17 Burst results for "John Norberg"

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I was that interview do space historian John Norberg there were a lot of anti American feelings in Europe at that time because of the Vietnam War but for the time when Apollo eleven was landing on the moon America everyone loved America the United States share that mission with the world we I was in summer camp like other people I remember that moment astronaut Dr David wolf and I hope that the younger people today yeah to have a similarly inspiring moment that ignites four by four eighteen PM okay and then okay global over the eagles descended to the moon's surface is almost over and over and contact they were in the all the baby is one of the get going going clear what the we copy on the ground you got a bunch of guys about to turn blue will bring them again I go on the people in Houston controlling the flight reading again relieved and excited that the spacecraft has made it Armstrong and Aldrin make observations before the eventual first walk on the moon by relatively level plain credited with the number crater the the the five to fifty foot read it and from region fall twenty thirty feet I would go yeah band I'd really love throughout my over the targeted landing area it was later Dan large numbers of the world probably from many larger than five or ten thirty five Lucy.

John Norberg Europe America Dr David wolf eagles Houston Armstrong Aldrin Lucy United States Dan
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Was their spacecraft and what they they did it was not going to fail and they were as the time grew closer for the three moon mission astronauts to board their craft and make a journey to where no man or woman had ever been Neil Armstrong buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins were rock and roll we all got our pictures in the paper on the on the news they were celeb's in much the same way that Gus Grissom and the original mercury astronauts and test pilots had been media Darling she all the letters people tend to produce historian John Norberg on Armstrong's fan mail when no one knew that he did this and they're now available in our archives along with many many other items is near Neil donated to Armstrong was from Wapakoneta Ohio he was the second person in his family to go to college and he chose Purdue where he began classes at age seventeen many of my friends and classmates went on to become superb engineers designers and managers throughout the entire American aerospace industry and more than two score Purdue alumni going on to fly you in the earth's atmosphere explore the new frontier he was smart but the grades weren't what they could have been at first Armstrong's time in the navy which has a pilot he flew seventy eight missions over Korea he resigned his commission in nineteen sixty after being selected for the man in space soonest program by NASA he was a test pilot at Edwards Air Force base where he set records and was known for both his piloting and engineering skills a certain that the space race was a diversion which we've entered the war nevertheless once a diversion it was so intense would allow both sides to take the high road with the objectives of science and learning an exploration Armstrong would need those skills to become the first man on the moon and it almost is correct it got off on time coming up fifty five seconds five seconds until they go on their own power the man has been oppressing Neil Armstrong saying that everything is smooth power transferred complete and we've got forty second gets real for Neil Armstrong and NASA where they'll be in the the ultimate test of skill you're listening to from for two to the living close to.

Michael Collins Gus Grissom John Norberg Wapakoneta Ohio Purdue navy Korea NASA Neil Armstrong Edwards Air Force
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I was that interview do space historian John Norberg there were a lot of anti American feelings in Europe at that time because of the Vietnam War but for the time when Apollo eleven was landing on the moon America everyone loved America the United States share that mission with the world yeah I was in summer camp like other people I remember that moment astronaut Dr David Wilson I hope that the younger people today yeah to have similarly inspiring moment it ignites passion for science four eighteen PM. eight hundred. okay global follow the villain command over the eagles descended to the moon's surface is almost over. contact they were. in the. the angle of one of the. going going quality we copy on the ground we got a bunch of guys about to turn blue would bring that again I go on. the people in Houston controlling the flight reading again relieved and excited that the spacecraft has made it Armstrong and Aldrin make observations before the eventual first walk on the moon relatively level plain credited with the number the the five to fifty four. and in that region the fall twenty thirty feet I would go. really well my over the the. creator Dan large numbers of rocks that were probably from many larger than five or ten thirty five. I.

Aldrin eagles America John Norberg Armstrong Dr David Wilson United States Europe Dan large Houston twenty thirty feet
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Ann summer jam in Michigan and we gathered up in a bar doctor David wolf was just thirteen yeah little black and white TV produce space historian John Norberg is in Europe and is found a cafe in French to watch and we we watch it on TV it was coming on and frankly the only Americans the place they were tossing a French are translating for it was incredible incredible night that I'll never forget Armstrong informs Houston that the original target landing site had been too rough and that he had to fly by the seat of his pants to find a new site before shutting down that may have been like a very long final the the more they can apply them to a football field all the old guard where a large number of big boulders and rocks for about that one of the diameter around it now the preparations to take off again and man Wilson we walk on the surface I'd like to take this opportunity and every month let me again however wherever they may be was altered speaks to nearly six hundred million for a moment contemplating the events of the past here are they give banks and is our own way I'm going to Babel during.

Michigan David wolf John Norberg Europe Houston Wilson French Armstrong football
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Was in summer jam in Michigan and we gathered up in a bar doctor David wolf was just thirteen yeah around this little black and white TV produce space historian John Norberg is in Europe and is found a cafe in French to watch and we we watch it on TV it was coming on and frankly the only Americans will place they were tossing a French are translating for it was incredible incredible night that I will never forget Armstrong informs Houston that the original target landing site had been too rough and that he had to fly by the seat of his pants to find a new site before shutting down like a very long final the the more they can apply them to a football field football bill five where a large number of big boulders and loud for about that one of your greater diameter now the preparations to take off again and man will soon we walk on the surface and every month the landing and however wherever they may be solved and speaks to nearly six hundred million contemplating the events of the past you are they give banks and is our own way your credibility baseball Girondin privately took communion dead silence you don't hear hundred thirteen year olds dead silence too often but you could hear a pin drop as we listen to Neil Armstrong's more that.

