20 Burst results for "John Nash"

.NET 6 Preview With Rich Lander

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

01:48 min | 2 months ago

.NET 6 Preview With Rich Lander

"Allu- and welcome into six-figure developer. Podcast the podcast where we talk about new and exciting technologies professional development clean code career advancement and more. I'm john calloway on clayton on. And i'm john nash. With us today. As richard lander riches a principal program manager on the dot net courtroom. He works on making dot net core work great in memory limited docker containers on arm hardware like the raspberry pi and enabling. Gpo programming and iot scenarios. Welcome rich thanks. Great to be on the show before we sort of jump into things. Would you give our listeners. Like a little introduction to yourself Perhaps tell them how you got started in the industry sure Yes so i'm canadian. Boarded bread From ontario and Went to school in. Well i guess my you know my. My dad wasn't exactly a computer and suzy but he thought we should be too so he He would bring home hardware thruster to play with in years on. That's what was kinda my start. Which i an incredibly thankful for you know twenty four hundred hundred baud modem than all the rest of it and then i went to school waterloo and then microsoft natives people knew somehow and which i did know a lot about And in two thousand. And i got hired at school and move to Seattle are ready for microsoft. And i've been there percents so that's kind of my origin story lounge. Yeah so what what What do you do these days from. Except yeah so. I work on the team at worked on like i said i joined microsoft in two thousand. I've been on the team since two thousand three. So i've worked on every release since including framework to. Oh

Allu John Calloway Richard Lander John Nash Clayton Suzy Ontario Microsoft Waterloo Seattle
A Face-Punching Legal Battle

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:31 min | 8 months ago

A Face-Punching Legal Battle

"The ufc has an overwhelmingly dominant position as the biggest promotional organization that runs fights in mixed martial arts. It likely made close to a billion dollars in revenues last year. And that's estimated to be as much as ninety percent of all the revenues in mixed martial arts and it achieved that dominant position both by successfully managing and promoting the sport but also by buying out all of its biggest rivals in getting all of those top fighters from its rivals to fight for it. So you have. These numbers are not public but these estimates come from nash analyzes the business and finances of mixed martial arts for the website. The bloody elbow. He's our guide to this world and is the lawsuit filed by the former fighters against the ufc has unveiled all these documents. That show what the fighters get paid. We had an inkling. We had an idea but now we have like concrete numbers. Okay so here. Are some of the points made by the fighters and here are some of the. Us's agreements i the fighters argue that they simply get paid a much smaller share of the ufc's revenues than athletes and other major sports leagues. And this is true. Those new documents from the court hearing revealed that fighters get paid roughly twenty percent or less of ufc revenues in a given year for the major basketball baseball hockey and football leagues athletes. Get paid close to half of what they're leaks make and in boxing the other major combat sport. It's even higher close to sixty percent of boxing. Revenues goes to boxers. And one of the reasons john says is it. There are several major. Boxing promoters trying to sign fighters it's just a more competitive market so for the fcc. The fighter has to pitch to the of c. To hire him to give them a fight because he needs to be in the afc to make money were in. Boxing promoter has to find a fighter and convince him to let him promote them. Because he's the person drawing the money in response to the fighters. Ufc's arguing that even though it's fighters getting smaller share of its revenues. Those fighters are still getting paid more money over time because the ufc is making more in revenues over time so the overall level of the fighters pay is still going up and john says if the us seaward some other kind of company that response might be enough to win the case if the fighters are just like other workers and their pays going up. Why would it matter. If the fighters are getting a smaller share of the sports revenues than the athletes in other sports. What makes this case different honest with the plaintiffs argue is that the fighters aren't workers like a typical worker on a factory line. The fighters are the product and as the product. That's being sold. They deserve a share of the sales. Dmc has also argued that nick martial arts is still a young and growing sport should not be compared against established. Sports leagues plus. Dear makes the case that a big reason it makes so much. Money is not because of how great it's fighters are because of how good the you have c. is at putting on big lucrative fight nights that effectively. Ufc has a special ingredient that it adds to its fight cards john. Nash is a little skeptical of this one. But what is the special sauce is a little confusing. When of would claim it's their production. It's the way they things but then can you be more specific because you know. Boxing does the same thing they they promote fighters they put on events they they make packages that you know all that stuff that seems to be part of the special sauce is done by other other promotions plus john says if the ufc does have a special sauce and the specific fighters don't matter too much. Then why did the ufc go to such lengths to buy out its rivals and get their fighters and why does the ufc put restrictions in the fighters contracts that prevent them from fighting for other promotional companies. Look there's lots of other complexities in this lawsuit. For example the ufc also makes its fighters except the sponsorship deal with reebok and keeps a lot of the money from that deal the fighters say they could get their own sponsors which they used to be able to they would get paid more but really we're just scratching the surface here on this lawsuit and it probably has a long way to go anyways. But what is clear is that the lawsuit is a fight. About worker power the former fighters say they lost power to negotiate their pay because a ufc made the market for their talent less competitive the ufc disagrees and has argued that it should not be punished for being a successful company by the way we emailed a spokesperson for the ufc about the lawsuit. They have not yet responded. What's also clear right now. Is that the financial life of a lot of you. Have fighters is really hard fighters who are not highly ranked will sometimes get as little as ten thousand dollars for a fight and finders will have at most a few fights a year and they pay a big share of their earnings to their fight camps. The places that run their training and provide coaching things like that and so these former fighters are basically suing the ufc for what they believe they are owed what they argue they would have made if the ufc had allowed a competitive market for their services. Nate quarry one of these x. fighters says they're also hoping that the ufc has to change. Its approach to paying fighters going forward. We deserve our seat at the table. Whether it's talking about sponsorships whether it's negotiating our purses whether it's being able to fight for someone else free agency that's what we truly need in the sport where the fighters will have the ability to really test out the free market and see what our values this episode of the indicator was produced by jamila huxtable. In fact check by sean sal donya indicators paddy hirsch and is a production of npr.

UFC Boxing John Nash AFC FCC Hockey Basketball Baseball United States Football Reebok Nate Quarry Jamila Huxtable
Interview With RZA Of The Wu-Tang Clan

Toure Show

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Interview With RZA Of The Wu-Tang Clan

"Tell me about this movie. Why? Why? Why this movie now cutthroat city to War Katrina Shamikh it the trailer is amazing. Tell me about this movie long. Hamas. Start talking about the movie without sandbox La Brother a long time acknowledging your hairstyle. Acknowledging each other's beards. Dante Very Long. I haven't cut anything in a while you have accrediting theater while. If you want to acknowledge you the first two time guest on this show. So I appreciate that Bongbong Quantity without grades I got breaks down so That's how we doing anyway a man's treasure to. Talk to you again but this film right here. This is like our this is me really conti myself down as a filmmaker. Based in New Orleans after. Noted with aftermath, of Hurricane Katrina. You Watch. These four young men who have always asked rations in charge of desperation. And desperation. Lead. US down the rabbit hole. Was We all know? And hopefully, the goal of the for me as a filmmaker is spire. Out The desperation what could be desperation? Trauma Nation. And that's kind of you know. Kind of summarize the. Trying to do here. That's what the film is aiming to show. I know you're a student of film. So what are the films that are most inspiring your vision of this one like it did you make a mood board or at least in your mind you're like I wanna take a piece of this piece of this a piece of this and make it my own like what is what is what are the fathers of this? And it is definitely I'll. Be, honest with you small struggle with no in class struggle as young black men in our neighborhood. Movie You saw the Cina. Right I experienced things that he trauma neighborhood apart unanimity and also experienced myself in A. Good Adelaide. And a lot of not getting out and so when I got screenplay got invite the screenplay was led by my buddy all. Ready. ACCOST Hurricane Katrina was a tragic thing for. Country, you know we have to your anniversary of the right now and it thanks don't seem to change much in this country right? A sense of. How fasteners? Post the black community or the community more, it hurts other communities because see right now the fan denic, right but even if this story was set. In Flint, Michigan would water was bad or Saturday Chicago is south bothers is going through the struggles. Or set right on Staten Island Faulk, hill either either place. Is destroyers relevant but this one is set a Katrina and and these guys may turn to that desperation. It becomes. A high school, it will lead the films that kind of. Inspired like you know like feelings I'll turn to. I think John Singleton Boys Hood was a great example of somebody trying to get out. Get the situation, the neighborhood itself what the situation was under holding a man I thought John Degree Job John. Nash Story. You Go back to F Gary Gray or set it off. You know what I'm. Trying. To figure out, you know

