13 Episode results for "John Michel Basquiat"

179  Radiant Child: Jean-Michel Basquiat

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

57:07 min | 2 months ago

179 Radiant Child: Jean-Michel Basquiat

"Welcome unwelcomed misinformation attribute podcasts for ladies and gents who have cool trivia and sticking it to nine teams at pub quiz. Where your hosts. I'm lauren and i'm julia. Hey jaw hi. hi so year It's a new year. It's almost the new year. We're so close. So i hope you all had a nice holiday First of all. And second of all. I hope you have a nice and lovely. And a warm and comforting. New year's may twenty twenty one be better than twenty twenty all signs point to. Yes but let's keep hope alive everyone so today so you know. I work in an art museum. Yes i hate to break it to you on the podcast on a live recording like this But the thing that i have learned from working at an art museum is how. The art market is very Subjective yes that's great. That's a great neutral phrase. Yeah so. I was actually talking to steve about this. We are committee meeting. And you know we always update each other on our daily. How was your day. And like how was your day. And i was like. Oh we had our committee and you know like you know. We're purchasing this piece of art for this amount of money and this piece of art for this amount of money and you know like and st was like oh my god and i was like what what's wrong. He was like it. Just it blows my mind that art is just is not like it's not like a resource that just the price of it is just like arbitrary letting everyone agrees that this thing is worth seven point five million dollars then people pay that much money and will you buy gold for work and he was like. Yeah but we use it. Looks like it's not like we buy gold and then carved into something and then resell it like. It's we use it for science. I i well. I guess you're right so Thinking about the art market and thinking about how strange it is and how. It's always been like very weird Despite the fact that we're a nonprofit museum institution we still have for still subject to the whims and and winds of of the art market. I was thinking about that. And i was also thinking about a very famous artists so two day. I'm going to be talking about the artist. Jules michel basquiat give then so julia familiar. Are you with joe michel. Basquiat hoop sketchy sketchily. Details in okay. Yes that he writes a black artist from new york city. A very good chance he did he die of aids he did. Not but you young okay. So we'll talk. We'll talk about that so we're gonna be talking about. John michel basquiat his style his his life. It's very interesting. So let's just get into him show. Shell was born in brooklyn as you mentioned on december twenty second nineteen sixty shortly after the death of his older brother. Max so You'll see soon that his his home life was little unruly hot. We'll get there. He was the second of four children of middle-class parents matilda and gerard basquiat He had two younger sisters and his father's yard was born in potter prince. Haiti and his mother. matilda was a puerto rican descent and she was born in brooklyn as well Mathilde in love For art and her young son by taking him to art museums in manhattan and she enrolled him as a junior member of the brooklyn museum of art She wasn't as she was used to be an aspiring fashion designer. So she also loved to draw So she really encouraged artistic talents Jean-michel was actually a very precocious child. Who learned how to read and write by the age of four. And yeah and he was also very gifted artist and his mother encouraged her son's artistic talent and his his dad was an accountant and he would bring home scrap paper from the office withdrawal over the paper so in september of nineteen sixty eight at the age of seven. He was hit by a car while he was playing the street. Oh it was terrible. His arm was broken and he suffered several internal injuries and eventually underwent splenectomy. they would move to spleen. Yes oh very bad. He was in the hospital for a month and while he was recuperating from his injuries his mother bought him a copy of grey's anatomy to keep him occupied and so what every seven year old wants to read while arms out he loved it so in this book would actually prove to be very influential at his future. Artistic style out Unfortunately his parents Also separated that year and he and his sisters were raised by their father. Okay so by. The age of eleven bosquet was fully fluent in french spanish and english and was an avid reader of all three languages so he was obviously like super smart just from the get. Go and also very artistically talented His family resided in boerum hill. Brooklyn for five years and then moved to san juan in nineteen seventy four Where he studied at a catholic school and then after two years they returned to new york. City unfortunately around this time his mother was committed to a mental institution and thereafter spent her life in and out of institutions very tough experiences with mental illness and so due to his mother's instability and just his family unrest. He ran away from home at fifteen and slept on park benches in washington square park until he was arrested and then return to the care of his father. So and then in his seventies that's like yeah peak rough new york city new york. Yeah very rough. So he was not. He was not in a very stable environment. So then in nineteen seventy seven. Basquiat and his schoolmate began spray painting graffiti on buildings in lower manhattan and they worked under the pseudonym sam o. s. a. m. Oh okay and this was an acronym for they thought the old shit basically This was after he dropped out of high school and so as a way to survive and make money. He began to sell a mosh postcards and t shirts so he would like you know. Draw somebody famous sir. Like favorite band or whatever and he would sell them on the street. the designs also featured inscribed messages with his untitled works Such as it was called plush safe he think samo. And i don't know what plush safe he think means but it's one of his first works so the thing another one was called samo as an escape clause so the thing with graffiti was that he used a lot of phrases and words that he would just see on the street. So it'd be walking around new york. He would see a phrase. It would kind of get stuck in his brain like around a little bit and then he just kind of like regurgitate that in his artwork across around the city and then he would sign it samo as like this roving character who was Samo and his mind was like this Ne'er do well like cult-like aspiring cult leader trying to write these codes around the city to get followers to follow him. It was just like this character that he had made. Which just kinda cool. That's cool so at the age of seventeen is father kicked him out of the house after he decided to drop out of school so then he worked odd jobs to keep himself afloat and at night he continued spray painting graffiti as samo on neighborhood buildings and the samo character the samo artwork Got so much attention that actually in seventy eight. The village voice published an article about the cmo graffiti so he was really a lot of interest In april of nineteen seventy-nine. Basquiat may michael holman at a party. And they formed the noise rock band test pattern which was later. Renamed gray okay. And he named it gray because of grey's anatomy that's like his degrees and adamy another member of gray. Was vincent gallo. Do you know who. Vincent gallo is. Something is an actor. Yes so engineer. Josh is giving me a thumbs. Up vincent gallo was the writer director and star of buffalo. Sixty six as well as brown bunny. These are these very gritty indie films. I'm sixty six. 'cause vincent gallo's originally from buffalo so he yeah so he made this movie called buffalo sixty six and it's basically like it's basically a movie about like the dark underbelly of buffalo new york. It's not good. I watched it a couple years ago. It's it's not great. It's and vincent gallo is a very frightening looking man. and brown bunny is also not good But you know he's well known in this gritty new york underground film. The circles the black market of chicken wings. Exactly yeah. yeah so. The band gray performed at nightclubs. Such as max's kansas city see gb hurrah and the mudd club. And the mudd club was a big was a kind of the hub of where all of these like young artists and musicians and things would hang out and So around this time. Basquiat lived in the east village with this friend. Alexis adler who was Barnard biology graduate and he often copied diagrams of chemical compounds borrowed from adler science textbooks. So the thing about basket was that he was always absorbing things and just kind of like mishmashing them in his head She talked a lot about how He his creative explorations would can manifest themselves as drawing on everything in their apartment he would draw walls. Oh floors doors furniture. She would he would incorporate all this into his artwork so he yet it out. He had to get it out. If he didn't have paper on hand he would. Just grab a pen and starring on the fridge like he. He could not stop. That's an awful roommate. I gotta tell you. Oh my god people. Actually some of his remains were like it'd made us absolutely crazy. Whatever it was awful. It's worse than the houses that they played on fire in. Yeah exactly exactly so one day. We'll selling postcards in soho by scouts spotted andy warhol at a restaurant and at the time he sold warhol a postcard titled stupid games bad ideas so this was kind of like the beginnings of warhol and basquiat their relationship. Which i'll get to so in october of nineteen seventy-nine at an open creative space called as basquiat showed his samo montages using color xerox copies of his works The owner also allowed basquiat to use the space. To create his man made clothing which were basically up cycled garments that he would paint on And in november nineteen seventy-nine costume designer patricia. Field carried his clothing. Line in her upscale boutique on eighth street in the east village and she also displayed his sculptures in the store window. So he's starting to get he's starting to gain some serious training in the art world And he was Like a multimedia artist he was just constantly working with whatever he could get his hands on busy making any money I think at this point. He was made like a little bit of money but he it. It accelerated very quickly like within the next year or so he was. He was becoming a really big deal. so after bosque out and had a falling out. The samo project ended with the epitaph. Samo is dead inscribed on the walls of soho buildings and early nineteen eighty so people knew he was samo at that point. Yeah and i think one of the reasons why they fell out was because elliot's felt like he was getting kind of elbowed out there. Collaboration where you know. Basquiat is being very open. About being samo in like trying to sell work samo and all of this stuff and he's like You know. I'm part of this to kind of thing so they decided to just kind of shudder. The whole thing So later in one thousand nine hundred eighty bucks gap began filming art writer glenn. O'brien's independent film called downtown. Eighty one which was originally titled. New york beat The film featured basquiat is the star. Basically it was kind of a loose story of his life It featured some of his bands recording on the soundtrack it actually was not released until the year two thousand. Oh about which is really strange But it was. I i think you can like it. Debuted at the tribeca film festival or something that year. I think you can like access it and watch it so during the early. Nineteen eighty s boss. Gap made his breakthrough as a solo artist and in june of that year. In june of nineteen eighty. Excuse me Basquiat participated at the times square. Show which was a multi artist exhibition. He was noticed. By various critics. And curator's including jeffrey who wrote the first press mention of basquiat in article titled report from times square in art in america which is a very influential american art magazine. we get it at the museum. It's kind of a big deal. So that was a big deal and he's only Twenty yes okay. He's very very young. So in february. Nineteen ninety-one basquiat participated in the new york. New wave exhibit curated by diego. Cortez moma. Ps one cortez organized bosque outs first solo show with amelio mud zoli. An italian gallery that opened in modina italy on may twenty third nine hundred eighty one. So he's now becoming international right in december nine hundred eighty one. Rene ricard published the radiant child in art forum magazine. The first extensive article on basquiat radiant child becomes kind of a short hand. Basket becomes kind of his nickname. Kind of thing in in the press. okay in the art press so it's this idea that he's so young and so talented and like this incredibly bright burning talent And it's you know it's very you know flattering article about him. And i think this was like the first time that people really started to like the powers that be really started to pay attention to him also during this period basquiat painted many pieces on objects that he found in the streets such as just discarded doors and garbage and wood and all sorts of stuff. So i'm gonna take a break here and talk a little bit about his style because this kind of speaks to. what what. What are you looking for when you're trying to identify asja michel basquiat piece. So his style is as you can imagine graffiti. There's a lot of pithy sayings just kind of floating around on the canvas. there's codes symbols. they're and they're all layered on top of each other. They're very messy very complicated. Very connectik Visual style He incorporates a big bold colors he would take inspiration from the city around him incorporated into his art There are these kind of frenetic layered complicated images with multiple meetings and this kind of childlike imagery. His figures have a kind of a Like a stick figure esque kind of quality to them he also used crowns halos etc to define and black figures in art work And he would. Frequently depict like charlie parker and dizzy. Gillespie because he was really into jazz and the crown that kind of like hand-drawn brown became his symbol basically k. Great so there's a crown like a kind of scrawled hand crown in the piece. It's probably a basket Also a lot of his artwork. It involves skulls internal anatomy references to catholicism and also haitian voodoo traditions. So he kind of like. It's just like a mishmash mix of different things and it has a very interesting like visuals. Nile to it. He also personally was preoccupied with this idea of burning bright and burning out like jimi hendrix janice joplin who also ironically died at twenty seven. Okay yeah it's very creepy like he. He would mention it often infrequently like oh man i hope i don't burn out like jimi hendrix janice joplin which is like super creepy He was both in fear of an obsessed with the idea that he would die young essentially and towards the end of his life. He would frequently call andy warhol and like freak out about famous people dying too soon. He had read The belushi book and so he was freaking out dying of a drug overdose. I like the peak of his career. he also clearly struggled with mental illness and possibly something that he inherited from his mother and he used drugs copiously to deal with both his internal demons and the trappings of this intensely. Quick fame that he was experiencing He started dropping acid fifteen. He was using cocaine heroin by nineteen eighty so he was quickly on the path of truly burning brighton. Burning out so it was kind of self fulfilling prophecy. Unfortunately for him Bosque out sold his first painting called cadillac. Moon to singer. Debbie harry who is the front woman of the punk rock band blonde okay. And he sold it to her for two hundred dollars. Let's see reasonable. Yeah that's a reasonable. I would man if i had the opportunity to buy bosque. I've got two hundred bucks sure. Yeah hell yeah They were in downtown eighty-one together so they had a previous relationship Boskin also appeared in the nineteen eighty-one blonde music video. Rapture in a role originally intended for grandmaster flash as a nightclub dj. So he's in that video if you if you wanna take a look and see let's see him there At the time. Basquiat was living with his girlfriend. Suzanne me who financially supported him as a waitress and later she described his his sexuality and jennifer clements book widow bosque out which is about his relationships. grabbed his sexuality as quote not monochromatic. It did not rely on visual stimulation such as a pretty girl. It was a very rich multi chromatic sexuality. He was attracted to people for all different reasons. They could boys girls thin fat pretty ugly it was. I think driven by intelligence. He was attracted to intelligence more than anything and to pain. Oh boy yeah. I know that. Like at like the little like addendum. There is like Like what so. For all intents and purposes boss cat is accepted as a queer icon. so it's it's interesting. It doesn't really come up in his in his artwork. Necessarily it's not overtly you know queer homosexual or or you know pan sexual or any of those things But he was part of his life and so if this idea that he was an outsider from the beginning so he was he was black. he was he was young. he was working in style of artwork. That was not common at the time that was not considered high art So he was always kind of grappling with this idea of being lauded by important people but also never feeling like he was yvonne seriously like he belongs. Yeah exactly and also for nothing. He was usually Nine times outta ten in like towards the end of his life when he was really really huge the only black person in the room and that really took a toll on him mentally as well that he was kind of this was a feeling of tokenism for him and that he was Not taken seriously as an individual and just kind of lauded as you know like this crazy. Black guy with dreads kind of thing who was making this intense artwork so there was them So in one thousand eighty one art dealer anita no say invited basquiat to participate in. Her group. Show called public address. provided him with materials and a space to work in the basement of her gallery and an eighty two she arranged for basquiat to move into a loft which also served as a studio so no more roommates whose stuff was just constantly being drawn on. Yeah exactly He had his first american one man show at the anita nosy gallery in march of nineteen eighty two and later that same month he painted modina again for a second italian By that summer he had left. The anita knows a gallery and brutal. Bischofberger became his worldwide. Art dealer He seemed to have a lot of issues with dealers He would frequently move from dealer to dealer looking further respect and money that he felt like he deserved and deserve for all intents and purposes. It seemed like a lot of people who worked with him. Recognized his talent but didn't really know how to market him. okay was he a street artist. Was he a painter. He wasn't formally trained and his artwork was rife with symbols and phrases and expressions of the black experience and it seemed like these predominantly rich white dealers. Didn't really have a handle on what he brought to the table. So to speak yeah So in june of nineteen eighty-two basquiat became the youngest artist to ever take part in documenta in kassel germany where his works were exhibited alongside. Joseph boys anselm kiefer gerhard richter side. Tom tom brady. And andy warhol Bischofberger gave boss a one man show in his jerk gallery in september of hundred eighty two and he arranged trubisky out to meet warhol for lunch in october of that year. Warhol recalled that basket quote went home and within two hours. A painting was back still wet of him in me together. The painting which was called dos cabezas ignited. A friendship between them does got pays us means and heads And basquiat was featured in the january. Nineteen eighty-three issue of warhol's interview magazine. So this is when is starting to get super hot and kind of ties himself to haul they develop a very strong friendship at this point In november of nineteen ninety two bus gap began working from the ground. Floor display in studio space. Larry goes ian and had built below his venice california home and for the rest of his life. Bosque would kind of go back and forth between california and new york and venice italy working in somebody's basement. Yeah but this is. Larry goes in so larry goes in like is like google z. And gallery one of the largest gallery systems in the west so it wasn't very nice minute. This was an extremely basement. Yeah yeah for sure probably had beautiful light probably right by the ocean all the stuff so there. He commenced a series of paintings for a march. Nineteen eighty-three show which was actually his second ethic. It goes in gallery in west. Hollywood bosque out then flew out his girlfriend A little singer you may have heard of called madonna to accompany him. Google and later recalled quote. Everything was going. Along fine sean. Michelle was making paintings. I was selling them and we were having a lot of fun. But then one day john michel said to me. My girlfriend is coming to stay with me. I was a little concerned one. Too many eggs can spoil omelette. You know so. I said well what she likes. And he said her name is madonna. And she's going to be huge. I'll never forget that. He said that so but came out and stayed for a few months. And we all got along like one big happy family. I don't take umbrage with one too. Many eggs can spoil the omelette. I mean i love a big omelette. You know what. I mean like goblet. Yeah three egg omelette with some cheese and bacon. Yes please. i don't know what larry talking about. It's ridiculous so in march. Nineteen eighty-three at twenty two years old. Basquiat was included. In the whitney biennial becoming the youngest artist to represent america a major international exhibition of contemporary art. And the whitney biennial is a big deal. It is a juried exhibit of contemporary art. Still going on now And if you are chosen for the whitney biennial you are set for life. Basically like that is a big big deal. Every art dealer art collector museum director worth their salt. Goes to the whitney biennial or at least buys the catalog like it's a big deal so At this time boss gout was deeply affected by the death of a man named michael stuart. Michael stewart was young artists in the downtown club scene. Who was killed by transit police in september of nineteen eighty-three Michael stewart was just like drawing on the walls in the First avenue station and The transit police kind of like confronted him and they arrested him and hog tied him and beat him into unconsciousness. And then after thirteen days in a coma he died. My gosh. it was horrific And basket was really affected by this because he felt like since he was agree fiji artisan. He used to do that all the time. That could have been him that he could have easily have had the same. Fate is michael stuart and he and michael stuart weren't friends but they definitely ran in the same circles They knew the same people. Actually michael stewart was dating. Bosque outs ex girlfriend at the time. Oh my gosh so And it's terrible like the cops were acquitted and the family Michael stewart's family was given like a civil suit. Settlement of like one point seven million dollars which does not bring their son back and it was just horrific stuff That he was just arrested for vandalism and was murdered which is really awful and he was only twenty five. It's horrific terrific. So basquiat painted a piece called defacement. The death of michael stuart in response to that incident and This it's a. It's a great piece and michael. Stuart seen You can see the two cops who have like they're pink faced and they have like Fangs okay and it looks. It looks like a little kid drawing But michael is in the center of it and you see him from the back. He just kind of silhouetted so the idea is that he could be any any young man. So you know. Basquiat really like reflected himself in that and wanted the viewer to like really reflect themselves in them so so this was another thing that kind of hit him mentally like it really affected him in a major way and this was kind of. I don't want to say the beginning of the end but it was another blow to his kind of mental same time. I'm nine hundred eighty-three also. Basquiat produce twelve inch. Single featuring hip hop artist ramsey and k rob billed as ramsey versus k. Rob the single contained two versions of the same track called beat bop on the side with vocals but the b side adding instrumental version and That music is the singer. In this episode. The beginning heard a little bit of beat. bop you can hear the whole elba on youtube. As a matter of fact The single was pressing limited quantities in the one off tar town record label and the single's cover featured basquiat artwork making the pressing highly desirable among both record and art collectors So nine hundred eighty four. Basquiat was showing at the mary. Boone gallery