6 Burst results for "John Naughton"

"john naughton" Discussed on Emma

Emma

15:28 min | 7 months ago

"john naughton" Discussed on Emma

"And hello welcome back to the PODCAST. Podcast that is still locked. Down and pair of podcasters. You still haven't seen each other now for several weeks several weeks. It does feel like that as well as time. Strange right now they face it Nehal. Yeah we've not been having our campuses being close to a snow for water week. I think There was two. I've I'm losing track me. Two at time has become strange. Tying feel suspended I feel suspended in time. We probably describe our circumstance. Right now sat in a car. This podcast down the line Because obviously we ought to be in the same place we are. We are social distancing from one another. So yes I in the car outside my dogs because everybody is sleep. It's quite late night. I don't have the luxury of any kind of guarantee or anything cars. A very good record in because they're very very dead inside their designed to kind of debt and old road noise and the engine noise. They're great space to record and But I am literally parked on the side of the road outside my house. I can pick up my Wifi from outside the House and Yeah it's Dark. It's cold and some people just won't pass but addicting. They sold me the link. We go to bring you this podcast. I feel I feel with surpassing ourselves. I think this is good. Yeah it's I I imagine you're probably you're comfortable high so you. My surroundings are nowhere near as as Quirky as yours right. Now I'm in the The tranquility of my study and Yeah I have no cocker Spaniel. You'll be pleased to hear a wandering around me. 'cause he's tie-dyed to walks. Because these self-isolating times we take the dog different shifts so got levingston walked to within an inch of his life or I'm just wondering if all the coding skin to be interrupted by the police coming past asked me whether my journey from my front door to my car was essential or not. The answer is yes it is. We hope that it might feel like proper journalists than some police manno tapping on your window. You Talk I live so we are going to bring you our traditional holiday light edition of Blogs tweets and stories from the news that we've gathered together Mine certainly are not particularly education related as usual. We haven't told each other what we've got an advanced but I can tell you that minor pretty far removed from the world of education deliberately so well one of mine is education related Quite short but the other one is definitely not related. Although I'm sure I'll I'll make some tenuous links But yeah hopefully you will find them of interest and if not you can always switch off. Please don't just stay with us if you can't stay with it. Just it can be freezing in the dark car recorded this. That's worthwhile yeah. Stick it out. Go the long distance for Tom. I'm going I'm going to start this off. You're going to start off with something. Work related this tweet. That came out on a very ominous day. Actually on the sixteenth of March twenty twenty which. I'm pretty sure was the day. That are poor Stevens. We're told that they could no longer be Going into school on their place but anyway this is not related to that. This comes from an a twitter handle at our S and school network. Which is an abbreviation of Research Schools Network? Which is an England based organization? I think have lots of connections with other organizations that we talked about on this podcast such as the Education Endowment Foundation. They have tweeted a quote from a guest blog on the education. Endowment Foundation's website And Quote at reeds treating implementation as a process not an event and seeking to answer the question. Does it work? Hia is how we believe. Our school can best improve. Student outcomes. it sounds quite dry. Leon are light episode but so I just thought I'd I'd mentioned white grabbed me and Tom and I have been an all of our co workers. Colleagues academic had been reading Mary. Miot book of late and She talks a lot about do wing more with less spending more time going deeper allowing teachers more time to think deeply. We've talked about this law in relation to quicken foils just rut really liked this this idea it. The the blog is speaking to senior leaders school leaders mainly but it just makes a refreshing point in the context of evidence informed practice in schools. Who Evidence informed. I dislike this idea that you know implementation is a slow burn Uninvolved a lot of collaboration discussion. Tiny get people on board and also that that really good question that's quoted in that tweet which is does it work here Because there are a lot of fire side than there are a lot of you know really important evidence strategies areas of focus that regain a lot of Menton in education. But I just struck me with this tweet that amidst so of some slightly more vitriolic tweets out there by you know retrieval practice cognitive science which is absolutely Acknowledged to be very very important in the world of education but I dislike the idea that you know with everything we should be asking. Does this work here. And how can we best? You know integrate this in a way. That's going to be right for us and Fowler kids. This is the theme. That would come up all the ones has next. We've talked about this move towards evidence. Informed research informed practice in schools and general. I think a lot of US welcome. I think it's a a real shot in the arm for the profession. But we've we've said more than once said with our friends from impact Wales. We'll said With Professor David James. It's so tempting for that to become the next management stick for beating people with all the next kind of quick fix or or you know sort of thing that the new broom imposes on everybody when they get appointed to a school. And you're and you're absolutely right. There are no shortcuts with this stuff and there are no black and white cut and dried ounces as much as some people might want them to be. Yeah absolutely and when I when I then sort of drill down into the block itself which is quite sure read actually. There was some nice reflect refreshing messages to to school leaders In how they how they grow leadership capacity and how they lead on on change implementation and you know change culture change mindsets and one of the big things that they talk about In this blog with this person