Hurricane Katrina Katrina Hamas Trauma Nation New Orleans Dante John Singleton Gary Gray Hood Staten Island Nash A. Good Adelaide Chicago Michigan Flint
"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John Nash this is the John Batchelor show I welcome the author and historian Anish lays her book great society a new history published in these last months and now in paperback is also an audio book and I highly recommend listening to it because it puts you in a time machine and takes you back to the nineteen sixties Lyndon Johnson after the tragedy of Jack Kennedy's assassination turns to the correction of the civil rights tragedy for the last hundred years Lyndon Johnson from Texas addressed his Democratic Party he had been Senate Majority Leader during the Eisenhower era and he addressed it with two important pieces of legislation still with us very important the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four the voting rights act of nineteen sixty five he also turned to a man who was out Kennedy relative Sargent Shriver to address poverty in these areas of the United States that we now know the old cities of the east however there was also disorder in the western city itself Los Angeles and we're going to begin there because amides book connects dots that aren't obvious when you look at it from the point of view of twenty twenty but is a recapitulation of my youth because I was in high school and college during this disorder and that he a very good evening to you congratulations for your Buck because you anticipated all of this and I want to go immediately to the watts riots August nineteen sixty five it began with a motor incident I challenged by the police the upset of the community feeling that a young African American was being picked up on by the police and it led to days of upset burning arson dance in the streets this came in the midst of this historic legislation by Lyndon Johnson sixty four and sixty five can you help people understand today why the people who were most going to benefit from the legislation at long last after a hundred years in the civil war why they became the victims of this disorder good evening to good evening I think when you you hear things might get better you want them to get a lot better than human nature isn't it whenever there's reform there to make a demand for yet greater reform but there's an interesting story here dexter Maine today it is the new legislation both the Civil Rights Act and also something new called the economic opportunity act aim to improve life in cities in the economic opportunity act specifically with it kind of sidelining local authorities including police the federal government sending in support for community action that's what was the plan for what and it was already in motion right the law was already passed by nineteen sixty five when this why it happened but the community action was actually the policy was actually an unexpectedly and tragically a trigger for the ride why because mayor Sam Yorty of LA had plans for community action you know and social workers more social workers just as we say today jobs for youth justice he said today I'm a whole raft of plans the mayor had to improve life for blacks in LA the federal government had plans through this new law which was a billion dollar law that would be a trillion dollar law today but they got very quickly the federal government Yorty and indeed the black communities are going into a fight over how to spend the money so the black community what to watch and different authorities black leaders white leaders mayor federal government more progressive thought over where the money would go and how to spend it therefore those benefits that were promised even though summer jobs for teens were late in coming and by August everyone was curious people didn't have air conditioning they don't have television they summer with her king and they thought nothing will ever improve and that was Watson of course police were up a factor there the police force of LA was notoriously bigoted but it's important to remember that your D. the mayor had been elected on police reform so imagine take two years hence we have a mayor in a big city was elected on police reform he might still confront writes the economic opportunity act the office of economic opportunity act was formed in October of sixty four Johnson takes office in sixty three sixty four the Civil Rights Act and then he turns in October of sixty four to tap Sargent Shriver a relative of the now deceased president I recall in your book there's a moment I don't remember whether was dialogue or whether you were describing Lyndon Johnson saying to Sargent Shriver here's a billion dollars and do something about poverty get a you know address it in the country and hence the war on poverty was Sargent Shriver the man for the job all these decades later is more than fifty six years later was he appropriate for the for the task he was an idealist so therefore he suffered some disappointments he was if not critically pragmatic he was just a very good man this book is about good people who wanted to do things for people they love and instead hurt those people one of them would be Sargent Shriver relative of the Kennedys founder of the Peace Corps white later did Special Olympics very good people and yet they were ninety Shriver thought his plans were better he was closer to the Ford Foundation and New York progress into a more extreme plans then kind of pragmatic mayor Yorty or pragmatic mayor Richard Daley of Chicago so she kept vetoing projects or his office did on these mares plans to spend his his appropriations basically his money and he got into a fight with the mayor then we can blame Shriver for just saying this isn't good enough that we won't find it rather than we see there's trouble will send money and you know you more deeply the problem was sending money probably wasn't the answer for LA sidelining the police with social workers probably wasn't the answer the answer might have been greater economic growth and more training there was a very thoughtful report that came out after watch emphasizing training the training however would not be just training for the heck of it but actual training for actual jobs and John in the backdrop of all these stories is the missing character so to speak the gross that didn't happen because had jobs proliferated at the old nineteen fifties rate in the cities then people wouldn't have been as angry but jobs were not proliferating and I'm thinking here of Detroit LA the kind of jobs that that under skilled people could get in and learn to be skilled and Saint Louis so when you see that what you get is payment but not perhaps being career prospects you're pretty frustrated Sargent Shriver was glamorous Lyndon Johnson.

John Nash John Batchelor Anish
"john nash" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"john nash" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I'm John Nash this is the job that you show bobs Evans Terry keeps the website beyond the black and we're off to study the sun ours wore yellow dwarf son is extremely reliable and doesn't have a lot of inconsistencies flares but it is largely mysterious I've learned from Bob over the years and there is now a NASA probe called the Parker that studying this on any new results Bob update on Parker the Parker solar probe's situation it's in orbit around the sun and it's in an eccentric orbit that brings it with each orbit closest to the sun and it completed its fifth close pass early in June and it's now retreating from the sun adequately in this orbit it flies past Venus which will slows it down so we can get even closer to the sun and over the next ten or twenty orbits it's going to break a record and get close to the sun than anything is ever been before and so it's completed the fifth pass live by it's reported everything's operating well they have had the instruments taking data much longer in the approach and they're going to maintain those instruments much longer in the retreat so they can gather data over a large area of the soul atmosphere and interior regions and so we will not get the data from this fly by for several months they once it's completed in the period when it's far away from the sun they they send the data down to us but either way it is functioning and operating and that's the important thing Bob do I remember correctly that we are have a we're very lucky to have a standard doesn't flare and that's reliable even if we don't understand where's John if players but the players relative to the brightness of relatively small but that's not the key the key is the sun is remarkably constant this is you know I do those sold the sunspot updates every month to keep track of the sunspot cycles social cycle is one of the only places we see any variations in the sun's total brightness and it's very small however the wheat you know learning more about our use the key and the sun appears to be compared to most similar sola G. Starsky scholars like it's much more stable and less active than those dollars and that's an interesting thing because it makes it possible for us to be Bob's favorite big space program formerly we always have to be updated is the India space research organization acronym is rob Israel is making important decisions the first one is a surprise to me does it have a man component yes yes we talked about this on your show but you know it's only it hasn't happened so it tends to fade from memory you cannot meet but they have a problem a plan to launch a manned capsule in twenty twenty two the call of god to John and they've been pushing all they actually have two astronauts in Russia being trained right now for this mission and they have help from Russia or anything from us and others to try to develop it and they plan to have two unmanned test flights this year or early next but it even else is this going to be possibly some delays and the reason is of course once again the wind flow pack they had the restrictions that have been posed that question to slow some of their operations so they don't know if they're gonna be able to meet their twenty twenty to launch dates which take pictures because the seventy fifth anniversary of the India's independence and they want to hit that day well they might not and that's the situation with us or at least now there the good news from Israel if I read this correctly yeah they're following the lead of NASA to capitalize or to monetize our to commercialize space enterprises that how to regard this yes yes superficially it is a multi government that runs that's in charge in India these days is a very is a somewhat conservative government tries to encourage capitalism and private enterprise and it's been pushing the their space agency is for to allow and and per minute and actually encourage private companies to do space operations instead of having Israel build and design everything kind of copying like mass and so they announced of a minister in India announced this week that the private commercial space sector in India is going to be given full and equal access to all the facilities operated by the space agency intro now that may be so the problem is once again is a question of ownership will those companies really all on what they do or will they be forced to follow the lead of what is hotel for them and that's basically the transition the U. S. is going through right now when no longer NASA runs the show it just buys the product and right now I don't know what's going to happen in India John the credit classes India from the British days is very powerful and protective of his turf that's really what this battle will be all about and we don't know how it's gonna play out a global map of lunar rock falls Bob can we get one of these on planet earth only not I mean there is different plus you have life hiding a lot of things and there's an avalanche but what what scientists have done is they've taken to they look through the to begin a little reconnaissance orbiter images of the moon that protects the last decade or so and they have now produced a global map of every case where they have identified a rock fall boulder rolling down a hill and with a track and they've located hundred fifty six thousand of these and they made a map and it does seem to be a certain interesting dichotomy about it it seems to be that the mid latitudes where the rock falls there's a majority of them on the near side of the moon but on the flip side is more scattered I have no idea why and that's a real mystery we got a follow up but that's that's the map and it is interesting that for future research why is the box what's happening the one thing they did take from this on is that they appear to be linked almost exclusively to impacts craters which is not really a surprise on the.

