20 Burst results for "John Newman"

Protesters topple, burn Albert Pike statue in Washington D.C.

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

Protesters topple, burn Albert Pike statue in Washington D.C.

"Statues and monuments related to the confederacy have been vandalized and toppled in recent days across the country during protests and now it's happened in DC for decades city leaders have wanted to see the Albert park statue taken down from judiciary square last night Juneteenth demonstrators took matters into their own hands using their own roads and chanting want to pull in toppling the statue before setting it on fire enter in general and also a leader of the free masons where the statue built in nineteen oh one featuring bright as a civilian and a soldier president trump criticized DC police for allowing the statue to come down calling it a disgrace the statues next to police headquarters but it sits on national park service so technically it's U. S. park police jurisdiction John Newman WTOP

John Newman Wtop Albert Park President Trump DC U. S. Park
US attorney Geoffrey Berman says he is not resigning despite AG Barr saying he was

The Moth Radio Hour

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

US attorney Geoffrey Berman says he is not resigning despite AG Barr saying he was

"The justice department is trying to oust the US attorney who oversaw key investigations of allies of president trump including trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani but NPR's John Newman reports and Geoffrey Berman says he will not resign Attorney General William Barr said in a statement that Berman left his position as the US attorney for the Southern District of New York but Berman and says he has no intention of resigning and his ongoing investigations quote will move forward without delay Berman's office still has an open investigation into Giuliani Mars announcement was made abruptly Friday night and Berman says he learned of his departure from bar statement bar says the president intends to nominate Jay Clayton the current chairman of the securities and exchange commission to take over

Us Attorney Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani Geoffrey Berman William Barr New York President Trump Jay Clayton Chairman John Newman Attorney
"john newman" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:38 min | 10 months ago

"john newman" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"To anywho juror should have a good night to rule with five double doubles on the season serums with four double doubles on the season he's coming off of a career high twenty three points in that game against Colorado what a bold look like future NBA players Terry Oglesby and we are under way and Williams arena the tap is controlled by the Clemson Tigers John Newman the third is out front for all of your dogs the freshmen on the right wing now for cave on more top of the key mac mac is the Alabama transfer this Constantine like Minnesota with a couple transfers they also have been dealing with some injuries like the golfers on the drive this is Sam shot partially blocked rebound to come talk to me Willis for Minnesota no words left to right shooting at the student section here is our in the first game sponsored by you working together to achieve great things that's problem solving visit you PS dot com to learn more you PS a proud sponsor of go for athletics the first take a lot of the jar is in fact one for to ruin a good job by Willis to find it on the trail a minute in its two nothing Minnesota out front is gonna step back as long to is the office of rebound put fact use thereby cave on more and we're excited to sequence for to restart the game got beat you just can't teach that a lot of them came out of nowhere to block it then sprinted down the floor for a wide open transition dog just to start that the sophomore needed cal sure gives out front top of the key to all the Honda mere hood is best game as a goal for inactive Paul game in terms of scoring at fourteen to the base line goes Kerr who struggled in that game against the call Patino mention it fortitude here's cal Sir open three stopping to route second chance points here for Minnesota will SO three enough rebound comes off two seven mac for Clemson Tigers now a chance to lead bring it into the offense of incidents on the baseline is a single team for demeanor tough match up for him back in and shot and no good circles off the rim rebound tells her he wants to run two one four now who what the rest of the group catch up hand off the car right side gets to the top of the key works his way toward the black got kicked out for Willis crosscourt skip past accounts are opened three from there one three from three to five to Minnesota advantage a soda right where they left off with the first seven games this season in terms of hunting for use in the half court here's the shop it's no good to mere another rebound for Minnesota all it comes out to Kerr works toward the elbow now to the free throw line behind the back dribble got in a little deep almost lost didn't kick out to Willis golfers lead by three five two balls coaches up on the elevated floor here doing their coaching right side the car stutter step move into the paint he's got his first two nine of seven to go for seventeen ten to go here first good start here for Minnesota three of five from the floor the basketball is sending the right wing lost in five second call a call to follow their lead on Daniel to room while I'll take you tacky thirty five feet from the basket and that's one eight zero two or you want to avoid wow I thought that was a five second call Spence yeah I thought it was you could for that too I thought oh to reserve a good job of once the claims in office the player picked up the ball that's no man's land your talk to go provide a ton of pressure on the printer try to generate eternal it's the white origin offenses player from being put in a tough spot is a baseline jumper no good by noon the rebound comes off to come here for the first Minnesota leading seven two with the ball is it three takes a three late whistling fall forty three in the official says that seven Max got him on the elbow it looks that way to the line will be card issue three car who as a freshman and played again sees Clemson Tigers eighty two percent from the line as a freshman here this year as a redshirt sophomore now just sixteen of thirty three forty eight and a half percent that has got to get better and one would assume it would he's a good shooter and a free throw use.

five second eighty two percent thirty five feet
"john newman" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