Michigan David wolf John Norberg Europe Houston Neil Armstrong French football hundred thirteen year
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Nine I was that interview do space historian John Norberg there were a lot of anti American feelings in Europe at that time because of the more but for the time when Apollo eleven was landing on the moon America everyone loved America the United States share that mission with the world yeah I was in summer camp like other people I remember that moment astronaut Dr David wolf and I hope that the younger people today yeah to have a similarly inspiring moment it ignites passion for science four eighteen PM okay I thank them okay Goebbels although the villain command over the eagles descended to the moon's surface is almost over thirteen of them contact me or can in the good going going quality we cannot be on the ground you got a bunch of guys about to turn blue it brings it again I go on the people in Houston controlling the flight reading again relieved and excited that the spacecraft has made it Armstrong and Aldrin make observations before the eventual first walk on the moon relatively level plain credited with the number the the the five to fifty four for that reason and from region fall twenty thirty feet I would go yeah really well my over the get it by the very I was later Dan large numbers of rocks that were probably from many larger than five or ten thirty five I.

John Norberg Europe America Dr David wolf Goebbels eagles Houston Armstrong Aldrin United States Dan twenty thirty feet
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The school of engineering World War two had a dream about becoming a neighbor lady Allen a file I want to do what they were doing at midway during the war and I stuck with that dream and my dad she might be known to me was for me to get that education he never had a chance to get certain in an interview with fox business channel explains the spirit of the moon mission we didn't go to the mall alone we had every every worker in a country who put a nut and bolt piece of wire and a spacecraft that was their spacecraft and what they they did it was not going to fail and they were as the time grew closer for the three moon mission astronauts to board their craft and make a journey to where no man or woman had ever been Neil Armstrong buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins were rock and roll we all got our pictures in the paper on the line and then they were celeb's in much the same way that Gus Grissom and the original mercury astronauts and test had been media Darling she all the letters people search for do historian John Norberg on Armstrong's fan mail no one knew that he did this and they are now available in our archives along with many many other items is near Neil donated Armstrong was from Wapakoneta Ohio he was the second person in his family to go to college and he chose Purdue where he began classes at age seventeen many of my friends and classmates went on to become superb article engineers designers and managers throughout the entire American aerospace industry and more than two score Purdue alumni have gone on to fly beyond the earth's atmosphere and explore the new frontier he was smart but the grades weren't what they could have been at first Armstrong's time in the navy which has a pilot he flew seventy eight missions over Korea he resigned his commission in nineteen sixty after being selected for the man in space soonest program by NASA he was a test pilot at Edwards Air Force base where he set records and was known for both his piloting and engineering skills a certain but the space race was a diversion which we've entered the war nevertheless once a diversion it was that would allow both sides to take the high road with the objectives of science and learning an exploration Armstrong would need those skills to become the first man on the moon in I record almost as Dracula got off on time coming up fifty five seconds five seconds until they go on their own power the numbers in Neil Armstrong saying that everything is smooth power transfer complete and we've got forty second gets real for Neil Armstrong and NASA come on the ultimate test of skill the fact that you're listening to from for two to the what's now rating a tax and shipping oil prices he's using tears in this crisis what's next what's next Russia I have information I think I've taken impeachment wanting for the laughable what's history would be historic making his aides what's happening here at the top and bottom of the hour what you want violence in south bend once you know the fact is what matters ninety three just because it's called higher education doesn't mean high tuition costs have to be the norm Strayer university we have the radical opinion that education should be affordable with our graduation fund you can earn up to twenty.

lady Allen school of engineering World Wa fifty five seconds five seconds forty second
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Was back at the interview do space historian John Norberg there were a lot of anti American feelings in Europe at that time because of the more but for the time when Apollo eleven was landing on the moon America everyone loved America the United States share that mission with the worldly I was summer care like other people I remember that moment astronaut Dr David wolf and I hope that the younger people today yeah to have a similarly inspiring moment it ignites passion for science for eighteen okay okay global the eagles descended to the moon's surface is almost over contact they were in the one of one of the good point crying quote the we cannot be on the ground you got a bunch of guys about to turn blue it brings in again I go on the people in Houston controlling the flight reading again relieved and excited that the spacecraft has made it Armstrong and Aldrin make observations before the eventual first walk on the moon relatively level plain credited with the number our creator the the the five to fifty foot variety and from region fall twenty thirty feet I would go really well my over the targeted by the merry I was greater than large numbers of rocks that were probably from many larger than five or ten thirty five Lucy.

John Norberg Europe America Dr David wolf eagles Houston Armstrong Aldrin Lucy United States twenty thirty feet fifty foot
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Sixty nine I was that interview do space historian John Norberg there were a lot of anti American feelings in Europe at that time because of the more but for the time when Apollo eleven was landing on the moon America everyone loved America the United States share that mission with the world I was in summer camp like other people I remember that moment astronaut Dr David Wilson I hope that the younger people today yeah to have a similarly inspiring moment it ignites their passion for science four eighteen PM okay okay global thought of the villain command over the eagles to send it to the moon surface is almost over contact me or can get down in the the goal of one of the good going going quality we copy on the ground you got a bunch of guys about to turn blue will bring them again I go on the people in Houston controlling the flight reading again relieved and excited that the spacecraft has made it Armstrong and Aldrin make observations before the eventual first walk on the moon by relatively level plain credited with the a large number of the the the five to fifty foot varieties and fall twenty thirty feet I would go yeah really well my over the the targeted landing area it was later Dan large numbers of probably from many larger than five or ten thirty five Lucy.

