-fact and he's really smart which differentiate too in French sheets himself with some of the other cast members on that show like you you get the sense that he actually reads books and like reads newspapers and knows what's going on in the world so I was really excited to catch up with him and to learn about what life has been. He's been on the show and then he gave me some exclusive information about his love life post show which I know that you will be very interested in hearing so here's my episode or my interview with John. Paul Jones John Paul Jones appeared appeared on the handle brown season of the Bachelorette and has been in my opinion these star of Bachelor in Paradise this Summer Mer John Paul Jones has become a dear friend. Dare I say could be a family member at some point I feel like I know him extremely well. I've had phone conversations with his father. Who is a delight and I am happy to tell you I I of tracked him down John Paul Welcome to the show? Thanks so much for having me really excited to be here the answer some questions that you might have I I have to say I knew watching the show that you might people and I did a quick. did did quick Internet research and found out that you went to Catholic University of America. I need to point out to those that are not aware that I am a graduate of Trinity College College which is across the street from Catholic and literally spend I lived in the cloisters apartments which for those that are not aware because probably wild no is a shithole apartment complex on Michigan Avenue in Washington. DC It did you live there. No I didn't but I had friends there. They always had issues with their stuff getting stolen and it was always smelly a not not a good deal but you know the Assad was that you could drink drink over their drinking was banned on campus so it's kind of how it became game Stamos a Catholic civil all four years of Catholic or did you ever move off camp best yeah the first two years on campus in that moved into the swint house. my senior year I was friends with guys and the head an extra room in their so high looks luck. Luckily addicts the swim housing is his a lot in there is no place more fun than DC now when I was there which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty two at this point. It feels feels like it are are calling. I'm just kidding. Our College Bart was the Irish Times on Capitol. Hill is my understanding that that was not your college bar. Where did you you guys go? Yeah we went to Adams Morgan. there was a bar called Shenanigans that had an all you drank open bars or ten dollars between nine and eleven out at night yeah it was it was awesome. It was almost too good to be true so you just have to fork out what five dollars for the Uber You'd spend a total of twenty boss to go out have a good time in DC it was it was a lot of fun. I really enjoyed Mina Catholic end the Let's go back you are not from. DC tell everybody where you're from. Yeah balanced all over the place several Berlin Oregon. I lived there for about four months when I was an infant and then moved to taxes for two years and then thereafter moved to Wisconsin a more specifically lived in walkie for about thirteen years than lived in Green Bay for about five years and a second semester senior year of high go transferred schools to Kansas because you know we just Kinda followed my dad's career right and the spent one semester of high school school in Kansas in once a Catholic after that in DC so from all over the place I live in working right outside of DC right now in town called Lanham well. Now people need to know that your father is an angel wing DUB from heaven. He is the nicest person Outta here he he he really is he really is. Your parents are still married and they have how many children answer you got the advise of us I just kind of grew up yeah yeah and you know it's like it's great your Your kids don't know it now. There might be a little bit embarrassed when they go public to have a bunch of siblings around the friends but trust me later life. They're going to appreciate the that the Hugh you and your husband decided to have a family I mean it's just great you know your siblings always have your back and you know we've moved into adulthood. Just become your best friends. It's it's really awesome a brother and then you have three sisters and and where in the number of kids what are you yes so let's see how old is bill bill side believe bill. Is those twenty nine. Mary is twenty seven. I'm twenty four Judy. It is twenty one into Jili is nineteen. Year parents named a twenty year old Judy Yeah. It's it's a pretty common name but leave you met judy. You'd understand click talk. There's a little bit ago yeah. You're definitely Ju- Shell tell me how in the world this Catholic University graduate from a family of five ends up on on the bachelorette yeah so it's a good question I suppose well i Salih never really invested anytime in watching the show. I really don't watch a lot of TV but my sisters are both my sisters. My cousins are huge fans so the totally about a casting taken place in Baltimore in you know I was about a year and a half out of college and you either the prospect of it sounded like a lot of fun. You know it just I mean why not you know I I had a few quick relationships at a college. Nothing nothing serious. I had really I retired you know sort of mine. I know my dating life and it just seemed like a great opportunity to potentially actually meet someone and you know it's not just would have been a fun all-round experienced. I just walked into this casino in Baltimore. Basically answer a few questions in front of a camera just kept getting called back and eventually flew out to L. A. and that was the producers and they gave me the roll on the bachelorette innings. It was a lot of fun. It's super glad how long did it take you to come up with your whatever you said when you got out of the Limo Oh man yeah that was sort of brainstormed a lot of different ideas and I got. I got me some input some people all in that what I what I believe. I said Hi my name's John Paul Jones friends. Call Me John Paul Jones so you can call me. John Paul Jones It was just seemed like a really the riskless easy thing to do in the you know. I think people liked it. How into Hannah were you like at? I I really sweet Jesus girl. Is it or were you like a normal person thought I need to get to know this person before I profess my undying love to her yeah so I knew decent bid about Hannah before the Bachelorettes as I watched the bachelor because I knew I could be dating one of these girls his while trying to get a sense for them. I don't know I just couldn't really see a US clicking and I I was open to a romantic connection but you know she would say the same thing that there was was no chemistry there but the she was a superfund girl we had a crate. We each had a great time in the you know. She kept me around long. I'm not meeting on Paradise Show. I'm super grateful for meeting. Anna Brown the girls of the contestants that were on the bachelor that season and you're watching that through the lens of one of these girls I might be dating issue. No should this all pan out is was there one of the girls that you thought now that one I'm might have something in you know some sort of connection with her and could see myself dating yeah I was definitely definitely hoping would have been the Bachelorette because I knew that she and I had similar values and I just think you know that had the highest probability of success had she been the Bachelorette so I've been hoping for her but you know same time you never know the Bachelorette I was expecting Teixeira Hannidy or Cassie to be the bachelorette granted. I don't read the spoilers on that. She a lot of cold but I was I was I was prepared for us and now you're off the show you get off the show and do you feel like it once. It starts airing what the heck just happened in my life. Are Oh you getting direct messages from all over the place or people super into you or was it relatively quiet after the Bachelorette yeah let's see for the Let's see so I headed us. I saw thanks three episodes before flying on to go do Paradise Paradise it was relatively quiet. You know I don't know I I think I before Paradise Ahead about twenty thousand followers in the you know the direct messages came in and there was all positive and you don't really know bachelor nations group of people you know they just you know I was is overwhelmed by everyone's missing. I was really embarrassed to be honest entrance of that Oh gosh betrays this Weirdo and everyone's been hey yeah. I don't know I had no idea what to expect. Claim that they played that quirky music and off gas it was it was cringe worthy. You know watching my entrance. can't tell you that it was it was brutal but yeah no the Everything was great. where people from college like what what are you doing on the Bachelor Bachelorette Yeah but again Kinda gone into college the expectation of US meeting my wife and that impact your this is what kills me about Catholic University students..