talks in this blog by should name him. His name's Roger Higgins Director of Norwich Research School part of the education endowment foundations for search schools network and he talks about the platform for Good School. Implementation is to create the right lead ship environment and carefully plan for implementation as a process not event and he talks about the importance of Senior leadership teams teams working as teams Rather than You know as individuals sort of going around policing everything is. It was just refreshing and for any student teachers out there who have got aspirations for senior leadership roles on the nine. I think is a lot to be found by looking into sort of school culture and implementation of of research informed practice house interesting. I think are sort of mentality building up a little. A little kind of metaphorical drawer marked really controversial. Podcast episodes we should do. I know we said to be recorded. Christmas. Didn't we gonNA really let ripon creativity at some point after Kepler stiff drinks. I think I'm going to add to that. Draw school leadership culture Yeah yeah he said. He says that he says the changes. We're making twenty. Chip habits aren't easy so it's just nice. It's nice to hear that and I hope that it may be nice for any senior leader listeners out there to to hear that two and two You know to to know that we don't see the enemy we see is very very important. Leaders of change in definitely make the occasional Kind of spiky comments about senior leaders sometimes better you know I. I always was aware even even when I was perhaps as a as a teacher. The chalk face kind of cursing the latest Thing to hit my email inbox that they were only being hammered by somebody above them in the same way. Anna wonder whether perhaps it might be worth just putting out their open invitation for any senior leader. Who would like to maybe come on and discuss The complexities and the sort of the pros and cons of different ways of being a senior leader with us. Because I think that could be a really interesting episode. I agree and there's an offer if after I heard done Tom. Okay Kamata senior leaders really WANNA speak to you now. You're up you're okay. So I know we always say blogs and I think I've done this before ended up with a sort of online newspaper column instead but it it's it's effectively a bit like a blog. I suppose I'm cheating slightly This column in. The Guardian called the network which deals with technology and. This is an article that came out. It's written by John Naughton then. It came out on Saturday the twenty eighth of March so just a couple of short days ago. And I'll spare you the sort of fooling the to cope with the bit. That really grabbed me. was a comment that they're making about Amazon. The enormous online giant company Amazon and the role they played in this corona virus pandemic. That's hit us all And just to kind of quickly give you the the punchline of the article the last couple of paragraphs it says that this whole kind of situation with the corona virus pandemic reveals an important truth back to our economies namely the extent to which Amazon has become so central and so powerful he named checks and other journalists at this point. Julia Carrie Wong and says that she's pointed out the Amazon in the US is beginning to behave more. Like a government than the trump administration itself. the author likens the hiring by Amazon of hundred thousand staff and their two dollar an hour. Pay Rice that they've given their staff to twenty-first-century version of F Diaz famous works Progress Administration In in the Great Depression the company sudden support for small businesses around Seattle headquarters so that they might live to serve Amazon. Another Day is. She says akin to a government stimulus package on its decision to stop accepting non essential products from third party. Saleh's who uses warehouses essentially Mites to government style market regulation so the pandemic will radically transform. The Industrial and commercial landscaper Western societies loss of companies. Large and small will go to the wall. No matter how fervent government promises of support our but when the smoke clears in some kind of normality returns a small number of corporations ones that have played a central role in keeping things going will emerge strengthened and more dominant and chief among them will be Amazon. What will then have to come to terms with is. The Amazon is becoming part of the critical infrastructure of Western states. So to perhaps a Google and Microsoft apple is more like a luxury good nice but not essential and the only reason for keeping facebook is what's up in which case one of the big questions to be answered a society's rebuild once the virus is finally being tamed will be. Really difficult one. How should Amazon be regulated? I just found that really interesting because it is absolutely true to to see that Amazon is now becoming so big. It is almost like a kind of like a small country or a government or something in itself and those points about some of the things that he's doing over in America. It's almost kind of taking the reins of of certain things that are traditionally the role of governments And it's just kind of really interesting to think whether this is one of the things that that will come out of this situation a kind of realization that some of these companies are now. I mean you. You just couldn't imagine being without the they have an enormous enormous amount of power and there was. There's been some really scary articles by Amazon. Those are a really terrifying one about Alexa. Outsourced data didn't send you because I know you've got one in your swell just about to say before we started this podcast. I asked Alexa to switch on my steady lights. I'm going to say it's you know she'll switch off okay and funnily enough it some. You know it's something that my half and I've been mindful of since we've been working at home out today because you can you can mute Alexa Stop Her from listening because she does should took speaking speaking about like she actually exist. It does records you. Obviously you can you can. You can look at all your review it you can. You can delete all but does transcribe everything that you've said. Kind of create. It creates micro con recordings of things that it thinks. You're saying to her. It's bizarre so yes an aunt..