John Nash Bob Evans Terry
"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"John Nash this is the John that's for sure and in the car and drove a car this new book is ball of collusion the plot to reckon election and destroy presidents John Brennan is one of the participants in the critical January fifth meeting in the White convened by president Obama about what is to be done with the conduct of the Obama administration through twenty sixteen investigating imagining prosecuting in some fashion the opinion that Donald Trump is a stooge of Latimer put we go to what we can find just the beginning of this theory it's somewhere in late twenty fifteen we don't have a date more is the pity but John Brennan we do have John Brennan who is John Brennan at that moment and where does he get the information that trump is in some fashion of communicating with the crime well John John Brennan at that point is the head of the CIA and he is a long time intelligence official of the government he was a high ranking intelligence official in the George W. bush government he's chief of staff to George tenet yes right was DCI during the attacks and and also the kind of architect of the intelligence for the Iraq invasion which is something that also follows him around so if a significant actor and intelligence correct and that's very important John because one of the things I I I tried to stress the medically in the park is that this is not Brennan's first rodeo and my theory here is that they needed a narrative to explain a number of things that they wanted to accomplish a strategically and Brandon would be a natural person to rely on for that because as I try to explain in the book there is a long history of the Obama administration exploiting intelligence for purposes of political narrative right they became sophisticated actors at least twenty fifteen if not before and there is a suggestion that it was used in the Iran deal run on their suggestion that once you go down the trail of looking at secrets at jams that it's too tempting not to use it for your political advantage well we're got so we're not beginning at the beginning we're beginning with brown right he guesses information not from Mike Rogers the NSA however the apparatus in the United States she gets from G. C. H. Q. what is that that is the British equivalent of our NSA and the it they're basically the signals intelligence arm of the of the British intelligence happen whether they give him well we don't know everything that they they given the fact there's an awful lot we'd like to know yeah but what about what he was taught that's one of the joys of your book and it's not a question marks when you get down to it as well to be filled and and eccentric well who knows yeah I guess its sequel stuff right right if somebody puts a gun to my head but my observation of the intelligence agencies from both working with them over time observing them even more is that they are essentially I global us is a loaded term these days but they're trans national Perretta progressives in there in their orientation and they believe very strongly in the New World order that the United States and then our European allies mainly Great Britain forged in the wake of the of this second World War and I think they saw trump as a threat to that because of his semi isolationist rhetoric I I really think it's a it's an over wrought description of of of where trump was coming from to call him you know complete non interventionist what I what I took him to be arguing for and maybe this is because I I feel this way myself so you have to police yourself in that way but I've always thought he wanted more sensible interventions and he did think that we needed a retrenchment and that we had made some very bad mistakes in at at the time of the turn of the century particularly with a democracy promotion it center but a lot of his rhetoric did did lend itself to an idea of a less American intervention in the world more demand on our allies that they take up the burden of their own defense particularly the financial burden of it and there's a lot of rhetoric from trump that is ante natal rhetoric or at least NATO skeptical rhetoric and I think that spooked be a number the allies a great deal and provoked a lot of intelligence flow to their like minded friend John Brennan that was hostile to trump and and because some of trump's rhetoric was sort of an olive branch to a counter top he talked open detente with potent AS striking only rand Paul matched him in the debates for the Republican and a lot of the a lot of the people whose ox were being gored by Heinz and policies that the truck was talking about were concerned that being being amiable toward Bruton was not much different from being what if what we think they hurt what what what IM alarm them that they passed on the planet I think that you know I I think there's a lot of there's a lot of connection between trump's business yes and Russians right there's there's real estate commerce there we now know that the that the trump organization was trying to build a strong tower in in Moscow I have a hard time believing that there was a great deal of that information that was coming in to to burn and because the the the investigation seem to been somewhat surprised by that when it will work what what I what I want to know is did they hear something along the lines of tell Vladimir all have more flexibility to the election and where McCarthy and your McCarthy ball of I was waiting to use that political Lucien the plot to reckon election and destroyed presidency when we come back what John Brennan heard and what happened I'm John bachelor this is the John Batchelor show.

John Nash
"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Is John Nash's cell Allen girls as new book is Gettysburg the last invasion the first day at John Reynolds sends his court to block Kerry he score coming down there's another core coming from the north take you'll we know it they don't know what John Reynolds to send for the eleventh corps to come up this is Howard score and the reason it's important to know Howard was a one armed man who was a Republican and that means that he wasn't part of little McClellan's gang that dominated the commanding levels of the army of the Potomac Howard score the eleventh corps had been very badly mauled at Chancellorsville and it was seen as a weak or fragile core that would break easily John Reynolds knows this but that's all he has that day he sent word to meet this is laid out a mid morning on the first but meets very far away and he doesn't know if meat respond me doesn't get the word I think till about noon time and then at ten fifteen as John runs his commanding hers first core to hold the line of something happened something shoots out of the woods and what happens to John Reynolds professor Reynolds is hit by a bullet just below the left ear kills him almost instantly falls from the subtle and suddenly the first court doesn't have a commander anymore Abner Doubleday the senior division commander has to take over but it means that the man who had designed this encounter and have the whole thing in his mind as a plan now certainly has been removed.

John Nash John Reynolds Kerry Howard McClellan John commander Abner Doubleday Allen professor Reynolds
"john nash" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"john nash" Discussed on KGO 810

"John John Nash wheels is a magnificent long and very careful telling of the presidency of Woodrow Wilson in addition to his life before and his life after right now however Wilson is depressed and despairing working very hard in the White House and then he falls in love is the spring of nineteen fifteen and the woman is Edith Bolling she's a widow she dot her husband died in nineteen oh eight she's born eighteen seventy two so she's much younger than Woodrow Wilson he graduated college eighteen seventy nine she is reluctant when the president romances her why Scott what is what is hold her back well a lot of things Peter bowling golf was a young widow she had been from the time she was a young girl in Virginia and she was a direct descendent of Pocahontas I should add would be in Virginia growing up in the civil war south she had of her job as a as a daughter of a man who had lost much of his fortune and wasn't really allowed to go to college because the songs in the family could go head to do that the money had to be safe for them the job was to look after her grandmother who is an invalid so you just grew up being a great care taker so she will really never had a chance for romance she married a man named goals who had a famous jewelry store in Washington DC up until a decade or two ago in fact the family still own the the jewelry store and anyway she had never really had love in her life this marriage to to golf was was pleasant enough but there really was no romance to it and then he died rather suddenly she became a business woman running the business herself and with some of her relatives so this was a woman now in her mid forties who has really resigned herself to a life of solitude and I would say a lot of listeners and now through a chance meeting and a kind of cute meat that was arranged by doctor Grayson who was a friend of hers and of course the personal physician of the president will soon meets her immediately falls in love and desperately wants to marry her well she's so reluctant because well she's close all those doors she has put all all her emotional feeling she's put them in a drawer and took them away and now here comes Woodrow Wilson wanting to open that drawer and wanting her to come out in the world and not only that but to come out in the big world to come out and become the First Lady of the United States will have a happy ending by the end of nineteen fifteen by the war immediately falls into place because while Woodrow Wilson is writing love letter after love letter to Edith Galt Edith Bolling golf who will become Edith Bolling Wilson the Lusitania as is sort of torpedoed by a German submarine there are Americans dead a hundred and twenty eight and this means right now that the Republicans especially teddy Roosevelt have an issue to go after president Wilson because he's hanging back but first Brian the man whom Wilson paid the one man he paid for his election was William Jennings Bryan the great populist speaker three times candidate for the presidency for the Democratic Party Brian does not want to challenge the Germans he believes the president is challenging them unnecessarily the puzzle here is was Brian aware that the president was not going to go to war did she think that this was war steps that the president was taking well I think he was afraid of that I think he was afraid that Wilson would be listening to the jungle west's such as teddy Roosevelt I mean the Republicans were the rattling a lot of savers and there was a great swelling movement in the country for us to get into the war this was a moment you see well Roosevelt and McKinley had sort of experience this ten or fifteen years prior with the Spanish American war and basically the issue is what is the role of the United States in the emerging twentieth century and or we to remain this basically isolationist country that is not part of world affairs or are we going to be in it and if we are going to be in it shouldn't we be the leader of it and so here was an opportunity the Republicans saw an increasingly more Americans for America to assert its new position in this new century since the Republicans took an advantage here and they pressed to teddy Roosevelt especially making accusations against Woodrow Wilson who did not go to war not for several years and things would change dramatically after the sixteen election Scott just a moment here before we turn to the war and then the peace afterwards in reading for all these notes I find Bryan's case very tractive did Wilson funded attractive was Wilson of the say the same scale of pacifist as Brian well I would say not like I think Brian really was a rather fewer pacifist and certainly believed in an American isolationism at this part at this point Wilson wanted to believe all that but he felt the world had changed he felt that things were that though the world had shrunk geographically because of the of changes in transportation and communications in commerce I mean no country could stand alone no country was an island any longer America had business interests around the world you mentioned the Lusitania and that's certainly the most famous historical example of what was going on over on the high seas but Germany in fact was would over the next few years torpedoed more than a dozen ships hundreds of Americans would lose their life let's go to some of those triggers in nineteen sixteen because we have to get on to the war fighting Wilson a Scott Berg is the author I'm John bachelor this is the John Batchelor show.