in soho and he would often paint inexpensive armani suits and would even appear in public in the same paint splattered clothing and in nineteen eighty five. He appeared on the cover of the new york times magazine in a feature titled new art new money. The marketing of an american artist so a large number of photographs depicted a collaboration between warhol and basquiat and nineteen eighty. Four nine hundred eighty five for their joint. Painting called olympics warhol made the five ring olympic symbol rendered in the original primary colors and basquiat painted over it in his kind of animated style. It's actually a really cool piece And they made another. Oh my gosh. The nineteen eighty four. Summer olympics with wings eighty-five Their joint exhibition called paintings. Shown at the tony chef rossi gallery It actually caused a rift in their friendship after. It was like kind of slandered earnings because critics referred to basquiat as warhol's mascot and at the same time warhol was ridiculed for associating with an a younger artists in order to stay relevant so it was great man. I know they're they're so they're like who's this young dummy. Who's you know. Thinks that he can become famous because of warhol and then like look at this old man thinking that he can stay. Relevant by you know hitching his star to you know this rising artisan whatever so whatever i mean. They're the worst. So despite his artistic success bosque outs emotional. Instability was continuing to haunt him and he used drugs frequently and his cocaine use became so excessive that he blew a hole in his nasal septum which is like a friend claimed that. Basquiat confessed that he was on heroin in late. nineteen eighty. And he started to these discoloration on his face like these spots on his face which he was really self conscious about and they were presumably the result of the fact that he didn't have spleen and his body couldn't filter out what he was money right so it was in your skin as oregon so that was why he was getting these like very strong spots on his cheeks and jaw. It's crazy and you can see it in photographs at the time to like it. Looks kind of like like just. You know. Dark spots or freckles. But that was a result of his drug use Also many of his peers speculated that his heroin use was a means of coping with the demands of his new found fame and the exploitation of nature of the art industry and the pressures of being a black man in a white dominated art world as mentioned before so in august nineteen eighty six plus gat traveled to the ivory coast for an exhibit organized by the art dealer bruno bischofberger at the french cultural institute in john and he was accompanied by his girlfriend jennifer. Good who was considered by many to be the great love of his life and she unsuccessfully tried to get scott into a methadone program. He was very resistant to rehab. And i think that was probably one of the main reasons why he died. So young was because he was just he wouldn't even entertain the thought unfortunately Basquiat also walked the runway for ray cow a kubo at the com our songs spring summer nineteen eighty-seven show in paris and in the last eighteen months of his life. Basquiat became something of a recluse. He continued using drugs and it was thought that it was a way of coping after the death of andy warhol in february. Nineteen eighty-seven okay And a lot of his friends and acquaintances mentioned that the death of warhol was really the end of basquiat partially because of this great loss of this friend and mentor but notably because this was seemingly another reminder of how quickly death can take people myers emulates. Yeah so eight. He traveled to paris for as an exhibit at the yvonne lambert gallery into dusseldorfer an exhibit that same month and in paris he befriended the ivorian artist. What tara watts. And they made plans to travel together to watch birthplace core ho-gau that summer so he was planning on going to africa making you know becoming friends and kind of getting in touch. This black america experiences ever experienced black american experience haitian experience and following Exhibition at a gallery in eight scout traveled to maui june of nineteen eighty eight. He had built. He had built a ranch in. Maui and hawaii became kind of his like refuge to And he was. His father said that he was like too generous. He would fly people out all the time to stay with him at his ranch and he would fly like these you know. Yes men and hangers-on like these people who are just looking for a free ride when he returned from maui keith. Haring who was very close friend of his Reported meeting with boss kiat who was glad to tell him that he had finally kicked his drug dependency so he was like. I'm clean unfortunately. Despite attempts at sobriety basquiat died of a heroin overdose at his studio on. Great jones street in manhattan's no-ho neighborhood on august twelfth. Nineteen eighty eight He had been found unresponsive in his bedroom by his girlfriend. Kelly in and he was taken to cabrini medical center where he was pronounced dead on arrival and he was twenty seven years old. A private funeral was held on august seventeenth. Nineteen eighty-eight and basquiat is buried at brooklyn's greenwood cemetery. In memory of the late artist keith. Haring created the painting. A pile of crowns for jean michel basquiat. And it is. I will say. I am not a keith haring fan but a pile of crowns for jimmy schelbosch. Gatt is so beautiful. I actually like tear it up a little bit when i thought it is just a beautiful piece And in the obituary he wrote for vogue herring stated quote. He truly created a lifetime of works in ten years greeley. We wonder what else he might have created what masterpieces we've been cheated out of by his death but the fact that he had created enough work to intrigue generations to come only now will people begin to understand the magnitude of his contribution so we had this really terribly sad life but he was enormously talented and just so prolific like he painted and drew and painted and drew and drew on everything. And all of these things are like still out there. He made like. I think like two thousand drawings. It's just absolutely insane. He just had an incredible amount of output. His father became the executor of state and The basquiat like brand is still around. I know that. I think it was mac or maybe pure some makeup company. Did like a collaborator with the bosque. Outta state which i think is like all right kind of cheap cheap you can buy. You can buy t shirts from unique low with like the basquiat crown. And that kind of thing. i mean. it's probably what he would have wanted like. That seemed to be kind of his thing anyway. We just kind of like drawing on whatever so this idea of like drawing on something you could buy. I think was not outside the realm of possibility for him but it just seems. I don't know it just seems kinda cheap than this poor man dead and like people are making money off of it. Whatever but anyway. On a lighter note. I have a quiz. Today it's called a quiz on jones and michel it's a quiz on famous people named john or show. Okay great question number one jeanrenaud. The striking french moroccan character actor or maybe best known to english speaking audiences as the titular lay all in the one thousand nine hundred four action film lay all the professional his twelve year. Old co star had her debut in this film and later become one of hollywood's most versatile actress playing a queen a first lady and even a bird afoul name. Her question number two analysts. Michelle was a german woman who underwent catholic exorcism rites nineteen seventy five the year before her untimely death and her story was the basis for the two thousand fifteen movie. The exorcism of emily rose many health. Experts believe here condition was not infect caused by demons by psychosis caused by this common chronic disorder of the nervous system which looks a lot like demon possession. What is this disorder question number three. This extremely french fashion designer is best known for his cheeky sailor style and his over the top runway shows. Who is this designer. Who is definitely somebody that you used to no question before engineer. Josh would definitely know this one. This french director screenwriter and producer is best known for his invented visual style. Cnn films like eternal sunshine of the spotless. Mind and be kind rewind. Who is the director who has also done music videos for daft. Punk bjork and radiohead question number five. Jean claude van damme is an oft macht and martial artists who has made a career and presumably a lot of money making b grade movies at best. He has a funny accent but he's not. French is j. c. d. french canadian or belgian question number six infamous twentieth century. French philosopher espoused theories that primarily addressed the relationship between power and knowledge and how they are used as a form of social control through suicidal institutions. He wrote madness and civilization discipline and punish and the history of sexuality who is this philosopher historian of ideas writer political activist and literary critic question number seven. You may not know a lot about french. Actor and comedian jean dujardin. But if you're around thousand eleven. You couldn't escape his starring role in this inexplicably popular and oscar winning silent film entitled. What questionable abe. This canadian hockey coach began his career with the montreal canadians where he led the haves to an impressive record of thirty six thirty one fifteen before being promoted to the pittsburgh penguins in december of two thousand five as a midseason replacement for at all sick and coach the pens until two thousand nine. He is currently the assistant coach of the philadelphia. Flyers boo hiss. Who is this coach. Question number nine junk. Octo- was an influential poet playwright novelist and visual artists who ran in the same circles as marcel. Proust's apollinaire modigliani and eric suttie. He denied being part of this artistic movement. But he's still considered practitioner all the same. What is this experimental unorthodox artistic movement which i didn't episode on. It's very good and finally question number ten. I've never heard of composer and performer. Show michelle jar. But he seems to be very big and france. He is best known for organizing outdoor spectacles featuring his music vastly displays large projections and fireworks. In fact he's planning a big virtual concert and notre dom on new year's eve. He is best known for being a pioneer. In what music genre that emphasizes tone and atmosphere over traditional musical structure or rhythm and has something. You might hear at a spa or during yoga session. What is this genre of music. We'll give you to think about it and we'll be right back with your answers two relaxing in my crib and reading a book on the early one thousand nine hundred eighty s art explosion in new york city. I started to think back about those times as i reflect afternoon. I recall the rehearsal group. Great in the summer nine. You would think with all these french names. He threw at me. That i was going to do really good but as i mentioned before my brain is very tired. It's okay you don't want it's right so this is not for any money or anything. It's just you just for bragging rights between the two of us which is very little so all right here. We go question number one jewelry. No the striking french moroccan character actor may be best known to english speaking audiences as the titular leo in the nineteen ninety-four four action film lael. The professional his twelve year olds co-star header debut in this film and would later become one of hollywood's most versatile actresses playing a queen a first lady and even berta foul name. Her she is. Natalie portman it. Is natalie portman semen. I watched the first couple of of Star wars where she was that she was inch. Queen yeah it is not good it is. They are not good movies. You should watch not that you're planning on a buttoned up why i am not good. Okay question number. Two analysts michelle was a german woman who underwent catholic exorcists writes in nineteen seventy five the year before her untimely death and her story was the basis for the two thousand fifteen movie. The exorcism of emily rose many health. Experts believe her condition was not in fact caused by demons but by psychosis caused by this common chronic disorder of the nervous system which looks a lot like demon possession. What is this disorder epilepsy. It is epilepsy. Oh jeez her story is very sad. I'm gonna tell you it okay after. She was diagnosed with epilepsy at sixteen and after taking psychiatric medication for five years which failed to improve her symptoms. Michelle and her family became convinced that she was possessed by a demon as a result her family appealed to the catholic church for an exorcism and while they were rejected at first after much hesitation. Two priests got permission from the local bishop. In seventy five. The priests began conducting. Xm and our parents stopped consulting. Doctors analysts michelle stopped eating food and died due to malnourishment and dehydration after sixty seven. Exorcism sessions michelle's parents and the two roman catholic priests were found guilty of negligent homicide and sentenced to six months in jail which was eventually reduced to three years of probation as well as a fine. That's terrible. it's very sad okay. Question number three. This extremely french fashion designer is best known for his cheeky sailors style and his over the top runway shows. Who is this designer. Who was definitely somebody that you used to know. Thank you for that clip goce. Yes it's shown. Paul goatee a quick like shorthand for a goatee a outfit. Is he loved that. The french striped like sailor style. Yeah that was like his thing like he would dress up all sorts of handsome man in like this very tight french sailor style and in fact his perfume line. He's got like a cologne and perfume. Line is just like a disembodied headless. You're i wear like some crazy perfumes. Yes yeah it's always like a body so like the women's one is like a body without a head or arms and legs and the men's one is a very handsome man's body without a head arms early cone boob thing for madonna That sounds right. I want to say let's check that out. Cone bra cone done cone. Brahma jonah yep i know oh yep it is shown pogo ta yup that makes sense goto super into like Exaggerating the body. Like high camp stuff So we love to play with like menswear and womenswear like kind of the gender binary is like his whole thing. He stopped doing Couture couple years ago. I want to say but he still does ready to wear. Because it's cheaper cheaper to make ready to wear than it is to make reams and reams of qatar with expensive stuff that no one buys and no one's going anywhere right now anyway. No one's going anywhere right now. He really had the right idea. Okay question number four engineer. Josh would definitely know this one. This french director screenwriter and producer is best known for his inventive visual style. Cnn films like eternal sunshine of the spotless. Mind and be kind rewind. Who is this director who also done music videos for daft. Punk bjork and radiohead okay. I feel like this guy's name is michelle and his last name starts of the g. wrecked and yes that's all. I got like three quarters of the way. They're michelle go on to this is this is the kind of thing where foreign and i were on attributing together. I would say michelle. I would say. It's something and then she would fill it in for him. Yeah yeah all celebrate. We are stronger together not individually. It's true anymore more letters. Doing the three three. Yeah three more letters old. Now that peace was there but the other the other pieces but expelled for my brain. It's michelle go. Andris gandara Shell laundry apparently pioneered the bullet time technique later. Seen the matrix movies engineer. Josh wants you to know. It's kind of weird. That you didn't mentioned the white stripes. Well i just honestly. I had not seen any of the videos or remembered any of them so i just picked three bands that i thought might be helpful. Thank you in. Cheer josh josh. Shaking his head pace so strongly okay. All right question for five junk claude. Van damme is an oft macht actor and martial artists who has made a career presumably a lot of money making b grade movies at best. He has a funny accent but he's not. French is j. c. french canadian or belgian. The man is belgian. He is belgian his given name. Is jean claude. Kamil francois van berg to to hilarious things about this guy okay. I'm won in two thousand. Eight actress. investor salone declared to the british magazine. Fhm that at a party in my home in miami in nineteen ninety-seven van damme was tired of steven seagal claiming that he could kick his ass so we offered seagal outside into my backyard. According to salone seagal made is excuse and left while van damme tracked him down and club and challenged him again. Salone finished by stating quote van. Damme was too strong. Seagal wanted none of it and the second thing is apparently in the french-speaking world vandamme as well known often mocked for his picturesque aphorisms that he delivers on a wide range of topics including personal well-being spirituality the environment women dogs his ability to crack walnuts but his but his realization that christianism is flawed based on the fact that quote. Snakes are nice and quote. Apples contain pectin which is anti cholesterol etc. And he is very sensitive about this because he he did not grow up speaking french. He was like trying to like reorient himself with speaking french. Because i think he spoke mostly german so he so. He's not great at french and so the french speaking world just laughs and laughs at him because he is not getting his point across. It's hysterical poor guy. He's fine he makes plays fine. He's fine okay. Question number six this infamous twentieth century. French philosopher espoused theories that primarily address the relationship between power and knowledge and how they're used as a form of social control through societal institutions. He wrote madness and civilization discipline and punish the history of sexuality who is this philosopher historian of ideas writer political activist literary critic Did you say nineteenth century twentieth century. One eighth century I'm just going to throw out the first name that popped into my head enough sejour shock russo. It's michelle suco. Oh he the pendulum. Yes he's got the pendulum. Fukuoka fukuoka died from complications of aids. Nine hundred eighty four and he became the first public figure in france to die from complications of the disease about that. Yeah question number seven. You may not know a lot about french. Actor and comedian joan jardin. But if you're around in two thousand eleven. You couldn't escape his starring role in this inexplicably popular and oscar winning silent film entitled. What was the artist. That was the artist. I went inside. I got caught up in the artis type just as much as the next person but literally it did not age. Well like it's fine. It's fine it's going to be wrong. it's perfectly fine. But it's certainly not oscar. Winning a throwback to the age of a lot it they're like oh the golden age of hollywood. They love that garbage. Just eat it up. was terrific and the monuments men. Oh you know what. I forgot about that. Yes you're right. It was incredible in that movie. Yeah so you're right. You know what he is. he's great. It's not his fault on his artist. Was what it was. Yeah all right question number eight. This canadian hockey coach began his career with montreal. Canadian's where he led the haves to an impressive record of thirty six thirty one fifteen before being promoted to the pittsburgh penguins and december two thousand five as a midseason replacement. For ed and coach ole check. Thank you and coached the pens until two thousand nine. He is currently the assistant coach of the philadelphia. Flyers boo hiss. Who is this coach. Thank you for all interjections and that question His name is michele -tarian it is michelle -tarian and he just looks so french-canadian it's out of control. He is he has he is. He's a big giant aquiline nose. Yes and a little bit of jowls and furrowed brow brow on hair that's kind of receding and it's Home back over his head. Very nice guy though. He seemed to do really well. With the penguins. Oh until he was fired until and then took over and then won the cob the global. It is jong van damme a little bit ago. Because i think personally the only god vanity movie i know is sudden sudden-death which takes place in pittsburgh and there's a there's a chopper that crashes through the ceiling of the civic green onto the ice while the pittsburgh penguins are playing on we get out and you know what stephen i have been trying to work our way through some cheesy zhong. Claude van damme movies. So we'll have to look that one you'll have to watch death 'cause we love to get drunk and watch bad movies and just laugh and laugh so all right. I'll keep that in mind. I'll write that down all right question number. Nine john doe was an influential poet playwright novelist and visual artists who ran in the same circles as marcel proust apollinaire. Modigliani and eric suttie. He denied being part of this artistic movement. But he's still considered a practitioner. All the same. What does this experimental unorthodox artistic movement. Which i didn't episode on it's very good experimental unorthodox is it. Dad is What i'll give it to you. I did put off guard slash surrealism. But dot is the beginnings of both of those things. You walk He was influential specifically to a group of composers called six Which frequented a very popular bar that cocteau had a hand in naming named. Are you ready for this Leboeuf twat how's that last word spelled t. o. It that's the cow on the roof. Yes or the beef on the roof. Which i thought was hysterical. The be on the roof which was their popular bar. Okay and finally number ten. I've never heard of composer and performer. Show michelle jar. But he seems to be very big in france. He is best known for organizing outdoor spectacles featuring is music laser displays projections fireworks. He's planning a big virtual concert and notre dame on new year's eve sign up And he is known for being a pioneer in what music genre that emphasizes tone atmosphere over traditional musical structures. A rhythm and something. You might hear at a spa or during a yoga session. What is this genre of music. A lot of bells sort of a lot of bells. And it's it's it seems to be a lot of like synthesizer No new It is a. I would say it is a it is a synonym for atmosphere mood music. You know what. I'll give it to you. It's very very tired it's fine. It's called ambient music okay. So apparently he has been around. He had his first. Album was in the seventy s and it was called suzanne or something oxygen And it was very big. It was very it was big at the time. And apparently he does these huge concerts like these enormous like projection displays. And i watched like ten minutes of a concert. They had the entire concert in morocco. A tube and there were like thousands of people. There they were into this. They're like show me and he was like rocking away. On his synthesizer he was loving and living at not my kind of music. But you know what life is a rich to it is a rich rich tapestry and jimmy shell jarrar is just a very small part of it. So yeah thanks everybody. This was this was another quick one but we want to let you get back to your to your new year's eve plans which involve imagining slippers comfortable clothing. Maybe a twilight zone marathon. Yeah keep your keep your decorations up. Yeah do it. Keep your decoration some. Yeah please have a happy new year. Stay safe and warm if you were in the northern hemisphere Stay cool if you're in the southern hemisphere eastern hemisphere. It's been awful. Yeah we're just gonna keep talking about all of the different regions of our growing and temperature. It is at the time. yeah thanks and islands. I hope singing. She's a very specific. Cool i guess. I don't know i'm going to google all of this. So yeah thank you very much. Please check out our merch public Please check out our social needs. I'm sure we have some re tweets or something that you can check out whatever recording this at a time. So who knows what i've liked or re tweeted in the time and be sure if you're interested were still hoping that burchell trivia night for the strong museum of play on Thursday january seventh at seven pm eastern time So get your tickets to that. If you're if you wanna play along with us yet definitely check out our social media we will be definitely Posting the link for that if you would like to sign up all money goes to supporting the strong museum of play and its efforts to bring play to The rochester community and beyond. Did you hear how i just bullshitted my way into your see'ums statement. Wow i'm telling you they should hire me. No i don't wanna be hired there. I love my job anyway. Let's before he continued before i continue. Thanks everybody for listening and we hope you have a safe and healthy. New year's we will catch you next time. good bye bye.