John Norberg Europe America Dr David Wilson eagles Houston Armstrong Aldrin Lucy United States Dan twenty thirty feet fifty foot
"john norberg" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on KTRH

"Harris break it all down along with the storm team forecast from Doug hammer for news four I did for we'll be on and working for you. Tom. Houston. Sounds good everywhere. Okay. Google play KTAR H and iheartradio. Our guest is John Norberg. Have you ever been to an Abba concert? No. That was before my time is Abba the biggest entertainment export out of Sweden. I think so I think you would have to say that even though recently for the younger generation, we do have up itchy and a surveys. Yeah. Mike, right. But I'm fond of Abba. And I I like I love what they did. And they stopped at the right moment in time to become legends as well. We're also actually engaged a little bit in politics their managers sticking under some he he actually was part of a music. Golic creative music all games the socialization of business. Oh, early nineteen eighties and above participated because this was the moment in time when basically the whole pop cultural scene and well. Authors, directors musicians also that no this. This does not work. You're ruining the kind of freedom and creativity that Sweden I have a kinda Abba moment. It's not as good as your under read. But I was at a Starbucks about a month ago and for years whenever I go to a Starbucks. If you know, they take your name, I will give my name as Rasputin, but my wife says rospa team the way the way Abbas Rah Rah Rah aspertain lover of the Russian plane. And so I always give the name then they can't. It's not always students of history that are working Starbucks barista. So instead what I did is I spelled it out for her R O S dash oh dash t in. So she had to say Ross Putin. And so she calls out the name when it's my turn. But she says it real loud because we're in the in the food court area at a Galleria mall, and she says respiratory chain. Like next coffee and the lady behind me says lover of the Russian Queen. And I just felt this is the best day ever. Somebody stupid joke. I've been doing for five years. They've finally got it finally stopped doing it. Yes. So let me ask you this. When you look at the change that occurred. It strikes me that most economies trend toward socialism until there is some major moment that causes a crash, and whether that was the Italians or the Germans are we've seen this a number of times, particularly with the Scandinavian mindset, how did it move toward liberalization. And again for those just tuned in by liberalisation. I mean, more libertarian more open. How did it move in that direction because that's rare that that happens? Yeah. Exactly. The Swedish experience came creeping in in small steps a little bit more taxes and more benefits here a little bit more regulation there that's normal trajectory that's often. What happens because you've got everybody wants more. And it's never enough, and it's difficult to to stop this unless you have a theory principal counter reaction to it. What happens we was part and overreach by the left. So they they did it too much. They began to loose popularity because we had this era when the entrepreneurs and the the stars left Sweden and people began to think of that there's something bad going wrong here. But then things really came to my blow in the early nineteen nineties, and what happened then was not for a long time. The Swedish economy had lagged behind other countries. We used to be the fourth richest country on the planet. Now, we were the richest country on the planet. We had not created one single job not single net job in the private sector forty years by then. Though, the population had grown by two million people. So something bad was going on. The socialist empowered try to deal with it by basically printing money and borrowing so it was a debt than inflation fuelled boom in the late day. Thank you. And that all collapsed in one thousand nine hundred it collapsed in a dramatic way to the extent that the rest of the world didn't think we would be able to pay its debts. We were running out of money literally. And for time for a brief period of time. Central Bank had to institute an interest rate at five hundred percent five hundred percent. And by that time, everybody realized that something is seriously gone wrong with the Swedish economy, and then there was a wide consensus. We're going to have to dismantle this experiment that turned out this badly. Yeah. Because it strikes me that typically what socialist governments do as things get worse is they drive deeper into the same pattern that that brought them to that point. Our guest is Johann Norberg the.