Amazon Tom US Education Endowment Foundation Alexa Nehal Menton Endowment Foundation Research Schools Network John Naughton Saleh Stevens Miot Mary Fowler Professor David James Wales
"john naughton" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

15:00 min | 8 months ago

"john naughton" Discussed on Talking Politics

"That's an attack on the most powerful citadels of American capital is she doesn't think in revolutionary terms and she doesn't think in movement terms of mobilizing base like sanders does so in that sense sanders comes out of a different tradition. She comes out of a technocratic tradition. I just wish you know the in eighteen nineties. The strongest date for socialism in America was Oklahoma Kansas Kansas and Oklahoma and And there's a tradition that she could have connected to in Oklahoma and part of the auditing of campaign. She's been entirely defined as within a Harvard Academic Technocratic Bubble. I mean she's she's a working class woman from Oklahoma hardscrabble. Pull herself up all kinds of ways of connecting with it kind of white working class base and she's utterly constrained in terms of her appeal now to college towns in a certain kind of middle class. But I don't think we should underestimate her radicalism and I connect her to Louis. Brandeis the anti-monopoly tradition American life. Where you gotTA break up centers of power and influence when they get to be too big and she is the most eloquent critic of that in American society today even more so than sanders on that real clear politics betting chart only things like bubbles the Kamala Harris bubble the Bloomberg bubble which was a very short-lived bubble the longest lasting bubble was Elizabeth Warren bubble. She was strong over fifty percent chance for a while so interesting in this. The establishment kicked back into gear. James Carville Bill Clinton's guy from back in the day has been pretty prominent and gave one or two impassioned interviews in which she said we can't nominate unders will become the British Labour Party. We have to find a candidate and he said the best candidate with the best stories. Elizabeth Warren Mike Good. Why is she not killing this because he also said because he moved not left? Yeah but still she did have a great story and we'll come onto what Biden stands for and a minute. He doesn't actually have such great story. One other historical comparison. I wanted to run by the other thing. This campaign reminds me of a bit is two thousand and eight and John McCain because John McCain people remember became the Republican nominee to fight Obama in that legendary election. He was dead and buried he was written. I can remember the headlines when McCain GONNA pull out. His campaign is more band and he came. He came fourth. I think in Iowa he did win New Hampshire but he he. He came storming back. The party did decide again. Biden reminds me of McCain's candidacy and of course McCain lost the general election but it's not the way just in some revolutionary era. These these patterns repeat themselves. This reminds me a bit of two thousand eight when I flash back to McCain two thousand what. I immediately flashed back to the importance of the vice presidential nomination because the other point of comparison. Yes they were. Both comeback kids up at the other point of comparison is that McCain was perceived in two thousand eight to seriously ailing man not as old as buying now with many more ailments and that made his choice of a vice presidential candidate particularly important because everyone was thinking not just who is this man. We're voting for president but WHO's going to become president of McCain dies in office. I know a lot of people including my father-in-law ultimately voted for Obama on the vice presidential ground. And so in some ways Sarah Palin choice was an element that really hurt McCain and this goes to the importance of if buying this gotta get the nomination. The absolute centrality of the vice presidential nominee. Not just picking up votes in other parts of the country. Where buying this week. But so people who are voting for Biden can plausibly. Imagine this person as president of the United States because that is going to be on. Everyone's mind we all know. Biden has got to have vacant moments over the next six months had some last night. That's not going to. That's not going to change and the weaknesses of his candidacy which is why he faltered so many times as the front runner are not going to go away. He's got to have a better organization now. A better machine that will come in. The money will come in and and other experts and operatives will be there and become important but there are serious concerns about the quality of his candidacy. And that's why the Democratic Party got in the mess it was that's also why Bloomberg got into the campaign so that issue for the democratic. Party's not going away. Does he remind you really The reason why is because I can't remember the name of what are those social conservatives repair as somebody who won the Iowa the Iowa Caucus. Oh I don't think that she was that one. But the Republicans had a tradition of producing some conservative Christian social conservative he would win the Iowa caucus and that that would then cause a problem for whoever the the party establishment was more in favor of I think the thing in two thousand and eight. Is I recall them? Republican side was that it was McCain versus Romney. That was forever. The Canada I remember was falling away. Then you had a contest between these two now noises move really the hall of then Republican Party Establishment. They weren't complete outsiders but there was a lot about blood between McCain and Bush George Bush Junior. They'd have I mean if you wanted another incident where case where South Carolina played a decisive turn. It was in two thousand when John McCain was challenging George Bush for the Republican nomination incredibly nasty campaign took place in South Carolina that effectively destroyed. John McCain's candidacy that but the one in two thousand eight on the Republican side was between two people on the edge outside of the Republican Party. Establishment Romney's come in much more than it was then that he wasn't that embraced party was to do with him being a Mormon from Utah but also he governed in Massachusetts. He beat in favor of state version of obamacare now the hymnal McCain for different reasons really quite fittingly Republicans. So let's talk about. We're going to see him by will be the nominee and let's talk about what might happen. I WANNA ask a Bloomberg question to start so Bloomberg got into this race. Spent half a billion dollars which is not a law if you were fifty billion dollars but it's a lot in real terms didn't get much money. Someone will do the math and work out. How much each vote costume? It'll be quite a lot. But he always said that this was partly to put his resources behind defeating DONALD TRUMP. And it wasn't like it to be him but he wasn't super fuss about who would be and he'll be fine supporting supporting biden but also the kind of advertising that he was running it was to say vote for my but it was really push the electability issue and there's a lot of evidence overnight that electability when people who voted for Biden were asked. Why electability was a big factor in that. And it's at least possible Bloomberg's advertising has already worked in Biden's favorite against Saunders and not those resources are still lies to Bloomberg could still have some impact on this race. I mean it's not