Basquiat basquiat vincent gallo Samo warhol michael stuart mudd club new york janice joplin buffalo bosque Michael stewart andy warhol michelle matilda Jules michel basquiat joe michel Basquiat hoop John michel basquiat gerard basquiat
Luther Hughes reads "Tenor"

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Luther Hughes reads "Tenor"

"This is the poacher magazine podcast for the week of December third twenty eighteen I Don share editor of poetry magazine. And I'm Lindsay garbage associate editor for the magazine on the poetry magazine podcast, we listened to a poem or two in the current issue. Luther Hughes is the author of touched a collection of poems that came out this year. Hughes's also, the founder of the shade journal executive editor for the offing and a columnist for frontier poetry his palm in the December issue tenor draws from a painting of the same name by Jean Michel Basquiat Hughes told us that in college. He saw documentary about boss Gat, and the artists became one of his muses. He was so free of kind of societal norms of how black artists should come a live at present themselves. I'm also he was poor. So it was like interesting to me how that never stopped him. The painting from nineteen eighty-five two picks four. Bird heads circling around a monstrously oversized around. I love crows. I really have an obsession with CROs and being from Seattle and living back in Seattle. There are so many crows here. So when I saw this painting. I was like, oh, my gosh has painting with CROs after seeing an image of the painting for the first time Hughes told us that he started looking around his apartment, and I had these paintings in my living room that had a bird in it that had a picture of a boy in it. I saw a mirror, and so everything is seemed to collapse into each other. And I remember one day seeing our rats in a crow's beak walking home from the bus stop. And I was like, wow. This is kind of perfect. How do I reckon with all of this perfection? How I reckon with them us telling me Luther Lou sit down write this poem. Write it. Here's Luther Hughes. Leading tenor after Joe Michel Basquiat. Crows and more crows one crow with a rat hanging from its beak sloppy and beautiful. Another crow with its wings plucked empty. I wanted so much of today to be peaceful, but the empty crow untethered something in me, a federal yearning for love or love that is so full of power of tenderness. The words fall to their knees baking for mercy like tulips in wind. I don't wear the crown for the times power has tainted my body, but I can tell the difference between giving up and giving in. If you can't ask the crow that watches me through the window, laughing as I drink my third bottle of wine. Ask the sound. The tree makes when the crow has grown disgusted with my whining after years of repression. I can come clean. I was a boy with a whole other boys stuff themselves into I have wanted nothing to do with blackness or laughter or my life. But about love who owns the rights really who owns the crow who loves fresh meats or the crow who loves the vibration of its own throat. Everything around me is black. I own good. I suppose the widow the picture of the boy crying on the wall the mirror with it's taunting the crows that belong to their scripture. Can you imagine being so tied to? Blackness that even your wings cannot help you escape about my life every needle a small prayer every pill a funeral him. I wanted the end several times, but thought who owns this body really God dirt the silly insects that will feast on my decay is it the boy who entered I or the boy who wanted everything to last. There's so much about this poem that I love I think it would be easy to read this poem without knowing about the John Michel Basquiat painting, but it adds such a beautiful layer onto what this poem is talking about. Specifically, the one mention I don't wear the crown for the times power has tainted my body because boss out was well known for putting crowns in his paintings as a way of honoring somebody that he cared about. And also in his own self portrait to kind of offer his own body and his own talent. And I love how this one mention of the crown in Hughes's poem both pays attention to honoring his own body. But also to talk about power in the way power can turn us into both like a Saint and martyr the same time. And so that crown sort of echoes out throughout the poem for me because the word crow is also within the word crown, and so is the word own which is also repeated. Throughout the poem. And so I love how all these different themes are tied together. And that way the way of Bosque painting does similar theme tying together, visually and textually. Ya Anne on the page the Palmerston stepped lines, and I suppose we'll remind readers of William Carlos Williams is accept that. This is like the perfect fulfillment of Williams American way of laying outlines and steps because it doesn't just have that kind of crow like movement through the poem, the stepped lines and not just the breath that Williams talked about. But it has those other internal sounds and rhymes that. You were describing that I think Williams ever quite got in or didn't want to. And so to me, this is grateful film. And it's a great American poem for this reason. And then, of course, another crow poem or book of pumps comes to mind from another poet named Hughes. I always like it when a poet and opponent come. Along and kind of displaced as what we think we know about a subject and so for most people upon about crows gonna call up something about Ted Hughes. And then for for me like you say, this poem absorbs all these influences, but it actually flies well above them too. I really like that. It's like now, we have a new brilliant poem that takes on a way of thinking about in visualizing crows. And also, it creates a landscape that to me is very intriguing because it's kind of like when you think of crow you don't always think of a crow is being in flight because actually a lot of their time is spent kind of calculating in moving and looking at things and doing things the very busy, and they're very clever and ingenious, and of course, they're very striking as well. I mean, it looks like crows yearning for something. They're working on things there. They have a kind of power using the figure of crow for kind of. Power Eknath thirty is really compelling in the poem. It's something that allows the poet to really think about how to live in a different way to realize, for instance, the poem says after years of repression, I can come clean, it's really creating kind of iconography for poetry and love about love who owns the rights really who owns the crow who loves fresh meats or the crow who loves the vibration of its own throat. I love that section where it says the crow who loves the vibration of its own throat because it's a sort of harkening back to the title of the poem tenor. Which is, you know, both like a sort of melody or pitch of a man's voice. But it can also be related to metaphor. It's object. That's being described in a metaphor. And I love what you were saying about crows too. Because the part in the palm where the speaker says if you can't. Ask the crow that watches me through the window laughing as I drink my third bottle of wine ask the sound. The tree makes when the crow has grown disgusted with my whining. Crows always seem like so observational to me like they're really watching you and really aware of your movements, and some people say that crows have a really excellent memory that they do remember people when they see them. And so the idea of the crow sort of being conscious or god-like figure in this speakers life of being like, I see you see what you're doing. And I see how you're failing. And I'm pushing you to do better is such a beautiful moment in this poem. And I love how it expands outward to be everything that's surrounding the speaker. So the widow the picture of the boy crying on the wall the mirror with it's taunting that this whole scene becomes involved in the speaker understanding themselves and understanding their own life a little bit better, and there's real power and liberation in that too it's very moving when the poem says canoe. Agean being so tied to blackness that even your wings cannot help you escape these questions that arise especially towards the end of the poem, which Hinz on a question really have kind of muscular movement to them, which I think allows us to imagine asking questions about things about our lives and about our bodies, and sort of almost become more muscular in our response to the questions to become strengthened by asking them by having tasks them who owns this body, really God dirt the silly insects that will feast on my decay is it the boy who entered I or the boy who wanted everything to last. You can read tender after show. Michelle basket by Luther Hughes and the December twenty eight teen issue of poetry magazine or online at poaching magazine dot org. We'll have another episode for you next week or you can get all December episodes all at once in the full length podcast on soundcloud. Let us know what you thought of this program. Email us at podcast at poetry foundation dot org, and please linked to the podcast and social media. The poetry magazine podcast is recorded by Ed Herman. And this episode was produced by Curtis FOX and Rachel James. The theme music for this program comes from the Claudia Quinta. I'm Don share, and I'm Lindsay it. Thanks for listening.

Luther Hughes Jean Michel Basquiat Hughes poetry magazine William Carlos Williams Seattle poacher magazine Joe Michel Basquiat Ted Hughes associate editor John Michel Basquiat Gat Luther Lou editor Don share executive editor Claudia Quinta shade journal founder Ed Herman
Stuart Vevers on Creativity

Dream It Real

42:02 min | 1 year ago

Stuart Vevers on Creativity

"Welcome to dream it real a podcast for those who dream brought to you by coach. I'm your host heaven. Got to each week. We're talking to inspiring guests about how they're making their dreams a reality dreams for themselves their communities in the world coach and I have been collaborating on this as a part of their dream, it real initiative, all about supporting the next generation and their dreams for the future. So to discuss creativity who better than someone who literally has creative in their title. That's right. We have coaches very own executive creative director, Stuart Vive on the podcast this week, fashion is about doing something new having a unique point of view. I think it's not about pleasing everyone. It's stunning up for what you believe in. I think there's a real power. So Stewart vivas has been the creative director at coach for five years now bringing a unique spirit to the brand that's been celebrated by both press in customers around the world. So in his work, he's collaborated with a lot of people from the rue Dr tasters to Mickey Mouse to Selena Gomez. I feel like that's a wide cultural spectrum, and I'm very curious to hear more about his influences and how he approaches those collaborations. I'm excited to share the conversation with you all take a listen. Welcome Stewart to dream it real. Thank you very much. So this whole episode is about creativity, and I wanna ask you point blank. How do you define creativity creativity is dreaming? Using your imagination to create something new in your head that then can become reality. But it it's, it's really about dreaming. Yeah. Yes. And allowing yourself to dream. I think it's also you've to allow yourself to dream, you've got to play, you're gonna lay in your mind in your day to day life. I think if you can introduce joy and play to me. That's how I spot creativity. You know, like doing, like, come up with the most crazy ideas, whether the they seem incredibly Embiid or impossible, you know, like that process of just. Throwing things out. It it's when you can just catch something that actually, you can achieve will you can create. But I think you've got a, you've got to go there, I think to, to get those ideas to tap into that creativity. When's the last time you allowed yourself to like play like that? I do every day, every day because I think I really challenged myself when I'm working with my team when I'm working with people. Listen head people's ideas. Don't don't you know? You know, you never know where that next big ideas gonna come from. So encourage it like, don't be too practical. Don't go straight into the. Oh. Well, like just let it, let it happen. You know. Can you think of any examples like that? I see. Yeah. So we have a Moscow coach. Dinosaurs has become the mascot for, for the new coach and people all around the world. Love, I traveled to China to Japan, people talk to me about Rex amazing. But I, I remember the moment when Rex happen, I was working with some of the team, and we were playing we were playing with different images. We, we, we were paying with ideas for sweater. And somehow we landed on the idea of this kind of this, dinosaur this t Rex who was kind of ferocious, but cute. It was one sweater in one fashion show. And since then, like, you know, it's she's become. Phenomenon. And, you know, if we hadn't been playing and open in that moment, Vecsey wouldn't have, you know. Let's put a t Rex on a sweater, and it was very first fashion show. And that's an easy people responded immediately. You're right people. It is a conversational item and it's outrageous, how much I enjoyed the, the dinosaurs. So the job of being creative director of a big brand is, like a huge task, but I wanna get into your background. I I wanna start there and then we're going to work towards what you do at coach. So you grew up in South Yorkshire. Pointing south Doncaster South Yorkshire. It's, it's real. It's really real. And then my parents are from Carlisle come rea- so we, we moved there. So the both in the both cities of England. So how did that influence the way you see the world? It's very different from New York, it's very different from New York. I mean, I grew up in a, an a normal working class, family. I didn't know I didn't know that the fashion industry existed. This was. How did you find out? I found out really from going out clubbing. I was I'm tall. So I could get into nightclubs at a young age, fourteen fifteen I started going out, and it was really the idea of dressing up. It was when I started to look up my Zien ze. And that's when I started to. To learn about designers and that that was was was from clubbing people wearing at that time, I remember one of my favourite looks was an all white. Ooh. Look, putty, white jeans loving white luck. Yeah. I also used to make some pieces. But like my grandmother, she was always a creative working with a sewing, machine making things. I'm she used to help me, make my clubbing outfits. Yeah. Yes. This habit. Yes, she, she was very encouraging. A naughty grandmother. In a good way. The nasi. So at eighteen moved to London to study fashion at the university of Westminister. How did fashion school in the city change your perspective or how did that affect you? What was that? It was so transformative because, you know. Growing up in these smaller cities. Suddenly, there was so much to see in so much to learn new people to me, and it was just it. I mean it was amazing when your you're still young when you're still the age. It's just I mean, I, I tried to initially I just tried to do too much. I was working in a ball, five nights a week kind of support myself, then going out and trying to say. It was the first year I definitely I try to do too much. But yeah, it was just it was it was so exciting. And studying something that, that, you know that I really loved that I had had up until fairly recently, just hadn't been on my radar as something that I could possibly consider doing that was amazing. What is it like to, to study fashion, because I this thing, a lot of people have interest in. Maybe they feel like they need an education to get into it or feel like they can be a little more self taught. Yeah. What was that journey like for you? I, I knew that I needed some structure. I knew I needed I, I wanted to learn. I wanted to learn how to make clothes pattern cutting. I, I wanted that teaching so that's why I chose the college I, I went to was because it had a good balance between. A freedom to, to express your creativity, but, but also enough structure that I felt like I was really learning. Would you recommend that path for someone who's interested in doing? I think everyone has to find their own paw. I think it's, you know, it I have friends who didn't go to college or dropped out of college, and I have friends who you know, went to different colleges. I think it's, it's for me it was right to go to study. But I think it's I think they're the lots of different parts. So after you, graduated, you move straight to New York at three bold moves. What drew you to the city? Did you feel like he just had to be there? There was definitely something really interesting happening in New York at the time I, I was really just seeing it through. Magazines tv. But had become during my final year, kind of my, my ambition was to go to New York. I'd never what so much to the was helmet. Lying had just started showing in New York acting Karan that time it was probably also the time in fashion that was suited to American style. I mean, the, the story of how I ended up in in New York is, is, is interesting because I think that's where miam- Bishen kick tin, because I think creativity is so important as a designer, but it's also you've got to take action. You've got, you know, dreaming and creativity with action remains a dream. And, and actually a friend of mine was interviewing full for Calvin Klein and she, I persuaded heart somehow to tell me whether interview is taking place and I just turned up a knocked on the door. Yeah. And it's one of the reasons she ended up offering me job. And so that's. Since then, you've, I'm going to list, a few the casual brands that you haven't worked with no major brands like Louis Vitton Jiangxi booked Hager. I can never say this to take then. Mulberry. Lou Lou FA. And then that's before you became coaches creative director, five years ago. That's quite that's quite a path. No, I've been very fortunate. I think that definitely has something to do with my background. I always feel I have something to prove and, you know, it's that that feeling has never left me. I think being very open minded to, you know, I've lived in a lot of different countries, the UK, France Spain. It's leeann. And now the US I think I've, I've always. Taking a Cianci's and, and, you know, when I've had these opportunities, I've just I've just I moved my whole life to, to, to, to be able to work with these amazing companies because, you know, this is my passion and I, I have sacrificed to the things to, to from my from my work, totally. What are talk to me, a little bit more about your design style? What is the design principles you live by? How do you think about these things, I think it's always changing is always evolving. But there's a the idea of cool means and what cool has men over the is something that really fascinates me youth culture today and in the past. It's, it's a real fuss nation. And so that's a recurring an inspiration, an I, I say about, you know, when someone has a coach piece when they put a jacket on, I want, and then just instantly feel just a bit cooler. That's kind of one of my the things that inspires me. What was what was cool when you were growing up? I think I mean obviously cool is a word that it's open to. Yeah. To me. It's a certain rebellious nurse. I think it's about not trying too hard, you know, like having an effortlessness in in your style in in, in your behavior. I think that's for me. Will what cool. Yeah. I love that music and counterculture play an important role in what inspires your work in your collection. What is your go-to song to music, and your life? How does how does that play a role in your work? I love pop music. I've always loved pop music. I I love pop music. I love pop culture. It's always changing. But I've been having a real revival of the Smiths. Which, I guess you might not define us pop music. It's popular pop. Pop. That's fine. I feel like fashion is pretty misunderstood world. Probably 'cause there's a million moves about it, and they're all say the same thing also like sex in the city or something like everyone's reference point. Maybe what's something, you think people misunderstand about fashion or something. You've seen in movies, and you're like that's not accurate. I think it's it's often perceived as a very superficial world. My experience of it is very different. You know, I've have very deep friendships with people who I've met through walk, and it can often be very friendly and supportive industry. And I think, yeah, I think it's perceived as most superficial. It's also. It's like this is my passion. It's a lot of people's passion, and it's not only mine, it's, it's the people who I work with who make the clothes or the bags you know, there's a lot of skill and love in, in how things created, and I think sometimes people forget that, you know, like I love going to visit fat trees and work with the people Huns on hooah making product and this is a lot of people's love. It's the passionate the the. The thing they have spent years training to do. And it's yeah, the I do sometimes, especially in the