10:03 min | 1 year ago

"john newman" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"I guess i'll tell you i i'm i'm not as familiar with acute obliterate. I guess what i can say though there are a number of these small molecule metabolites that now we're interested in in the study of aging <music> alpha beta glutamate is one beta hydroxybutyrate. My mentor eric verdon his lab studies. Things like you know sucks no coa and mallon ochoa and suck nate and a so quinn an acetate and one thing that all of these have in common. I think you know i as i talk about beta hydroxybutyrate as a signaling molecule. That's not just beta hydroxybutyrate but it's it's one of the small molecule metabolites that were starting to learn the most about how it acts as a signal in not just its role in metabolism which is really important but also its role in indirectly cle- binding to proteins and turning on pathways i would bet ken that lots of small molecule metabolites have similar hidden lives you know for example. There's i dug out a couple years ago. This this old paper purporting to show that lactate has some histone deacetylases inhibitor effects. I bet lots of these may even inhibit. The settlers is just it's like not drexel does but just with different affinities <hes> a c. to what acetate for example also measurably inhibits deacetylases is just tenfold worse than beta hydroxybutyrate so it's not relevant at the levels of two acetate in our bodies but other molecules may be so i think there's this entire universe this symphony the systems biology network of small molecules molecules small metabolic molecules binding to receptors inhibiting enzymes often the same ones probably with different affinities and overlapping synergistic and antagonistic effects and that systems systems biology symphony. I think has a huge role in how nutrition and environment and metabolism affect our pathways of aging and we're just scratching the surface of what that all means so in addition to your work as a researcher bug. You're also geriatrician who cares were hospitalized older adults that you see san francisco and san francisco via medical nickel centre and i read where you said that at san francisco you take care of people were medical problems aren't so simple and also answers aren't simple so can you talk a little bit about the work that in san francisco yeah now. We're getting to my my other passion. I am a geriatrician. I'm really proud to be a geriatrician. I love this work of helping the care for older adults. What's and people often. Ask me even if they've heard of what a geriatrician is. How old do i have to be. You know who who do you really who do you who do you. Who do you help. Who's your who's using your clinic and the answer is usually that it's not it's not about the number it's really about the aging and it's about the complexity so so geriatricians particularly particularly loved helping people who have lots of medical problems who take lots of medicines who are probably having lots of side effects who need help doing doing things day to day who need people to help them <hes> their caregivers their family they have complicated social situations. You know it's hard for them to get out to the drugstore. It gets to the grocery store the more complicated the better we love complexity because we love the challenge of taking all of that complexity <hes> complicated person's life and having to look get every piece of it and figure out what is what is just the right thing. I can help with to help make that person walk better or stay in their home longer or be more independent cardiologists take care of the heart and pulmonologist take care of the lungs and on and on but but geriatricians we take the entire complexity of the whole person in any environment in which they live and figure out how to distill that into just the right things to do to help them meet the goals that they want out of their health to stay healthier longer to stay independent longer. It's incredibly rewarding an incredibly challenging work. I absolutely love it. See recently published an interesting perspective on the education and training of a future darah scientists so can you give us an overview and kind of key messages from that report. I'm sure so jero science is a brand new field of translational medicine and translational meeting taking basic science and applying it to help people improve people's lives so gerald science means to take what we know about the basic biology of mechanisms of aging aging and turn it into interventions that help people's health help them live longer better delay chronic diseases stay independent longer in particular about trying and to create better treatments for the complicated problems of older adults so you know it's never just one thing right and <hes> and many of your listeners have probably experienced this in their own lives or with their parents and grandparents that when someone is having trouble when someone is having trouble walking or or having trouble getting out of the house or or has a fall. It's never just one something and this this makes these problems of aging really complicated to treat clinically and this is this is what geriatricians specializing so geriatricians have all of these sophisticated had complex evidence based approaches to try to manage the complex problems of aging well. We don't really have is the biology to help us. We have lots of tools that can make a huge difference in people's lives but we need more tools. We need the same sorts of tools that the cardiologists have in the oncologists have to help to treat the actual biology. The biology of aging in are patients who are having falls or having multi mobility or having functional declined so gerald science is about creating these new tools from understanding mechanisms of aging and this is a new area of medicine and to really figure out how to take drugs that come from studying aging and use them to improve the health of older adults. Well you need to understand the aging biology you need to have have that that basic science clinical research and you need to you need to know about older adults and not necessarily be a geriatrician at least be familiar william with how we do research and older adults and in the clinical problems of older adults like what is a geriatric syndrome you know. How do we prevent falls. What is delirium in order to to see if new tools rules new drugs might help with these things and there's very few people in the world <hes> that can do those sorts of studies so there are thousands of of oncologists allergists who can do translational clinical trials to test the latest cancer drugs but you know there's probably maybe a couple dozen people in the entire country who could run a clinical trial that tests a new aging intervention in a group of older adults so this is the bottleneck. This is right now. <hes> what's stopping us from making faster progress in turning aging biology into new therapies for people and so this this paper rewrote was a group of jerry traditions and basic scientists and clinical researchers who kinda see this need and realize that we need need more people to fill this gap and how do we find them. How do we find and recruit young researchers but also experienced researchers who can bridge this gap between the basic science of aging and testing interventions tensions and figure out how to use aging based interventions in older adults and we're really hoping that we can inspire people to come into this field. I love being a geriatrician. I love taking care the older adults. I think this is the most rewarding and fascinating field. It's also a fantastic field to do science and do translational medicine and figure out better ways of helping people. I think just as is exciting even more exciting than cutting edge cardiology or cutting edge oncology and hopefully we can figure out how to bring researchers to to bridge this gap and really really create create this new world in medicine. We're using aging targeted therapies to prevent chronic diseases to improve resilience to keep people independent of and keep people healthier theater much longer so i'm curious what are the most promising interventions being investigated and jerry science right now. Are there any breakthroughs. That seemed to be in the offing so don. This is such a great question because you know many religions are probably thinking i'll all what are the most exciting interventions probably a few things work in mice but i can actually tell you what are we testing in clinical trials and what are some of the interventions which clinical trials have already been done as is such a exciting moment and in the world of geriatrics enduro science instead of this exciting science really is turning into clinical trials and will soon turned into treatment guidelines and clinical interventions. I guess the state of treating aging in mice is very much. It's like the state of treating cancer cured cancer a thousand times over in mice at this point. We've we've treated aging thousand times over and it's really about <hes> now the interventions that are coming into human clinical trials and the ones that are farthest along fall into a few categories so many of them. We've talked a lot about the links between nutrition and aging and how these work worked through specific molecular sensors that sense the nutritional state and turn on repair pathways many interventions now in clinical trials have to do with kind of activating these these sensors. There's one group are the detour inhibitors so we talked about target of rapamycin a protein complex senses protein and if you inhibit tour you turn on protein repair pathways rapamycin mason is probably the best known tour inhibitor but there's a variety of other ones metformin actually falls into this category two we think that mitt foreman to modulating mighty andrea function <hes> and through maybe acting thing through <hes> a._m._p. Chinese kind of is gets in at these new at these nutrients signals related to insulin and glucose signaling any d is in this category too so of course any he d levels as many rulers ms probably no decline with age any ideas a cofactor for a whole class of enzymes called sir tunes which have been linked to ageing. There's a group of drugs that activates sir twins directly but now there's kind of more of a sense in the field that it's not just about turning on the enzyme but it's about also giving it. The cofactor needs so there's a lot of excitement around any d- replacement therapies toward hitters are furthest along joan manic who is a leader in the field of jurisprudence has actually finished now to clinical trials giving tore inhibitors to older adults salts and showing that it improves influenza vaccine response she replicated that and then also showed that after a after just a one month treatment with a tour inhibitor the older adults had fewer respiratory infections over the next six months so this is this was groundbreaking. I mean you guys probably haven't even heard of this. It really went under the radar. That's the first example of a clinical trial from a an intervention that targets a mechanism of aging in this case tour inhibitors were they using rapamycin. It was a combination of rapamycin and ever lemus <music> a related or inhibitor. It was the first example of a clinical trial that used a drug targeting mechanisms of aging and tested against a complex syndrome of older adults else in this case immunised senescence and risk of serious infections.