Sweden Starbucks Mike John Norberg Johann Norberg Google Abbas Rah Houston Doug hammer Tom Harris Ross Putin Galleria mall Golic Rasputin principal five hundred percent forty years
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:22 min | 3 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Ninety three WIBC. It is Terry. Stacey. I man this story of Nasr's mission to land a man on the moon focusing on Neil Armstrong. It opens this weekend Armstrong, as you all know, graduated from Purdue here to talk about Neil Armstrong is produced space historian, John Norberg, John. Hello, what pleasure to meet you? Is pleasure. Talking to you. How long have you been produced space historian? I guess, you know, since I wrote the book and in two thousand three wings of their dreams. I'm really I started in Lafayette with the Lafayette journal here in one thousand nine hundred seventy two I went to Peru in two thousand the first one I met Neil, hiking seventy nine while I was a reporter for the journal and courier the tenth anniversary of the moon landing that time was at the university of Cincinnati. And I asked for an interview along was probably two million other reporters way more than he could handle. Of course, he and I just that everybody turned down and said he regrets. He can't handle all requests. Then they came back and said that he is decided to invite a limited number of borders to a small press conference at the university nearly near tenth anniversary any invited me. And the only reason he invited me was because journal and courier is produced hometown newspaper. So that was a wonderful opportunity in a moment. I'll never forget I asked what that press conference if he was happy with his statement. That's what step for man one giant leap for mankind. And the interesting thing that is that important thing that I said that day asked him, what was the important thing. He said the important thing. I said was the eagles landed he said, it was really tough to land that lunar lunar Lander walking in the moon with just a piece of cake. He believes he only had a fifty fifty chance of succeeding in that landing. And he saw those guys were just thought. Wow. What an opportunity you had to meet him was that the only time that you ever spent with him. When I when I started at Purdue had the opportunity to various times, escorted when he came to campus became in food for when he came through in for the dedication was building. He and his family up at the airport took him to the to the union times been with my campus. I had the opportunity interview in personally about the mood landing which is something. He didn't do very often. When you're you're right there with him. And you think this is the man that was the first man that landed on the moon. You must have a million questions. Oh, yes. You know, you you can't help. But think that of course deal some people have this impression that. Neal was somewhat aloof because he didn't talk like a moon landing every time someone asks the time he turned around. He was not he was very friendly. He was funny. He lose fun to be around the last time. I was with him was with a Neil. And gene Cernan the last man who walked on the moon Purdue graduate. I haven't pizza and a beer at earners in west Lafayette. And there was a full moon and Neil and gene never once talked about Neil recorded everything he had to say about the moon mission and everything else. He did NASA is available to everyone, and he talked in detail about two spaces stories and to Nassau officials and engineers. He just couldn't talk about. Every report is to. For awhile. I handle is media requests. And we followed in the world that they wanted the interview Neil couldn't do it. He couldn't possibly you. Everyone who wanted to interview. So it's turned them all down only did occasional anniversary appearances Purdue was also home to a huge collection of his personal documents and more in that collection. There are got a ton of fan mail that just continued to come long after he had done this mission to the moon. Right. It was fascinating. And no one knew about these. I shouldn't say, no. And I'm sure it's his immediate family knew about him and his secretary there in Connecticut. But he did he say all the letters people sent you. No, one knew that he did this, and they're now available in our archives along with many, many, many many other items of Neil Neil donated to Purdue. There are also right now, there's eight at auction taking place later this month of much more. You'll Armstrong items that the family had and they they think it's time to to sell. And deal equal chance to get them, including museums, which I'm sure we'll take a lot of the items one of the most fascinating things in that collection. I've seen her for is a letter from a Diner's club free checking him or credit card. The letter was seventy five years after the moon moonlight. If the software. Landing on the move will not get your credit card. This is produced space historian, John Norberg. He's awesome incredible author. There are some things that part of the sale. The we already have for instance, there's a Purdue flag three cook to the mood took another move any the to Purdue two thousand. So there are some things that were duplicates and and do as one of them. But the the people are emphasizing if anyone would like to purchase some of these items. Sure, some of them are going to be very reasonable guys would love them, and they love to share them with everyone. How many astronauts have you personally met and talked to that have been graduates from Purdue University. I don't know the total number of astronauts, I've met but not that I have met twenty three of the twenty four. Wow. Purdue astronauts, and and talk to them many times for books and gatherings. When they come to Purdue are twenty four th astronaut take last year. She's what they call kind of a quarantine for anybody interviewing your for two years. And the the astronauts, this group of astronauts love to get together among themselves, and then just talk, and, you know, share old times not necessarily about the mission states, they flew, but about all the training, and the people they knew you have you ever thought yourself of going into that direction of working for NASA. I'm not smart enough of that. I'm just a writer, you know reported. I I've always loved I'm an old, man. I'm seventy years old. I grew up, you know, in the fifties. And sixties when this whole thing was going on. I remember Sputnik. Like it was yesterday. I was fascinated by it. I remember the creation of NASA. And I remember that the original mercury seven astronauts, and when they pick them Gus Grissom, THEO went went to produce one of the original mercury seven astronauts being in school when they were gathering altogether and watch Allan Sheppard launch. And Gus Grissom launch just how mazing all it was in the summer of nineteen sixty-nine. I was backpacking through Europe. There were a lot of anti American feelings in Europe at that time because of the. I'm war. But for the period of time when Apollo eleven was landing on the mood, America. Everyone loved America the United States shared that mission with the world when Neil landed on the moon, Neil and buzz landed on the moon. We were we were needs France. And we found a cafe that opened all night their flaw cafe. And we watched it on TV. It was coming on in French people Americans. We the only Americans to place they were toasting us buying pain and translating. It was incredible incredible nights that I will never forget. And I went back a couple years ago in sound that cafe again to one day come to know, Neil Armstrong, personally was an incredible experience in my life. I can only imagine your talks on on campus about a number of things, including the are involved in in flight before space and space, and I have never given that talk to a group of students that at least one student doesn't come up afterwards and say. I came to Purdue because I want to be an astronaut, and you know, I tell people, and I truly believe this is very very possible walking on our campus. Today is some young man or some young woman who will be the first person to step foot on Mars because we have people who are there with that goal in mind. John Norberg, he's the author of seven books, including spacewalker, my journey in space and faith as Nasr's record-setting frequent flyer which details the story of Purdue grad and astronaut Jerry Ross, his eighth book every true one hundred and fifty years of giant leaps at Purdue University that one's coming out pretty soon. All bet, right. The spring right before Daniel day, which is may we're celebrating at all year. Neil armstrong's. The fiftieth anniversary of the mood walking is is is a big part of our planned activities. It was a wonderful wonderful person. It was fun to be around talkative and friendly. You just didn't talk to him. But landing on the moon. Once you would. Pre-arranged that because that's something he's discussed so many times. And he did so many other things in his life and how much he loved Purdue. He was so generous with his time, especially with our students. Well, it is a pleasure to meet you John Norberg again, author of the books. I've mentioned wings of their dreams Purdue in flight. So Jon, thank you for taking time for us produce, a space historian, John Norberg, and again, they have an unbelievable collection of Neil Armstrong memorabilia and personal documents. And that is available to everybody to to look at. It's amazing amazing is right here at Purdue John group. Yeah. Come to Purdue. Hey, john. Thank you so much. You're awesome. Thank you. This was fun. We're out of time. Thanks for joining us this morning on the first day people get insurance for alien abductions. Coconuts and pirate takeovers. Crazy, right? What's not craziest? Domino's carry out insurance. We'll.

Purdue University Neil Neil Neil Armstrong journal and courier John Norberg Purdue NASA Purdue John group Nasr Lafayette Stacey west Lafayette Gus Grissom gene Cernan Lafayette journal Europe university of Cincinnati reporter Peru eagles
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