just that the establishment is that the Democrats have got some stuff to throw it trump including money now. My favorite line from Bloomberg is he was asked When he was still a serious candidate for the presidency what he thought about two billionaires running against each other in the general election and his answer was that that was. Who'S THE BILLIONAIRE? Well he went to Las Vegas and better half billion dollars and lost Mike Bloomberg although I think your point is a shrewd one David that he did press the electability issue to the fore and one of the questions we have to answer is why did turn out go up yesterday. Why was turnout knock knock going up earlier in earlier? Primaries and one interpretation of that is that the electability issue was already weighing on Democrats minds and a lot of them chose to stay home or they were uncertain about what they wanted to do and suddenly went Biden's path to the nomination became somewhat clear and continued to be influenced by Bloomberg's mass advertising campaign. Many more of them turned up at the polls. We don't know that for sure because we don't have enough information yet but that's certainly a plausible scenario. The Bloomberg and Biden campaigns are talking and if Bloomberg really wants to defeat trump he will drop out of the campaign soon and put his extraordinary machine and extraordinary resources in the service of Biden. He has shown himself to being an inept retail politician. Helen told me before that he spent an enormous amount of money. Winning New York. He's someone who's very good to point his money and deploying organizations in the retail world of American Politics. He has severe limitations. I think it's been too long since he's talked to anyone who was not an employee of his which can work fine large well-run Corporation. But we're not quite as well in the hurly-burly world of American politics so it's been appalling. How how weak and unorganized the biting machine has been. I think he had one office in the state of California through yesterday if you can believe that not much more in the state of Texas and so having an infusion of organization from the Bloomberg machine into the by campaign can make an enormous amount of money will in Texas. I think Bloomberg can he can do the buying retail politics. He can't do the selling but yeah I was reading yesterday. In the beginning of it was a New Yorker article from two thousand nine and it said no money in American political history. Spend more money buying public office the Michael Bloomberg. This was just to be mayor of New York. So I think the thing about Biden's campaign financially an organization he was as Gary said how normally week was for what was supposed to be the party. Establishments Lead Candida so actually if you look at the fundraising. It was relatively poor from the start. He struggled with endorsements I mean Obama might have been doing some work behind the scenes in the last forty hours but she always had wasn't helping him prior to that in terms of giving any obvious indication that he was willing to support him indeed anytime Biden and tried to get closer to a bomb Obama's to push him away or the people around the bomber seem to push him away so it suggests that actually the party established itself in the donors who are very important for the party supplement is. We had got quite a lot of doubts about Biden now. I think that it's say that. From the point of view of Bloomberg he in Paul wasn't just critiquing what he saw as the weakness of violent as a candidate. I think the weakness of the machinery around him part of his argument at least one of the debates was look. I basically bought a house majority because it was my money in these crucial seats in two thousand eighteen midterm elections. That got us where it is. So you can see scenario. I think in which if Greenberg's willing basically sort of say. Okay here's my money and here's what I can do organizationally that works well on the other hand you know. Trump was in general in terms of the kind of money that gets bent in American politics. A weekly financed candidate. I mean he was a non existent finance candidate except for his own money in the search for the Republican nomination. Two Thousand Sixteen but it was quite easily outspent. Clinton in the general election in two thousand and sixty trump's go on with a lot more money this time on a lot more organization again. I mean he was winning states in the primaries in two thousand sixteen had organization whatsoever you practically ran his primary campaign on his twitter account. But that isn't going to the trump the the Democratic candidates going up against this time. Let's talk about by versus trump so many different perspectives. You can have on. Biden says something I would recommend. People IS THE NEW YORK. Times into did in depth interviews with the editorial board and they published a full transcript and the full transcript of the Biden into use really interesting because it brings out both his weaknesses and his strings. So it's really rambling. There are moments in that however long it took hour and a half. We felt he might be having an episode. Didn't seem to know what was going on. It's very folksy so he's trying to Schmooze them even on the page consent. He's charming but also it's a little bit strange but it's quite policy heavy. I was pointed to it by John. Naughton who often talked to on this podcast because he said you go to read the stuff at the end about the big technology companies just Elizabeth. Warren he's coming for them Joe. Biden's coming for them which gives me because then Zuckerberg might when he realizes that Biden is coming for him due to him what he did Elizabeth Warren but it binds a serious guy and he's got some serious ideas he's got some huge weaknesses and I don't know half there are moments where you think he could be an amazing president and there are moments. We think. This guy doesn't seem like he might have the wherewithal. What do you think that's what I think Before for mixed picture. He's a very mixed bag before I talk about him. Let me just. I need to say a word about Bernie in relationship to the election. First of all this election's gotTA ON FOR AWHILE. And both of them are gonNA accumulate allowed delegates. Secondly we have to remember that. Have to take cognizance of the fact that Bernie. Sanders is the most arguably the most successful socialist politician candidate in all of American history. He has changed American politics in very significant ways he has passionate supporters. Some of you may be in this very room with us right now. And I'm saying this because that is going to have to be part of Biden's plan. The Democrats have a way forward of having a a centrist with a strong leftist presence in the campaign. The model for that is the successful Democratic politician of the Twentieth Century. In America. That's Franklin D Roosevelt. Who was a centrist? But he had to deal with thunder on the left during his campaign and he made a very strategic decision before he was reelected in nineteen thirty six to turn left and to bring the Battalions of the left on board with him. I think Biden. He's got a need Bernie soldiers and that support to win the election and that enthusiasm and that's going to have to be part of the deliberations and negotiations that go on so quite apart from Biden as a candidate if that relationship is not in some ways resolve the Democrats I think are GONNA be in trouble in November and I would encourage them to look at the model of of Roosevelt Thunder.