san francisco gerald science jerry science eric verdon ken mallon ochoa delirium drexel researcher joan quinn metformin nate foreman six months one month
"john newman" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"john newman" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"Stem talk is an educational service of the florida institute for human and machine cognition a not for profit research lab pioneering groundbreaking technologies aimed at leveraging and extending human cognition then perception look emission and resilience as an aside personally worked on understanding the effects of the ketogenic diet on the avoidance of sarko pina indus indus. I was pleased when i saw the paper from the ramsey lab. I was like oh this is perfect timing but as you said no one knows what actually caused that if if if that's that's a robust result but it's fascinating topic so my my lifespan study use these alternate week cycling diets. Which wasn't my intention going winging. It was just how i how i had to do the experiment to test the i wanted to test it had an interesting side effect that i think is really interesting. Kind of popularly mice nice of course are not people and you know we have to be very careful about how we interpret mouse experiment results when we're talking about people in about human nutrition but yeah there's a lot of interests 'bout kieschnick diets for people and one one of the questions we most commonly faces so does this. Does this mean that someone has to always be on it. If you start a cage nick diet does that mean you have to stay on occasion. Act out your entire life life which often is the case for treating epilepsy for example but if you're trying to prevent sark opinion trying to do it to do something about aging. Do you have to always be on occasion diet and i this is not the question i set out to ask but it is it is the case that you know my my experiments showed that whatever i saw on the effects of kieschnick diet on the health and lifespan of these mice they were not eating a key genetic data all the time. They're actually only eating diet half the time they constantly went on and went off so there's there's a lot more to understanding how to use kieschnick diets or ketone bodies in people than just you know go on occasion of diet and stay there and i think there's maybe there's hope when we start designing <hes> clinical trials <hes> <hes> using this biology to target aging that maybe it is the sort of thing that that we could just treat intermittently or once in a while and not have to figure out how to make someone key topic attic for you know for ten years at a time john. There's a lot of research today about how key to jank diet helps with type two diabetes epilepsy and inflammation as we've been talking about some research in primarily based on animal models mice that he's up at this point also show potential protective benefits of other neurological disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as has alzheimer's and parkinson's traumatic brain injury and stroke so in your mind. Why is it that the key to jank diet has such play tropic effects on people in diseases vocation. The occasion ignite is a complicated thing. It's a it's a really dramatic change in in our bodies and our biology and i i think a lot about what are all of the things that are keeping that that's happening in our bodies ladies on occasion a diet or that's happening bodies of the mice that i studied kieschnick and how do i connect each one of those individually with a clinical problem that might be relevant to <hes> sort of very kind of big level. This is how i think about a diet so you listeners probably are familiar with the idea that a a kieschnick diet is basically if you eat less cover hydrates and and you eat so little carbohydrates that your body starts making ketone bodies to burn fat for fuel so key genetic diets generally inherently involve carbohydrate restriction and of course they involve your body turning on the production of ketone bodies the process of kita genesis and then there's the keystone bodies themselves so by definition and occasional diet you have ketone bodies circulating acetate and beta hydroxybutyrate. There's these kind of <hes> different elements carbohydrate restriction the act of kita genesis and the keystone bodies themselves and then i think about the embodies themselves you know we've been talking about how their their their fuel their source of energy that cells can use very easily to generate a._t._p. But they also have these drug like signaling effects facts epigenetics inflammation and all that so there's a lot going on you know it's very similar to the idea of calorie restriction if you faster if there's keller restriction you know there's a lot of lot of same changes in your biology a lot going on and you can try to kind of map out. Exactly what is it. That's connected to a particular problem help with so. It's not too surprising that there's there's a laundry list of clinical conditions that kieschnick diets might be helpful for based on laboratory studies or based on about chemistry or even based on small small human studies. I think it's really exciting that there are clinical trials going on right now for using key genetic diets or kitone bodies to treat some neurodegenerative diseases including alzheimer's hammers disease most prominently and i think there's a lot of promise to that getting at the mechanisms though is still so important because kieschnick diet is a complicated thing for person to do by perspective as a geriatrician russian <hes> is that you ask jerry trish about nutrition and what's the best nutrition and the answer is usually pretty simple more we so much more often face problems news of older adults who are malnourished who don't have access to food or don't have access to healthy food and fresh food and you know thinking about patterns of nutrition like carbohydrate restriction shen or kieschnick diet or fasting or things like that is a second order problem. We're much more worried about not eating enough and losing weight about how someone is eating which is just a reflection of how complicated can be to use something like a kieschnick diet to treat a clinical problem in an old renault so i i really love this idea of understanding the mechanisms. What is it exactly about the kieschnick diet. Is it something to do with insulin signaling from the carbohydrate restriction or glucose. Is it something to do with the ketone bodies themselves being available for fuel or the epigenetics changes and if we can understand which part of the kieschnick diet is that's most helpful for a condition like alzheimer's disease than i really do think that that this will lead to useful therapies that you probably aren't going to cure alzheimer's disease certainly not but which could help an older person's brain to cope with alzheimer's disease better so one of the most frequent criticisms of the diet comes instrument nutritionist who likes to say show me the five year data and then we'll talk they believe ketogenic diet could cause long term harm to persons health and longevity. How do you respond onto that nutrition nutrition and people as a very complicated subject. It's also a subject about which people are very passionate. I've learned as i've sort of. You've dipped my toes into this. I'm geriatrician right. I'm a doctor who specializes in older. Adults and nutrition is a part of that but i've really my research. My basic science research on on ketone bodies and kieschnick diets has just let me kind of dip the toes into this larger world of nutrition science and boys at complicated and i certainly don't have the answers would have kind of picked up from from listening to smarter people than me talk. <hes> is is realizing that interest is really hard to study in humans especially in a rigorous randomized is way and if you ask anyone about any pattern of nutrition. You're gonna get the same answer that most studies short term. There's not a whole lot of long-term randomized data data certainly most of what we think we know from long term outcomes comes from you know serve as an epidemiological data with all the caveats that that entails of you know what else is different in about these people you know. What are they really eating that sort of thing. So certainly i think for all nutritional patterns interventions we could use better long-term data data and for kieschnick diets and in particular. I think what the research has. I was probably just as skeptical about kieschnick diets as anyone else before i i started studying studying this in the laboratory and how studying has changed my mind a little bit. I've definitely kind of gained a new appreciation for fat trains as that sounds <hes> but this idea that you know fat is is really probably not our enemy and that we shouldn't be afraid of fat. This is this. Is this geek coming out now. When a jarrow scientists thinks about about nutrition we think about your nutrients signals and and we talked a little bit about how for example protein signals through tour target rapamycin. We've mapped out really well. What are are the what are some of the aging mechanisms that are activated by reduced protein intake <hes> and that these are beneficial for for long term health even if you know everything has its own context but less protein intake less activity better for long term health or we've already mapped out some of these examples for carbohydrates about how less carbohydrates i mean less insulin signaling less. This is jeff signaling. This is really well established in the aging world <hes> and actually for example drugs that help to reduce insulin signaling drugs to help to reduce i._g._f. Signaling are some of the candid ended interventions for treating problems of aging in humans so pretty clearly. We know how less carbohydrates can improve long term health well. You gotta eat something so what about fats so. What do we know oh about the mechanisms through which less fat intake is sensed by the body and improves long term health kind of drawing a blank on that and i'm not sure if that's just because we haven't focused enough on you know what are the mechanisms of sensing fat restriction. I don't really know so. I think it's really interesting that my at least now we've done the mouse studies nicer not people of course but we released <hes> done these mouse studies showing that a really high fat diet shockingly high fat diet as long as we keep the mice from getting obese certainly wasn't harmful for them long term and actually actually improve their longevity whether that's really true for people or not you know. We don't know i kind of come back to this idea of. I just don't think that fats are are crazy anymore. <hes> and i looked at kind of some dietary recommendations which recommend this extreme fat restriction and occasional diet is really just the same degree of carbohydrate restriction <music> as we consider perfectly normal for fat restriction. Maybe this is something we should just you know look at a and and really see what are the what are the longer term health effects because we might be surprised if we do this in a healthy way. What we see nothing is for everyone. Another less than definitely learned is that there is no perfect diet. There is no panacea zia superfood or diet. That's gonna prevent aging. Every person is different. We ought to find our individual way to health but i think for a lot of people we might find out the carbohydrate restriction or some in the form of ketosis interurban kito strategic diet might be part of that pathway to health understand that you recently went down a rabbit hole thinking about the arctic variant mutation in the mitochondria fatty acid transporter c._p._t. One and how this mutant might affect ketosis some people say that the existence existence of this mutation is evidence that inuit's eating a high-fat diet were not in ketosis chronically and as our listeners know. There's a lot of discussion about this these days can you describe the mutation and how you think might be affecting kito metabolism in the inuit population and how might we be able to investigate this further. Is there a a clear path forward to understand this but boy can. I don't wanna fall down a rabbit hole but this is just such a fascinating thing and maybe your your listeners can help me understand how to think about this but i only learned about the existence of this mutation a couple months ago and reading about it. It's it's just such a fascinating story of adaptation to <hes> to diet so the so if you're in your don't know about this and and again this is not my area of expertise so i'm just kind of telling the story as best i understand many native peoples of of the high arctic have half to survive and historically did survive on very low carbohydrate intake or at least straight intermittent carbohydrate intake and idea that.