08:24 min | 3 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In aeronautical and astronautical engineering. Hello jeffrey. How are ya doing? Really? Well. Thank you, Terry. Thanks for having me today. Purdue had some early screenings of the film. I man did you get to peek at it? Yes. I was looking up to go. I think it was last week and Dakota opened in theaters. I really like that. It was a really good movie. And I think the production Jin took a really interesting. Perspective. All that. Everyone knows the story of the polo eleven. Everyone knows strong as a great hero Purdue and the call for the country in general, but the movie really took a personal. Look at it. Like, no the treatments, and it was renamed for do has graduated twenty four astronauts, will you be the twenty fifth. Doc. It'll be the next one. But I would certainly be alert. If I ever had the town where did you grow up? I grew up in New Jersey. But because they have an accent. My family's originally English. Do you remember the first day that you stepped foot on the campus of Purdue University and saw that statue of Neil Armstrong? Yeah. Yeah. I do. Actually, I was invited out here when I was looking at graduate programs. It was in the middle of the winter was very cold. But I remember coming and seeing amazing building looking gallstone bowled engineering and seeing that you goes pretty quick during the campus. So deep. In aerospace, engineering. So how long have you dreamed of being an astronaut, I don't really know. I think those kind of sold bitch. Probably when I was an undergraduate. The thing I up doing when I was a little kid. I was actually pretty shy and didn't like adventure things. Now every little for those dogs. We get older I learned how to fly planes, and I started studying engineering and other things. That'd be a really cool. And I think as I've gone on and pull the studies and engineering and flying skill. It's something that has seemed like an increasingly good fits me. If I ever able to do it. I grew up in the sixties and seventies. That's when I was a kid. We were very excited about space exploration. And we knew all the astronauts names. And do you think young people are still excited about space and want to become astronauts are involved in NASA or space exploration in some way? I think probably yes, I like to think that space exploration of something that would always have appealed to the such a cool thing. But I think that compared to the sixties and seventies it's probably a little bit less popular. But less for a lot of young people. And it was back. Then I think in some ways that NASA fell victim to it own successes in this program of making seems so commonplace that it kind of looks a lot of people or I mean, we kind of take for granted. But we've had people living fulltime faith folk almost twenty years now. That's incredible thing. But people don't even know that they take it for granted these days people are not always quite bitterly excited about face flights as they were new. But I do think that there's a certain girl to it. And I think that as we see the private sector growing. More more people are becoming engaged in it. You know, the stuff done by SpaceX and blue origin. Other companies. It's coming people that might not otherwise interested in based Jeffrey Andrews future astronaut, what do you want your role to be? I would say so. My goal is is the same same as what of absence since. I was a kid which is I've always been interested in high-speed site and hide seats rights research. So what I study at Purdue is a field called, hyper Sonics, and it's a little bit broiled basically that. Any kind of flight at roughly five or more times the speed of sound. And you know, you mentioned that when you were growing up everyone's super excited about safes than what future would bring, and I think a lot of people still have been a little bit let down, but you don't have flying cars and we all living on the moon. It tomorrow. What kind of laugh at those things? Now, I think fifty years ago people scarcely expected that and I don't remember the exact date, but he was congressional reporter or something of that nature to try and sort out a plan for not since. Faith, and they will have a base model people by I think two thousand six or two thousand twelve or something like that people really did think I was going to happen that usable and one of the big reasons tackling the big struggles that we faced in trying to move further and face it, actually understanding the dynamics of light vehicles. You know, we all remember, sadly, the Columbia accident and things like that. Hell roadblocks said make it very difficult to be also getting a little bit long winded. But basically, my idea what I'd like to do is to continue researching high-speed site and make it. Hypersonic flight that is more of a practical reality. And if I had the chance I certainly applies being astronaut, but my aspiration is to continue doing my research. And if you'd like give you really looked into applying for a job is national like what the process is what you would need to do next. I think I've got decent idea of what the application protest is. It's an incredibly incredibly competitive jobs as you'd expect. I think the last. The two thousand seventeen and they've announced if I remember, right? The call for applications in two thousand fifteen. Year and a half or two years just to go through the applications and makes selections, and I think they had something like eighteen or nineteen thousand people apply twelve so. When I say, I don't care. Say that I intend to do it to that you can even perhaps lights incredibly incredibly competitive number that something like zero point zero five percent. The most competitive year they've had and I think, you know, maybe ten years ago. It wasn't quite as competitive. But I guess it goes to show that people are getting more interested in. I guess you're right. Yeah. You're right with that number. I think application processes is actually a relatively straightforward at least apply they basically just your qualifications. And then they tear it down bit by bit by bit get down from eighteen thousand whatever two thousand to five hundred two hundred and they go through final rounds of interviews. And it's something I've Lucic 'cause my dad actually went through the process. Thirty years ago now, and he made it to the last hundred or so, and I didn't realize this until now the left in like an old pilot in our house from NAFTA. Dr Andrew, whatever. I think in in the beginning it it's relatives faithful tolerant holiday do interviews medical tests to make sure that you are perfectly healthy, they pick the people from talking took mother astronaut might be done element of luck in bold to so many incredibly call by people that when you applied to be an astronaut you're going up against people that are catch pilots with PHD's. So have multiple doctoral degrees or all these incredibly unique and useful experiences. So you and everyone is still qualified in the last I don't know hundred people or so it's a little bit of luck. Two. I think. Yeah. Maybe so, but I'm still gonna look for your name. I'm still gonna wait. He Jeffrey Andrews sounds like a like an astronaut, and you are at Purdue, which is a good thing. So I still gonna keep my fingers crossed. And hope someday that we'll see you as an astronaut Jeffrey unders thank you second year doctoral student and aeronautical and astronautical engineering at Purdue. Let's really interesting is that he's from New Jersey, and he has this beautiful British accent. Amazing. Well, that is a whole nother conversation. But you are something Jeffrey thank you so much for spending some time with this morning as we look ahead to first man, this this fantastic movie that just opened up this weekend. We really appreciate talking to you. I wish you the best of luck. And we'll be I'll be I'll be watching. You never know. You just never know. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you very much to produce. Space historian, John Norberg talks to us next about his relationship with at Neil Armstrong as we continue on the first day ninety three WABC. The news you.