Biden Bloomberg John McCain Mike Bloomberg Obama New York sanders DONALD TRUMP Harvard Academic Technocratic Republican Party Establishment Iowa Elizabeth Warren British Labour Party America Republican Party Democratic Party Elizabeth Warren Mike Good president Oklahoma Brandeis
"john naughton" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

10:46 min | 10 months ago

"john naughton" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Around the world. You are listening to the foreign desk on twenty four with me under mullet still with me. We Are Carolina Enj and Richard Seymour. Richard having just discussed their President Donald Trump's singular use of twitter in particular. We do have have to look at the potential dangers of this because as is the case with so much social media we still haven't quite figured out built as a species what the rules of this are and it's quite something for the most powerful personal nerve to be party to the process of figuring this vouchers. We go along. Isn't it. Well I mean in two thousand seventeen. There was a study which showed that about a fifth of twitter's value was made up entirely by Donald Trump and his twitter storms storms. Which I think is incredibly telling an interesting? He's obviously figured out. Something really really important about how online soldiers of attention work the problem album as there's a pretty good media skull John Naughton mid a point that we tend to overestimate the short term impact. All the systems an underestimate the rest of the long term impact of these systems. If you thought back to print who would have predicted that it would lay the foundation for the modern nation state from modern industrial civilization as as we know it or even play a vital role in what became the reformation. So we can't really say how this will alter power relations globally. But what we can see is that it's very good for in my opinion. A certain type of demagoguery on the one hand playing to people's sentiments. Because that's how it works as a kind of a stock Mauka sentiments on on the other hand. It's very good a kind of infotainment news as infotainment politics in payment. Everything's going to be titillating. And that's why conspiracies spiracy cultures male rage you know even up to the obscenities of Holocaust. Revisionism tends to thrive and proliferate on the systems and the question China's not. How can we put the toothpaste back in the tube? We can't But what could we do better with this. How could we rearrange it Carolina? Is there a danger. And we'll come back to the dangers of people misinterpreting the language online. But is there danger just from a cybersecurity perspective the concern of course that the account of somebody important might get hacked and misappropriated. I mean I think this. Probably a non small chance that Donald Trump's password is donald trump There is a threat of course but my previous release being in charge of a country cybersecurity policy so this is something that we were acutely aware era of and the twitter account a high-profile leader tends to be something that we in Cybersecurity community would call them monument. It is very important important. It has huge symbolic radio but when it comes to the substance you're not actually threatening the security of state if you take over someone's twitter sir account or president's website or whatever it might be so it is hugely important and it'd be terrible for the country's image and reputation if they let their leaders tweets deter possible at slip like that but overall retirement actually impact on security of of the people in that country. I'm highly doubtful. Richard is the uh-huh danger of a twitter digression by a nation state leader taking on a life of its own as things often do on twitter. And anyone who spent any time on the saw has seen this happen. Somebody can make what may have seemed an innocuous joke. A remark gets taken out of context. Somebody put something entirely invented invented online and even though it can have very little or no basis in reality the endpoint is ruined careers ruined reputations massive massive scandal. Is it possible that something like that could occur at an actual nation state level with proportionately. Terrible consequences well you will. Yeah no doubt. Recall the terrible story a couple years ago when the Pakistani foreign minister saw a fake news article on twitter in which was alleged. That Israel was threatening nuclear claire strikes on Pakistan and replied by threatening Israel with nuclear strikes. We are nuclear power to now. Of course you know this was fake news and this is you know Oprah's leads it's too crude example. Nuclear wasn't going to happen on this basis or anything like it but you could see how more complicated and subtle variations of that kind of misunderstanding. Standing could spiral into something a lot more toxic and a lot more dangerous but I think it's also important to recognize that it's not just a question of you what you say on the Internet and all the rest of it by being there of course the incentive to be there is that it's useful but the price that we pay we give up an awful lot of data about ourselves else and it's a huge amount every time we right every time we school every time we clicked through so they know an awful lot about us now. What does that mean? Well if you're an actor in cyber war and you're very good good at scraping data like for example Isis. was you can locate targets. You're going to locate members of the Armed Forces members of the police and you can incite attacks against and this is what they did on the other hand