alzheimer ketosis alzheimer's disease ramsey lab florida institute diabetes sark keller jarrow jerry trish parkinson inuit jeff five year ten years
"john newman" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"john newman" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"They also act like drugs. We're learning now binding to proteins inhibiting editing enzymes <hes> affecting epigenetics affecting inflammation metabolism and these things are all implicated in regulating aging so i think that's <hes> if you fast if you're calorie restricted that ketone bodies aren't just a bystander but they may actually be one of the ways in which fasting and calorie restriction have effects on health so i wanted to test that hypothesis offices as directly as i could if you just have keep homebodies around so not fasting not calorie restricted. There's plenty of energy but just keep homebodies are there with that have similar effects on health as restriction does so we sell to test this in mice we fed. I say a key genetic diet which is a diet with very little carbohydrates as many of your listeners now in order order to force the body to make kito bodies so there's plenty of energy around it's not calorie restriction but there's also ketone bodies around and we asked the question if mice eating this sort of diet it would live longer and be healthier like as if they were calorie restricted or whether it'd be unhealthy for them because there's so much fat around and the answer was was pretty clear and pretty cool that having having lots of ketone bodies around being on occasion diet for much of their adult life actually helped them to survive better live longer and be healthier in a number of ways especially having better memory and having better heart function so we think that keystone bodies are are actually part of the way through which these fasting activated or kaleh restriction activated pathways can affect health in off in a positive way so you and eric verdon <hes> as you mentioned he recruited you to bike have been interested in looking at keaton bodies as signaling metabolites. Can you expand on that a little bit further so eric verdon was my <hes> is my mentor in research. <hes> was a post doc in his lab and i came into studying ketone bodies because he you became interested in ketone bodies as signaling metabolites so when i first joined eric's lab a very brilliant post doc in latin name tadahiro shimadzu was just wrapping up this this really provocative story showing that one of the keystone bodies the ketone body that your body makes them most of beta hydroxybutyrate binds to and inhibits disobeys deacetylases enzymes so deacetylases are these critical regulators of gene expression. They control how the historians around with danny is wrapped are modified. They control how how tightly wound your d._n._a. Around stones and how easy it is to turn a gene on or off so we know a ton about deacetylases. We know how important they are in all sorts of processes from from you know from cancer to stem cells so tadahiro to the series of experiments showing that beta hydroxybutyrate inhibits these enzymes inhibits deacetylases and affects histone said elation and affects gene expression expression so this was really kind of mind blowing it wasn't the first time that someone showed that kitone bodies do things other than get burned to make energy but it really kind of crystallized this idea that there's this whole world of ketone body biology which has nothing to do with with them as a as a fuel but has to do with them acting kinda like drugs and so now we were learning more about this every year that's keith home-bodies bind to receptors they bind to a couple of <hes> cell surface receptors on a variety of cells throughout our body which regulate fat metabolism awesome in regularly inflammation they inhibit the settles they also directly bind histone surveys are the proteins around which d._n._a. is wrapped <hes> and so they regulate gene expression or epigenetics happy genetics through a couple of mechanisms heat on bodies also regulate the activation of the inflammatory home which is this big protein complex mostly in immune cells that helps immune cell decide whether to get inflamed or not <hes> when it sees damage signals in the environment all these things are actions of keystone bodies that are kinda like drugs there signaling activities timothy's above and beyond the body getting burned to generate a._t._p. So we're sort of seeing that there's this whole new world of key body balaji kito bodies as fuel which we've known for a long longtime but now more and more ketone bodies as signals as drugs to manipulate the way that cells work <hes> to affect genetics affect metabolism and affect inflammation and even affect senescence. We've been learning about this idea of ketone bodies signals at a very micro level so what proteins does it bind to what enzyme says inhibit and we're learning more and more about that the real cutting edge now is we're still trying to figure out what does this mean. What does this mean for what keith homebodies are doing to our bodies when we fast past or when we eat occasion of diet or if we take an exotic kitone how are the epi genetic effects with the inflammation effects relevant to how akito bodies might work in in alzheimer's disease for example or an aging or in frailty so it's really opening up this whole new vista for figuring out how key bodies might be useful clinically and to improve human else. Don and i were at a meeting here at night him see this week and one of the presenters had a list of metabolites nights of t._h._c. from the kimba night and one of them was key tones. I tried to drill in on that in the question period to no avail. It was an epilepsy researcher. They weren't at all interested in that line of question but <hes> it strikes me as fascinating that this would be metabolite of t._a._c. That's really interesting. I actually hadn't heard about that before made their out but certainly an epilepsy that that's that could be hugely relevant. That is quite light interesting because you know people use c._d. For seizure control <hes>. I wonder if it's also a metabolite of c._d. Of it is that would be interesting. Yeah i mean so there is a long history of treating epilepsies with key genetic diet <hes> and this goes back a hundred years <hes> back to the greeks yeah yeah you know. Kieschnick diet is a complicated intervention and when you when you try to drill down into the the models of specific epilepsies <hes> sometimes it's a seato acetate. Sometimes mrs bid hydroxy meteorite. Sometimes it's something else maybe the carbohydrate restriction but there are certainly elements beta hydroxybutyrate seems to be relevant and in particular. It seems like it's relevant for <hes> some some of the research. I'm doing with seizure like activity in alzheimer's disease so i think ketone bodies as as metabolites at certainly could be relevant. It is interesting. I'll dig up what i cannot send it to