John John Nash fifteen years
"john nash" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:40 min | 1 year ago

"john nash" Discussed on KGO 810

"John Nash this is the John Batchelor show I am in Baku Azerbaijan with my good friend Christopher Nixon **** of the election seen institute we are here thanks to the generosity of the embassy of Azerbaijan to the United States LA Silla mon office the ambassador and my partner scholar dot com a global technology from transforming the retail space we are in attendance at the end or the middle or the conversation about and. conference run by the state off under the Republic of Azerbaijan shorthand so fast. for the investor and thinker about the future it was entitled impact investing opportunities and challenges for institutional investors that is a very dry way of saying what we've learned today and we're very lucky to have real hot tall wore a futurist who set the meeting with the presentation of the morning and close the meeting with an excellent summary of what we heard so we're lucky enough to have him here to comment on this very specialized language wrote a very good evening to you thank you very much for joining us and the first question was the one that puzzled me as the day started at the Hilton and Baco what is a working definition of impact investing good evening to you well good evening John thank you for having me on your show. so I think what we established over the course of the day in layman's terms is the impact investing is about an intentional approach to investing. which is designs to bring about benefit the people on the planet whether that's creating new jobs whether that's investing in infrastructure that enables the growth of an economy whether that's dealing with environmental issues women's emancipation raising educational standards or tackling are environmental challenges and climate change for building the energy infrastructure for which we heard we need to spend twenty seven trillion dollars by you know twenty fifty so intensely impact investing is about being very intentional about where we're trying to have an impact with our investment funds Rohit Christopher **** here thank you so much for being on the program my question balls the measurement of impact how do we go about actually ascertaining what the impact of our investments are it seems like it could be a squishy number but it what we've heard today is that that's not the case maybe you could tell us a little bit about that so so there's there's two ends of the spectrum here one end of the spectrum is that if we say we really investing for the good of people on the planet then the question is what number do you put on the survival of the planet and the human race and and you cold put an economic number on that but then what you can do the other end of the spectrum is break this down into the individual initiatives that say what is the value of the jobs we create what is the value all reach you seeing death rates due to pollution what is the value of an hold sing like inspect and see what is the value of having better rural infrastructure that allows you to create new jobs so that's what people are trying to do at the moment is to find tangible ways of measuring is very diverse set of of activities that full under the banner of impact investing in we have sixteen sustainable development. ghost in the U. N. that cover the whole spectrum and then a seventeen co which is about working together to achieve the first sixteen goals so they're all litri a hundred and sixty nine sub goes underneath those top sixteen the people trying to measure against a because we're trying to attract private capital whether that's nations own sovereign wealth funds with us pension funds whether that family offices whether that see other types investment fund because they need to see a return on their investment they want something very measurable to say if you're asking me to invest in something that has an impact then show me what the cooling the double bottom line what is the financial return on my impact on my investment likely to be I'm how do I measure the impact that you say you're going to have whether it's female emancipation whether it's education whether it's job creation all tackling climate change or building the new energy infrastructure people want those measures they're very hard to create it's very hard to get the data but we get seeing closer to proxies for what those measures might be you happily began the day with a power point presentation for the investors on how to think about their decisions in three levels hi won't characterized in the the Papa bear mama bear and baby there are I the three please explain what you talked talked about and how that help the investor class listening to you when I read a lot you'll your interpretation of the three best so Papa bear is about one of the things that we continue to have immediate impact in the next twelve months and some people's time horizon is really the next twelve months so that's things like social ventures where we can see people recycling materials to create new businesses I'm I'm having an impact within twelve months but the economic. and job creation but also having a benefit of reducing waste in the economy using all of us the mama bear one I guess is about creating a platform for growth and touring change and that's what you're looking at the kinds of things that might reduce the amount of meat and produced by cows and sheep by feeding them different things that dramatically reduces the amount of makes a missions from so it is things that you know science and technology we need to invest in now that will have an impact in the next one ten what was the time line be for mama their mama berries yeah the one to three years Papa bears the next twelve months and then baby bear is about investing for the long term future that vision we have what do we want our child to be like what we want the world to be like for a child so those are the developments that might have an impact on the four to twenty eight time frame so when we talk about things like. a job creation we're talking about one of the industries of the future that we would be investing in now to create the next generation of jobs so whether that's with Thomas vehicles synthetic materials growing buildings all of these things at the moment all just either science or proof of concept of the first prototypes investing in those things that create the jobs that might be lost today to the automation of existing industries in the decline of existing in the scripts those three time frames a really critical if you're an impact investor what we're saying is you need to be really clear on what is your time frame for investment and therefore what types of things do you need to think be thinking about whichever your goal is for impact investment might be energy it might be climate it might be job creation. to bring this down to our listener level one of the things that I found fascinating about this conferences that impact investing isn't just about big projects like irrigation in Central African Republic. or other countries in Africa it can also be done at the individual level based on where individual investors allocate their capital maybe you could talk a little bit to our listeners about things that they could do to be more of an impact investor on the individual level. so as an individual this is about being clear on what kind of impact do you want to have and not starting to say. where do you make your investment by putting money into a business or by buying the goods and services who you trying to promote so if for example you want to drive job creation. you might say that you're going to put the money into the local branches that are being started by people who just lost their jobs in the car factory and you don't really care what the crates and you just want to encourage them C. guard you so you can buy the part of the services or might be saying I think that it makes a lot more sense to be making clothing in a local market rather than shipping it across the planet and so I'm going to put a little bit of money into investing into your business this making locally produced teacher so handy Croft soul growing food locally that instead of having it shipped across the country so you can you can make very targeted choices as to how you use your money whether it's a three dollar purchase in a store or a five thousand dollar investment and the great thing is now with things like crowdfunding platforms I can invest a hundred dollars in someone's business to help them get it going a very local level which is a great way for people to be able to support the things that they want to impact or even in the stocks in the asset classes that you invest in even if thinking about where you put your money in the stock market that can also have an impact as well yes and no I mean if I chose to put my money into a twenty billion dollar corporation I can show my support for the corporation but I'm not sure that.

John Nash John Batchelor Baku Azerbaijan Azerbaijan Christopher Nixon United States twelve months twenty seven trillion dollars twenty billion dollar five thousand dollar hundred dollars three dollar three years
"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"John John Nash. migration always in the news but this is profound. the idea of men homo sapiens travelling from Asia across the sea bridge boring yeah it is sometimes called when the oceans are much lower sometime tens of thousands of years ago but the exact number is always a fascination because from there all of the American Indians the native Americans spread across the continent there's lots of DNA work however that doesn't come to the big theory of when I welcome professor Lauren Davis of Oregon state university's dip department of anthropology for his work written up with his colleagues in science magazine which is the premier peer reviewed magazine for scientific development in America matches nature in the in Europe and the professor takes us to a site in Idaho called Cooper's fairy that he's worked upon for more than twenty years it began in nineteen ninety seven but this is it discoveries here are a challenge to the general theory that I learned many years ago that the first the first settlers in North America the native Americans at a place that we call Clovis the Clovis Indians and they came via a land bridge in other words they walked well this is another approach proventia will begin location first where is Cooper's fairy and what is this well good evening thank you for having me on your show. where we're located is in western Idaho so the coopers ferry site is found in the bottom of the lower Salmon River canyon which is near were Oregon Idaho and Washington come together at the junction and the seven river canyon is a very deep canyon into north American grandkids were three it's a little known fact so in the adjacent canyon for the Snake River is hell's canyon is the deepest. so it's a pretty rugged landscape. dry and hot it's not uncommon in the summer to get temperatures well over a hundred and ten degrees there so yeah have to work outdoors of course all day to do the excavation so we have to.