design, like when you're thinking about designers, you may not think about the entire team goes into. Yes. Making every single detail of the piece that you love. No, I feel like that's also true. Podcasting, people forget, there are other people at work, and I certainly I certainly don't do this alone. I work with incredibly talented, people who the interactions that we have the conversations, sometimes the design process is just playing it's like getting together and dreaming of what what's possible, do you ever get overwhelmed by maybe, like, so coach, for example as a seventy six year history, do you, do you get overwhelmed when you're stepping into some like taking on a project where you're stepping into history. I mean this definitely a certain amount of pressure. But I also think that's good. You know it it gives you drive up in the morning. You know. Yeah, but at the end of the day, you know, it's I do what I do. And I, I truly love what I do and I think it's just about doing your best and being collaborative and, and hopefully that's going to come through. So I wanted to talk a little bit about your time at coach specifically over the last five years, you've been celebrated for an American spirit that uniquely bring into the brand. I feel like I I have some reference points for like, Americana, but I want to know what you're thinking, and how you magin those kinds of things. When I when I first joined coach, what excited me most was, I, I was feeling this re this a real shift in, in the fashion world. Like, you know, the way people addressing today was it was changing dramatically much more casual more relaxed. And I thought what an amazing opportunity to be at an authentic. American house with this great heritage and being able to reference those those icons of American style. The white teasha sneaker the Hyundai the denim being able to reference these, these pieces like quintessential American clothing, archetypes from an American house. Just had a lot of it just felt right? Had a lot of appeal to me, you know, coaches a down to earth, real house. You know it's. It's America's house of leda, and the something about that dant worth quality that I really love, I think it really sets coach apart. And I think it means we can be less formal. We can be warmer. We can be friendly. I think that's, that's one of the things that I really love about coach. How do you take a creative vision and apply? It to such a big brand. There's already so much happening here. I've been given a lot of freedom. You know, I've been given you know, when I first arrived at coach, and there was a real desire for change. And that's what really excited me that's what really drew me to the role, and I was given the freedom and support to do that. And you know, we will really bold. We we changed a law and we did a lot of things differently. And I think that's one of the things I love about fashion. It's always changing. It's always moving it. I think at its best it should reflect the times, we'll Evan. Can you tell me more about what you've changed? I mean, the probably the biggest thing I mean, we've changed the aesthetic direction of the house. The we've created a real identity for Guyon goal. But the main way we did that was by introducing clothing. So when I joined we started to show at New York fashion week, which was the first time coach had ever done that. And like it's I mean Supra exciting. I mean, very nerve racking, you know, before presenting that very first collection, which was, you know, eighteen Lux. You know, I I we pulled it. Together in a very short time I didn't know what people are gonna think because I think introducing ready to for the first time, you know, it's a can be a challenge. You know, it's not something has there, isn't something that you'll referencing from the past. It's a brand new idea. But in many ways that blank slate gave me the opportunity to really to dream and to try something totally new. But after that first presentation with it's just eighteen looks like the response was so strong and people just were like great. This looks like coach. This looks like coach clothing. This looks like the coach girl. It gave me it gave me and also the company is self encouragement to, you know, push things further and become student. I've been watching a lot of project. Runway's like I know tiny smidge of what your your day is like, when you're trying to make ready to wear and you have to make eighteen. Eighteen. Yeah. Few that's. A fashion show is, is usually more, like forty to eighty luck. So this was very small in comparison, yet move. Yeah. I knew it from what? I'm curious you brought a lot of collaborations into into how coach creates you've collaborated with everyone from the road. Dr tate. To Mickey Mouse to Selena Gomez. Why is collaboration important to you? How do you how do you pro- those collaborations? I worked with Marc Jacobs that Lou return. And he was, you know, he had created some incredible club rations. And I think that training was definitely you know, it's stuck in my head because I think at its best collaboration does, is it, it really stretch your your you'll boundaries. It pushes your boundaries. It forces you to see things in a different way to see someone else's point of view someone else's aesthetic. And, and I think that's healthy for, you know, it creates it's creating attention. I also think when it works that tension it can be really surprising. You know, some of the club rations you mentioned people weren't expecting them. They didn't see coach the they didn't imagine coach and Rudolf Tate's together coach and Disney and I think coach. And Keith hiring these things that, like, it's, it's surprising. It's you know but, but creatively what I love about it is that I get to learn. I get to try new things. I get to push my own boundaries. I I've learned a lot from the people, I've collaborated with, I know you're working with Michael Jordan, the first ever face of coach, men's, what's that collaboration been like what you when you have a Michael Jordan in your corner, like you can't go wrong? But also, how do you perch that? I think the great thing with Michael is that we've gotten to know each other over a few years. Designing for him. It's amazing. It's, it's he's what's great about Michael. He's got a very strong point of view. But also, he's really using this experience Salah. And like he's asked a lot of questions. He wants to understand the process more. And that's you know, that's that's great to be around. We had him on the podcast. He's a great listener. Yeah. He did ask that question. Michael jordan. So I know through coach. Create your now also inviting customers to collaborate. What's it been like to see customers able to interact with the design process in that way? I feel like that's very rare. Yeah, it's really interesting. I often searched that hashtag. It's, it's about expression writes about choosing a collie. You love fashion is about bringing joy and making people feel good. So if you've been part of the process, and you create something that, that's unique, that's really special to you. I think it, it makes you know, that piece just all the most special more. Yeah, I want to meditate a little on what you think about in terms of creativity where you're getting inspiration. What is it like a typical New York is such a great city to find inspiration. What's like a typical Sunday for you? Where are you pulling from an in your world today? I mean, honestly, the, the most important inspiration for me is the people who I work with the people who I can have those conversations with where we can challenge each other, because that multiple people coming together, whether it's just two of you or small group like. Throwing ideas around it just build like something. Somebody says, you know, you can then jump off that it's working with people to me as biggest inspiration. Yeah. Brainstorm. But in terms of the city, it's like it's I recently moved how. And I have a whole new subway. Wait train, and like, it's the something about that, that something about this city, that's so unique, like just the pace an energy of people like I just love that New York, just people from all over the world here, that is to me, something that makes New York. So special is not it's full of character and personality in individuals. You know, I think that's, that's super inspiring love New York, especially in the spring, New York in the spring up, salute. You feel like things are possible. The winter's over humans weren't meant to live like this of the winter, too, though my love snow day. New York days. We've been asking all of our guests this what some advice, you'd give your younger self. I think an advice, I would give to my younger self ole for a, you know, someone studying fashion, or dreaming about studying fashion. Is you really got to stay true to your instinct fashion, as about doing something new, having a unique point of view. I think it's not about pleasing everyone. It's about having your own unique point of view stunning up for what you believing. I think there's a real power in that beautiful. We have some very audience questions from social media, and they are a little random. Which I love, if you could bring one cultural aspect of the UK to New York City, what would it be from Jonathan JD Bishop? Wow. I mean, I've been working twenty three years now and I've only spent three of those in the UK, so I'm I, I, I have family in the UK, and I visit often, what would the one, I think there's a dry sense of humor. I don't know whether that's a cultural thing. I sometimes miss that. Yeah. It's, it's yeah. It's, it's, it's something that I totally feel you, I feel like my version of this one New York City thing that one American bring to the UK is, I don't care for the way you all say schedule. Chadrel wrong. And I don't like it. So just if everybody in the UK listening to me, you know, just FYI I how I feel about it. Okay. Another question from palm tree with a lot of ease in there. What are some tips and tricks, you use for self encouragement? That's a really good one. Okay. So I have this thing that I've learned over a number of years when I when I'm trying something new, and I get that anxious feeling you know, that feeling kind of inside that you like who is guy yet, you know, gut like I've learned that, that's a signal that you might be creating something new that you that you have to trust that feeling. So I use it as a signal that I might have hit on something new that something. Creatively? I've had a breakthrough an think it's the anxiety of Munis that I think you've gotta like how trimbe like okay. This is good. So it's kind of turning. Yeah, I just run away from that trying to suppress, that's really hard. But you're right. It's definitely a sign, but if you if you turn it into a signal of, like, okay, this, this could be a breakthrough then this, you can kind of accept it more and, and joy and away and enjoy it. I love that. Next question. What's your morning, beauty regime? This is from Benjamin Seidler. It's my husband who may you may know yes, it's very simple. It's very quick. I'd done. Why not? I recently got into linked products. Really good really enjoying them bit of Estee Lauder bit of Clini. But it's really fast really. Simple. I love that as a gay designer. What do you do to support the LGBTQ community from D Bishop? I, I live my life, you know, I let my family. Which I think is really important. I I'm also very conscious that, I'm you know, I work in an industry. That's you know, very tolerant, very supportive of, of me. Also in a city that, that protects me in many ways, and my community. I'm conscious that a lot of people don't have that, you know, they don't have that in their life, you know, I experienced a lot of difficult times growing up. You know, it means that where I have the opportunity to give people a voice to give people a -tunities from my community. I, I really I really welcome. Question from Eliza described the coach, girl or woman in three words within tick American dream. Ooh, thank you so much for talking to us Stewart. I feel like there are a lot of people who may not know all about the fashion world are going to be excited to check out what you are doing. And for a lot of insiders. We're like, ooh, how does he do it? Thank you very much. It's been really fun. Yeah. Thank you. Hey like what you hear? Well discover more about the coach fam- and what the brand is all about at coach dot com. Now, let's get back to the show. Okay. So to keep the conversation going about creativity. This week, we're joined by special guests and siblings. Satchel and jackson-lee. You may know them because their father is the economy director, Spike Lee an earlier this year. They all three of them collaborated on a short film for coach starring Michael Jordan. And the film is called words matter. And it's highlighting the importance of values like courage, and inclusion love that family band. Yes. Like their dad. They have very intentional approach to creativity. They're not just trying to tell an interesting story. But to also create real change in real conversation. So we're very excited to hear them. Talk about creativity in how they work we asked actual and Jackson to interview each other. And I'm very excited for y'all to take a listen. This is what happens when you put a sister and brother in the studio together and turn on the mics. Hi, my name is actually I'm twenty four years old. And I am the creative director of Drome, which is a clear, art, and fashion magazine. I also freelance. Right. And Acton Steve other things. Jackson-lee and twenty two years old. I'm sure designer designed three shoes for pan Jordan, also them director, and we're about to interview each other for the very first time on thing we've ever done this before we got a hatful of questions here random questions, and we're going to pick one in one and go through it Cl I'm gonna pick I write getting know each other. You know, let's get deep what sparks your creativity. I think living New York, there's so much like inspiration. I think it'd be like street is run way. Everyone is their own creative director managing their own brand. The tape very seriously. So I think just going up in New York, from the people the buildings like the culture, everything. And also a lot from the past think to Collado inspiration from like boss, Kiat, war, hull, Gordon parks. Most types of also. A lot of music. And that's a good answer. Would you see yourself in ten years time the good one, I like that one and twenty four? Now, I feel I in ten years. I like this question because I think there are a lot of things here. Right. I think typically, we think about, like money, we think about, like, status, we think about success, but I feel like recently and not necessarily just like recently, but I think that there is like a whole emotional like arc that I'm trying to take where I just really wanna be like in tuned with myself, and who I am, as a person, and the way that I relate to other people, I think that I've done a lot of work to allow myself to be more vulnerable now than I have been before. And I think that comes with just growing up anyway, but I hope in ten years, I just I more fully integrated as a person that, like, I like trust myself. More and that artistically Justin every cent and every sense, I think it's about just like kind of getting to the core. And also like you're thirty nobody cares. I just I wanna be like a, a better version of myself also, like I'm going to grad school. At some point, you know, a little continue to do all of my creative work as wells than yours. Yeah. I think so. I mean probably what year what is two thousand nineteen probably like two thousand twenty next year twenty one. No a little bit together. I we don't need to do the study brothers, and we don't need to do that. All right. Your turn. All right. Don't give me the politician answer on this one, drew name three people who inspire you. And why so first on the list, John Michel Basquiat, I think that he is a person was more free than many, many, many people on this earth. Have achieved a part of freedom is being free to not care like what other people's than other people think what the status quo as but he's a true soul, those first person my neck's people, I think, were are mom and dad, and then firing because on their own. They're two of the most incredible people are mothers, a lawyer author, producer and raised us and didn't amazing job. Our father, obviously an amazing director musing writer, not such an amazing actor but he tries. Has an actor really. Yeah. I don't know. I just can't it's a different type of performance. It's not if you're looking for, like, realistic, like heavy deep, you're not gonna find it, but I think he's charming other stowing, but no, but seeing them this on their own. I think is inspiring. But also sing them to come together. I think is amazing for us. Both to watch shows us like how a marriage should run. All right. You pick a question. What's one of the words describes our brother sister relationship as interesting? I think we're very different. Yeah. I just want everyone to hear this. You know, whenever I'm on a phone call with my sister, and I say, all right bye. Love you. She has never ever ever said love you back to me. Well, you're not alone in that. So I don't think you should take it personally asked one of everyone to hear that just for the record. Okay. Yeah. But that's just like I don't know. That's how I am. But again right talking about growth. This is like the vulnerability thing that I'm actively working on. You know what I mean? So I'm like, okay, whatever. I also try to explain to people like, don't take a perfect, and they're like, Why's your sister's like washy some mean to me, they don't take it further just how she is exactly. Why are you pressed? Lord manner film, he collaborated on with coach encourages inclusion optimism courage, why these values especially important today. Well, I think that they are important because inclusion is important, because I think that we can get very narrow minded, a lot of the time and we can kind of put ourselves in a bubble but you only benefit from having people around you who, like, have different opinions and thoughts and viewpoints. But anyway, optimism, I'm a Sagittarius. So like optimism is like my like bread and butter, basically, like what other choice. Yeah. Do you not feel that from me? Now I'm like the most optimistic person. I know because what else is going to happen. True true. What else what early? Gonna be fine. Don't worry about it. And then courage crew is really hard. I think it's really it takes a lot of work to be courageous. And I think, but here's the thing about just like everything in life will tip you can do anything as long as you practice and practice. You need to you. Need to practice being courageous? It's not easy. It's not something that comes naturally, and I think this is a big another myth that we've heard about life is that all of these things are supposed to come naturally, but that's not true. It takes a lot of work, you know, and it takes experience. So to be courageous, you know, it's not easy, and you might be concerned about what other people think about you. It takes practice. It takes. Just faith in yourself. You know, these are all good words that we should all try to think about. Yeah. Okay. This is the last question for you. What is your dream? Mine Jim is to achieve happiness. I think thought something that people should focus on more is like achieving shoe happiness. But also, my gym is to achieve is the tree, a creative agency in decreed a legacy that will outlast me and also that I will build off of the amazing legacy in grand Rick that our family and antecedents have made frost, like you sought to become amazing family on both sides, so making both of making them proud and building up off of that also, when I die, I want the day named after me on, I mean, like Jackson, loosely day holiday school. Yeah. I, I hear you say that happiness. And I think that's true. But what I will say, too, is that I don't think happiness is a place. It's not like nirvana. And I feel like sometimes we can. Get caught up and just trying to get to that place. Where will eventually be happy like one day. I'll be happy or if this. Yeah. I think that everything is a process. And so there's a lot to enjoy. Just even every everyday that it's a good day. It's good. Enjoy river of Goodson undone a thing. Cool. This is so much fun. I've learned so much about you, and all of your business plans. I plan to roll them ration-. Yeah. Now's was good. We should enter you each other more often. Maybe they'll give us a spinoff and coach in order to cause. Jackson satchel. Thank you for joining us. You both have such interesting perspectives to share. I love your spirit your vibes as children might say. Dream, it real is a collaboration between coach pineapple street media young people across the country and me the show is brought to you by coach as part of their dream, it real initiative, all about supporting the next generation and their dreams for the future. To learn more head to coach dot com slash dream in real. Tell your friends about the show. Tell your mom tell your grandma, make sure to rate and subscribe to dream it real on apple podcasts Spotify, and wherever you get your podcast. See you next week for the final episode of season.