you. So following up on one of your <hes> inciteful comments. Could you go into a little more detail about how ketone bodies ottis may link environmental cues such as diet to the regulation of eighteen so one of the themes in aging biology and gerald science are these really close lengths between nutrition and nutrition cues and mechanisms of aging and it's this begins from the study of fasting and clark restriction decades and decades ago but we're learning learning about exactly what are the mechanisms that link nutrition with cellular sensors that sense nutrients are sense metabolites and then decide whether to turn on on pathways that affect mechanisms of aging and we think ketone bodies are one of these sensors so when you fast or if you eat less food your body starts makita bodies and they're not just a source source of energy that helps you to survive when there's not a lot of glucose around they also have signaling activities that can turn on repair pathways and affect mechanisms of aging so we think that ketone bodies are one example of these cellular signals that help your body to sense cues in the environment like what you're eating and how you're eating it and then decide whether to turn on or turn off these deep solar molecular pathways that affect aging through things like epigenetics and protein repair and and things like that it seems that kitone bodies bodies are emerging as crucial regulators of metabolic health and legitimacy as you just explained and it's partially at least <hes> via their ability he to regulate histone diaz tilles activity and thereby influence epigenetics gene regulation for our listeners. Can you explain what in h dak inhibitor a bitter is and why hydroxybutyrate maybe an increasingly useful important signaling molecule as we age of finding that the keystone tone body beta hydroxybutyrate inhibits histone deacetylases this is what really launched us on the idea that maybe ketone bodies themselves have brought effects on aging and that comes from what we what we know about what deacetylases do and the importance of epi genetic regulation in ageing so step back for a second and maybe i'll explain to your listeners <hes> so what is a d._s._l. Delays and what are are we what is epigenetics. When are we talking about. Your listeners all probably know that our genes are encoded in our d._n._a. Sequence of of letters captain each and every one of ourselves and and this is what i inspired me to be a biologist really is is the beauty and the elegance of of d._n._a. That beautiful double helix structure and these perfectly matched base pairs but there's more to us than just our d._n._a. Much more so it's not just what genes do we have but it's also how are they expressed our they turned into proteins and enzymes that do work and when and where this is gene expression regulation or epigenetics epi above everything that happens on top of the genetics so what genes are expressed wherein when is really important to to our biology and also to our health one of the ways that our cells regulate <hes> how genes are expressed is through the proteins around which are d._n._a. Is wrapped so everyone of your cells. I still find this incredible. Everyone of your cells contains about a meter of d._n._a. Every little tiny cell so you can imagine you stretch that out. It's it's your it's an arm link through more and yet it fits inside a microscopic cell and that's because it's it's very tightly wound up mostly around these proteins called histone z- <hes> and it has to be unwound just a little bit in order for other enzymes to get in there and transcribe the d._n._a. Turned into our entered into protein so the winding and unwinding of dna china is a really important way that ourselves regulate gene expression and a key way that we do that is through deacetylases and settled transfers so dna has a negative charge historians have a positive charge they attract that helps to keep dna and histone tightly wound an prevents gene expression. You can modify the positive charges on his stones by modifying find him <hes> by adding an settle group onto them and their enzymes that do this so you basically neutralize the positive charges on his stones and solely d._n._a. Headstones aren't so attracted to each other and then it loosens up a little bit and you can get in there and transcribed genes so in general less assimilation means more positive and negative charges more traction tight less gene expression morissette elation means that you loosen that up and allow more gene expression so settled transfers and deacetylases kinda strike this balance between keeping d._n._a. Tightly wound and opening up to let jeans be expressed so inhibiting deacetylases in general allows the assassination to win <music> over de escalation and so you loosen up crumble anew loosen up pistons and d._n._a. A little bit and you make it easier for jeans to be transcribed so finding that keith home-bodies take part in this in this fundamental process regulate gene expression was huge. We already knew that there are there are some really provocative links between epigenetics between regulating et cetera and aging so for example <hes> we often studied very simple organisms in the aging world like yeast and and flies and worms. These organisms can teach us incredible lessons about how we age. My favorite example of that is the very first time that someone set out to try to find genes that regulate aging our cynthia kenyon at u._c._s._f. U._c._s._f. Who wanted to find genes in worms that regulated worm lifespan which sounds like couldn't be more distant or less relevant to humans than just about anything but the first gene she found was the worm version of the insulin receptor perfectly relevant to people and now we we know just how important insulin signaling has <hes> to human health so even it flies and worms have lessons for studying human aging and in east flies and worms. If you've reduce deacetylases activity inhibit deacetylases just the right amount goldilocks like not too much not too little. They live longer and in many of these organisms. It seems like this is the same pathway as dietary restriction. There's a bunch of really provocative evidence of that. Epa genetic regulation regulation of deacetylases activity has broad effects on aging and here we have ketone bodies part of fasting part of dietary restriction attraction that now we're showing in a test tube and cells in mice inhibits deacetylases and acts like a histone deacetylases inhibitor so that really excited about this idea that ah here's this this drug like signaling activity of the keystone body beta hydroxybutyrate that seems like it should have brought effects on aging and maybe it'll be interesting to the test this out to test the hypothesis that just having kitone bodies around might be one of the mechanisms of dietary restriction and a having till bodies round could help an organism can help rodents in the lab and maybe even help us to live healthier longer john study that you and.