Idaho Oregon John John Nash. Snake River seven river canyon Washington Salmon River canyon North America Cooper professor Europe America science magazine Oregon state university Lauren Davis American Indians Asia
"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:58 min | 2 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"This is the John Nash's it is twenty one January nineteen house of low George this is a distinguished audience the very and controversy London naval conference of nineteen a new book at the crossroads between peace and war identifies what is important to understand about the remedies for conflict and treaties and how they're used by the powers when peace and war and finances and economic us the best ability are the questions this convergence so though we speak of nineteen thirty in the events of the nineteen twenties and certainly looking to the catastrophe of the of the second World War in the nineteen forties these see is a narrative that applies exactly to the balance of the twentieth century and here in the twenty first I welcome one of the authors and also editors of this collection of essays John now he serves as the Alford they're not Han professor of sea power grand static strategy in the strategy in policy department at the Naval War College where admiral my Han spoke and wrote at first it's important here that my hair Mahaney and naval theory very much dominates the thinking in nineteen thirty as it continues I'm told here in the twenty first century certainly in in the minds of our Asian adversaries professor of very good evening to you I also mention your co editor and author Christopher bell I go to this opening of the conference where George the fifth speaks very ponders Lee everybody's around in their best clothes and they're looking to success in these next weeks it will continue in January February and March of nineteen thirty the world knows that there's been an economic disturbance in the key for the crash in nineteen twenty nine and yet there is and a hunger for peace this particular conference however will not put Germany that Hitler rights because they don't exist yet the Hitler is still an aspirational political player in Germany against the Americans and the British as the second World War doesn your this will Pat United Kingdom the great British navy the United States the brick building tools in a two ocean navy of the United States and Japan against each other in the Pacific France and Italy are also in attendance I begin with this question the Japanese they arrive they already have a a burden it comes from the nineteen twenty one Washington naval conference and the nineteen twenty seven a Geneva naval conference what he is in the Japanese mind as they arrive and listen to the king's remarks good evening to you first let me thank you for having me John on your your program to speak about the this period of time the nineteen thirty conference Japan when they came to this conference they had already been involved in two previous attempts at naval arms control the Washington conference of nineteen twenty one and two is you mentioned and also in Geneva in nineteen twenty seven and the purpose of these three conferences was to try to arrest the naval arms competition that was taking place between the United States Britain and Japan these three powers had aspirations to play a great role in the Pacific they also had substantial holdings of the Pacific the buildup of their navies threatened each other to one degree or another and so Japan was concerned that they wanted to try to arrest in Washington twenty one twenty two try to stop a large American naval buildup which they saw as threatening to to them in the Pacific Britain to wanted to try to stop this American naval buildup which had been a legacy of the first World War the U. S. entry into the first World War lead the United States to build up a great maybe what president Woodrow Wilson called a navy second to none the Japanese were frightened by this sleep because they believe that threaten their security so what Washington the Japanese were trying to stop this American naval buildup so were the British and what happened was that Washington that they were able to hammer out an agreement among these three powers and so Japan when approaching the nineteen thirty London conference was trying to improve upon the position that they have one in Washington back in nineteen twenty one and twenty two so their fear is that the United States is going to build up its made and be able to project its power in the western Pacific and threaten the security of Japan in the western Pacific Britain at the table it's led by an extremely able negotiator cranky I and he works with his new prime minister Ramsay macdonald who is the first labor prime minister everywhere what is Craig he's rich what does McDonald want to happen at this conference given that he already has parity from twenty one and twenty seven with the United States how do they regard the Japanese the if this is a fascinating story Robert Cray he is an expert one the United States and naval arms control he is a foreign office official who has made his special read as you said his study the whole question of armaments and competitions and ornaments at the time this was considered vitally important to world peace because it was thought that one of the major causes of the first World War was the orange competition between the great powers both on land and sea in particular the Anglo German naval rivalry somehow led to the first World War so cranky is a very important official in the foreign office because this is what he has mastered this is the brief he has mastered and so he is the principal adviser to the prime minister to the British government about how to arrest this competition armaments among the great powers great Babel powers United States and Japan now Craig he has an interesting career he then goes on to become the ambassador Britain's ambassador to Japan at the outbreak of the Pacific War nineteen forty one and indeed he was to write a fascinating memoir later in life behind the Japanese mask in which he wrote about how the war in the Pacific occurred between Britain and Japan crazy is giving advice to Ramsay macdonald the prime minister as you said rams of McDonald was the first labor prime minister in Britain he is committed to trying to hold down the cost of naval expenditure he is also someone who firmly believes the competitions and armaments can lead to war so he wants to try to defuse the competition and and they will forces among Japan the United States and Britain he's concerned not only about Japan he's also concerned about the United States as well so his goal in this conference is to try to limit naval armaments among these these three powers now to make Donald he sees that if the cream it can be reached between the United States and Britain they in turn will be in a position a stronger position to negotiate with Japan limitations of armaments as well so for McDonald's it's a it's a three player game here that's very important it's Japan and the United States as well as Britain or the three big players and he's concerned about both the United States and Japan in nineteen thirty the navy's were the largest weapons systems on the planet the battle ship the dread not class the cruisers heavy cruisers light cruisers and then this new entity the aircraft carrier we will speak of those classifications when we come back because we need to turn our attention to the Americans especially a new name to me that professor professor our will explain is a very important player here his name is William V. Pratt admiral later chief of naval operations who is Herbert Hoover's negotiator at the London conference nineteen thirty what you see in nineteen thirty is a template for what you'll see and all international treaties believing.

John Nash George one degree
"john nash" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"A John Nash so this is the John basso shown by his bootstraps that's will scanner and there is a wonderful way to tell this is a romance but this is a history of one man coming with nothing to America and a skill that he learned from his mother who was bent with poverty and striving to be a silk weaver in Spitalfields in London he's now in America and he follows a young man named Valentine who come before him also and they they had they had assets and that was they knew about Silk they knew about dying they knew what the process looks like but there was a struggle to make it work in America it says found established eighteen forty eight for will Skinner's farm hi he established in Massachusetts how to get to Massachusetts and how did he get the money to start his first firm one touch on a brief twenty just made earlier which is that Skinner was poor and when he came as country he had nothing of any material value but he did have something that no American had at the time and that was a knowledge of how to dye silks and that was extremely valuable because as a as I mentioned the Americans are trying to figure out how to get in on the soap business and they needed the skills of the Europeans in order to be able to help them launch the silk industry in this country so Skinner came to America and he took that package of Toronto arrived in New York City and unlike most of the people in steerage most likely he actually had a job waiting for him here the son of the box it's gonna work as in a dye house in London and the son of that his boss had come to America few years before and had started to die house in north Hampton Massachusetts now when Skinner arrived he thought he was coming to help his friend Valentine with his die house in fact on time at that point had gone to bankruptcy the terrible businessman and he had not been able to parlay his extraordinary skill into a successful business when Skinner was able to do just that he took over Valentine's die house in eighteen forty eight and launched his own die houses owned business and from there he moved into gradually few years later manufacturing silk soaks read with a partner and that didn't work out so well leans Skinner was an extraordinarily forceful personality as one can imagine or to survive his childhood and to come over to the states when he did and he wasn't so much a team player he was very much been independently minded man and so his partnership with dot was Joseph when it didn't last too long scare them branched out and launched his own mail up river in an area that was completely there was nothing there there just a few farmhouses if there was an old building he converted into a silk mill and ultimately that area that he moved into that was the middle of nowhere became the villages Skinner bill because it's so it's not became so successful an entire village grew up around he did marry he married the bought his partners sister Warner yeah and and that was a very successful marriage but he lost her after two children were born how many more children were born correct some of it's Nancy Warner who is Joe the sister they had two children and then Nancy died prematurely after the birth of their second child and Skinner was very much in love with her and wrote just a heartbreaking had a heartbreaking home inscribed on her tombstone which is still there in the north Hampton Bridge Street cemetery north Hampton Massachusetts and then he was a widower for two years until he met and married a woman named Lizzie Allen Sarah Elizabeth Allen and he had very good taste and wives yes they are they are partners full partners in both instances yes one one thing to also know about Skinner is that he had absolutely no formal education I mean this is a kid who grew up in a garret in an attic he was working from the age of four for his mother and then he worked for some some Spencer on helping them with their business he was farmed out to them and then he worked for the dye house with his father you know he never went to school but he trained himself he he was self educated as you mentioned earlier so he carried a book he was taught to read by these ants that he worked for and he carried a book with him every single day and memorized poetry Shakespeare and the Bible I mean he had a vast knowledge in his head and but felt inferior his entire life because he was not an educated man his two wives were both very well educated and he made sure that all these children including his daughters were very well educated Skinner unlike most men of his generation fully believe that if a woman wants to have an education she should have it this is the nineteenth century when that was extraordinarily unusual and Skinner's own mother had been a literate you know couldn't couldn't read or write and he saw how that had affected her and he did not want his daughter's to be affected one way by any lack I wanna give will Skinner the credit also intellectual property right for recognizing in eighteen sixty that a man named Dimmock invents a machine that will be extremely useful and becoming a prosperous silk manufacture but he goes on a journey as a sentimental journey in addition to business he travels back to London and he goes to the patent office to register Dimmick into game partners but it's in any does body needs in that journey that is introduced to his mother his very aged mother and I think that's the saddest moment in your books are it's true so Skinner was a very smart businessman use a big risk taker and so he embarked on the speculative journey in eighteen sixty which took him back to England with this invention that he was going to get the patent for and so the patent rights in Britain and you know taking the journey was a risk in and of itself it taking him so much to get away from England come back to America and now he's going back to England when he's there he goes to visit his mother as you recall and it's a it's a terrible scene his sister that he takes him to visit their mother he literally loses the power to speak in her presence issues so debilitated for whatever reason she was she couldn't see so she was she was blind for some reason she could've been drunk which is very characteristic of people instead of field skin grew up on beer he didn't even need it hardly drank water as a child and because the water in England was so foul in London so she could been drunk she could have been a prostitute she could have resorted to that and she could had syphilis which could have taken away her I think there's no we don't know why she was unable to recognize Skinner visually but she couldn't see who he was showing that there is a male presence in the room skin was so shocked by her and so taken aback that as I mentioned he couldn't speak and his daughter his sister lied to their mother when she saw her brother's discomfort and said that he was her husband the scanner stayed in the shadows his mother had no idea her first born son had returned home after fifteen years and then they left and Skinner went about his business in England sold the patent rights to this invention made a lot of money and then decided his second week that he had to go back and make its presence known his mother one more time before coming back to America and so he does he goes by himself this time he doesn't go with his sister and the scene again his erection and however it went down he doesn't go into detail but he wrote his wife afterwards and he said he seeing his mother made him well she was it it felt like essentially itself so disgusted that he was sick the rest of the day and he's saying her literally made him the first time around because you know rendered him speechless and the second time around made him literally feel my sense of an hour is that she was ill some in some fashion perhaps it was syphilis but she was somehow she was disfigured or mutilated there was something that happened and he doesn't tell us about it but let's go to the success of well Skinner away from submittals field because he travels back to America and a long comes the catastrophe of the civil war and it never occurred to me that that was the secret for the success of stock in America the ads government imposes a sixty percent tariff on imported silk and Skinner bill is exactly the right place to prosper all through the eighteen sixties and Mister Skinner quickly with Lizzie as his partner becomes the prospers person we left that morning of may of eighteen seventy four this silk association takes off American silk is very popular in America finally it travels widely and he has a very progressive attitude towards his work force and towards doing business in America for fifteen years correct and just to emphasize the point you're making earlier the civil war is what made this so can you see an American take off so obviously was not very popular in America everybody wanted it no one wants to make no one wanted American made socks and that was the difference they wanna soak from Europe because that was a fine so no one thought that so could any quality could be made in America the democracy was too young to be nice to do it and and the first attempts at it we're we're pretty terrible you know so the colored dyes were were often horrible would come off on your skin I want the the dye was the art form that's what Skinner knew that's what he is at his best partners knew was the die yes they would say the color sells the good and so you know Skinner has I sold really well that would set his socks apart from others and made them lasting now when the you know the American government institute these terrorists on silk that helps the American home industry because suddenly it was simply too expensive to be purchasing stock from abroad and so American consumers began to experiment is buying the M. the homemade product and and by that time there have been a great deal of improvement in the quality of American made cell and that's what and it does sort of you know right place the right time enabled American so to take off and Skinner at his you know with his mail in scandal the right place at the right time he became a very rich man in the eighteen sixties and by eighteen seventy four the Americans look industry was firmly established in this country there was an association specifically devoted to promoting it products and protecting them called the American Association of the Americans look at the American Association and.