John Paul Jones Judy Yeah DC Catholic University of America US Bachelorette John Paul soccer Baltimore HBO Mia Hamm Christie Brinkley Casey Trinity College College Paul Jones Steve Irish Times World Trade Center John bill bill
"john paul" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"john paul" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Second Amendment he was ninety seven years old at the time but John Paul Stevens wins mind and his words were still razor-sharp join us now by phone C. N. N. legal analyst and Supreme Court Biographer Joan Bisque Biscuit Pick Joan you know the history. The court has as well as anyone. Let's talk about John Paul. L. Stevens is legacy. You know Anderson just what Pam said right now about how razor-sharp he was. I just talked to him about a month ago. He just finished his latest book and he still wanted to be so much a part of the dialogue dialogue in America and I think one thing he did was offer exhibit A. to the kind of <hes> promise that Chief Justice John Roberts has said there are no such thing as oh Baba judges or trump on judges because and point the public Gerald Ford in one thousand nine hundred seventy five and he certainly couldn't have been predicted as someone who voted along the Republican Party lines he offered such a moderate to liberal leaning view at the end of his life. He wanted to ensure a greater protections for free speech. Although he really thought free speech <hes> he really fought conservative effort to lift regulation of campaign finance he continued to argue for <hes> <hes> narrower gun rights he opposed the Supreme Court's ruling broadening broadening the ability to <hes> have gun ownership rather than regulation so across the board more than thirty years influencing all areas of American life <hes> just an extraordinary legacy again the third longest serving a Supreme Court Justice Joan cubic appreciate it Chris. We'll have more on the life and the legacy of justice Stevens News continues one and handed over crystal Cuomo prime-time Chris. I am Bill Kristol feeling confused about politics..