d._n._a eric verdon alzheimer's disease tadahiro shimadzu keith homebodies keaton researcher danny Don keith home-bodies Epa makita timothy clark pistons john hundred years
Washington Post publishes last column by missing journalist

All Things Considered

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Washington Post publishes last column by missing journalist

"The Washington Post has published the final column written by missing Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi who disappeared more than two weeks ago after entering the Saudi consulate and this timbale NPR's John Newman has more in the column. Published by the post on Wednesday kashogi warns that governments in the Middle East quote having been given free rein to continue silencing the media at an increasing rate. He says this is because the suppression of journalists in Arab countries, no longer enrages global community. Now, his own disappearance has brought

Saudi Consulate Jamal Kashogi Washington Post Middle East John Newman Two Weeks
"john newman" Discussed on KHJ 930 AM

KHJ 930 AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on KHJ 930 AM

"And efficiency men effectiveness that you can get more done than you possibly ever thought you could get done but in addition to all those plans of work and recreation of doing the chores and completing our homework at all the things that all of us have to do in our various stages of life there is that's plan of life when it comes to our spiritual life if we are to pray always and that's the goal because when you're in love you want to be constantly thinking about the beloved most recently talking to some married couples actually a few that were just recently married one that's been married for a while and another one that's been married for a very long time and what struck me and speaking to all four couples was the fact that that they constantly are thinking about their spouse because they're in love and the spouse is everything in their vocation and they recognize that of course that's integrated into their love of god and their love for their children and the work they do and everything else but that it's all so much a constant presence for them of the one that they love that they're called to one flesh unity in the sacramento marriage when a similar way we have to have constantly before us the love we have for god and that is not possible unless we have a prayer life of depth and substance each and every day especially for adults and i would say for children to starting even before they can receive communion of a meditation daily meditation that allows us to be alone with our lord as say john newman the cardinal newman has taught us it is we're never less alone then when we're totally alone with god and it's in him that we discover whom we really are and so i really encourage everybody as we.