Purdue University Jeffrey Andrews Neil Armstrong New Jersey NASA Purdue Terry Dakota Columbia Jin NAFTA Sonics reporter John Norberg WABC Lucic Dr Andrew PHD zero five percent
"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Welcome back to the first day Ninety-three WIBC. It's Jerry Stacey glad you're here with this this morning. I'm such a space geek, and in celebration of the movie I man opening this weekend produce basis during the John Norberg is going to join us and also produced student that wants to be an astronaut just like Purdue grad Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon. But I I wanna welcome to the studio. He's here anyway. But looking to hear his voice producer and WBZ's news. Reporter Henry Davis is here. Hello henry. How you doing? I'm good. I have been so glued to the television. Watching what's been happening with the devastation down in the Florida panhandle from hurricane Michael. And it has been just so tragic and heartbreaking to see the pictures. Steerable eight is and I just want to mention that our friends at the Salvation Army collecting also the Red Cross. But I know we all want feel like we want to do something because it's a second home almost to so many of us here in Indiana. It's where we spend our spring break and in our family vacations for so many years that. Feels like a second home. It surely does. So it's been heartbreaking to watch. But you can help videos. I've seen videos of churches of people standing inside of places where the churches used to be cloud is completely wiped out. Yes, just awful and I saw a kit. I saw one of the Weather Channel people that were standing there doing report. And then there was a kitten buys buys ankle. And he says oh, Hello little fella little fellow survived. And I know many strays probably didn't in some of those areas, Mexico beach and actually Panama City, and you can help if you if you want to I hope that you do and you can with your money. They know how to do the very best with it at the Salvation Army Nassir so with the Red Cross. But anyway, Henry, I know you're here to talk about some of the things we need to pay attention to this coming week. Yes, ma'am. So I'm here with the very first segment of Henry's happenings. I think we dislike that happenings. Okay. Vince to tell your listeners about for the coming week saw start with the children's museum they're hosting their fifty fifth annual haunted house this month. Actually, I got to go see this LA. I think it was last week. I was covering the story for them. And I got to see it before they opened it up. It was really awesome. Yeah. It was a lot of the people that they have their witches. They call them the people who helped put it together females about one hundred of them the work. They did was awesome. It galax. Great. Yeah. The guild in the important thing to know is that there are specific hours for the visitors to go, you know, is for kids. But there's hours that are good for the kids who scare easily. There's two hours for the kids who really want to dare to scare as they say. I have those hours right here actually for you. You want to go Tuesday's between eleven AM and five PM Wednesdays ten to eight and then Thursdays Fridays and Saturdays from ten to three Sundays from eleven to five. If you wanna get there for the kids who are easily scared. They call an appeals lights on our Scott it and then for the triple A's frightening hours. They take place during Thursdays through Saturdays three thirty pm to nine pm. Okay. Now, I saw some of the stuff. They really do. Have.

Henry Davis Salvation Army Red Cross Jerry Stacey WBZ Neil Armstrong John Norberg Purdue producer Indiana Florida hurricane Michael Panama City Reporter Mexico beach Vince Scott LA fifty fifth two hours
"john norberg" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on KTRH

"Guest is John Norberg into an Abba concert. No. That was before my time is Abba the biggest entertainment export out of Sweden. I think so I think you would have to say that even though recently for the younger generation, we do have up itchy and ace. Obeys new. Yeah. Mike, right. But I'm fond of Abba. And I I like I love what they did. And they stopped at the right moment in time to become legends as well. They were also actually engaged a little bit in politics their managers sticking under some he he actually was part of a music. Golic creative music all games the socialization of business. Oh, early nineteen eighties about participated because this was the moment in time when basically the whole pop culture scene and well. Authors, directors musicians also that no this does not work. You're ruining the kind of freedom and creativity that Sweden meets. I have a kinda Abba moment. It's not as good as your under read. But I was at a Starbucks about a month ago and for years whenever I go to a Starbucks. If you know, they take your name, I will give my name as Rasputin, but my wife says rospa team the way the way Abbas Rah Rah Rah aspertain lover of the Russian plane. And so I always give the name, and then they can't. It's not always students of history that are working Starbucks barista. So instead what I did is I spelled it out for her R O S dash p o dash t in. So she'd have to say Ross Putin. And so she calls out the name when it's my turn. But she says it real loud because we're in the in the food court area at a gallery of mall, and she says rospa teen next coffee and the lady behind me says lover of the Russian Queen. And I just felt you know, this is the best day ever. Somebody stupid joke. I've been doing for five years. They finally got it finally stopped doing it. Yeah. So let me ask you this. When you look at the change that occurred. It strikes me that most economies trend toward socialism until there is some major moment that causes a crash, and whether that was the Italians or the Germans or we've seen this a number of times, particularly with the Scandinavian mindset, how did it move toward liberalization? And again for those just tuned in by liberalisation. I mean, more libertarian more open. How did it move in that direction because that's rare that that happens? Yeah. This is exactly the Swedish experience came creeping in in small steps a little bit more taxes and more benefits here a little bit more regulation there. That's. The normal trajectory that's often what happens because you've got everybody wants more, and it never enough, and it's difficult to to stop this unless you have a theory principle counter reaction to it. What happens we can was parked an overreach by the left. So they they did it do much. They began to lose popularity because we had this era when the entrepreneurs and the the stars left Sweden and people began to think of that there's something bad going wrong here. But then things really came to my blow in the early nineteen nineties, and what happened then was not for long time in the Swedish economy had lagged behind other countries. We used to be the fourth richest country on the planet. Now, we were thirteen richest country on the planet. We have not created one single job not single net job in the private sector. After forty years by then. Even though the population had grown by two million. People saw something bad was going on. The socialist empowered tried to deal with it by basically printing money and borrowing was a debt than inflation fuelled boom in the late day. Thank you. And that all collapsed in one thousand nine hundred it collapsed in a dramatic way to the extent that the rest of the world didn't think we would be able to pay its debts. We were running out of money literally. And for time for brief period of time. The central Bank had to institute an interest rate at five hundred percent five hundred percent combined that time everybody realized that something is seriously gone wrong with this economy, and then there was a wide consensus. We're going to have to dismantle this experiment that turned out this badly. Yeah. Because it strikes me that typically what socialist governments do as things get worse is they drive deeper into the same pattern that. That brought them to that point. Our guest is Johann Norberg the.