of course the. US government was also able to use the same techniques to identify individual isis fighters drone attack them and so on. So there's it's a lot of different ways in which our involvement in this is kind of an involuntary conscription because everybody's account can be used to be hijacked We can be we used to share. Means that we don't realize part of somebody else's strategy we can use to share fake news all the rest of it. There's a term from the French Revolution lavelle muscle switches. You know mass conscription and I fear that. To an extent we have not really begun to get to grips with just how much we're part of other other people's designs other people's operations that we don't even know about Carolina is the any calls for optimism about how twitter might enable diplomacy SUV. We compare and contrast say with an event like the Cuban missile crisis. Where a big part of the reason that neely prompted calamity was that the leaderships of the United Insights in the Soviet Union? Were having to guess what each other was thinking. There was simply no way for them to communicate to each other directly and unambiguously and certainly they not in public. Is it possible that the existence of twitter or similar platform might actually reduce the chances of a catastrophe of that sort. That's absolutely the hope rid near think back to various major conflicts throughout the last few centuries not understanding understanding. The other side is a major issue. We order member sort of American military exercises during the Cold War and leadership in Moscow. At at the time were seriously wondering is it. An attacker is an exercise enough. These calculations still made today but in a situation where information is more freely available we might be April to have more sensible policy making and diplomacy is very uneven playing field Lewis who have power the hundred ninety three. UN member states have more more power than non-state part to for example and often the power comes from having information or not having it and what we add. Independent diplomat be be copays that using new technologies non-state parties are actors who are traditionally left out of diplomatic. Discussions can get their points across two who leaders. In other countries. They struggled to make contact. They can't get their message. Historically to leadership to actually decision makers receiving that perhaps through using social media new technologists various sort of other ideas that might actually get some sort of information to the United Nations Security Council for example where they would traditionally. Let's talk a little bit more so there's certainly some hoping there but understandably we need to build up our resiliency to various threats that come with it at the same time. Richard Annoys reluctant to ask guests to have a crack at predicting the future for obvious reasons. Nevertheless I'm going to do it anyway. We've been talking a bit about how how twitter and social media have disrupted diplomacy both for good and for Hill but is it possible that process could accelerate still further to the point point where twitter and other social media starts disrupting the very idea of the nation state as we currently understand it. I think that this is a very real possibility disability inasmuch as you know if you understand the modern nation where did it come from came to a large extent from minute depends on your analysis but some people would say it came from print. Capitalism came came from the invention of print creating imagined communities people sharing literature sharing newspapers and therefore having a sense of being part of a common entity when when you've got twitter and facebook and all the rest of them you have something more like what poor Leo called tally continents. They're not territorial entities there continents the people connected massive people connected by telecommunications technologies and you have new cultural tendencies arising just look at how the alliances ince's form on twitter or facebook or anything else around particular issues like Hashtag birther gate or Hashtag. Indicate these are you know no. These were big cultural battles took place on these platforms. It would be hard to imagine. Donald Trump having been propelled to the presidency. Had He not been such an active participant in so called birther gate so that this sort of cultural stew was not formed within a national state it was not formed within national media or within a national national education system it was formed something a lot looser. Something like sort of right-wing anglosphere. So there's going to be new and complicated cultural formations plus I. I think it's important to say we don't know in what direction this machine will develop and evolve because it will evolve and what we're talking about a snapshot but it will add things like augmented reality. Reality it will add things like smart cities already seeing these being developed and that will require a lot more data a new technologies so all we can say now is that there are tendencies at work which will tend to undermine the national state where that goes is really impossible to firmly predate Richard Seymour and Caroliina Age. Thank you both very much for joining us. That's it for this episode of the foreign desk will be back next week and look out for the foreign desk explainer available every Wednesday. The foreign desk is produced by your goffin and Bill Rudy. Bill also edits the program with help this week from Jack Jewish. The researcher was known potter. I'm Andrew thanks very much for listening until next time bomb..