New York director UK Michael Jordan New York Rex Stewart vivas Selena Gomez Jackson Rudolf Tate executive creative director Lou Lou FA Vecsey Moscow New York City England US Stuart Vive
Hotel Art

Decoder Ring

33:07 min | 2 years ago

Hotel Art

"This episode is brought to you by I travel for a new podcast from American Airlines, British Airways, and visit Britain. In this series. Three Americans find out when inspire them to explore they pack up and take to the skies for a vacation in Great Britain and experience a new kind of travel one that pushes them to embrace their adventurous spirit. They encounter twists and turns surprising detours, and the truly unexpected while relying on local Brits and their own curiosity to experience Britain like you've never seen it before. Listen and subscribe to. I travel for on apple podcast. Google play Stitcher or ever. You get your podcasts. This podcast contains explicit language. In two thousand sixteen the world's largest budget hotel chain super decided to put on an art show. If you're an art aficionado, this is the place to be Miami and art Basel, but this year something different anew exhibition this collection called when the art comes down curated by super eight. Yes, that's super eight proving everything old is new again, super wanted to get rid of the art that had been in its motel rooms since the chain was founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy four, whatever you imagine when you imagine quintessentially kitschy hotel art a deer by a babbling brook near Lampley cottage LeBron's paint by number special powdery winter scape of quaint villages of Elvis painting. That's the kind of stuff that was on the walls of the super eights rather than just throw it out. Super eight gave the paintings away at one event at our Basilan Miami, which ended up on the today show and the news clip you just heard an another at a gallery space in New York, which is host. By the comedian, Amy sedaris sedaris named all the paintings, and she told Jimmy Fallon about it on the tonight show you just had an art show the very. Eight hotels given got rid of all their old art. They're bringing a Newark city specific. So like let's say you're in San Francisco, you don't reward. You aren't and you wake up, you'll see a painting of the Golden Gate Bridge arch St. Lois, namely, I sure did that was really hard to name this. What's Allen showing sedaris a washout painting, three spindly trees birches maybe that are emerging from foreground of oversize slightly impressionistic tulips and are standing in front of a psychedelic, pastel sky. This one, I don't remember, but let's call it early menopause. We were. All of this was meant to bring attention to SuperBeets new look. They had gotten rid of all the old art for a reason to upgrade it to signal that the age of kitsch hotel art was officially over and that something new had taken its place. When we decided to do it episode about hotel art, we thought we would be doing an episode about, well, hotel art, exactly the sort of ugly shoddy cheap paintings used to hang in super aids, but it turns out that's an outdated understanding shore. You still regularly come across bizarre paintings in hotels, collages that match the carpet, who the soup rates move away from Kipp is part of a decades, long trend on hotels, part hotels of all price points to reclaim hotel art, to transform it from something unconsidered, an embarrassing into a selling point, a sinus sophistication and authenticity, an Instagram photo op a communication to its customers about the kind of people they are and the kind of hotel they're staying at or at the very least evidence that they aren't desperately behind the times hotel are you can believe it has become a signifier of good taste. This is decoding a show about cracking cultural mysteries. I'm please TV critic will pass skin every month. We take a cultural question habit or idea, crack it open and try to figure out what it means and why it matters. What happened to hotel art. Hotel are is a subset of commercial art, which exists all around us in all of the places that need and want art. But that are not museums or galleries places like doctors offices and dental clinics, restaurants and workspaces hospitals and airports places for art, but not about our economically and aesthetically. This kind of work is often distinct from the work of artists who show at galleries and art fairs. But you might be surprised at the overlap, particularly in high end hotels, which increasingly compete with each other to have the most ambitious art programs at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, which was opened by the art collector and hotel as Steve Wynn, a ten million dollar glass sculpture by delta Hooley blooms out of the lobby ceiling. The w hotel in south beach has a collection that includes work by Andy Warhol. John Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel high end hotels commission original work all the time sometimes from big name, contemporary artists and even non luxury hotels, boast site, specific pieces. In their lobbies like a mural of a taxicab made out of Pennzoil stubs or thirty foot installation featuring the faces of local residents hotel design in general has become so intentional. So stylized that it's been lampooned on Portland area. Here's a sketch called the deuce in which Fred armistead plays a hotel clerk. It teases a certain kind of overdone hipster hotel were no singular piece of artists bad, but the whole thing reeks of trying too hard. Well, enjoy your room. Sink is really weird. It's going to look like there's no faucet, but whenever you feel the need to brush your teeth or whatever, don't worry about it and it will happen. Comes with turntable in order to understand how we got here to a place where hotels are jockeying to distinguish themselves with their art. You need to understand how the modern hotel came to be. The hotel as we know it first appeared in America in the seventeen ninety s at the time, inns and taverns were the norm places. It often house travelers as a way to procure a liquor license. There were bars with beds, basically, by contrast, these new hotels wanted to emphasize elegance and luxury their safety, their architecture was imposing and they were decorated beautifully from the plush carpets to the chandeliers to the sumptuous wall Hanes. And this approach at the high end of the market has more or less continued through to the present day. But in the early nineteen hundreds, a man named EM statler pioneered a different more affordable version of the hotel. He wanted people to have a reliable predictable kind of hotel experience, so they would always know what they were getting. That's AK Sandoval Strauss. He's an associate professor of history at Penn State, and he wrote the book hotel and American history in one thousand nine hundred eight. The statler hotel opened in Buffalo New York. It was the first of a number of economical standardized hotel. Locations that promised customers in Stadler's words to provide a bed and a bath for a dollar and a half, and he was the most influential hotel man of the first half of the twentieth century. So for for quite some time, the idea, oh, we'll democratize hotel. We'll create very standardized experiences that actually carried prestige. If you're traveling to a new strange city, just knowing that the cheap hotel you'd end up at would be of a basic level of quality and not say a bedbug infested flop house was an innovation kind of luxury. Even reliability was so desirable. The nearly seventy years after the first statler hotel. Other hotels were still crowing about it. We never got your reservation. You get enough surprises when you travel. That's a commercial from nineteen seventy five for Holiday Inn hotels, promising its customers above all else, a predictable experience. Every holiday in the best surprise his no surprise. Because art didn't serve the customer experience directly. You don't sleep on the paintings after all hotels, despite being standardized in many other ways, often relied upon operator taste or lack thereof for the art thirty years ago before the arrival of digital printers. The only way to reproduce affordably was to do massive runs of an image. This meant hotel owners were often picking from a small pool of pieces, each of which had to work in multiple locations. This is where your classic kitschy hotel art comes from a dearth of options. Here's David Winton the president of Cala Scher North Carolina based company that makes art for the hospitality industry on this pre digital era, art Ross would Paletti store cly people thought about it as an illustration of a flower, or you know something that got mass produced and printed Dow's ends of. And then hopefully that would work okay and hundreds of hotels around the world, but then the backlash to all the sameness arrived as with. So many things related to hotel design and art in hotels. We need to go back to this pivotal moment in the nineteen eighties when Prager and Steve rebel introduced a completely new concept, the petite hotel phenomenon that's mayor Ross, the west coast editor of architectural digest in the late nineteen eighties, the hotel, Ian Schrager. One of the co, founders of studio fifty, four opened a few hotels in New York that immediately became sensations. One was the Royal tin which was designed by the singular Frenchman Philippe Starck who's witty, playful, lobby included velvet armchairs that leaned back at a precipitous angle wall sconces in the shapes of rhinoceros horns and three legged chairs that had a tendency to tip over a hotels in New York became the gathering spots for the beau-monde. You know, this gave birth to a movement of hotel ears. We wanted to signify cool in some wage signify feet. And to draw people into their properties by, you know, promising inexperience of like minded people. These early boutique hotels had an elevated even unexpected style. They weren't standardized because they wanted to set themselves and by extension, the person who stayed there apart, these are tells could be funky elegant sexy, but they were always deeply intentional with a very strong sense of place because the whole idea was that when you were there, you weren't nowhere. You were somewhere. In the thirty years since this idea that a hotel ought to be designed experience, it has expanded beyond boutique hotels to most hotels. And then further still David Winstons company Scher has worked with many hotels from best Western's to four seasons. And Winton says, despite these hotels, different price points and styles, they want the same thing to have an experience and while the best western art might be a Frank, Fred, maybe showing anything landmark from the counter. An interesting moment from the area and the four seasons peace has an original painting from an artist and the neighbor that it still intended to give you a sense of place which making feel like you haven't just gone to random white box in the middle of nowhere. You are in Idaho, you are in Paris. This was what super eights were after two never had. An art program. It was always you must have two pieces of art within the room. That's Mike Mueller. The senior vice president and brand leader for super eight worldwide, explaining what the chain decided to put on the walls after took down all that kitsch, and it came to our attention as we were starting to think about how do we shake off the dust of a perception that super eight is like your grandfather's old hotel. And so we had a concept that take take all the wall art down it take the headboard doubt. What if we took that headboard turn that into the art and combine those pieces. And so now we've got these oversized from top bed to the ceiling, black and white photographs. If you walk into a super eight today, instead of seeing a mass produced impressionistic sailboat, you'll see two huge chocolate framed very polished, black and white photographs above the bed. These images are not just if anything, the related to the specific location of that specific super eight at the Fort Worth. Super eight. For example, there's a photograph of a cowboy on a horse in silhouette, getting ready to use his LASSO at the Los Angeles, super eight. There's a photograph of the man Chinese theater lit up at night next generation of traveler. They're interested in things like farm-to-table, they wanna know where things are source. They want to know where where things are coming from where where they can go for for truly local authentic experience soup rates which are scattered all over North America, and even in China can often be found near inauspicious interstate exits. I've stated a few in my life driving away from college with a u. haul full of stuff between Chicago and New York on a road trip somewhere in the Texas panhandle, and I could not. Possibly be more specific about their locations because that was what was so useful about soup rates. They're just right there when right there is the middle of nowhere. The idea of a super eight as a place. That's anything other than a stopover as a place that should be locally branded. It shows just how deeply this new idea of what a hotel should be has permeated. Now's the time we talk about a sponsor, not that you would launch all the applications on your computer at the same time just for fun, but now you could lack running the eighth gen Intel core processor with Intel. Octane memory allow you to push your computer to new limits with Intel. Obtain memory. Everyday tasks are up to two point one times more responsive with all that power, the possibilities seem endless. What are some of those possibilities you ask, how about launching big media apps and content faster, allowing you to create more in less time with the ace gen Intel core processor. Many of your everyday tasks are speeding up to like Email presentations. Even your browser can launch faster with Intel, obtain memory. So not that you would store thirty two gigabytes of photos on your computer and then open them all at once. But you could don't believe it go to Intel dot com slash you could to learn more. For more complete information about performance and benchmark results, visit WWW, dot Intel, dot com. Slash benchmarks. Okay. Now back to the show. So how does are actually get into a hotel. Generally speaking, the way hotel, particularly a chain hotel goes about getting its r is as follows. You start with the developer, the people who own the actual property where the hotel sets the development will hire an interior design firm to design a specific type of hotel. At a specific budget. They designed the rooms and the lobby and the interior architecture. They pick the furniture of the fixtures and attended the overall vibe of the place. These interior design teams will then hire and work with another firm or sometimes an individual consultant to source the artwork for the space. The reason the design teams don't just do this part themselves is because procuring art is a big complicated. Job hotel was say, two hundred rooms, hallways, conference rooms and a lobby will need hundreds if not thousands of pieces of art to find it. Art consultants do a bunch of different things from actually commissioning artists to make an original work for the hotel to licensing art for the rooms to searching for found objects or knickknacks at flea markets to making the our in house with an in house art team and printing it on those giant versatile digital printers. These printers make it easy and affordable to print in small batches. Needless to say, it's not a coincidence that hotels have gotten much more interested in bespoke art as bespoke art has become so much cheaper art firms can now easily create thoughtful artwork and reproductions or just as easily make the sort of images that match the bedspread. It really depends on what the hotel and the designers want. Here's an example of the directions and art team might get. You know, I, I want it to look and feel like this tiny doodle that I made on the back of a napkin, or I've got three key inspiration word and they are read no birds and textural David Winton. Again, someone is company will then create art that interprets and fits those specifications. It's graphic design across for sharp, but not quite art making in the studio artists sense, but they're artists of that ilk whose work appears in hotels, two. I'm Tom Swanson and I'm a visual artist. My work focuses on cranes in America that kind of it. Tom loves cranes. When we spoke, he had dozens of crane facts at the ready crane for the largest species in North America, and they migrate. They had the largest migration in the United States and Zandt hill cranes they migrate. It's the largest. My work has appeared in scores of high end hotels, including Ritz Carlton four seasons and Saint rita's gilded cranes made out of metal leaf are applied to canvas or age panels, which can be quite large in one piece, half a dozen silver cranes in flight sweep past leafless trees that are rendered in bright copper in another. The cranes are semi obscured by the tangled branches of a silver tree. Tom has gallery representation and regularly shows his work. But he says about seventy five percent of his business is commissions from private customers. And the hospitality industry for Tom dealing with them is pretty much the same except that hotel jobs can extend over years and tend to pay better. The process starts with the conversation about what the client wants, which is to say it's collaborative. I encourage them bring ideas so that we can talk a little bit about how we might incorporate that into my language. There's a back and forth in the hospitality business between the consultant and the artist, and eventually the designers and the developers who have to approve everything that wouldn't suit everyone and is at odds with our Amandus ideas of the uncompromising difficult artists if not the reality of it. But it works for Tom and for lots of working artists for whom hotels are a lucrative way to make a living and an effective way to locate potential customers on working with hospitality. I'm trying to match it up to where my client basis. Sweet spot from my work as somewhere between fifteen and thirty thousand dollars a piece. So I really need to match my primary client and what their aspirations are and where they might stay. Then you matching hotels, kind of like an advertisement for you. That's exactly what I can't tell you how many commissions I've gotten because people went to Jackson Hole to go skiing and stayed in the four seasons. When you talk to people involved in the hotel art industry, all of the development sound positive hotels care more than ever about the quality of what the hang on their walls, it's easier than ever to make and get our of quality to hang their hotels or even hiring real artists and helping them to make a living. And all of this is true, but there's another part of the hotel already quesion we haven't talked about yet a player who's not the hotel or the middleman, or the graphic designer, or the artist who's not. So recklessly involved in the business of hotel art, and that's you and me the people who look at it and for customers and for viewers. There's another question we have to ask can hotel are really function as our new hotel. Art may be better, but can it be good. Now's the time. We talk about a sponsor slack, the collaboration hub for work, no matter what kind of work you do. Teamwork on slack happens in channels where your information and conversations are organized around projects offices and teams. And because everything you need to work is in one place, it's faster and easier to get things done, designed to support the way people like you naturally worked together. Slack makes collaborating with your colleagues online as easy efficient s face to face Ben, the producer of Dakota. Reaganite use slack literally all the time, like all the time designed to support the way people like you naturally work together. Slack makes collaborating with your colleagues online as easy and efficient as face to face. The more slack is used across the company, the more value it provides as tools and information shared by one department become accessible across departments, helping teams work together across locations, time zones, or job titles with slack. The. The right people in your team are kept in the loop and the information they need is always at their fingertips, learn more at slack dot com. Okay. Now back to the show. My perspective does Black Watch on the wall or even worse than what used to be there. That's David Raskin the Mon family professor of contemporary art history at the school of the Art Institute of Chicago. What used to be most motels was things that were just, you know, generic indicators of art. So you knew you weren't supposed to pay attention to it, which was kind of the ideal didn't put any demands on you if you noticed it at all. The lesson was don't pay me any attention before speaking with him. I had sent him some pictures of the new art in a super eight hotels. The big frame photographs of local sites. He had some beret Singley strong opinions about them is, you know, kinda gorgeous kinda artsy photographs black and white photographs of local scenery that super it is now gone to, you know, look like what art should look like, which is even worse because they've just turned into branding and. Decoration and a claim on kind of upscale lifestyle exist. Basically ruins all art because it says if these gorgeous black and white images are actually nothing than all art is actually nothing is there no way to have a meaningful encounter with art in a setting of a hotel? There's no way to have a meaningful encounter in art where that art, the purpose of that art in the nature of that art is simply to make claims on the. My style that the if you're aspires to this is so much more extreme than the ways I had been considering hotel art, which seem so harmless to me. And while I think it's absurd to insist that no one has ever had an experience, I find meaningful with the art in a hotel. I've been thinking about this conversation ever since. There's always going to be a tension inherent in hotel art because it's never just or even primarily art. It's always something else to a decorative prop that's supposed to make you feel positively about the place that you're staying and what horrifies Raskin is not just at hotels use our as decoration would horrifies him. Even more is the way that hotels turn art into lifestyle branding. Remember the Holiday Inn ad reprise his nose, apprise. This is not at all how tells advertise themselves today. Here's an ad from two thousand thirteen from Marriott. The hotel brand that owns several lines of hotels up and down the price in luxury spectrum. This is not a hotel. It's an idea that travels should be brilliant, the promise of spaces as expensive as your imagination offering surprises that will change as often as you do. I find this ad so deeply silly. Please notice the use of the word surprise in it though which in a complete reversal hotels are now promising their guests. They will provide the travel is no longer the surprise. It's the hotel itself, though, as this ad would have it, the hotel isn't even a hotel anymore. All of this is what happens when hotels have ceased to be just a place to stay and become instead aspirational in a crowded marketplace being merely functional saying, you've got four walls and a bed and won't lose a reservation. It isn't enough to distinguish you. So hotels have had to become signifier 's not just of class, which they've always been, but of the micro niches of class and taste an art. One of the most versatile aspects of any hotel is one of the easiest ways for a hotel to announce its niche to sell itself to make you feel stuff about the. A hotel and then preferably share that feeling with your friends on Instagram? Probably at least on a weekly basis kicking off a project, an interior designer, Earl hotel owner will say, we need to make sure we have at least one Instagram moment that's Ari Grassi the founder of indie walls, accompany that helps hotels fide and work with artists and the so much publicity, free publicity for the hotel, like everything else in hotel. The art wants to affirm your choice to stay there since it trying to do that for many people, it's very rarely going to be genuinely challenging or provocative or political in less. All of those qualities are part of the hotels brand. Even if a hotel showcasing work from renowned artists work that is undeniably art with a capital a. it's meaty political anesthetic substance might get subsumed by the hotel context or at least that's what David Raskin things. The real question is the said, go to a really fancy hotel in New York City, and there's an actual Monet painting in that hotel room. And I'm looking at the Monet in my room in my suite at the Ritz Carlton, what's my experience with that Monet. And I'm contending that while there might be a little bit of Monet's still there, mostly it's while look at what the rich gets me. The Ritz gives me a chance to see a Monet. All of this doesn't mean that it's not nice to look at something beautiful in your hotel room. It doesn't mean it's not nice to stay in a place that cares about the art. It doesn't mean it's not nice to stay in a hotel that can show you a Monet or a Warhol or an installation from an incoming local artist. In fact, these things all sound exceedingly nice. It's even nice from a certain perspective that hotels decided art of all that they could spend money on is an important way to connect with their clientele, but art as opposed to decoration as opposed to branding. It's supposed to be more than nice. There used to be something that we believed we could get from art that is getting harder to believe in every day and that that the artist put something special in there for the to work really hard to share. And when that something special is getting told is exactly the same as the fancy dining room table and the rug. Then we're losing a lot. There's a famous story about Mark Roscoe who in the late nineteen fifties won a commission to create a series of paintings for the new four seasons restaurant in New York. It was a lucrative and prestigious assignment and Roth goes work would have hung your Pollock's Picasso's. But the story goes that in nineteen fifty nine as the restaurant was preparing to open, he went and had a meal there. He had hoped his art would exert a force on the space. He had told a friend, I hope to ruin the appetite of every son of a bitch you ever eats in that room. What he discovered instead was that his paintings would be no match for an expensive power lunch. His work in this context would become use a phrase that was leveled critically at his abstractions, just apocalyptic wallpaper. So he pulled it. I find this story and Roscoe standard speed very moving, but I'm not nearly so principled. I like to think I've had a few profound experiences with art in my life, but sometimes when I walk into museum galleries, the first thing I do is scan the room. Think I'd like that on my wall. In other words, my first reaction to piece of art is purely acquisitive swish owned it. I don't want to speak for you, but I think this makes me like a lot of people who sometimes relate to art in a thoughtful meaningful way and more often relate to it in a not thoughtful meaningful way. One of the knock on affects of all the technological advances that have made it easier and cheaper to create reproduce and distribute art than ever before is that it is easier than ever before to have this kind of casual, unthinking relationship to art. We now constantly find ourselves in extremely designed commercial spaces that are chock full of professional art, and that's kind of catch twenty two because there's more art around us than ever so, how can we attend to at all or even very much of it. And I think the truth is that often we don't, and that's a loss. That's what I take from Raskin's argument. Art is now like so many other pieces of culture like mood music or the TV that's on while you do the chores or the movie you watched while texting we can, of course still get meaning from it, but there is a kind of work you have to do before you can get to that, meaning you actually have to pay attention. At some point while I was working on this piece, the reams and reams of tasteful high end hotel art that I was seeing all sorts of feel the same. What ends up happening spaces that are so designed and you might be familiar with this from farm-to-table restaurants or impeccably source coffee houses or so many other aspects of modern consumer life. Is it a focus on quality on uniqueness on locality on experience end up amounting to kind of claustrophobic sameness? Everywhere you go. There you are in a room with perfectly bespoke are so carefully reflects presiding good taste. It looks exactly like all the other rooms full of perfectly bespoke art when presented with all of this idiocy and Craddock sameness. You may find yourself longing for something actually idiosyncratic, which brings us back to all that kitschy art the super eight, got rid of it used to be that encountering good art in a hotel was shocking, but now the opposite is true. That art is the outlier. If you walk into hotel. L. room and see a black velvet painting of a white tiger or weird sculpture of a house cat or some watercolor of a sad clown. You might get the actual jolt the freeze off the call to attention that you would usually only get from much better more substantive art. This sort of want in display a bad taste. It's getting so rare. You just have to look at it and as good as good hotel. Art may be, can't give you that charge. Maybe in losing that we really are losing something surprising, something genuinely unpredictable as opposed to something unpredictable and quotes in the curated way of modern hotels. That art of the truly unhinged. Righty may bode poorly for the rest of your hotel stay. Maybe the battle be- lumpy and maybe the food will be crappy and maybe you'll have to talk to the clerk for too long, but hey, doesn't that sound like what modern hotels are supposed to be all about a real experience. This is decoding, I'm willa Paskhin. You can find me on Twitter at willow Paskhin. And if you have any cultural mysteries, you want us to code. You can Email us at Dakota rang at slate dot com. If you haven't yet, subscribe and rate are feed in apple podcasts or ever. You get your podcasts and even better tell your friends. This podcast was written by willa Paskhin and produced an edited by Benjamin fresh who also does illustrations for every show special. Thanks to Matthew Whitaker, Michelle hunter, John, Sarah, Sulu Kuneva seen Lauren Kane, Alice grace Deitz Lisa Larsson Walker, Kevin hatch, rob Myers, and everyone else gave us help and feedback along the way. Thanks for listening. We'll see you next month.