John Nash John basso America fifteen years sixty percent two years mill
"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

10:42 min | 2 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John Nash this is the John that so show Russian K. becomes spike and Larry Johnson is here to help us analyze some new tax that we have from Lisa page and he just dropped the disgraced FBI employees who were involved in twenty sixteen and what appears to be the foundation of crossfire hurricane the operation to investigate the candidate Donald Trump as a stooge a lackey a total a hireling of slander Putin and the Kremlin I'm not making this up that was the allegation repeated it to Congress and twenty seventeen launching as part of the predicate for the larger case the investigation that we call the molar apart well we're back to the beginning now Muller doesn't exist the trumpet campaign is just an idea and well behind in the polls it is August first twenty sixteen and Peter struck is in London at the US embassy in London the CIA the FBI the DOJ are all these enormous institutions but when it comes to fundamentals they talk funny especially when they're text messaging so Larry Johnson a former employee of the state department as well as the CIA is here to help us translate Larry very good evening to you Peter and Lisa they are featured in a theater piece which has now been performed in Washington after being a run out of one theater has been performed at the Reagan center in a call love birds because while this is all going on they had a special intimate relationship all well and good but Lisa pages job is that she works for any McCabe the deputy director of the FBI he just rocks job is that he's counter intelligence at the FBI he works for several people including a man named strap but will concentrate on this exchange between them it's August first park across from her came were told started the day before the thirty first what are these two going on about Larry whether they worried about good evening to good evening to you John up Peter struck went to London to be really the first FBI official to interview a source and in doing an interview process like collecting information that could be put into another off of what they call a three oh to an FBI report and in that report could be used as a foundation for presenting evidence to a grand jury what this what this string of text messages from August first August second call us is that prior to this everything was being handled in intelligence channels even though the door FBI informant at work conformance like acrylic skater who we discussed previously on your program informants like Christopher steal those activities of those informants were not being handled as law enforcement procedures for collecting and collecting evidence instead they were being used in intelligence this is the first time struck is now in London and the other thing is fascinating about it is when you have kids would be repeated attacks people who have not been in government happened Sir the intelligence community will be at I think it S. the stress trying to figure out what they're talking about but the judge did Peter struck goes to the embassy to meet with us the both the CIA leaders which means Gina household and or her deputy China has full as head of station in London at this point for the Obama administration in a hospital is the same one who is now director of central intelligence appointed by Donald Trump please continue correct so the the the to meet with them both to get a handle because see I a was dealing with British intelligence and and and and jargon that's called liaison so when the bridge coming give us intelligence of that's called retaliation channel or for liaison can with the British were going to giving them information so in this case the Brits were clearly handling Joseph must serve the professor who was dealing with George Papadopoulos the bridge we're also dealing with Alexander Downer the former of British yeah I guess he Australian diplomat written and he is now he was now he was now seconded to British intelligence perhaps retired version challenge right so you've got these individuals and so the meeting at the embassy is both the introduce Peter struck to these persons or to people that they're going to be in because Straka's the FBI he's the FBI representing a counterintelligence investigation that's what he does and this is the introduction of the F. B. R. crossfire hurricane to this tangle of characters that at the top of which is John Brennan correct he's the top of the CIA although there is an NSA representative present but that signals intelligence all right as the strikes there to learn what we now now we know everything Peter struck is about to learn because he's about to interview and it's blank out but you presume he's about to interview Alexander Downer who as the informant forty right he's the informant of what is said to be Papadopoulos's remarks about emails per line from Mrs Clinton it's not clear whether it's the per line from the private server emails or per line from the DNC embarrassing details about the campaigning males but in any event Downer passes on this information a month and a half earlier to the British embassy add to the American embassy in London and now struck shows up to interview down our John is not clear when he first informed US officials US intelligence officials about that conversation with Papadopoulos all we know from a factual standpoint is that some time in may Downer has this contact with Papadopoulos and then waits until of the actually the end of July good to you Sir all my god I had this alarming conversational Papadopoulos and that's why they dispatch struck to London to talk to down that's why is there yeah one one of the reasons and what what was in it into this text exchange with Lisa Lisa and Peter she says well but who would do the deputy chief of mission go with you in other words it was assuming that the DCM would have gone in with him the P. C. M. as the number two person at the US embassy of on the foreign service life he goes no is it just two of them two of us so the two of us would to me tells me that is Peter struck and then we have what's called a leak at legal attache a senior FBI person at that embassy of probably accompanied him man and two of them and the two of them is CIA all right now stop full stop because we're concentrating just this exchange we have much to learn years ago we'll get it all fine good we're still finding things about Churchill alright fine still we go inside this and Lisa rights yeah that's helpful meaning the interview with down yeah that's awful band is calling you guys and then a vulgar term which Lisa seems to use all the time on a text message Ben is calling you guys a bunch of vulgar terror then capital letter D. E. N. whose Ben we don't know for certain but it would appear I've from what I've been able to glean of F. B. I. roles this appears to be a better roads at the White House in other words there is reason to believe that the White House was being kept informed of these endeavors at a completely informed now but there's also concern that they don't want the DOJ to know what they're up to so Larry helping you worked in government the FBI don't they work for the DOJ and the DOJ works for the president our is so are they going around the DOJ is that what they're doing some kind of game on the seventh floor of the FBI well they're not fully disclosing to the department of justice what they're doing they will not amateurs like me call that going around yes yeah you're you're exactly right they're going around but they're doing that the justified because your quote using sensitive intelligence all right we got thirty seconds we've we've done what we can for Lisa and Ben at Lisa and Peter for this moment Larry some funny here yes this is what dorm has to solve what what they knew on August first these exchanges we've got to fill in the blanks here who was informed of this unusual interview with Alexander Downer that we're told by the Miller report will be one of the fundamentals of launching the suspicion that the president was in cahoots with the Russians right here right at this to be self correct yes and if you really can't start a law enforcement investigation which requires evidence that can ultimately be presented in court but intelligence information that you can't disclose hi this is this is what they're basically admitting to is that they're they're handling information cannot be disclosed into legal transcendence is not online car this is a counter intelligence enquiring working for the president of the United States that's what counter intelligence is for correct correct correct and Peter is strong and Lisa page I questioned by investigators say name John dorm will learn more if it to is that a fair assumption will learn more when under arm has these conversations do you want to go back and look at the number of FBI officials that have been removed from office I think we're up over ten right approaching twelve that's a lot shoulder there are a lot of people who are going to have some explaining to do and when they when they're faced with a real prosecutor like Durham then the the the savior save your own soul of a motive kickstand and these people be running for life where is your peace Larry yeah it is it's a six that sick temperature runs itself six separate around us just a titled interesting developments in Russia gates sock Larry Johnson the veteran he survived government service I don't know that struck in page well I'm John bachelor this is the.