twitter Donald Trump Richard Seymour president Carolina John Naughton Enj China Bill Rudy US Mauka UN Moscow Oprah Armed Forces United Nations Security Counci
"john naughton" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"john naughton" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Crash sit on top Hove, the very long lasting effects of industrialization often said that the NextWave automation isn't being discussed nearly as much as it should be being discussed by policymakers hasn't really entered political conversation much wasn't a big part of the Brexit discussion. It didn't come up in the general election. Do you sense that we are better place to that one through before it happens? A we are we talking about enough, but took about it in my area become quite a lot. But in the wrong sort of way, and people who trading forecasts of how many jobs are going to get destroyed by the votes if this is pointless, we don't know. And it depends on what the not any policy action, but have firms adjust to it, and what their economic incentives are and other markets the new products that they make they might come along with and so on and I'm very skeptical about some the Fukushima. Don't think truck drivers going to be made redundant by robots anytime soon. So we're not talking in my view about the reading Putin questions, which is what are the skills needs. Really in the kind of curriculum that we have is it really delivering those skills. I think the answer is obviously not. But there's no proper discussion of how you would develop a curriculum for a much more automated robotizing future. None of tool, and we're not talking about the jesmyn costs, and how you get people through those transitions that we know can destroy people's livelihoods on grocery when when you think about the future when you think over the next say ten twenty years, we're going through these profound social changes. We are changing the way we think about a measure economic wellbeing, but that phrase adjustment costs sometimes feel like it's going to be adjustment from hair on the pace of this is such that we're not going to emerge the other side in this new economy, which we measure better, and we're better equipped full that this. Eruption is going to be the story of our lives. My being too gloomy when I think that is it just my age, speaking illness at near each peaking kids. I think if only attend Logica just meant that we had to make that happens a lot anyway. And it's when those adjustments a made depot moose sudden because they're interacting with other changes that are going on in the early eighties. The other changes that are going on were political. It was deregulation and privatization and the very shopping crease in the value of the pound. So that all compounded and made it much more serious. So I would worry now that it's going to interact with trade, walls and Joop Likud disturbances and the consequences of Brexit. I anything disloyally in terms of the transition there, and those things interacting, I think could make you very limited in a way interconnectivity is the biggest challenge of all. Yes. For the reading lights as episode is. Is a teepee podcast underscore. We did a whole series of guides over the summer if you'd like to listen to those we will tweet links as well. The next guy is going to be with John Naughton. And he is going to be telling us all about Facebook. My name is David Runciman and weeping talk in politics. Cheerful note, you're much whichever the molten Raith. He was telling us that we will. So the need.