john newman sacramento
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

46:53 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"Me lazy then a k because right now as i missed it to gary i'm not actually cooking myself at home but it's interesting i'll let you in secret after that interview gary gave me some tips he emailed me over some tips some ways that i need to start cooking and i'm gonna do it soon very very soon when things quiet down the loop in a few weeks i'm going to go on the barlow boot camp and i'll let you know how it goes and effort on twitter as she was talking about the idea of of the tight that musical the band being made into a movie and she says please can i dish in for the band movie i know all the dance moves to forget show they'll be a lot of interest it was going to end up starring in that movie if it does happen now just like gary we have so many interviews and how locked just sitting there and that absolutely free just for you so you need to subscribe by searching for the dan woodson interview that's www t o n and then you can hear amazing interviews with pink sharon selene dion making trainer sam smith we have loads of brilliant interviews coming up throughout the year as well so if you subscribe you can hear all of those i and also you can feature and little feedback siegman like the one we've just done right now all you need to do is get in touch with me and comment on the podcast on one of my social media feet so you can follow me on twitter or like me on facebook you just need search for dan wilson or instagram as well and please it know what you thought of john newman's dan wouldn't view and we'll see you next week.

gary twitter sharon selene dion facebook dan wilson john newman dan dan woodson sam smith
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"Good i'm in your place now what you wanna ask me who is the most devers person you've ever met i james corden asked a similar question and i do honestly have to say the same answer it's kim kardashian maseko questions because they actually saw on tv and he said about james corden what does lure in smell like i was crying i mean i told james corden that she smelt like the scottish highlands for free yes she sees she actually smells like i brew right she literally smells like she drinks i enver consistently constantly all day long and i think she probably does okay what jean of mind do you up solutely hit non non is there any that you dislike a really well i maybe didn't like as much your office song thank you right we talking further but yeah but i think that's because it was so different yeah i know i'm to it wasn't me and i loved you know you'll earliest stuff yeah i love your new single actually 'cause i'm back i didn't mind but you know honestly i'm yeah i still made my like spotify play lewis yeah well that's okay is there a wedding planned arguments career in something but this is it for you now kids sitting down i you thinking sardana ever be quite i think i think she's dreaded no kids thing because of come on let's go let's do everything and window gets kids whatever but.

james corden kim kardashian enver spotify
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"I said to my friend thomas what point do you think this is it never gonna see her again anyone at the top of the masculine is because that's outbound and we'll find the uk she's come in you know so we went up the skew and i was generally really really good she'd met left such markle man walking along to customs unto immigration if she knew what if what if and basically my in the lead actor pose the picture of me on home and hashtag depan home she searched on home on instagram found this pitcher found out who was direct message rand said hey great stalker knows like that it was so men and that was so was that like very soon after that flight in second like ten minutes and i was he was well but she was mega media's well so rather than give give you her number she just found you the molten way well no turns out she couldn't hear a word i was saying the home she was be polite i'll go anyway even better she could air away to say gi didn't own stunned me own that's fitch sue came when she met my moment it was even worse she can understand her is this your life you celebrated your debut album tribute topping the uk chart by building a shared truffaut's how sad already joe what are you doing on the best day of your life building shed so below key before your music career you wanted to be a mechanic true you featured on rudimentary song layers all on me i didn't know it was failed the love.

rand truffaut joe thomas uk ten minutes
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"On a very very positive note though you got engaged i did congratulations thank you very much so you proposed yeah and this was a lady could nanna who i just love the story so much you made on a plane yeah it was it was doing get the octane vertically so do some colin c for many good i so then we went it was for studio plus and they were doing on new new online platform they wanted to compete against netflix and soon as we ask the new year yeah we love it five jim on a plane tiny tiny little island of south sweden of east of denmark called home and so we changed company these flood sit down tiny little fly a move identifying not even talking about my anxiety of and and what are those little moves gives up anyway the the emphasis on the front sees sut right in front of us and i was oh my dad's it was like she is ridiculous women's she's beautiful and then i got really nervous because my best player he's from scandinavia anyways what didn't bring on his right hand and a lot of people do shutter ring on the right on those no the and i been through about brick and i wasn't bothered i don't wanna be relationship or anything i'm just enjoyment everything just came flashing but then i was like switchmen game on i've been i've done this before i don't under i i talk to her and she said light sma maine's of she was like no if i did get engaged where the red wedding ring on my left hand finger because van that goes all the way from your finger to your heart and i was like who's been that went from your finger to my.

netflix jim sweden denmark maine colin c scandinavia
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"All right i'm just going to cover because i liked to credit like everyone to know where my heads up but like lift wolf of wall street i also loved a watch the bodyguard the other day actually i'm going to go with the bodyguard it's amazing he's finance on that one i was gonna say interstellar was that the first time you've seen the buddy yeah now how old he twenty seven says the thing you will young when it came out yeah but gem lunacy surprising how many people on scene especially musicians as well as so many people and so amazing what about the last movie you hate it head thoroughly bad because i watch it every year because quite like it this is weird vibe quite into like kids tv and ins and young is just simple in it when you know in a christmas morning but watch the film called nativity and i'm gonna i'm gonna kill you if you leave this on any longer and i was like i think i'm gonna kill myself the last joke you told token if the bodyguard actually i was in the night he's really weird pie felt like we would three people me my brother and he's mrs fell three people the normal people in a horror movie everything was going to go through but anyway so i like a bit feel a bit by going knock knock his there whitney when here stunned skirted simple fake to my mind simple ineffective.

whitney
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"I do i love doing and if somebody tells me it's not going gret conical block out ten minutes of workout how to get it right out and that's what this whole stage of my life's being you know i realize asian chat with people from my level from my brother to my mom to everyone around me and my fiance telling me this is up for reason she's gonna make you the reason you music not done so well in the past will ever is because you need to rebuild and go again and work out who you are again and a summon allow maybe some videos whereas punching around in a in a closet carbs beautiful women next is so not me that's not the guy and he's just so bizarre now to look back at that and while i was up for the an not now i'm i'm not unlike i just want to make the best music make the most rowers stuff and really connect people again because i felt like a lost connection of last last time you got yourself ten minutes ago yesterday was it all right yes all i like it to be loads like the reason do you do when you're in campaign you wanna see what the reactions are the world lives in internet now and that's the only way finding out the reactions that because that is an honest and also checks or any weird from nights the last movie you loved less median.