Starbucks Sweden John Norberg Mike Abbas Rah Johann Norberg Ross Putin Golic Rasputin five hundred percent forty years five years
"john norberg" Discussed on  News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

08:14 min | 3 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Think we should take a moment. And talk about something that is incredibly important. And that is the state of the American economy. And in so doing the US jobless claims have fallen to an almost forty nine years fifty year low for the third straight week. Brin talk about those jobless numbers. We should really be talking about the job full numbers because Americans are going to work, man. This is great news. But let me I promote ahead. The beginning of the next hour an hour from now, we're going to talk to a very interesting man is name is Johan or Johann Norberg. He's swedish. He's an author and editor he's a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. And is executive editor at free to choose media. He's going to be in Dallas tomorrow screening his new documentary, which is called Sweden lessons for America. You might have known that my voice went up at the end of America. Because there's a question Mark at the end of it. But it's hard to convey that. So I have to tell you. But I'm going to try to read it again. And when I say the name of the movie, I want you to imagine a question Mark at the end of America because that's relevant to to the move. Okay. So the name of the movie is Sweden lessons for America. Try that again, Sweden lessons for America. See the good thing about Spanish is you put the there's an upside down question. Mark at the beginning of a sentence. That's going to end in question. One of the troubles with English is sometimes you don't know you got a question Mark at the end of your sentence until you get to the end of the sentence unless you're a good scanner. But you don't know or you might not know you have an exclamation marks. He's Spanish does that too. If a Spanish sentence has an exclamation, Mark. At the end, they put an upside down at the beginning. So that if you're reading to your kids at night before they go to bed, and it's a sentences that should be exclaimed rather than just stated they tell you that at the beginning of sentence. He'll be upside down exclamation, Mark. So you can say outta here said the dragon to the monkeys. I'm trying to go to the great land of peach trees, and you know, that you need to scream that. It is a good story. I can't remember the name of it. But but Crockett's I'm reading it to Crockett right now. And it's by an Asian woman. I can't remember. But his chapter ten of the book. I can't remember. But it's pretty interesting because the dragon wants to go in to the where the into the deep part of the woods, and they got peach trees, they're apparently these peach trees are beautiful to look at. But the Monkees have control of of the of the deep woods, but they're very, greedy. And they don't want him. Why are you doing that? You're putting yourself in the mindset that you have a. Oh, yeah. I'm telling you story. So so dragon. He's too powerful. They can't stop him. So they wait until he goes to sleep and they tie him down. So he tells the little girl mainly M I N L, maybe you could find it the little girl, mentally she comes upon him. And she thinks this dragon is going to be some big powerful beasts, but he's crying, and he's crying because he's been tied up for days. And the reason he's been tied up for days is because the monkeys tied him up to prevent him access to go in. So he told them he said, look y'all don't have to be upset. I'm not going to I'm not going to eat the peaches. But he said they're so, greedy. They didn't even want him to look at the peaches. Where the mountain meets the moon. That's it. Yes. What's the woman's name? Asian woman, right? Grace lynn. Yeah. But it's L I N. So I'm pretty sure she's Asian. Yeah. Yeah. That's what it is. Anyway, so the so the movie is called Sweden lessons for America. And the reason you're going to want to hear this is here's a quote from from John Norberg. If Bernie Sanders and Alex Andrea Cossio Cortes managed to make America more like Sweden, which I'll interrupt and say, they often say we need to be more. Tweeden. The US would have more free trade pension reform school vouchers, low corporate taxes, and no taxes on wealth property and inheritance. In other words, their image of Sweden is stuck back in nineteen seventy five Sweden has been drastically liberalized since then now. When I say, liberalized erase from your mind, the use of the word liberal as we use it in the modern context because liberal historically meant hands off classic, liberalism is what we might refer to now as a mild form of libertarianism. But when you liberal is an economy that doesn't mean, you socialize it, actually means you get the government out of more of it. But he's he talks a lot about free trade. He talks about tech companies that are opening up there. And we also talked we we did the interview couple of hours ago. So that we could make it work. We're also going to talk about Muslim refugees in Sweden. And whether that problem is as big as it's being portrayed in the news and one of the one of the data points. There is just a few days ago. They had national elections in Sweden and the. The hard, right? One seventeen percent of the vote which blew everybody's mind, and because of their parliamentary coalition style system of governance that means that the hard right is basically or has the ability to tank the government, which gives them an incredible amount of influence, Sweden is one of those countries that if if you read the the international news stories, profiling this is suffering from an aggressive Muslim refugee problem. And you know, there there there is a real problem that folks coming from Syria, and and some of the countries in that region where the economy's tanked and folks have fled. Those folks are. They're causing a real problem is is the answer to it. It's never it's never recipe for success. When you have fifteen to twenty five year old young men. Without any real skill set without any real opportunity or our hopes for advancement loitering loitering around in your streets. I don't that's not just a Middle Eastern prob. That's not a good problem anywhere at anytime. So that will be in the next hour an hour from now. And I think it's going to be an interesting thing. Because after you hear this interview, the next time you hear some liberal Democrat say, well, we ought to do it like this because Sweden doesn't like this. You're going to be surprised at how off they are about Sweden because they've never been to Sweden, and they've spent no real time. Understanding what has become of Sweden. But just as the United States is not still stuck in nineteen seventy nine under Jimmy Carter in twelve percent. Unemployment and twenty one percent. Interest rates on loans, where the misery index was basically how how you calculated how bad things have had gotten inflation was through the roof. The United States is not stuck in one thousand nine hundred nineteen seventy nine and you wouldn't want us to be.