statler hotel New York Intel David Winton David Raskin Earl hotel Tom Swanson Art Institute of Chicago North America Andy Warhol America menopause apple consultant Miami Google Golden Gate Bridge Amy sedaris San Francisco Fred armistead
THE 27 CLUB

What Really Happened?

43:19 min | 2 years ago

THE 27 CLUB

"Welcome to a new episode of what really happened produced by Dwayne, the rock Johnson, Danny Garcia, Brian, Goertz, and cadence. Thirteen. Now our show is only as good as our listeners. Y'all fact check me provide new insight, give your opinions and to become a contributor, simply go to Jenks pod dot com. Slash contributors or call four one, three, four, seven one, two, nine, seven, five. Thank you for being a listener and voice for the podcast. In the last few years NFL star, Aaron, Hernandez, musician, and rapper freight. Oh, Santana, k, pop star, Kim, Jong young all died at twenty seven years old upon their death. Many publications made a point of saying that they joined a special club a special club. You may ask, well, picture, perhaps somewhere in heaven, six positions, they're at a private club. They're in different parts of the large elegant living room that offers fine dining, a wall of interesting in wide ranging literature and obviously comfortable expensive sofas and shares near the entrance is Amy wine house. She's focused while writing in her notepad which isn't a surprise. If you watch the documentary, Amy, you'll see a scene in which she is inside a studio, writing the lyrics for her back to black album. Unlike many pop stars of her era. Wine-house for this critically acclaimed album co wrote only four of the songs and herself wrote the rest of the album. This led to five Grammies in two thousand and eight tying the record at the time for most wins by a female artist in one night in two thousand one wine-house house died of alcohol poisoning. She was twenty seven years old on the other side of the room is Brian Jones from the Rolling Stones. It's hard to see him because there are a variety of instruments surrounding him. He seems like a mechanic obsessed with his tools, the sitter saxophone, oboe, and a dulcimer a Falk instrument which few know of and apparently dates back to the early nineteenth century where it was used somewhere in the Appalachian mountains. Bill Wyman, bass guitarist, further Rolling Stones. Once said, Brian Jones formed the band. He chose the members. He named the band in nineteen sixty-nine. Brian Jones drowned in a swimming pool at his home while under the influence of. Drugs. He was dead at twenty seven years old quietly working away with a companion in the middle of this lavish room is Jim Morrison. Jim would rather be in a corner or one side of the room like the others, but space is limited. Jim says to his friend, hey, listen, I don't know how to write songs. Got these words in my head and the only way I can remember them is with melodies Jim finds a quieter side room and sings a cappella. A song like crystal ship has a complicated melody, but Jim sings it and his fellow musician says, holy shit, wait a minute, f, sharp. Let's do that. Jim couldn't play a chord on any instrument, but he had this orchestra in his head. Morrison is considered one of the greatest singers in rock recorded six studio albums with his band, the doors and is well known for his poetry Morrison's. Death was likely from congestive heart failure while in a bathtub. Some have disputed this for different reasons, including there is no. Oh, autopsy done and changing stories from those who were around him at the time when he died in nineteen seventy-one Rolling Stones headline didn't mention his music. Instead, it said James Douglas Morrison, poet dead at twenty-seven. Unlike anyone else at this private club, Kirk Cobain has wandered up onto the second floor and discovered. There was an easel that was intended to be highbrow decoration for the prestigious club, but Cobain didn't consider this found it to be a waste of a perfectly usable easel and got to work. His painting is coming together. It will be extraordinary. Kurt was a prolific artist and frontman of nirvana considered one of the greatest bands of all time in nineteen Ninety-four four, he committed suicide. He was twenty seven years old. Janice Joplin is hard to see it. I, she also has found a corner, but there's a group of people as it turns out, mentors surrounding her job. Pleine was self taught listening and studying Billie holiday Otis, Redding and endless others Joplin admired Bessie Smith so much. She paid for tombstone to be erected where Smith is unmarked. Grave had been Joplin has been called the first lady and Queen of rock and roll. Sure means one of the top selling musicians in US history in one thousand nine hundred seventy. She died of a heroin, overdose. She was twenty seven years old. He may be alone and not talking anyone, but Jimi Hendrix is easy to spot with blue velvet pants and a shiny red top with an oversized. Well, perfectly oversized scarf. He isn't surrounded by people like Joplin, but a variety of strings. When Hendrix was about twelve years old. He was with his younger brother, Leon clearing the garage, Leon remembered. There was a ukulele. It had one string, and that's where Jimmy started. He took it one string and when he wanted to. Change notes. He tighten and loosen it, and that's how he started to make music. He said, wow, I get the whole range on one string. It was like Jimmy could just about play anything on one string here music, and he learned it. Music has a spirit and Jimmy felt that spirit. The rock and Roll Hall fame describes Hendrix as arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music Rolling Stone has considered him the greatest artists of all time in one thousand nine hundred seventy sleeping medication caused an accidental overdose. He was twenty seven years old. These are the six musicians in the club all six tragically dead at twenty seven years old. They have become known as the main members of the twenty seven club. In fact, they are part of a larger club of which there is at least fifty members. Fifty musicians who have all died at twenty seven years old author Howard soon. NHS has written by fees on Bob Dylan, Amy wine house, Charles Bukowski and is author of the book twenty-seven a history of the twenty seven club Howard cataloged three thousand four hundred sixty three people between nineteen o eight and two thousand twelve all cheating. Notoriety in popular music. He sorted out at what age each person died. The oldest person was a hundred and five years old and the youngest was fifteen twenty nine individuals died at twenty five years old thirty individuals died at twenty six years old. Suddenly at twenty seven years old fifty died when twenty eight years old. The number of deaths goes back down to thirty two and a twenty nine years old thirty four deaths. That means the average age of death in the two years before twenty seven and after twenty-seven is just over thirty artists, but at twenty seven years. Old. It is nearly twice the number. There have been books and documentaries examining the twenty seven club even studies in academic papers. Many of looked at this and considered the club a curse. There are endless theories. Why? Those at twenty seven years old seemed to die at an unusually high rate. I wanna know what really happened. For years. I thought a lot about this twenty seven club. I pitched a scripted series HBO about eight years ago in a documentary series to a few production companies only a year or so ago. If you go online, you'll see endless articles about it. When this term the twenty seven club actually started is unknown. It seems to have taken off by the media and public at large after Kurt Cobain died. It is reported that his mother said, I told him not to join that stupid club. However, whether she was referring to others who had died at twenty seven or was referring to potential suicides in the family is unknown. Author, Charles r cross said Hendrix Morrison and Joplin all were at least lucky enough to die before the internet entertainment tonight, and people magazine it wasn't until Kirk Cobain took his own life in nineteen Ninety-four that the idea of the twenty seven club arrived in the popular zeitgeist. Cockbain suicide set off a worldwide media onslaught, and Cobain's mother added to the launch of the club concept, much of the coverage of this club focuses on six of the most famous musicians who died at twenty seven. The six. I mentioned earlier here in order of when they died, Brian Jones, Jimi Hendrix, Janice Joplin, Jim Morrison, Kurt cobaine, and Amy wine house when studying all six, there are interesting similarities outside of just their age. One genius in his early days. Jim Morrison was certainly known for his good looks is what many of us imagined when talking about a rockstar, moody, sexy, scandalous noted for taking a piss wherever he wanted as a result. Morrison's brains were sometimes overlooked for my young age. She loved poetry history, philosophy unit. When he graduated high school, he asked his parents if they'd get. him. The works of Nici. A genius is considered somebody with an IQ above. One forty. Morrison is reported to have an IQ level of about one hundred forty nine, Amy wine house was a bookworm at a young age reading literature, ranging from catch twenty two to art Spiegelman's Maus wine house was a spelling bee champion and advanced mathematics. This genius or at very least incredible intellect, and creativity is clear with each member of this club. The second similarity, divorce or traumatic experiences with parents. Amy wine house was nine years old. When her parents split Kirk, Cobain was also nine years old. When his parents divorced. He wrote on his bedroom wall. I hate mom, I hate dad, dad hates mom. Mom hates dad. Kurt was ultimately sent to live with his cousins eventually becoming virtually homeless when Jimi Hendrix was fifteen years old. Old, his mom died behind a bar after collapsing. His dad wouldn't let Jimmy go to the funeral. Jim Morrison's, father, an army guy was always moving. And Jim wrote about wanting to kill his dad and refuse to ever see him in Brian Jones's Lee teens, his parents were so sick of his lifestyle. He came home one night to find his suitcase. In the driveway, said, Pat Andrews girlfriend of Brian's and mother to one of his children. The one thing Brian wanted was first father more so than his mother to say, Brian, I'm proud of you. The third similarity, a family history of mental health issues. This is tough because to this day, people are afraid of talking about their own mental health issues and any history of this in once family still faces the stigma that comes along with it. Family records, oftentimes avoid whatever the reality was according to Howard soons his book about the twenty seven club. There was a history of odd behavior. And violent death and Kirk Cobain's extended family on his mother's side. Kurtz great grandfather died in a mental hospital of a self inflicted stab wound on his father's side. Kurtz great-grandfather, a county sheriff died in bizarre circumstances. Reaching for a cigarette. He dislodged his pistol which fell to the ground went off and shot him dead to of sheriff cobaine sons chose suicide by gunshot Jim Morrison, Janice Joplin, and Jimi Hendrix families all had a history of alcoholism. The fourth similarity, each individual showed signs of severe mental health issues. Several people in Brian Jones's life believed he had bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression. Linda Lawrence, who had a child with Brian said, the parents thought he was just a bad child. He was a sick human being that needed comfort and love. While in highschool aiming wine house was asking her mother who was. A pharmacist why she felt depressed. Wine house began taking medication later in life. She would take the anti anxiety medication. LeBron a drug Janice Joplin used for similar reasons, Joplin herself. Once wrote in a letter, I wanna be happy. So fucking bad at seven years old. Kerr Cockbain was considered hyperactive and put on Ritalin. So a quick break here to talk about ring ring is making a difference for millions of people because they do a really impressive job of making neighborhoods safer. They do this by using smart video, doorbells and cameras in an incredibly simple way ring helps you stay connected to your home anywhere in the world. I'm able which still amazes me to use my phone to see what's going on at all times. If there's a package delivery or surprise visitor, I get an alert and I get it from my phone. I can talk to them yo, what's up, criminal? What are you looking to get my neighbor actually has some pretty good stuff. You can also see the criminal or whomever in HD. So if you're like me and you want to edit a video of them snooping around to put on YouTube, you totally can, but more seriously outside of my incredible jokes ring helps you stay connected to your home anywhere in the world and as a listener, you have. Special offer on a ring starter kit available right now with a video doorbell and motion activated floodlight Cam, the starter kit has everything. You need to start building a ring of security around your home. Just go to ring dot com. Slash w. r. h. that's ring dot com. Slash w. r. h.. The fifth similarity drugs and alcohol. Kerr, Cockbain and Janice Joplin were addicted to heroin Hendrix used LSD cocaine, in a means more. Sin used LSD mescaline amphetamines and many believe died of an accidental heroin, overdose all drank to excess and all smoked a lot of weed. I spoke with Charles r cross author of the New York Times bestselling book, heavier than heaven. The definitive two thousand one biography of Kirk Cobain. He also wrote room full of mirrors a biography on Jimi Hendrix cross is one of the top music journalists in the world. He pointed out that it's important to not get lost in certain narratives and remember the nuance and layers in people's lives not to mention the facts. Many people talk about Jimi Hendrix and they talk about his life as it is the life of a drug addict. I think that's really overstating it because I think his accessibility in the. Availability of any of these drugs, and in fact, is ability to pay for them really only would have even come up in the last year and a half of his life to Charles point. I don't want to make it seem like these musicians lives are somehow exactly the same. We are talking about unique artists, but there is without a doubt, similarities, the six similarity that I want to bring up all six seemed to have felt trapped for significant portions of their lives, and it certainly sucks to be trapped. Imagine that feeling, but being an artist when your entire livelihood centers around expression, Kirk Cobain, chronicle this feeling throughout his childhood in a small town, a hundred miles south west of Seattle Hendrix, felt trapped as his family moved frequently. Also around the Seattle area Joplin hated her high school so much. She go onto say, they laughed me out of class out of town and out of state when Jimmy. Hendrix, finally could leave home. He desperately wanted to play music, but instead felt forced to join the army. He'd send letters to his father, pleading for him to send over his Petar like other musicians when Hendrix did reach fame. He felt audiences trapping him to only performing the songs they had come to love for Jimmy. There was also race, Charles r, cross added. You know, Jimmy just simply could not be accepted in African American radio lack stations in America with not play him, and he felt to some degree betrayed by that at the same time, he was trapped within a worldwide rock culture, and everybody wanted to hear purple haze and here in Sweden on the electric guitar. Jimmy wasn't as interested in that last and most important. All six were extremely talented. I think what was amazing about Jimmy for himself awareness is that music was away for him to. Express themselves emotionally. He wasn't a big talker. He wasn't somebody who sat down and said, hey, I've got a lot going on. Listen to me talk about this. He wasn't very analytical about himself. And yet at the same time, once you put a guitar in his hand, he was able to then use music to kind of create this picture of his emotion. Jimmy said that he saw music colors. I truly think he was a musical genius and like some of the grey classical composers. He was in some ways touched by what he was able to create what he was able to actually do with this instrument. You know he was smarter than people want to remember. There are several other similarities. Each have been reported to have premonitions about their own untimely death. Each had run ins with the law, each rose to fame relatively quickly in some cases extraordinarily quickly and each had complicated relationships with lovers. Why do these similarities matter? We'll get there, but I, it's important to note that in addition to the musicians of the twenty-seven club, there are also world renown artists who have died at twenty-seven. Perhaps the most celebrated artist of his generation was John Michel Basquiat who died at twenty-seven like many others in this club. He died of a drug. Overdose also came from a small town move frequently as a child and showed signs of brilliance at eleven years old. He was fluent in Spanish, French and English, and could read very techs in these respective languages at thirteen years old. His mother committed him to a mental institution at fifteen years old. His father left his son on the streets. His rise to fame was quick at just twenty four years old. He appeared on the cover of the New York Times magazine in a feature titled new, our new money, the marketing of an American artist. There are also those who have died or had several mental health issues that appear to fit a breaking point right around twenty seven years old at twenty-six Britney Spears infamously, went to rehab only to leave a day later and shave her head in front of cameras, and thus the world heath ledger died when he was Twenty-eight. His former wife said for as long as I'd known him, he had bouts with insomnia. He had too much energy. His mind was turning turning turning, always turning. I'm sort of hesitant to talk about the following. But if we're going to do an episode on this twenty-seven club, it doesn't take a lot of searching around or reading different books to see why those who believe in supernatural or mystical forces. Have really latched onto something unexplainable happening at twenty-seven according to certain mystic and Christian theologies. The number twenty seven is known as the death number twenty-seven is a lunar symbol of the divine light. Ancient Greek philosophy in a complex system that used numbers to explain the universe proposed that twenty-seven represented the process of the soul being reabsorbed into its creator in the Bible's book of Genesis. God creates humans in the twenty seventh verse in Buddhist philosophy, twenty seven is the highest level of spiritual taint accounting for leap years and measuring a year as three hundred sixty five and a quarter days. There are thirty one million, five hundred fifty, seven thousand six hundred seconds in a year. The some of those numbers is twenty-seven. But at what point can retake any number and begin to assign some sort of larger meaning to it. I'm not doubting the importance of astrology. Or numerology right now for this portion, I'm going from fact checking to an opinion, but I think there's a massive reach to start drawing correlations between the meanings of twenty-seven. And these people dying at twenty seven years old with the help of Jonathan Harris and others I could now talk forever about twenty-seven. The diameter of the moon is point two, seven, two times that of earth approximately twenty seven percent. The atomic weight of Aluminum's only stable isotope is twenty-seven according to hang sh- way. It's good luck to have twenty-seven identical coins at home in baseball. Each team has twenty-seven outs twenty-seven is a perfect cube three by three by three. The English alphabet contains twenty six characters. In the seventh century, European monks invented the white space character between words and the alphabet. Now contains twenty seven characters. I'm thirty two years old while writing this which means I've lived for two hundred and eighty six thousand five hundred twenty seven hours. If I was reading this in the federated states Micronesia, otherwise, not twenty-seven. The more I studied numbers and understood the thinking behind supernatural or mystical forces the more I found myself thinking, well, twenty-seven is certainly a number with a lot of meetings behind it. Twenty seven is the age. These individuals died, but just simply pointing this out is about all you can do trying to connect. The two feels forced. It is forced. It reminds me of the danger of conspiracy theories. You see different things going on and attempt without facts to connect them. Let's say you're looking at a piece of paper and there are two dots. One dot represents people dying at twenty seven and the other dot represents the meanings of the number twenty seven, but I'm doing right now is trying to create a line that connects these two dots, but that's all I'm doing. Trying opposed to explanations that we've talked about explanations which can cause an early death drugs and alcohol, family history of mental health issue. Use fame depression or lack of support. There is a line connecting those dots and the dots of those who have died at twenty seven years old. If you're interested in exploring this further, there is plenty of reading out there on the meaning behind twenty-seven. And any correlations this may have, but not for me. And with all this information, I took a deep breath and went back to the drawing board. So as many of you know, I'm really proud to have some great sponsors this year for our podcast. And that includes an app which I constantly use like a few times a day use, and that is com- com- has helped me quite a bit. It is the number one app for sleep, meditation and relaxation. It was even named apples 2017 app of the year. If you had to calm dot com slash w. r. h. they'll get twenty five percent off com premium subscription which includes hundreds of hours of premium programming, including guided meditations on issues like anxiety, stress, and focus, including a brand new meditation each day called the daily com. Sleep stories, which are like bedtime stories for Dulce. I have been using them every night. Com has over one hundred of these soothing tales read by well known voices to help people unwind and fall into a deep sleep. For a limited time. What really happened listeners that's all of you can get twenty five percent off Akam premium subscription ADT com dot com. Slash w. r. h. it includes unlimited access to all of coms amazing content get started today at com dot com. Slash w. r. h. that c. a. l. m. dot COM slash w. r. h.. When doing research for each episode, I always try to remind myself and I know mocked me if you think this is cheesy, but I try to remind myself of the George Orwell quote to see what is in front of one's nose needs constant struggle. Maybe this happens in your life when you've been preparing for some big event. And then when the special day comes, you've realized what's the address again, what my wearing? Did I get a gift, an oversight of the most obvious form a few days ago. I was in a cab home from psychiatry point of all things when I thought. All right, are twenty-seven club episode is coming up. Is there anything I missing? One component I began harping on is something that's been on my mind this whole time, and that is the word club in the twenty seven club. I was somewhere in the mid seventies in central park. When I looked up the word to make a long story short, generally speaking club is a good thing to be a part of a sports club, a book club, a dance. Club, there's exceptions like anything, but generally speaking, you wanna be in a club, the twenty seven club sounds like this to at least for me. It doesn't just sound like something special, but something you'd want to be in. And then I thought, well, maybe it's an ode to these great musicians. If you're going to die at a young age, this is an impressive group to be with, but then it kind of hit me in all likelihood, the last thing these six members would ever want to be a part of some sort of club. We're talking about world-class rebels, individual thinkers, these were artists who were the least likely people to ever join any type of club far more seriously and less of me participating is proof that these musicians didn't wanna be a part of this club. We know this because they asked oftentimes pled for help help for their depression, mood swings, drug habits, help from their own family and friends. If there is such a twenty-seven club, they add. Actively were hoping not to be a part of it. If you haven't seen the kademi award winning documentary on any wine house called Amy, I'd highly recommend it. It's directed by Asif Kapadia while researching this episode of the podcast. And after we watching the film and going down the rabbit hole of reading more about us process while working on the movie, I came across the below quote also is talking about one of Amy's most well known songs titled rehab before getting to this quote for those that don't know, Amy song was a smash hit. The catch is part of the song which you could literally hear people singing along to when walking down the street was they tried to make me go to rehab. And I said, no, no, no. I remember exactly where I was. When I first heard this song, Chelsea New York twenty third street. I felt weird like, yeah, I don't know a better word than that feeling weird when listening, maybe it's my own struggles with mental health. But wine houses song quite clearly is about a person saying. They should be getting help, but aren't however, like most, I can't say this stop me from listening to the song instead I did so endlessly director Asif Kapadia in the interview, I read said the following about Amy's thoughts. I don't think she liked the song. It's dark and it's a cry for help. I think she was surprised. It became a hit. The trouble was already there, but that's when it really kicked off that song becomes, I think the thing that she hated people wanted her to sing it and she singing it with a drink. In her hand, it's a cry for help every time she says, no, she saying yes. Oh shit. I thought in retrospect I was or I am part of the problem. I was one of many celebrating a song about a person badly hurting and pleading for help. So I tracked down also on Twitter, asked if he could semi his Email, he was kind enough to respond in. I emailed him. I set up a time and called him for an interview. But off in the kindest way, possible said he wouldn't take part. I'm not quoting him, but he was okay with me, relaying his thoughts from the notes I took while respo- his reason for not wanting to be part of the podcast was simple and left me wondering why I was doing this episode at all. Awesome. Has made it a rule of his not to talk about the quote unquote twenty-seven club. He believes this concept has somehow made it seem like it's cool to be an artist and diet twenty-seven. When in reality, it's obviously horrific. Any reference to the club, even if well, intentioned will further the romanticizing of this fake club that is simply put tragic. I'm not kidding that when he told me this, I was kind of angry myself. I felt terrible. If you do is simple. Google search of the twenty seven club, you'll get photos that don't show the reality of each musician's death at twenty-seven. Instead, you see cartoons. Or paintings of the six musicians hanging out in heaven or talking over a card game or seated as if that the last supper you see photos of them like they're in the Brady bunch smiling smoking or playing music being part of a club incensio celebration. Exactly. Like how I started this episode, she'll music the group hanging out focused on artwork. I now really was part of the problem. I thought of forgetting about this episode and doing something else. I want to take a quick break to thank one of our great partners who really make this podcast possible as many of you know, I spend most of my time working. I don't really like to do much else reading writing recording. Repeat. So what happens when this is the case, you don't really get furniture. I lived two years. This is true. I live two years in an apartment once with only a mattress. No fridge, no rug. No girlfriend anyway, my current place. Well, something wildly unexpected happened now. There's no girlfriend, but I got in touch with the folks at article article has beautifully designed modern furniture and that Scandinavian simplicity, which I happen to be a fan of. I got this new suite high table desk, not too much just tasteful and it's all online. No showrooms, no sales people just savings. An article is offering our listeners fifty dollars off their first. Purchase of one hundred dollars or more to claim visit article dot com. Slash w. r. h. as in what really happened, that's all it takes to article dot com slash w. r. h. and the discount will be automatically applied at checkout. That's article dot com. Slash w. r. h. to get fifty dollars off your first purchase of one hundred dollars or more. I thought of forgetting about this episode and doing something else, but I I wanted to spend a bit more time going through my research. I came across the work of Diana Theodora Kenny. Dr. Kenny has a degree in pretty much everything. She's primarily a psychologist and researcher as well as professor at the university of Sydney. Dr. Kenny is the author of over two hundred publications including seven books. She was curious about this twenty-seven club and did her own study with a few colleagues. Dr Kenny used over two hundred sources and studied over eleven thousand pop musicians from nineteen fifty to twenty fourteen her findings. Well, if anything, perhaps there should be a fifty six club. Eddie rabbit, Tammy Wynette Mimi Farina, Johnny Ramone Chris Ledoux van smokey Hampton and Charles baby Tate. All died at fifty six in terms of that twenty. Seven year old bump according to Dr Kenny study. One point two percent of the over eleven thousand musicians in her study died at twenty six years old. One point four percent died at twenty eight. And one point three percent died at twenty seven. So again, one point, two percent at twenty six years old. One point, four percent at twenty eight years old. And one point, three percent at twenty seven years old different studies on this have had different outcomes. But I do believe that the more focused and the more precise the study, the results are the twenty-seven isn't really all that different. Even Howard soons would go onto explain the limits of his own study so opposed to moving forward. I took another step back and looked at the years. The main six had died, Brian Jones, Jimi Hendrix, Janice Joplin, and Jim Morrison, all died between nineteen sixty nine and nineteen seventy-one. That's four of these six. Members dying over the course of two years. In fact, Hendrix Joplin died within two weeks of each other. So what was happening during that time period? Singers, like Frank Sinatra and Tom Jones were at the peak of their careers during the nineteen sixties and sold millions of records. It was the second half of the decade which saw the emergence of rock music, including psychedelic rock. Michael Hicks, author of sixties rock garage psychedelic, and other satisfactions defines the John Jonah as one which excavates and enhances the mind, altering experiences of psychedelic drugs. Most notably LSD. This music was personal and introspective for one of the first times in pop culture history, the masses were talking about suffering and pain. Musicians were exploring their subconscious more and using drugs to do so us editions and record company saw that the. Doug culture sold people, particularly young people, loved it. It was celebrated. There was the human being during the winter of sixty seven and that summer was the summer of love and all reached historic heights during the nineteen sixty nine Woodstock festival. With that in mind, it's not so hard to believe that during this time four of the most famous rock and roll musicians died in their late twenties while enormously popular. It wasn't until twenty years later that his concept of a twenty-seven club came up. Again. This was in one thousand nine hundred four when Cobain committed suicide Kurt had a history of mental health issues and so does family he had attempted suicide before turning twenty-seven. It seems to me it was a convenient and easy way to put him a unique and brilliant artist into this twenty-seven club. This constructed group. Of course, the term found itself again on the headlines of papers. Around the world when Amy wine-house died about fifteen years later, what is perhaps less exciting to talk about an examine is why musicians and artists are dying at this relatively young age. And if there's anything to be done as it turns out I've learned there is research that shows how our perception of the late twenties is misunderstood or at least was misunderstood by me until the last eighteen months. While I thought of a twenty seven year old as a fully formed adult research shows. Otherwise with the help of Heather Sherman, I reached out to Dr Robert McIntyre, a professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the university of Toronto and head of the mood disorders psychopharmacology unit at the University Health network. The old notion that we had in neuro science or brain science for a long time was that, you know, after you go through your adolescence in reach early adulthood, the brain have. There's the brain that you're stuck with and we've moved away from that very outdated anachronistic notion to a more comprehensive, coherent Egmore scientific. The informed notion that the brain really is this plastic mutable, changeable organism Dr McIntyre added, but even your mid twenties, for example, early thirties, there's still the capacity to generate from early progenitor or early sort of undifferentiated cells brain cells. These brain cells are not just sort of a hearing, but they're also a functioning. So these are new mature adult brain cells that have a functional relevance to people. When it comes to drugs, we'd has a bigger effect on our minds than previously thought. We know the cannabis exposure, specifically THC gnawing in developing brain can be highly toxic, can induce psychosis in those who I've risk. But typically in the. A younger brain that is people under the age of twenty five still on the age of twenty. What Dr Kenny did find in our research was that pop artists lifespans were up to twenty five years shorter than the average American accidental death rates were between five and ten times greater suicide rates were between two and seven times greater and homicide rates were up to eight times greater than the US population after publishing her study, Dr Kenny concluded. This is clear evidence that all is not well in pop music land. Why is the so the pop music scene fails to provide boundaries and to model and expect acceptable behavior? It actually does the reverse. It valorize is outrageous behavior and the acting out of aggressive, sexual and destructive impulses. The most of a stair only live out in fantasy the music industry needs to consider these findings to discover ways of recognizing and assisting young musicians. Distress at the very least those who make their livings from these young people need to learn to recognize early signs of emotional distress, crisis, depression, and suicide -ality, and to put some support systems in place to provide the necessary assistance and care in regards to Jimmy's death in those around him, Charles r cross said he didn't have a one person kinda checking up on him in the end. Both Jimmy's managers are dead. Now, you know there's no, you know, really way to say it other than to some degree to me, death ends up being the responsibility of his managers. I think that ultimately ends up being a lot of the story of rock history. Many times these stars are using drugs. The managers are well aware of it and Jimmy case in all likelihood, one of his managers, Michael Jeffries was probably supplying drugs to Jimmy at times that gave him a level of control. Jim. Death. In some ways we blame on the manager. If you're a rock manager, the worst thing you can do is let your client die. And sadly, that ends up being the case in more than a few of these rock. Lots ultimately, I've discovered that there isn't any club. What you do have is six artists who were faced with a great deal of success and turmoil in a very short period of time. They also faced fame drug and alcohol addiction money, or at least people with money, a lack of foundational support the trappings that can come with being an artist and all of this. Well, their brains were still forming. When you look at this infamous club, four of these main members died over the course of only two years during a time period in which drugs were rampant and largely celebrated. Unlike us of who directed the documentary on Amy wine house. I clearly opted to talk about the twenty seven club. I don't think there is the right approach. There's a larger debate to be had about whether or not addressing this club helps or hurt the cause of addressing the larger problem. It only takes a very quick search to see that Rolling Stone magazine BBC the Washington Post and endless other respectable news outlets to fairly obscure blogs have written at length about this term and its members without also mentioning the terms flaws, oftentimes getting lost in some sort of romanticised recounting of those who've passed for now. I don't think there are enough voices pointing out why this term is in fact, offensive and has nothing to do with a PC culture. It has to do with facts, not adding up and being sensitive. When we talk about mental health issues and alcohol IX or drug addicts, would I think would be a step in the right direction is to bring attention to this because to this day. When you hear about a public figure who dies at twenty seven years old, you'll read headlines that they are joining a club, but that is not what really happened. Next week on what really happened. The nine hundred ninety four. The president of Russia Boris Yeltsin was discovered by the secret service in Washington DC on Pennsylvania Avenue. He was extremely drunk wearing only underwear yelling for CAD and demanding pizza. President Clinton would do his best to help his friend President Yeltsin with his drinking problems. But in the decades since the American and Russian relationship has taken severe turns that's next week on what really happened. Don't forget go to jinx pod dot com to give me feedback or jinx pod dot com. Slash contributors to become a part of the team. I'm on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at Andrew Jenks.