Supreme Court John Paul Stevens Pam Justice Joan justice Stevens News Chief Justice John Roberts Joan Bisque John Paul Bill Kristol Gerald Ford Chris analyst Republican Party crystal Cuomo Anderson America ninety seven years thirty years
"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So john paul how how would you i wonder i know about your mennonite background and how that flowed into what you became that just in this moment what is there something in your spiritual spiritual background of your life also perhaps just what is your vocation that is especially present to you well yeah i suppose with time and exposure to a lot of these situations that have that deep level of darkness in finding ways to seek the light you you open up we i found that to be true for me you opened up to any of the sources that began to shed light whether it's from the daily conversation all the way up to you know i sometimes consider myself we heard a bit this morning you know a mennonite who writes hi coups studies contemporary of buddhism loves sufism and listens carefully for the divine in the every day because it's miraculously so sometimes the formal structures and shapes that i grew up with i i wanna always take a sense of gratitude in deep appreciation for having had a caring loving community that may community serious and i also don't wanna feel bound by boundaries that sometimes our communities can create i'm interested in boundary lous identity so how do you how do you find that meaningful we that is expansive and that's sometimes understood and sometimes not well understood by those who find more meaning and keeping the gates of bit more closed so it's a ongoing.

john paul
"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Seen the culture acknowledged their existence and their struggles and anyway he was able to come speak to her parents specifically through this movie about supporting her wish to go to college and i could not have imagined are scripted that i would be alive in a moment where there is this ripple in our space and time where artists and art and culture are so being called to step up and and speak from an activist heart and i feel like i was born for this moment to tip it and this is on being today with america ferrera and john paul rock john pawlak one of the things you learned as a professional peace builder i mean i think you would say that just huge catharsis and deepening in your your art and practice a peace building was understanding the arts even when we use that language it sounds like something in a box and also that we also professionalize that but what i got from you is you in being proximate to that kind of conflict on suffering understood that it's so often true that our deepest pain in the deepest things we have to reckon with and resolve lion a place that words and analysis don't touch and that art the all the arts and just our capacity to sing is as a sensual as any tool or any conversation absolutely well i have this running question i've been struggling with is used to write a lot of poetry when i was younger and then when i came into my formal phd studies i had a fifteen year hiatus and i always wondered what was it about becoming professional took the poetry outta me and coming back to it what i sculptured mother things is a lot a lot of what you have a capacity trained to do which are very important things but it's based quite often analysis and of course the notion of analysis you we know by breaking things apart and some former fashion and analysis in and of itself doesn't have the heart to put things back together so where where where do we find the capacity to think in ways that hold something has a wider hole but it's not entirely visible because it's gotten so fragmented and.

america ferrera john paul fifteen year
"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So john paul how how would you i wonder about your mennonite background how that flowed into what you became just in this moment what is there something in your spiritual spiritual background of your life also perhaps just what is your vocation that is especially present to you bureau's pose with time and exposure to a lot of these situations that have that deep level of darkness and finding ways to seek the light you open up i found that to be true for me you opened up to any of the sources that began to shed light whether it's from the daily conversation all the way up to you know i sometimes consider myself a mennonite who writes hi crews studies contemporary of buddhism who loves sufism and listens carefully for the divine in the every day because it's miraculous so sometimes the formal structures and shapes that i grew up with i wanna always take a sense of gratitude in deep appreciation for having had a caring loving community that may community serious and i also don't wanna feel bound by boundaries that sometimes our communities can create i'm interested in boundary lous identity and so how do you how do you find that meaningful we that is expansive and that's sometimes understood and sometimes not well understood by those who find more meaning and keeping the gates of bit more closed so it's an ongoing love affair with my own community and beyond do have turbulence.

john paul
"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"john paul" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"From john paul i've recently picked up this phase social courage a really love that phrase us what i want to have and i want us to share with each other and then we have america ferrera who is on some of our very present american frontlines of danger and reckoning this call to social courage do we do we claim this or not i think i another phrase i've been using lately social artistry social arts and i feel like you also are a bare of that like a teacher of that just by virtue of being yourself you end up in yourself grappling with a lot of the pain and fear and divisions and challenges that mark this american moment around women immigration race socio economic wellbeing one thing you've said about yourself i am the daughter of immigrants who worked several jobs to keep food on the table and the lights on and by the way we still found joy in life we still loved people and had relationships and breakup something john paul has said about himself i have traveled most of the globe on the backs of people whose lives are held together by the wars they fight so what we have here is in artistic conflict transformer and a conflict transforming artists america i wonder how you would start to talk about the religious and spiritual background of your life of your childhood whatever those words mean for you i love that really have waited so long and last night thought oh god i don't have an answer.

john paul america
"john paul" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"john paul" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Yes crashed john paul bad nick cave now dan one oh boy the path no oh god two so upi ankara but does the the old sean in may paul.

john paul