Sweden America Mark United States Cato Institute Brin Monkees Johann Norberg Johan executive editor editor Crockett Dallas John Norberg Jimmy Carter senior fellow Grace lynn Bernie Sanders
"john norberg" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

08:24 min | 3 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on KTRH

"Before we get to the silliness. That the supreme court nomination fight has turned into. I think we should take a moment. And talk about something that is incredibly important. And that is the state of the American economy. And in so doing the US jobless claims have fallen to an almost forty nine years fifty year low for the third straight week. Brin talk about those jobless numbers. We should really be talking about the job full numbers because Americans are going to work. Man. This is great news. But let me I promote ahead. The beginning of the next hour an hour from now, we're going to talk to a very interesting man is name is Johan or Johann Norberg. He's swedish. He's an author and editor he's a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. And he's executive editor at free to choose media. He's going to be in Dallas tomorrow screening his new documentary, which is called Sweden lessons for America. You might have known that my voice went up at the end of America. Because there's a question Mark at the end of it. But it's hard to convey that. So I have to tell you. But I'm going to try to read it again. And when I say the name of the movie, I want you to imagine a question Mark at the end of America because that's relevant to to the move. Okay. So the name of the movie is Sweden lessons for America. Try that again, Sweden lessons for America. See the good thing about Spanish is you put the there's an upside down question. Mark at the beginning of a sentence. That's going to end in a question. One of the troubles with English is sometimes you don't know you got a question Mark at the end of your sentence until you get to the end of the sentence unless you're a good scanner. But you don't know or you might not know you have an exclamation Mark see Spanish does that too. If a Spanish sentence has an exclamation, Mark. At the end, they put an upside down at the beginning. So that if you're reading to your kids at night before they go to bed, and it's a sentences that should be exclaimed rather than just stated they tell you that at the beginning of the sentence. He'll be upside down exclamation, Mark. So you can say outta here said the dragon to the monkeys. I'm trying to go to the great land of peach trees, and you know, that you need to scream that. It is a good story. I can't remember the name of it. But but Crockett's re- I'm reading it to Crockett right now. And. It's by an Asian woman. I can't remember. But his chapter ten of the book. I can't remember. But it's pretty interesting because the dragon wants to go in to the where the into the deep part of the woods, and they got peach trees, they're apparently these peach trees are beautiful to look at. But the monkeys have control of of the of the deep woods, but they're very, greedy. And they don't want him. Why are you doing that? Putting yourself in the mindset that you have an oh, yeah. I'm telling you story. So so the dragon. He's too powerful. They can't stop him. So they wait until he goes to sleep and they tie down. So he tells the little girl mainly M I N L, maybe you could find it the little girl, mentally she comes upon him. And she thinks that this dragon is going to be some big powerful beasts, but he's crying, and he's crying because he's been tied up for days. And the reason he's been tied up for days is because the monkeys tied him up to prevent him access to go in. So he told them he said, look y'all don't have to be upset. I'm not going to. I'm not going to eat the peaches. But he said they're so, greedy. They didn't even want him to look at the peaches where the mountain meets Simone. That's it. Yes. What's the woman's name? Asian woman. Right. Yeah. Grace lynn. Yeah. But it's L I N. So I'm pretty sure she's Asian. Yeah. Yeah. That's what it is. Anyway, so the so the movie is called Sweden lessons for America. And the reason you're going to want to hear this is here's a quote from from John Norberg. If Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Cossio Cortez managed to make America more like Sweden, which I'll interrupted say they often say we need to be more like Sweden. The US would have more free trade pension reform school vouchers, low corporate taxes, and no taxes on wealth property and inheritance. In other words, their image of Sweden is stuck back in nineteen seventy five Sweden has been drastically liberalized since then now. When I say, liberalized erase from your mind, the use of the word liberal as we use it in the modern context because liberal historically meant hands off classic, liberalism is what we might refer to now as a mild form of libertarianism. But when you liberal is an economy that doesn't mean you, socialize. It actually means you get the government out of more of him. But he's he talks a lot about free trade. He talks about tech companies that are opening up there. And we also taught we we did the interview couple of hours ago. So that we could make it work. We're also going to talk about Muslim refugees in Sweden. And whether that problem is as big as it's being portrayed in the news and one of the one of the data points. There is just a few days ago. They had national elections in Sweden and the. The hard, right? One seventeen percent of the vote which blew everybody's mind, and because of their parliamentary coalition style system of governance that means that the hard right is basically or has the ability to tank the government, which gives them an incredible amount of influence, Sweden is one of those countries that if you read the the international news stories, profiling this is suffering from an aggressive, Muslim refugee problem and. You know, there there there is a real problem that folks coming from Syria, and and some of the countries in that region where the economy's tanked and folks have fled. Those folks are. The causing a real problem is is the answer to it. It's never it's never a recipe for success. When you have fifteen to twenty five year old young men without any real skill set without any real opportunity or hopes for advancement loitering loitering around in your streets. I I don't that. That's not just a Middle Eastern prob. That's not a good problem anywhere at anytime. So that will be in the next hour an hour from now. And I think it's going to be an interesting thing. Because after you hear this interview, the next time you hear some liberal Democrat say, well, we ought to do it like this because Sweden does it like this. You're going to be surprised at how off they are about Sweden because they've never been to Sweden, and they've spent no real time. Understanding what has become of Sweden. But just as the United States is not still stuck in nineteen seventy nine under Jimmy Carter in twelve percent. Unemployment and twenty one percent. Interest rates on loans, where the misery index was basically how how you calculated how bad things have had gotten inflation was through the roof. The United States is not stuck in one thousand nine hundred nineteen seventy nine and you wouldn't want us to be.

Sweden Mark America United States Brin Cato Institute executive editor Crockett Dallas John Norberg Jimmy Carter Johan Johann Norberg editor Simone Grace lynn Bernie Sanders
"john norberg" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"john norberg" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"Me dave ramsey here now dedi over blockers this will be the man as regards them on you were above the target the average two shades of your now now it can happen let me make up north oh god medina macabre annoying in lynnwood within now that eleven thirty a no that's all the double yes johns norberg roman once the daiei them stop no he's not prince william what about dorky millions in ghana and now put it daniel bhel available rob opponents alone terror fabulous at the about home to the new dr rugova her so tired of winter i'm sorry if you're going to warm and probably a good wintry dams on hurt me i hope owned by an airport maxine eurodac what's up.

lynnwood ghana maxine eurodac dave ramsey daniel bhel