David Runciman John Naughton Hove Eruption Logica Putin Facebook Joop Likud Brexit ten twenty years
"john naughton" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"john naughton" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"That's this is page eight of the times and it's falling on from an article in prospect where a bunch of current or former diplomats on and off the record argue that the foreign office has been. Amputated by the surroundings of Brexit and by poor leadership. The four office of course has been divided since the June twenty third, two thousand sixteen referendum into a department for exiting the European Union department for international trade and the core foreign office itself. Hence, I think the amputation metaphor, but it's also had leadership which according to these diplomats, has not invested in the processes of developing foreign policy hasn't lived up the foreign office's history of being deeply engaged in the management of diplomacy. They're a couple of really quite striking quotes here which the including Simon MacDonald, who's the current permanent undersecretary asked whether the creation of dex, you and the department of international trade was a good thing responded. It's a thing which I think is a one. In for the hall of fame of British understatement. And Simon Frazier, who actually his predecessor in that role, saying, one of the difficulties of being a diplomat is you tend to be diplomatic. And actually government is a brutal world, which I think is an interesting comment about the way that the way sort of institutional personality and the personalities of people who go into those institutions translate into how. Intra governmental. Maneuvering actually works, and I've been very struck by the fed having a bit to do with them over the years, opiate on one country. One issue there appears to be almost no institutional memory. So you talking to people on a country desk about something that's happened in that country. They have no idea what's going on eight or ten years before him, which I think is really, really important. It's like the US State Department. The foreign office tends to rotate people through assignments, and there are very good reasons for that. And I think that that you end up with people who are very, very strong generals. But as you say, it doesn't mean it's harder for the institution to maintain institutional memory. Yeah, we're moving on now and this is a new story that I don't even know that you've chosen amendment coffins. Let's look at coffins and then we can go to the guardian Highgate coffins taking up too much space. So Highgate cemetery in north London. Famously, the final resting ground of Karl Marx and various other. Famous people not least George, Michael apparently will not allow any further burials in coffins because simply there's no more ground to put them in, which I suppose is a commentary on the the general space crunch in in London. Even when you die, you can't get away from it. It is the most extraordinarily beautiful symmetry though, and I can understand why people make such a push to be buried. Yeah, it's absolutely spectacular. It's a, I mean, I'm a south Londoner myself and have only ever lived in south London, but it's it's a pretty spectacularly beautiful part of the city. So what are they saying that people can still be buried there, but not in coffin, vacant cremated, and their ashes can be put in a relatively small plot, but there will be no more big sort of excavations for full-size coffins. Let's move on again the Republican policy with a focus on Trump in White House. So this is a painting that was seen in the background of. Of Donald Trump's interview with sixty minutes on Sunday, which is a very sort of jovial portrait of Trump in his tie his, his red tie. White shirt has jacket off sitting around table with Gerald Ford, Dwight Eisenhower. Ronald Reagan, George W Bush George H W Bush ABRAHAM LINCOLN teddy Roosevelt. And curiously Richard Nixon painted by someone named Andy Thomas who's interestingly also painted a parallel portrait of Barack Obama and Bill Clinton and a bunch of democratic president playing poker together. So it's not there's a painter named John John Naughton who has done these very, very sort of politicized portrait's of, you know, Trump and Bolton and Sarah Sanders on a boat in the swamp in Washington, going hunting for swamp creatures. It's all very sort of stylized and propagandistic, and this is more kind of feel good. And and just soft focus, but it's a bizarre choice. Well, I would say to bizarre choice of of decoration in the White House except the current incumbent, it's it's probably expected. Well, the himself..

Donald Trump London European Union department George W Bush George H W Bush White House US State Department Brexit Simon Frazier John John Naughton fed Karl Marx Simon MacDonald Highgate cemetery undersecretary Bolton Gerald Ford Richard Nixon Ronald Reagan Washington
"john naughton" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"john naughton" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Because I do believe that that if you add it something very high quality and you'll probably resolved and you do the basic function of journalism which includes investigations and you do that too high level and you're prepared to defend them. That's what people think journalism should be. And. I think the confidence, not eight hundred thousand people who prepared to pay for it voluntarily and to keep it opens that people can read it because it's a dangerous dog place where good news lives, Minnesota gated community, and everyone else has to make do with crap if you can get to a place where people say, will I trust my the God in it is on my side. It is truthful and brave, then I will pay for it. The opportunity is huge. I don't find myself plunged into gloom about where we all today. Almost the features open, different feel quite nostalgic. We'll tweet links to Allen Morton's books, wills, tweet a link to the episode that we did with John Naughton. Jennifer kkob about came genetic. Next week we're talking to France's Fakih Kiama after that, we are going to come back to talk about America because there has been an awful lot going on. We got search. Well, the historian of America first among many other things, and she's going to be joining us before the midterms with Helen. And then we're doing our special the morning after the night before when we will try and make sense of what the voters think. Join us for that one last thing just to that, you know, we started transcribing episodes. So if you'd like to read what we say or you know, so many access to put cost. You can find that under each episode at talking politics, podcasts, dot com. My name is David Runciman, and we've been talking politics..

David Runciman Fakih Kiama America John Naughton Allen Morton Jennifer kkob Minnesota France Helen