John Nash Larry Johnson Donald Lisa FBI thirty seconds
"john nash" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

"And any thoughts about how it will do on paper view. There are some reports Jerry Bader over at his new project wizard had said that you have C two thirty which one six yet. Was it two hundred nine thousand hundred ten thousand a lot of different ways to evaluate the successor lack there. There's a threat by John Nash. I encourage everyone to. This was probably gonna do real bad. If I'm guessing thirty six way more intrigued than this card, and it was domestic the mystic. That's the big issue. Right. Because even you'll see some of those UC's Aldo one was at UC one forty two. I don't think it the very good numbers. Chad Mendez, even you'll see one thirty four which was their return. I don't remember doing gangbusters. So my thing I think that you're right. It has it's it seems doomed to be one of their one of their loans go out there and save fifty thousand about right something like that. I mean fifty thousand was just a core. Like it started there. Right. It used to be that was there's fifty thousand no matter what. So I don't know. So this is not the newest news. We did get chance to talk about. I don't wanna spend forever on to talk about it. Because it relates to this paper view news. So Brock listener tells you see he's not going to compete anymore. Although that's not quite true. When it would melt reporting Fairleigh Meltzer says that Brock wanted a flat fee of a certain number and you'll see said, no. So he said see you wouldn't want to be. And so they're going to go with DC versus stay to the big takeaway from this story, we evaluate everything is what what's the what's the number one lesson that the US should may not be as public about a kind of dream fight or novelty fight in such a way. Because what basically happens is like, hey, guys. Look, there's a Maserati that we're going to put you in Iraq around Mazar. And then like, Nope. You're going in the Tra what saying that's what it feels like in the end because they the the for the first, and then you get the second thing. And I'm like I feel like that's the buzzkill field. Of that is what strikes me immediately. If you get past that, and you think of it from an insider stamp went where you're basically, you know, this is a good fight. Right. Like, you're like Cormet, you knocked he knocked. But you know, he caught him to. And you're like, I don't think you saw the best mutual. I'm sure that they they do it again, maybe has a whole different outcome. There's still tons of doubt over that fight ended obviously holding the record for most defenses. And all that probably deserves. I know that we've talked about all the stuff a million times. He could make the case deserves to be there again. And I feel like that was probably their next fight. The other thing was those domino effect because they could if they if they're not waiting around for Brock listener if there, and I know that there was like this back surgery for gourmet and all this that would complicate it. But if they're not waiting around for Lessner John Jones was there. I mean, he's fighting these other guys they could have made that fight and been promoting that for July. You know what I mean or something like that? But because we're waiting on Brock, and we're you know, we were fixated on this. A lot of other things were altered is it good or bad. The Bronx mix. I think it's for for you. We'll for me was I think it is bad because I did I wanted to see that fight wanted to see DC get a big payday and walk away with a big fight. But man, I think this speaks to like how the UC is is handling business now because I wonder how many big fights we're gonna get because we saw kinda McGregor..

Brock Cormet Jerry Bader John Nash Chad Mendez Aldo one John Jones US buzzkill field Fairleigh Meltzer Mazar Iraq
"john nash" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"John Nash saying well that was me. Yeah. I shouldn't laugh in the bible, which is a book. The there is a. I I was about to call it a chapter, but I guess they aren't called that the book of numbers and the verses. It's numbers twenty three twenty three. If you look that up what hath God wrought that is also the very first message sent by telegraph in code by Samuel Morse in eighteen forty three. So if you if you take all this in you. You look at it a certain way, it becomes plain that there's something very special about the number twenty three. If you look at it, a different way, it becomes plain that people have invested a lot of like mystical significance to twenty three that isn't actually there. Yeah. That that it could be any other number especially any other number that is within one to thirty. Because a lot of people ascribed dates, you know, significance. Today's I should say John Nash died on the twenty third of may in two thousand fifteen point. And so that just proves it to people who are twenty thirty. It's obviously Twenty-three means something, but it could also be fifteen or seven or three. There's a lot of like numbers that we ascribable out significance to and if you ask a cognitive psychologist what's going on. They will just basically say that our brains contain a mechanism for detecting patterns. We search out heads. Have we make sense? Of things as we save brain energy is finding patterns so we can predict things and just make sense of the world around us, and sometimes we force patterns onto things don't actually have any significance that don't actually mean anything and that could be things like the number twenty three popping up suddenly a randomly. Yeah. When you look at the clock, and it's eleven eleven you make a big deal about it. It's more likely that you just don't make a big deal about every other time of day that you look at the clock. Exactly chuck. I got nothing else except for twenty three chromosomes Heo. Well with that short stuff is out. Stuff. You should know is production of heart radios. How stuff works for more podcasts. My heart radio is at the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

John Nash Samuel Morse iheartradio Apple
"john nash" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:40 min | 2 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"This is where she spread radio programming from Monday WC SPF from Washington. Pleasure to be here. Little known fact that after one dies ones, nails and hair continue to grow. And I may be. A living illustrative of that fact. I can't hear back there. Is that better? Well, you you actually miss nothing. Too many people ultimately people apparently some very famous ones are questioning whether a Liberal International order, which includes geopolitical as well as 'economics can be maintained. And the original reason for founding all of this is tends to be forgotten back in nineteen forty seven the GATT. The idea is memory does not. Exist beyond two generations. So on the occasion of George. Herbert. Walker Bush is death a couple of weeks ago. Writing in the financial times, John Nash, John Nash wrote social order is to some extent self cancelling the longer people have it the more. They take it for granted historic events. That warn them against such complacency pass from living memory to folklore to something more like rumor. I'm with the. That sentiment part of the way another book. That's implements me. A lot is by Robert Kagan the jungle grows back in which he says that the last seventy years where an aberration. That's not the norm. Major countries go to battle with each other regularly. And free trade is not the norm and illiberal world is the norm. And that we were in a very an extraordinary period. The US as a hegemonic coming out of World War Two. There were two wars separated. Largely by the great, depression and the. The results were putting into place the international economic order that we have but that is not the norm in human history. So I'm with him part of the way what he says is if you don't tend the garden the jungle does grow back in other words, what you have you tends to deteriorate in terms of a liberal trading. Order. I think there's a path forward. I think that many important people are seeing a path forward that reform is needed. And most recently evidenced at the g twenty ministerial in Buenos Aires in which they said that the system is currently falling short of objectives. And there is room for improvement. We therefore support the necessary to form the WTO to improve its functioning. A year earlier before joining us IRA's ministerial for MC eleven you wouldn't have heard any of that didn't exist. And last week in the last formal session of the year of the general council one hundred and sixty four members of the WTO they authorized a process of consultation to go forward with respect to reform. That is extraordinarily. It is a sea change. The. What is required? Now, it's not where but dis there's been plenty of lip service paid over the years to a multilateral trading system and very little investment in it very little investment by business, very little investment by most of the major trading countries. And I have a litany of those that I would consider under investors since they respond poorly to my saying, so I'll leave it off the agenda for the moment. I'm very optimistic. I came away from Wayne SRA's a year ago ecstatic you euphoric because the legislative function the rulemaking function of the WTO found a way forward there were four joint initiatives, they resisted by a number. But those who wanted to sit down and talk about electric commerce or investment or domestic regulation of services or micro and medium and small enterprises or the how gender how women can have a greater participation in trade. They all got together. Three quarters of GDP, not all the same selection of countries in each case. But three core members accounting three quarters of GDP came together and said we're going to discuss these things and see where they lead. My purpose today is to talk about. I why optimism is justified which I think it is. And then what some of the crises are and how to approach them. What WTO reform can be all about the measure of what remains to be done and something about my personal experiences. Which makes me quite hopeful about the WTO and appended to the text that I messed up this morning on my own laptop. I woke Ford to Fred. And it'll be available is a list of areas in which the WTO on a regular basis. Doesn't number of things that are value to its members. Reasons for optimism. I there was Ricardian physics. Namely that open borders and rules-based trade. I added the rules based trade. I'm not sure David Ricardo had that in there. Are better for national economies on the whole then protection? It's about efficiency and efficiency is a gravitational force. It's what countries eventually all have to come back to. And it's true today than any time in the past especially in a digital word world in ecommerce. And vastly more capable transportation systems that efficiency drives economies and therefore countries have to eventually live with that reality second despite noteworthy exceptions. There is a widespread fundamental understanding of nearly all governments of the utility of having a multilateral system. Not just regional systems, not just bilaterals but multilateral. They only way to get tariffs across the board within agreed bounds. The only way to have nondiscrimination the only way to have product standards that work worldwide is to do multilateral. Next the WTO delivers benefits through the multilateral trading system that can't be duplicated through plural lateral agreements, for example. As I say non-discrimination on a global basis. Agricultural subsidies cannot be negotiated among a few countries. They have to be negotiated. More broadly. Industrial subsidies have to be the go. She added more broadly fishery subsidies, which is the one thing that was pledged to every pledged every couple of years has been going on for about twenty years fishery subsidies can't be negotiated by some plural lateral. It has to have all the major players in it. Alan wolf WTO deputy director general it next the WTO agreements Cape the world from being redivided into trading blocks, and they the rules of the multilateral trading system. Underpin the US MCA NAFTA free trade agreement they. New continental African free trade agreement. They are all based upon the WTO rules. V. There's a commoner effort to improve the system not scrap it, the sharpest critic of the WTO whose name will be familiar to all of you said in may at the D ministerial if we didn't have the WTO we'd have to create it. That's not anyone running for the door. And in fact, no members left and twenty two are seeking entry currently six the multilateral trading. System will prevail because nations who've tried alternative models ignoring the market fail. The USSR is a marvellous example of failure. Japan had to change and did a number of countries in Latin America changed for the better. In central Asia. There are economic reforms in a market oriented direction in quite a number of countries in Moldova in Kazakhstan and Belarus in Pakistan. They're all moving in the same direction of wanting those who aren't in wanting to come into the WTO and moving towards market-oriented reforms if a country's large enough, it might be able to try our move towards autarky, but that goal is a dead end and Mercantil has its limits. Mercantilism has its limits, namely, others don't play along. So it is a self-defeating seventh without the rule of law. This chaos. Trade depends upon certainty. Certainty depends upon rules. There's no place where you can craft rules of general application other than in the WTO. My conclusion national policies will ultimately align themselves with economic reality. Part to the system at risk. You all know, what the headline challenges are one is the US China tariff war. Neither side has to my knowledge claimed a legitimacy under the international rules for the latest round of tariff escalation against each other. It's not my position to condone or condemn any party any member? But my neutrality does not extend to the WTO, which I happen to favor. And I think that the rules have to play a role when China came into the WTO an e you European negotiator and Chinese negotiator. We're talking and the EU negotiators said you drive on both sides of the road. What he meant was there's market orientation, and there's the party there's non-market aspects and the person on the other side, reportedly the EU person told me said we're always going to drive on both sides of the road. Okay. The US and the and the Chinese are now driving on both sides of the road, slightly different context. Namely, some things within the rules. And some things are not within the rules. The what should be done the way to a solution. I would hope the truce that exists detente, not the final outcome, which no one can predict. I don't think Xi Jinping. Can I don't think Donald Trump necessarily can? But the middle position is for a truce the detente broaden the rules. So that what the US does is more within the rules, and what the Chinese side does is more within the rules. And there are efforts in that direction. The last great contest that Fred, and I and others here. Our veterans up was the rise of Japan. I only had two brief exchanges with George Bush, forty one. One was I congratulated him on one marketing opening initiative with respect to Japan, and he said. The jab his response was that Japan would never deliver on trade. He was wrong. But he never gave up. He was going to Japan. And I called Lloyd Bentson then chair of the Senate finance committee and said would you raise the following issue with the Japanese Prime minister and Benson said he would and did and. Ask the president to raise it president did raise it it helped bring about a solution. George Herbert Walker Bush never gave up the lesson is actually in this town for any subject, persistence and persistence for opening markets is something that can't be foresworn the death of the appellate body as the next crisis. In the United States. We do not expect cabinet officers to stay beyond noon on January twenty. None of them. Thank abba. I'm not finished with my work. So I'll just continue. It would be. They have to be asked to continue the appellate body members continue beyond their term of office to render opinions one hundred and sixty three countries say, that's okay. Rather practical, the US says, wait a minute. We the members didn't tell them they could do that. They're just doing it on their own initiative, and that's not acceptable. It's one of several counts in a multiple count indictment that the US has of the appellate body as overreach. Alan wolf WTO deputy director general countries actually, do not agree with the United States. They're not that concerned about this at all. They are concerned about the death of the appellate body because the US, watch appointments. Not later than a year from now, and perhaps earlier there won't be colored water, which I think is a shame because I think that there should be an appellate function. And Jennifer Hillman has made some suggestions that I certainly can't Doris as a neutral member of the WTO secretariat. But actually, the EU is thinking about it. The Canadians are thinking about it. There's a proposal on the table from Honduras countries are beginning to come to grips with the fact that the appellate body is going away. One thing that struck from my remarks being too cute. Was that one former member of the appellate body said that the United States was a speeding the appellate body? My own view is it's more of an assisted suicide. But the result is the same. And it's not a good result for the system. So something has to be worked out. This was not designed to be a system of rule by judges. That's quite ARCHE a word that you have to look in the dictionary. Because who in the world has a crater arkie rule by judges. It was designed to have a legislative function which didn't function and executive function of sorts which didn't function..