Jim Morrison Jimi Hendrix Kirk Cobain Jimmy Brian Jones Hendrix Joplin Amy wine house Joplin Amy Diana Theodora Kenny Kurt Howard soons w. r. h. Charles r US Bill Wyman Twitter heroin Kurt Cobain
At Eternity's Gate with Julian Schnabel and Lee Daniels (Ep. 172)

The Director's Cut

39:21 min | 2 years ago

At Eternity's Gate with Julian Schnabel and Lee Daniels (Ep. 172)

"Hello, and thanks for tuning in to another episode of the directors Cai. Brought to you by the directors guild of America, featuring today's top director sharing behind the scene stories of the latest films and insights into the craft of directing please take a second to subscribe to our podcasts, and I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. This episode takes us behind the scenes of director Julian Schnabel's new by graphical drama at eternity gate set. During the time Vincent Van Gogh lived in arl- and over. So was France. The film is a journey inside the world and mind of the tortured artist. Who despite skepticism, ridicule and illness created some of the world's most beloved and stunning works. In addition to add turn ities gate, Mr. Schnabel's credits include the feature films Miro before night, falls Bosque and the documentary feature. Berlin, he was nominated for both the DIGI award and the Academy Award for his two thousand eight feature the diving bell and the butterfly following a recent screening of the film at the DJ theater in Los Angeles. Mr. Schnabel's spoke with director Lee Daniels about filming at eternity gate during their conversation. Mr. Schnabel discusses putting the audience in the perspective of Van Gogh working with an editor whose main background. Was an architecture, and why this may be his last film. Everybody. We have matching a patent leather shoes. Tell them why. There was the gala of route the. Lucknow? So and he kept he kept his AT took his tux off in the car here. Ooh, how you. Ju-? The last time we were here together you interview in you interviewed me for the Butler. I think we did that in New York wasn't hunting. So but say movie, Saint people just different state. All right. Thank you. Nice to see everybody. Thank you for coming out. So Julian Schnabel's, my hero. And he's one of the reasons why I do what I do. And I guess I'm going to just start with. I why why this film? Why? Well, I didn't wanna make a movie about Van Gogh because everybody thinks they know everything about him. So it seemed absurd to do it. But. I don't know a whole lot about other things. But I know quite a bit about painting. And that's what I am on the painter. And I think there's a an inevitability about his work and. I think he's still waiting for his audience, but they keep coming anyway. So I think that maybe it was a reason why didn't want to do it in the first place. But are later I think the fact that most people think they have a relationship with the painter. Why? Mus good to try to answer that I think ultimately, I got a chance to say things about painting that I wanted to say and about being an artist in just about making anything it wasn't necessarily about painting. But maybe that was a way to talk about what it's like to be alive. When I when I. I walked away with the feeling of like. Wow, critics, you know, 'cause they dogged him, you know, and. As an artist. You know, you get dot you open yourself up to complete vulnerability. And I what it left me. I ended up leaving this film with the feeling of what defines art who who who is who defines that a critic from the New York Times. Who defines what defines art? And I was just wondering if you had anything to share on that. Listening is that why you did the phone. I think that art is a practice that nobody asked you to make. I don't think people do it for the money. I don't or for the fame when you're young you want agreement from other people, maybe one agreement from other people just for being alive, and you don't really know how to get it. So you do different things to get people's attention. But ultimately, the more you work. I think when Vincent says. To Dr Gachet. I thought that an artist was supposed to teach something about. Life. And then I I stopped thinking that now I just think about my relationship with your turn ity. And. I think the more you do it the more you realize that the process of doing it is really. But the thing is and. The notion that Van Gogh wasn't successful. Is a bit is absurd. I would say since. First of all he. If and I guess there's that moment where Wilma sitting in that vegetable field any pours dirt on his face, and he starts smiling. And I would say that to me it looks like that guy was exactly in the right place at the right time and. I don't know how many people actually feel like that in a lifetime. And the work that he made were was his. His was his companion was his confident, and it was his he had the dialogue with himself. It's a luxury when you can have a dialogue with other people. And I think that that's what he loved so much about Gauguin that he had respect for him. And I love that. I love that you showed that I felt like when I was watching the movie I was watching. Watching Van Gogh paint is how you sort of. Is how you directed. It. I shot who shot it Ben wa Delo shot the movie. I think he did a great job and guess this bunch of directors in this room, and I can say to you that he never said wants to me. I can't do it. And that's extrordinary. And there was no he asked for a lot this one. Well, we devised ways of doing things Louise Coburg is in the audience. She wrote the script was John Claude carryanne, I n and also edited the film. I did it with her. But she did it how you wanna stand up stand up. Louise. So obviously, we all know that editing is writing and. Ben wa Willem Louise, and I all became the same person at some moment and. What was your question? I'm sorry Lee. Where'd you shoot it? Okay. So we were we were in all. And that all in the south of France. And that's where Van Gogh lived from eighteen eighty eight until he moved to over sir walls where he died, and so this was took place more or less than the last two years of his life. Gauguin came down visit him as brother. Paid for Gauguin to go down there. And. Keep them company, but Gauguin wanted to do it and one thing that was, but when we arrived, for example, there was no weet in. The south of France. So we sent Ben wad. Scotland asked him to shoot his feet. Okay. So how much is your budget for this? Budget was ten million dollars. And we probably had to spend two million dollars on lawyer's fees for some ridiculous can reason. I mean, it really was hobbled together in a way, and and at a certain moment. Also, we lost three hundred and fifty thousand dollars from one of the investors. They said, well, can you shoot seven hour days? Yeah. I can. And in fact, every day at about five thirty it was magic our in our will end. So Louise, and I would actually. Keep inventing scenes to shoot. And so many of the things that are in the movie were done spontaneously and Willem was up for it. And so was Oscar so good. He's so good. He's so good in the film. Let me do you. Do you like you shot? Now a couple of movies the country. What's different between those crews and these crews here. Your American supposedly. I mean, my father's from Czechoslovakia. My mother was born in New York, but she's from Romania, and I would say. Well, but I would say about say be honest. Well, I would say I mean, I've felt like a person who's person without a flag really somewhere in mid Atlantic. And after I made the diving bell and the butterfly was within tell you, right. I was with Sean Penn who made a movie about. Go with the Emile Hirsch. Into the one to the wild. And I was sitting there watching Shawn's moving. He's really an American director. I was a real American movie, and I looked at the diving bell and the butterfly and I thought well, that's a French movie. And it was a moment where Jerome said do one in me to make the movie in English. And I well, I can't do that. Don't you think it'd be weird for? French people to be speaking English and people reading French subtitles of a movie about a guy who's runs a magazine in Paris. So no, I don't think it'd be weird at all. I said, well, I can't make that really. And so we made that movie in French, and but this movie. I think we're in a post linguistic kind of moment and. What is often Tissot and? Okay. Those kids it would have been very inauthentic to me for those kids to speak English. And also for the people that were in the bar in the Tambo around to be speaking English. But when you're a foreign are you speak your language with your family at home and in this case? The convention was advan go and his brother, we're gonna speak English. And then I guess you could see how beautifully Oscar Isaac speaks French. But he doesn't really speak French that beautifully of. He did a pretty good job. But French people would have heard that it wasn't that good. Louis Gorell came over to the house, and we recorded Louise voice on iphone, and he did Oscar's voice. And we were able to. Arrange acuity and do the tenor of his voice to where it sounded like Oscar's voice and Louis Carell did in mazing job. He also read Orioles letter and was go Gant's voice in the end. And I'm glad that they let them use the movie place. So you could see the yellow come up because I think that's kind of the really the end of the movie, but we didn't want to have too many endings. So we had to wait a little while to give you the yellow. I loved the I really was surprised in love the tenderness between the brothers came came out of nowhere. A shot of Willem in the bed looking up at his brother not wanting to leave. I felt. It's interesting when you think that an image could speak volumes because what they're saying. Isn't that interesting? But the fact that these two guys are lying in a bed in a suit and his his his brother holds them like that. I thought Rupert was really the repository of all of his grief and all of this love, and and at a certain moment, he said to me, I think maybe just my character. I need to have more agency where I could speak about my brother. I said. If I said if you just do what I ask you to do. I think it'll be fun. And he sure did I mean he was really able to be still and the he had so much affection in him towards Willem. And he was so there was some pretty chaotic moments in some of these scenes, and Rupert was able to be very stoic and still and still still still still the that's that's how I felt too about. Who's that beasts that was in the in the? Mental. Oh, Neal's our droop. He's a beast. He's brilliant. You know, when he said basically told him that he couldn't that. What was this garbage? Was it? What was what was he doing? I mean, he was acting as as what he was wasn't acting. He's not acting. He's just crazy as a bug. Here's a great actor though. But he's not I don't think he was acting. In fact, I wanted him to say because some people don't understand what he's saying. Sometimes maybe some people did or didn't. But didn't feel like we needed to put subtitles under what he was saying. Because of I didn't want anybody to read anything when they were looking at his face, except what was on his face so Neal's. He played in the diving bell and the butterfly also. And he's what was what was he was a guy who had been locked in a basement on had been kidnapped and came to see John Doe, and John Doe is sitting there paralyzed. And he says God why why didn't I call this guy when he got out of being? In after he was kidnapped. And so he was instead of it being a positive thing. He was just mortified that. He is sit there and look at this guy. He never called. Anyway, I wanna kneels to do to play in the scene, and at a certain moment, I said to him you think you could just tell me the words sergeant again. And he said, you know, I am like a leaf that's blowing around in the wind. And I don't know that I could get to that place again and really deliver that line that you're asking me to deliver. And so I said, okay. And then he said it anyway, but we never changed it. And I think that the movie was made like that. I think that Willem was like a leaf blowing around in the wind, and we were like a leaf blowing around in the wind. And there was a lot of wind, and weather and the weather and the landscape. Protagonist in the film. We shot the movie in the asylum, where did you shoot the film for? Was thirty eight days or something like that? But we had two weeks where we was not scheduled and we went down to all. And it's not a cozy place maybe in the summer. But in February when Gauguin told him to go down there. It's brutal and people are not necessarily warm, and they definitely were not nice to Vincent. And it's. So when we went down there, the sunflowers were dead, and it was fantastic. I mean to see though, sunflowers really looked like you were walking through a concentration camp in those and those of flowers each were people and to walk through there and. Really Benoi did an amazing job. And when when he went to Scotland he was wearing van Goghs, shoes and his pants. He even had his hat in case. There was a camera shadow, and when I walk around I look at the floor all the time, and sometimes you look up, but I thought it'd be nice to see feet walking up the screen on. So tell me about that you just tell them what you share with me about that. But shot. About walking through the seasons that way, I mean, basically it starts and you're you're walking around with him. But without it was a way of him walking through who shot it. Oh, well, those particular moments at the beginning when you're not by Ben wa but at another moment, we gave William the camera. So there's moments when William is running and he's holding the camera when Willem is walking home after he's been shot and he walks in front of the liquor. He's shooting his feet. And then he shoots the people that are looking at him with the split Dieter. I mean, basically I walked into. Vintage shop, and I bought some say, well, she is to what is it a vintage shop old clothes store. And I. Bought the sunglasses, and when I walked out I looked to the floor, and I realized they were bifocals. So there was a step in the grass, and I thought. Wow. That's okay. So I took the glasses and gave it to Ben wa and asked him to tach it to his lens. Then the sunglasses were a little small for the lens. So we created a split Diop there. So we could have a dif- different depth of field and thought that that could reflect van Goghs feeling of. Or anxiety or gets more exacerbate in and so and by not attaching it to lens, we could just move it around a little bit felt more human. But it's very interesting. When people say, oh, what's wrong with the bottom of the screen, or why did the blue eyed all of a sudden came black did something wrong with the projection into say, no, no the movie supposed to be like that just some K about research. I mean, like did you do things? I did he have a girlfriend. Did he have a lover? Well, and then how do you how did you go about researching? It's it's a bit ago. How are you? How did you go about your research? Yeah. And did you have a girlfriend or lever? Well, he had a girlfriend in Amsterdam. I mean, she I didn't know her. And I wasn't there. But it's documented that he had a girlfriend who had a child and he couldn't afford to take care of her because his brother was paying his bills. And so he had relationships basically with people that he paid have relationships with. So he didn't have a girlfriend. And. An particularly at this time. Between the winter of the beginning of eight hundred eighty eight until the time he died. He definitely didn't have girlfriend, but he was accused of touching women. Sometimes in our being kind of like a town. That's sort of like how you began it. Well, let's see. I mean that was the goal that letter. Yeah. Okay. I don't know that was going. That'd be an interesting thing for everybody to talk about from it. I'm just for us. 'cause I can tell you what I thought. Okay. Love to hear what I thought that something was going on. And I didn't know where we're going and when you came back to it. I thought that something was wrong. I know you're right. But at the beginning of the movie, you you you're lying in the dark or I lie in the dark in the morning. And I think about things or whatever, and I would like to be one of them. I'd like to sit down and have a drink and asked if they Mike somebody to ask me if I'd like a piece of fruit or I mean, just something and a one would smile at me. And anyway, and so an a very literal way you kind of see what he wants. And then here's a woman standing on the road. But it's not really connected in such a. Literal, way and. I think that there is a big chasm. There's a chasm between art and society. There's a chasm between artists and society, and there's certainly a chasm between or I mean, somebody might be very good at one thing and not so good at other things. I mean, he was very good at painting very bad at relating to people. They did of. There was a petition to keep him from coming back to ARL, man. That's a fact, and so, but we invented situations that would serve the story. I mean, he didn't paint the roots in eighteen eighty eight those kids didn't bother him. I mean, that's not exactly what happened. But it was a good way to get him into the hotel set up the sing. So then his brother could call write a letter to Gauguin to get him to come down there. I mean, I wrote the letter to go GAM, but there worked correspondents that were close to that. And then. Getting Gauguin down there. You could have you can see how how important friendship was. And also somebody that he could communicate with. That's so cool. I mean to. I thought about my friendship with you. When I watched the film to you know, how supportive you've been and how you are a supporter of the arts. You know, you support artists and. Yeah. That's what I thought about that with him and your style, man. I really dig your style. I love how I love the music, and I love your your lack of your lack of sound. We're in. We're in motion. We're hearing things. Oh, we don't hear anything. Didn't you hit me with some music is almost like a cool jazz album? And who did whose Taylor who who did the music Tatyana, Liz off sky thinks this is the. I think I I soundtrack that she ever made her first instrument is the violin. And. The first couple of cords in that I made up, and then she and Paul Cantillon did the rest, but all of the piano music, she played by herself. And then louisan I as we edited the film or saw the film really heard that in his head. Now, the in you, you say louisan you edited the film. How does how does that does that? The editor of the film. Editor of the film. Okay. All right. What happened was it was unintentional of you hire had you edited before Louise, she's an architect. Okay. So how did that work? Gene. You can you. Explain it or are. Okay. Well, John Claude carrier, and I started to write the script. And at a certain moment. I mean, something happened. We were we went to we saw Van Gogh Arto exhibition at the museum Dorsey, and when I was looking at the paintings, I was explaining what I thought how Van Gogh painted them to John Clottey felt like go Van Gogh was talking to him. I didn't know that till a couple months ago. Anyway, I was explaining things about the painting. And then I thought okay, the fifth say fifteen paintings in the room, you have an experience with each one of these things at the end, you have an accumulative feeling about everything you saw. So I thought if the structure of the movie is that and we have fifteen vignettes, and it doesn't have to be nil 'lustration of what's in the painting. But a story that could be a parallel life to whatever that separate image was. So we started thinking or talking about things for example discussions about Christ. Shakespeare, vietnam. At a certain moment of. I was seeing a movie I guess being somebody that may actually makes things three dimensional things. With seeing the movie at a different way than John Claude. He's eighty seven I'm sixty six she's thirty three she's from Sweden. I'm from Brooklyn. He's from Columbia, and we all had a feeling about Van Gogh and saw it in a different way. So at a certain moment of Louise started to organize the vignettes into a place where this narrative was coming that was closer to how I was seeing the film. And then when we went down to ARL, if you see the script, you'll see it says that we've been kind of re wrote it, but it was say he walks in nature. I mean, we had seen those eighteen minutes long him walking in nature. There were a large moments of the film where there's no talking, and then there's some where there's a lot of talking. And so we thought and I think that she saw the movie visually head portrait's horizontality landscape, and I guess also. So we started to. Respond to these seven hour days and also to literally to the physical arduousness of the landscape, and for example. So you started the film without an editor knowing so did, you know, she's going to edit prior to on the journey know what happened. No, not at all what happened was Juliet wealth lane who edited the diving bell and the butterfly was supposed to do this. But she was working on Jacko DR Smoot movie and wasn't going to be free till April. And I love Juliet and trust her and thought, we'd wait, and we got done shooting on December ten, but the thing is that don't you hate that? When that happens. When you're doesn't happen to me all the time because movies all the time. But but you hate that. I hate it when it happens. So. Louise. Learn the avid program in two days because she basically does all of these bills these buildings and all does all the spatial work sketch up and different things in has. Curated different exhibitions. And in fact, there's an exhibition at the museo door state where she built the walls. And so I think thinking spatially has a lot to do an editing and also. Inventing things. I don't think there was one set that we did we didn't change everything around. So someone asked her the other day, did you we editing on on the set? She wasn't editing but recorded everything new all the skeletons were buried in undescended tenth of we just started editing movie, and it was on the laptop. So we went edited in Mexico airplane wherever and by the time, April rolled around. We were so far how long does that? So you got a December tenth to April tenth what does that December? Mark was a four or five months. That's good. We were so far gone that when Juliet of looked at the material and some money, well, we paid her anyway instead of breathing on her neck, we'll let her work on it for a while. But she was going to take out everything that characterize it as what it was. And you've got all fight for whatever. That thing is. I mean, there are a lot of battles to fight when you make movies, but there's. We really preserved what we thought was the film. And so we just were inseparable and basically. Went through that whole process. And she used the editor. We added it together. It's great. None of your films are like and yet they still have the same heartbeat. You know, I can never. Know, they they have the same heartbeat. But just none of them. Feel the same. What were you? What were you going for like when you when you when you with this you going for I wanted somebody to have the feel I didn't want to be about Van Gogh? I want you to feel like you were him. I wanted to put everyone in have the experience. That's how I felt. I felt like I was criticized and I felt like, you know, anything you read if you read a review, the one thing you what you cling to what I cling to is the negative as opposed to the positive. I felt so I felt for him as an artist. Well, he didn't really have the tickets you start the movie with the taking the paintings down from the wall get outta here. Yeah. That's a bit predictable. And that's why we put the girl at the beginning to say, hey, this is not going to be a regular bio. We're going to have some really. Thing out in nature that will be the poetry of this guy's life. And. It was a bit too wrote. The fact is that he actually did those and you asked about the research, those are the paintings that were in a more or less. Those were the paintings that were in the cafeteria. So I guess I knew a lot of art historians and people that have curated and and authenticate Van Gogh's work. So we knew which pictures were in the cafeteria which pictures were painted in the asylum, which pictures would have been at his brother's house of. So for example, the roots were painted in eighteen eighty nine not one thousand nine hundred eighty eight but it was good to paint the roots to have that scene. I mean Van Gogh is never seen a Velasquez painting or Goya painting because Goya paintings weren't at the loop at that time, he did see Delacour Varanasi frowns halls. But I thought it was more interesting to show that if you look at it. Painting. And of Alaska's painting up close you see a bunch of abstract marks. And that's what you see. When you see Van Gogh painting and his work is more in concert with those guys and say Millais or Gustav de Ray somebody that he might have light. So I took the liberty to pick what I wanted. I mean even had Carvalho in there. But the. Who I think is as my favorite. But he did. And it just so happened. They let us shoot in the Loof and neck. How do you mean it just so happened? That's well, I'm just so happen. I guess they know my work, and they would have let me shoot in the Lou probably if you would have paid them. Yeah. I doubt it very nice. And anyway, so we've gotta pass shooting in the room where the Delacour paintings, and you see Garrick halt the rafters in there also. But in the next room is the marriage it kinda by Varanasi, which is the painting that Napoleon stole from the Cini foundation Venice, anyway, we were able to just walk in there. So William guests to walk up to the painting and in the real life, supposedly Van Gogh wrote. Because he didn't think he liked Varanasi. And he was painting potatoes eater. The potato eaters around that time, which was kind of a gray Brown and black painting. But when he saw the marriage at Khanna, he wrote the colors in my painting. Don't come from reality. They come from my palate. Well, the your was in your house recently. And I gotta tell you. I wanted to I wanted to I wanted to take it out of there. The portrait of Willem. And then there's a there's a there's a portrait of Willem. And then there's a portrait another portrait of Willem. Tell me. I would've I would've taken anyone is going to go for some money. I know, but then what isn't gonna go for some money. One was a prop. And I was going to ask if it's a prompt and give it to me. I will I already gave it to William do you gave it to will Andy I did. So what who gets that who gets who gets the money? I hope I get some someday. Anyway, here he goes. Nah. Okay. So what happened is Van Gogh? I'm one of the things we found out and making the movies how we worked, and I don't know if anybody knows us in the room, probably raise your hand, if you know, do you know that the flower paintings, the paintings of sunflowers, he didn't paint all of them from life. There. Fifteen sunflowers in a painting and their fifteen sunflowers in another painting. In some another one there might be twelve sunflower. So what I'm saying is he would make paintings of his own paintings say you couldn't go out that day or whatever he wanted to paint. He would make paintings. So he was kind of like Andy Warhol in that sense because he was sort of the first post modern painter. So that being said if William was going to be Van Gogh I needed to make the painting that he painted himself. Look like willing sees in the movie, so I painted Willem as Van Gogh. And that's what's on the wall and the asylum after I got home, I painted a painting of the painting. So I made a plate painting of the painting of Willem as is going to steal. And that's what he saw the student who said this is going to be your last movie. And I don't believe you. And I hope to not know why why am I really change? Well, you know, I have to really change gears to do that. I mean, everybody here. Probably I mean, if that's what you do you do that that way of mediating the world, I do that by painting. And I really didn't want to do this. But I think it was my mother that was. Had an impulse to educate people or maybe she did that to me. I don't know what it was. But I felt like he was. Mistreated during his life. I think he's been Meese mistreated historically with all of these silly myths, and I think he's missed been mistreated in films that we've seen by directors that we all respect who don't know anything about. I mean, Robert Altman's a great director. He didn't know God damn thing about. I was gonna say Willem Dafoe about Vincent Van Gogh. And I mean, it was beautiful thing. Sean, I always loved the thing about the brothers in them. But the first thing that happens in that movie talks about a painting being sold for thirty six million dollars or whatever who gives us. I mean, that's not what it's about. And so I mean. I mean, MAURICE Piazza's movie. I don't know if anybody likes that movie. But it was a busy in my opinion. I French people like it. But I mean, it could have been about anybody. I mean, you didn't answer my questions. My final question to, you know, don't I hope not? I hope this is not that just some bows. No, no, no. Because I really have to change gears to do that. And this was something that was very very close to my. Of me trying to understand what it's like to be alive. And I think I said what I wanted to say when he says when I'm painting, I stopped thinking. I like to do that. I like to stop thinking. And and I guess when I'm painting. I do stop thinking. And maybe when we're making a movie we've stopped thinking also at the moment, we can stop thinking when we can just let something happen. And I think that what you can see in the movie is how we really depend on. I mean, what William did how we could access that place and do what he did how Oscar mas- Mickelson. I mean, these people. Who knows where it comes from? I mean mas- is a dancer. I mean, Chris walk and is a great friend of mine. I mean guy could read the telephone book, and it's interesting, but but they can do something that I can't do. And when I was a painter. Longtime ago, and I had comments about movies. Nobody listened to me. But being the director of the actors, listen to you. So I started to I and the thing about John Michel Basquiat? I think I probably did it for the same reason. Because. I hated Robert Hughes saying that he was he was you're the Eddie Murphy of the art world and all of this abuse that he took really and I thought okay, oh at the John Michel to give him. The respect. Well on that note. I respect you very much, and I'm really happy that you brought this into the world. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you Lee. And thank you guys are coming. Thanks for listening to another DJ QNA if you'd like to hear more you can find past episodes at the director's cut wherever you listen to podcasts. We'll have a lot more fuel in the coming weeks as Ford season approaches, including QNA's Alphonso Koran David McKenzie and Steve mcqueen's. So be sure to subscribe, saying don't miss Nep sewed. If you're enjoying the podcast, please take a moment to write in review us on. I tunes. We'd love to hear your feedback and you can help Palestinia files. Find the show. Thanks again for listening, and we'll see you next time. This podcast is produced by the directors guild of America music is by Dan, Wally.