ten minutes
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"Jimmy actually caught fussing in because thing illness is the thing that you only look into the health side of your body a lot that's the thing i it it's something you don't know about not something you learn about oh about foods and good foods and everything like that but illness you don't unless you're a doctor you don't want you might gary anything so he's actually thing way you open them you know like a big full of the branch human foundation now i i know so much about area of the brain is actually generally really interesting on fascinating but sort of scary it's scary but also to see like the the level of jews in the level of the doctors and stuff are there incredible ahead this whole oh took the budgets on things that because he saw so important to us taking thousands of police a huge mistake and if you take of the nhs you know the police on that to protect you and then if something does happen the people that can heal you from on their either send the country to the ground bus i pay it dog this kiss awful i date nonexistent first person you talked to today my fiance first person you takes message this is gonna tell i was gonna take me a cabello because i was concussed you're graduating on everything but it wasn't it was riana but still you know you say in my friend camila cabello but then i decided to reenter colours been around longer riano is in the room right now we don't have to clarify which reenter is but she is here the first tattoo it's been couvert up i heard a smiley face this was in my time of leads when i was losing my mind but it was like my own signature he was a shoe pid goof fist this is all journalism pepper style and then my birth and the idea was that if i ever got lost somebody could the new my signature my birth to get me home wasn't practical it's practical ohio i have grown now.

Jimmy nhs camila cabello ohio gary
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"Okay sorry sorry rudimentary joe kane and which would you repeat repeat come and get it and shuffled governors i say we didn't there you bet yourself you know you backs your own i like it you have come back with a huge new single fire may feel like a massive return to what you were doing but there are still it's still like beat you know what i mean it's still a song that you can vary much dance two yeah i think it was key to make sure it was still raucous in real for yes and how dr 'cause that's kind of me that drives something remember is really hard putting the single out because it opens up to the question is what he's about and i say he's about findings health drive again and no lost point and what was so so it's written about your career would you say rather than your personal life both i think everything my career is my personal life i just felt slightly demoralized and in dome by the whole thing because i said today take ten percent of success off yalies senate people normally nuts i felt like i went through a bit it was a real bouts even find talented people to work with almost and it was an easy to be me do you think that something that's specific to the industry no i think you generalists in line yeah i think people do in general like do you think that because you had that big success and then maybe you released some singles that didn't live up to that as a result there were people in the music industry who would put you in the sort of thomas good spots.

joe kane thomas ten percent
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"The other thing i find up suit bamboozling is just the quality level of musical is being slip through the net and being acceptable as good you know and hopefully that's beneficial to people like rudimentary new single these days hopefully my single like hopefully these songs of we appreciate at which through demento song is because he's not just every day what can we write intimidates in the studio student for joker my engineer the i was like autry a number one and then start writing the most simple thing and he was like that's actually really good and i was like no no you just believe that there is now because for niggers that's what's played on the right because i honestly think if you asked a lot of our is that an early the best can do no shuffled deletes repeats john this is way you have to choose from your own songs so i if you three choices you've got failed love with reutemann tool blame with calvin harris and common gases and you have to choose which of those three songs you would shuffle which you would repeat and which she would delete i'm ready scared of them all you're not allowed to do that i are you going to stop by deleting best in it i think site right i'm going to do this in the most gentlemen where possible i'm gonna look at the quality of songs and how much involvement i had in the writing of the song and how much for this this song did such a huge thing for me and my career and really should me into where i am now but for me i felt like i could write better because it was so simple and i didn't have much of the right and so i'm going to dealey feel the love.

engineer autry john calvin harris dealey
"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"The hello there thank you for listening to a brand new episode of the dan worst interview with me dan wilson each week i'll be bringing you some of the biggest names from around the world straight to your headphones and opening up about his life and larry's emotional and very revealing detail today is the singer songwriter john newman the britain joins the pot to talk about his brain gym show why he's no longer working with calvin harris white scandal they're me thinks and how he proposed was go friend it's very very romantic plus taking on regular features shuffled elite repeat is this your life and revealing the five songs that mean the most him stick around late to too because i'll have all of your comments about our previous guests including gary barlow and if you want to subscribe to listen to that interview or any of our the islas like comedic baeau james corden or kylie minogue from last week then do so right now just hit subscribe but this let's go indian and personal with john new joan newman welcome into my little pod is closure a little while since i've seen you you remind pod less time i was at the fist year yeah but if disappeared i'm about now so what happened needed time to stop you know just to make sure it's doing the right thing i was that music cly yeah ersan lee or but if both of birth i just feel like molasses video on a yacht were in a tropical shirt and not singing the lyrics adra and i was like really would the kids.

dan wilson larry john newman britain gary barlow calvin harris james corden kylie minogue joan newman
"john newman" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"john newman" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Which is next on cspan radio our guest this week is judge john newman he has spent thirty eight years on the us court of appeals for the second circuit his memoir is called benched abortion terrorist drones crooks supreme court kennedy nixon demi moore and other tales from the life of a federal judge judge moon will be interviewed by his home state senator democrat richard blumenthal judge newman thank you for joining me i am really honoured and excited about having this conversation regarding your book which is remarkable and fascinating because he led a remarkable and fascinating life as a judge for forty five years and uh this book talk not only about that life in the law but also about your political history and a lot of personal stuff in on the issue of personal stuff i should disclose right at the beginning that i was your law clerk some perhaps around forty years ago long time ago and you also officiated at my wedding so we've been good personal friends for a while as well longtime while the law clerk relationship is one of the great perks being a judge i bow had 95 law clerks you were one of the very first uh seven have gone on to become judges fourteen or tenured professors at leading law schools and one is the united states senate has an accord had any many you'd only one zero they say a senator so far and.

john newman demi moore law clerk united states senator cspan kennedy nixon richard blumenthal senate thirty eight years forty five years forty years