WTO US George Herbert Walker Bush EU Walker Bush Japan GATT Robert Kagan Washington Alan wolf Buenos Aires Ford deputy director John Nash David Ricardo USSR Asia Donald Trump
"john nash" Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

WBAL 1090AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

"Memo itself to me was not earthshattering it was confirming which is all the we all but i think we could have really hopedfor was that it was going to confirm thing was that we already suspected but there's a lot of confusion going on around there there's a lot of people who are saying that its acts that were saying that it's why the president not being particularly helpful when he tweets out that it completely exonerates and i think there's no there there but i don't think this memo was ever intended to be an exoneration of donald trump what it was sometimes i feel like john nash in a beautiful mind i'm just sort of put things together drawn things together got a whole time mom we're going to go through here today but you know trade gouty on meet the press over the weekend at was was absolutely correct in this regard i actually don't think it has any impact on the rush approved for this reason the memo has no impact on the rush not not not to me it doesn't and i was pretty andrew collier involved in the traffic of it there is a russia investigation without a dossier so to the extent that memo deals with the dossier faisal process the dossier has nothing to do with the meeting a trump tower the dossier has nothing to do with an email sent by cambridge analytica nothing living on the stuff of the the dossier which is at at the central issue in this memo has to do with a couple of other different things their election triggered is actually correct right the russia investigation would still exist without because there are other things that are at work here to say that the that the that the though nunez memo which is what we're talking about is this memo put together by the house intelligence committee chaired by congressman devin nunes there was released on friday to say that the memo was everything is incorrect to.

president donald trump john nash house intelligence committee congressman devin nunes andrew collier russia nunez
"john nash" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"The lusa we're going to see some warmer temperatures the next couple of days the low tonight is going to be a twenty four degrees tomorrow we'll see a strong south wind that will be gusty a high of forty two that wind will die down on wednesday but still fortysix degree high nice little respite before we get back into the colder air late is this week that is the news radio 1040 who three day weather from channel thirteen i'm ed wilson who radio news time is eleven old five currently here in des moines we have a clear sky and you can see the moon and it feels like 12 below no it's twelve above that's not banned because of the actual temperature is eighteen degrees this is news radio 1040 who stay tune for the last hour of john bachelor from the high vis studios news radio 1040 who john boehner missing john nash was show is a great pleasure to welcome professor omar partowned round university his new book is anatomy of a genocide the life and death in the town called boot charge the book has on the cover a photograph of survivors this is the story of survival but at the same time centuries of criminal behaviour confusion of loyalties blood feuds they continue because this village boot charge is now part of ukraine western ukraine and we all know ukraine is caught up in a frozen conflict between the remains of the russian empire that is now the russian federation ukraine which is a national sovereign state and the europeans than a man eric hines competing with the russians for the attention of ukraine professor a very good evening to you thank you very much for this congratulations especially because i know this is part of the story of.

ed wilson des moines john nash ukraine russian federation ukraine eric hines professor john john boehner omar partowned twenty four degrees eighteen degrees fortysix degree three day
"john nash" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on KGO 810

"You know i had answered that and say the following i'm not sure that it's a business mistake i've made but i made plenty of mistakes and dealing with people and those are the ones that i actually look back on and say if i didn't fire that guy that way or if i never hire them to begin with or if i was more honest with who i wanted in the company or who strengths and weaknesses are in a play out the best who friendship that might have been damaged by detained i think one of the biggest mistakes that were made and a people do it all the time and we're told very early on not to do this never do business with friends and family well you do when you do it back in the ass and it usually deadly in a bad way and and it it does it it it alters the trajectory of what you're doing so i would say it people mistakes that i made um and and they're the ones that you can't really correct at easily that they're the ones that teach you the most moving forward no boy i knock you to say that i've looked had learned that same experience from experience but much essay i i know what you're talking about john on that one all right so so let's the the other angle the flip side of this is so let's say you know i've had just graduated from and got my mba and i have a business plan about to start a business and they say john nash you have experience you're an inveterate rackin's tour as well what is like the most important thing that i should know when i'm starting a company what is the one the biggest piece of advice it you'd say don't ever forget to do this is the most important thing when you start your company what would that piece of advice be it's going to sound terribly monday and boring but it's all about cashflow it's all about having money and the checking account you can do anything you want but if you can't pay adel you're not going standard business if you don't have money in a checking account you're not going able to pay employees are grow so paying attention to.

john nash adel
"john nash" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"john nash" Discussed on KGO 810

"The unique perspective i am looking forward to it john nash focus group hey also as a radio show as well john thanks so much for coming on the show today even at two pleasure i've been enjoying your broadcaster now i'm thinking about how we in costumes see it's time it's time john and i think i might be mr spock from the mir mira universe because after that show at trump tower i feel we've put into all new gal exactly and do you remember from on my asheq awesome blanking the the super friends there was bizarro who is like the opposite of superman actually exactly yeah so a week one could go one of us you'll you'll go as spock and i guess i have to do that bizarro outfit dan because we are living an alternate universe is and that's the way it goes look i i love this from your bio though it begins with an inveterate tour so you that you're spelling bee at advocated spell at because i believe that you are a very good speller correct it's true acts how did to hutu told you this hey i do my research that one good ruled business right always dear research that's absolutely true so i all right so ceos i have so many questions for you i love your background in marketing so this is a really big deal to me that we're having this conversation and i mean it because as of so many advances you you have focused on you know the lgbt q marketing right in this and super america chase mortgage other giant corporations so tell me if i always asked my cnc joost bali tell me about what you do and i just did to half the told me about the focused group in focused group race what are you got what do you do well in my mom like to say about the focus group shelled a show do now on youtube and also veiled on i tuned into account cloud she likes to say that showed a little bit of business a little bit of marketing and a lot of nonsense in between and the nonsense part the most fun of course but we do it covered business and marketing topics and my cohost happens to be the my childhood friend from sophomore year.

trump tower youtube john nash mr spock mir mira