Vincent Van Gogh Willem director Willem Louise Gauguin Lee Daniels editor William ARL directors guild of America France Julian Schnabel New York Sean Penn New York Times Lucknow Scotland Academy Award Juliet
Haoui Montaug

Suicide Buddies

1:09:36 hr | 2 years ago

Haoui Montaug

"Hey, folks, this Hampton here. I know that David I tend to joke a lot about suicide and make a lot of lighthearted jokes. But honestly, if you're having any sort of trouble, we would recommend that you call one eight hundred two seven three talk is the national suicide prevention lifeline, and they do amazing work. They they really will talk with you. And so we we just hope that you know, you have fun here at the pod. But if you're ever having truly deep suicidal thoughts that you would call one eight hundred two seven three talk, we love you. We want you to take care of yourself. Thank you for listening. No. Me. You get sick. Please stop putting the microphones directly down your. Up your heinous and up the SAFA Amos. It's one tube. I gotta clog to soften as. Worm? You got one two million. If you come in have you got to Dave's now. It's good. I think the world can handle you your damn right dude to two days. It'd be too funny. He will be laughing so hard they die. Yeah. I hate it when I'm too funny. No, you don't one time to funny in front of a Buckingham Palace garden. He blues fucking brains out because he laughed they do kill themselves. If they get flustered fire that was the joke that made them laugh went you. Like our president. Yeah. Totally who's great. He loves that. Kind of riot bald in your face American style. Politico we bit political humor. You know, what I was thinking about forgive me. But this will be a bid I do have mercy and up. Is it like, and I think this is actually a pretty obvious observation. It's like a thought that we've all probably had at least once, but it had never really sunk in for me until I found out that there's no White House correspondents dinner this year. Oh, yeah. Because Trump said he wouldn't go. That's because they were upset about the about Michelle wolf. And so they did this other show that was just like a panel thing on CNN, right and Jordan temple was telling me this. And I was you know, it's good for him. It's good like multiple commies cut to do it. But I was just telling me that I was thinking about it and like liberals get called cuts, right? But like always the most thin-skinned in the fucking world coward insane. He's a coward all his followers or cowards. It's really funny. Like it just really is sinking. In with me. How like sure I there's a lot of things I'm afraid of and one of them being confrontation. But like those people are like babies little crying fuck in baby. He should little bitch people and roast master general, Jeff Ross, the roast master gender Rostom. Yeah. Isn't that weird? He had the comedy central roast. And the thing is he's kind of a sociopath. Like, you really can't laugh at anything, especially has real trouble laughing at himself. Yeah. So it's like the funny thing is like he could easily just ask for a different comic or done a different thing. Like, yeah. You really is like a lot. I'm not gonna show up which he didn't do didn't. He not show up last time or something. Just Sarah Huckabee. He wasn't a wasn't there. Now, they're just like, let's just cancel it. Checks though. It's like even really sell them that it bugs me about because he is so historically this way. But I guess just like, I don't know. I know it's probably not revelatory. But it feels like a revelation to me it just occurred to me like like sure I'm a liberal and I am softy. I am Gajah. But let in I like truly like this is a liberal. I am I just said the word bitch, and I feel bad. What I mean? You are a little big. Yeah. That's me. Working my aggressive. You know, red state blood, look good character. Yeah. I think you're making my point is like that's how liberal I am even I'm more liberal than even liberals want you to be where I'm like any gendered insult, no one should ever say. And here's the other thing about me. I'll fucking kill you. Do you know what I mean? Like, I'll kill you. Tell you saw sitting. All of those things together. No like, eat me up. And you, and you are also know what I'm saying is like I'll like those are how that's how I feel politically. And I stand by. No, yeah. Any sense? You have empathy is what that is not being soft, and that's actually a sign of strength. I agree should about other people. You know what I mean? And it's and it knows them kind of soft. My point is like, I literally am I get upset easily? You know what? I mean. Like, I am. I just it just never really hit me these guys that are like constantly complaining online and saying they're the strong ones and saying they're tough like I'll kill them. Do you know what I mean? Like, I feel very I feel so much stronger than that. I won't kill anyone. I won't hurt anyone. But I just like heaven turn allies d- that we're the soft ones. And then recently like, no, I feel like I don't take. That kind of shit from people, and I don't also get all like. You disagree with me? And I really think that as liberals we should stand up and be like, no fuck you. I like we're stronger than you will fuck in kill you. That's really feel all bullying behavior is guarantees. Right. Right. Bullies are cowards. That's the opposite. If that is somebody who does have empathy, and yes, you beat yourself up. But that's actually just having empathy for yourself. Sure. Understanding how feelings work and how you know things are maybe not right and you have to fix the situation, and then you feel emboldened to correct that situation. That's actually just being a functional person for the most part. And it's the people who are trying to be, you know, ruin it for other people trying to out early harm other people for no real reason. There's usually some sort of like cowardice they're trying to bluster and back right up. You know, by just hurting other people like I can't think of a more frail individual than Trump. Yeah. He's like he has a. Doctors say say that he's basically superhuman motherfucker. We can look at you like, you're you're obviously lurch across the room like you're out of shape. At least, you know, like you're not Hercules, and it's like you're the president. And you're wearing pants you found? He's like, I'm not a lot. I'm not a liar yet will say like women's cause cancer. This like he's everything is like a defense. It's all defense mechanism. You know, and it sucks because people look at that person. Go what a proud strong guy. But it's like same thing with John Wayne that guy was like the most complete blubbering. Loser. If any director ever said, hey, John that gives you do another take. It wasn't very good. He'd be like, what do you mean? No. I know. That's what my favorite thing about the sopranos is like, we you. The we like their murderers, and the we like they are kind of in our culture, the embodiment of being tough is Tony soprano right nihilistic. But if you watched the show, they are crybabies, they're like, would you say about me? Why does it bother you so much that someone said you eat too much spaghetti or whatever they said, you know? That was racist. And I think that might have been racist. And. A window. And the weird thing is like I I don't know why I was thinking about when Piers Morgan is an example of these guys who think of like JAMES BOND or John Wayne or Tony soprano as like these are all masculine men and Mike they are all fictional care. And James Gandolfini, no matter how tough you looks onscreen. I guarantee you at one point he wanted to go to drama school. You wanna do Shakespeare to do the whole fucking rigmarole? So let's do did. I tell you this that I did it show Carl Heston I wants to show where Michael chiklis was in the crowd, and Michael chiklis is one of these guys who like he's like V tough cop on the shield, you think of him as just like you'll break into your house and he'll kill everybody. And. Family thing to. Yeah. That's what he is. Monster. He actually will kill you and Carl as a joke about being a theater going to feeder school, and we were talking the whole show like a checklist likes my jokes. You know, and. And afterward. I was talking to Carl. Beat me uptick listening. Fucking. Up against the wall suck my dick. Fucking punch sign at the end of that thing that tank when I come back going to be five bucks tags. There's going to be body tags toe toe tens on bondage, or tow tags. Don't make correct. Is. It's so funny. Yes, I'm just talking to Carl after this show and Michael chiklis walks up. Looking all chiklis looks at Carl and goes, I went to feeder school. Chiklis famous out. I know. Yeah. Totally so hysterical. Yeah. I think about like Tony soprano, James Gandolfini and Michael chiklis. You could have done anything really like as an actor. You're kind of open to whatever he could have been like a sci-fi actor James get but at one point people relation body shape. You look good with a gun and a Meatball. Sam I get you. Now, totally minute. John Wayne put on a cowboy hat people. Fuck. Says it's a James Gandolfini while he's auditioning to play curly. Sue, and he's like, oh, okay. Gonna be girly. I win over to roll this seat three. Ellison might joke. Mcgee scum. It added a front CAD piece. Got the big nice fed horn Indem trying to do all the dialogue a Luke AM day in this space is on fire. Gotta get out of the desktop building. Our building. Got. The N Y. No, thank you. Thank you for your time. No. Guys aged skinny better agents folks, by the way, I'm sick welcomed suicide buddies Davor us, I'm having young and sick this week sick. He's sick. And I'm in the middle of depressive episode five. Mentally sick. Last sex. And then you die. That's from NewsRadio. So we often mentioned on this podcast loving NewsRadio. It's the much better show than Seinfeld. And I stand by that. Stephen root never had a high school girlfriend. Well is radio. Yeah. For a lot of reasons actually fully might Seinfeld, folks. I know she was seventeen right folks are going to wanna bring up I've held on YouTube going to look Shoshana is. Pick up Seinfeld, lizard girlfriend. Seventeen year old girlfriend was in fact snake? All women are snakes. Keep my wife and my toilet gonna black forced com. Literally sweating right now is fever. Tried to do an Alex Jones impression. Well, story of your life. You're going to be eighty five years old sweating sick trying to do Jones impression there as long daddy five. You definitely will make eighty five. But no further. That's it. That's the end of the road for old ham. Oh, man. There was something else. That was going to say about that tough guy thing. I liked everything you were saying about bullies in that way. Certainly when you're growing up you never bully who's making my life shed is such a coward. It's weird because I think one one super negative of the internet is that it really helps bullies win. Because like the the people allot of the liberals that are killing it online are the bullies of the liberals like the liberals that are like if you do one thing wrong, you should be dead. Just like we're all like, hey, wait a minute. What? I didn't say I will kill you. But I meant it cosmetically. All like, I won't from. You is what I meant your honor. Metaphysical now, I know I really try and watch myself to not say something that would be way over the line. As far as go kill yourself or whatever because it's so easy. You absolutely want to. Yeah. First of all, I would never say go kill yourself. And I don't mean I didn't mean. Yeah. I guess that's like shaky ground. I was saying I will kill you in the sense of as if I were doing stand up, you know, what I mean? You know what I mean? Like this like the stand ups different you're up there. And everyone's watching you, and there's this context of this kind of extreme I'll get you. And I don't even really mean that I mean, like if what I mean is this I see people being tough online. And even though I am a person who is straight up of frayed of fighting. I see these people being like fuck you and your fucking cook. PCS bullshit. I don't I don't give a shit it should be male and female bathrooms, and if you disagree with that, then you're not an American and I'll kick your ass. My point is like, okay kick my ass, man. Do it. That's my point. I guess I'm just sick of it, dude. I'm like, I don't want to be in a fight. And I will probably cry in that fight if I will. But like fuck you, dude, I'm not your I'm not your whipping, boy, we're not your punching bag, and that's what I mean. Like, I'm not gonna kill you. But I will not fuck you. I'm not gonna take the ship for MU. But what if I get you? You on my twelve month Chritine, shake Rogan experience which rogue. Rogue isn't even this guy. He's not like, listen liberals are garbage. I have all kinds of problems with Joe Rogan. But like, he's not you know, what I mean. It's like town fans. Here's how you do a reverse spinning back. Kick a trouble. Giving you trouble to you and your trouble reverse spitting? Kick has twice the power of a front kick because whipping around using centrifugal force to break the sternum. Strong. More like Mia FC. You know what I mean? Jerk off often, I watch it, dude. I'm so mad at getting called week. Oh, this is what I wanted to say. I totally agree with this. There's this weird thing in like the way that we talk about manhood, America. They're all these diverging ideas that I think are so funny and like like, yeah. One of the things they say is like stand up for yourself. Right. That's a big part of being quote, man. But another thing is like you have to be our idea of a man or will make fun of you. And I just think it's so interesting that those two things exist inside of people saying what manhood is because to me the quote manliness thing. And what I mean when I say, quote, mainly is strongest the strongest thing to do is to be you and be okay with that that's incredibly strong to be surrounded by people being like, you're not one of us. And to be like, yeah. Well, I'm still me. And fuck you that is standing up for yourself. Yeah. But then the bad verse. Standing up for yourself. Stand your ground laws where people anybody who gives me. Trouble will die. Yeah. Exactly. You're not standing up for yourself. You're trying to create an image of yourself. That is this. God this hero figure. Yes. And it's like you'd need to really actually just be comfortable with your weakness. And that's very well said being comfortable with your own weakness in limitations yet. And honestly that is like my goal in life to get there. I am not there yet. But I would I really really strive and want to be someone who's like unabashedly me. And I just it's so funny as much as American manhood says that it's about being strong. It's about being one of the heard it is American men hood is my favorite Seth MacFarlane show. Currently. I hate it American it ruined my life. No. I. I would say gave you a career. Well that to I'm blown. Yeah. It also gave me my current depressive episode. Would you create? Bullshit when you're growing up. Does you think that you are? Yeah. Would it be creative? I would Elliott, dude. I would just be making telling jokes about like pin wheels and Thuc and green grass, man. I'd be making stained glass wheels, more like art wheels. You know what? I mean. I probably have a little that. I sell jewelry in Phoenix literally. You're right, dude. I would be I would be a fucking human resources span. I would I would have nothing. No for sure I mean, all of my I mean, I'm sure I would have liked the creativity. Is it some way on the like nature end of nature versus nurture for me. But yeah, it's mostly situation. Talking sometimes about with comedy, creative also comes out performance. Just like if you have that desire to perform say at a young age. It's like, whoa. Where's that coming from? I wanna tension. Do. I don't I'm sure I'll get into it. I don't really feel like getting into the depression have been dealing with lately. But I will say when. I will say one thing about it. I said in therapy yesterday. That. The stand up is the only when I'm perf- literally while I'm performing stand up is the only time I feel actually safe socially because it's the only time I feel like I'm important to anybody. Wow. I know didn't appreciate oh. It's like, I don't know how to like. It's very real. I mean, that's what I've been dealing with. I like I had a thing happened over the weekend that like it's weird, man. It was very minor. But it triggered me into. Into just thing that I fight off constantly, which is the feeling that I have no one, and and it's been just so bad. And so that's why said that because it's true. It's like, and so like what you were saying about creativity. Like, that's it's funny because there are millions of reasons why I like stand up, it's my favorite thing ever. But. I, but the reason I'm doing it is that it makes me feel wanted. And maybe right. Maybe it's wrong. If you're putting that level of emotion on it. It's maybe not healthy. You know what I mean? Because it's not that. It's not the thing. That defines why people love you. You know what I mean? Like, I and you're my friend, and it has nothing to do. How hard you crushed in front of me or. But I don't know man, because I think that I think that anything you like can be boiled down to dark, emotional reasons. So I don't it doesn't bother me. And I don't think it's bad. I think it would be bad if I needed to crush. But I feel good after stand up. Whether I bomber or kill really dude affect me because I have. Bombing hurts my feelings for sure and it can it can really affect me. But I feel I'm not I'm not kidding. When I walk off stage. Don't matter what I almost every time. And it's because everybody paid attention to me for seven minutes. That's cool. It's crazy. It's it is. It's sad. It's definitely very sad. I'm very like. I'm very like. Yeah. I do. I do take it so hard if it's like, especially when it's new stuff. It's all like m I still finding like it's more like, that's maybe where I'm coming from it. Anyway, stand up is just not a healthy thing to invest ton of emotion into it can't be your main thing. Roese like lawless will. There's there's no rhyme or reason to it. It's just such a fucking anxiety attack of career that it's the more. You can really find happiness outside of it. I do it and do it professionally and treat it like a job. Then you will be happier. Totally. But I see people on. I think that I'm Razi bet. I'm better about that than many comedians. But and that's kind of what I'm saying. I'm certainly at this current moment. I'm not it's really. Very present that reality. But yet it's weird. It's not like an ever-present like I need this. I don't. There are other things in my life. But that's I think like this subconscious motivation for sure. Because I don't know. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe maybe it is that and it is unhealthy. And I shouldn't like, you know, just shut that thought down completely because it's something worth paying attention to. But you're right like actively search for other things in my life and try to like make sure I like maintain friendships and have other things that move me through life. But, but when it comes down to it, at least, a minor level throughout the day all day, I have interactions where I'm link where the entire interaction I'm saying to myself. They don't. They're not trying to get you. This isn't a cruel joke. They don't what you're saying matters. The fact you hear matters. I say these things to myself in my head all day every day. Well, I'm really sorry. This sounds like it's a really awful. Sorry. I'd give you a hug, but I don't want to give you the flu. Flew to. Thank you. I appreciate it, man. We were talking about do seriously. Thank you. I wanna talk more. Oh, well, before and before we get into talking about the suicide this week there two things we talk about real quick one of them is tour dates, but the first is that era statal is not a cat. Huge, news dot a cat human beings human beings. Our producer is a wonderful, man. He's the only good straight men in Hollywood. He's yeah. Dave an IRA monster. He's honestly, the only straight man that I consider to be alive. Cool because it's a spectrum. Being straight as a spectrum being is. Either day or. To talks Basque, you're straight until you're full gay did. Man. Yeah. No someone who's a fan of another podcast Aristotle produces which I didn't know that he produced other podcasts, but not cool. Not all right with me. Cut out your they thought he was a cat because they only talk about him as the as doddle in the corner. I guess which makes me question. How much this other podcasts respects you? It makes me think that we're your number one. We'll get you to say place. Totally. And. Yeah. Tour dates yet, dude. I I like without even meaning to have like kind of a bunch coming up. Now, the one the big one coming up is him. Night are co headlining two shows that theater on may twenty six fucking Portland. Siren theater. Guys. Santa did all the work things up on our websites. Hampton, young dot com. It's not on my website Ross, but you're putting other dates up there. So that's may twenty six Portland the sirens. Jeter to shows day than me what he'll yet. Coming up, man. We've never done this together. No sauce tonight. Doing sauce a local Austin. Five minutes each at each other at each other. Hey. Sorry. Roofer one straight. I was going to be dead before twenty somehow our material just syncs up perfectly Floyd style. So anyway, my girlfriend cat, my cat. Got depression to Britiah encamped album up with Dave Ross Zalba mitts fuck in seamless. Yeah. And then I also. I'm going to be in boulder on June second. And then I have I'm going to be in Santa Cruz and Eureka and San Francisco also in June, go on my website soon and those states will be up on the roster com. Check out those Portland dates at Hampton dot com. We'd love it. If people came out, we know all up there. So people can make all yeah. We're excited, man. I also been to Portland in a minute. And I love Portland, I decided I don't know what you're doing. But I'm going to stay there for like five days. I'm going to hunt down. Fred arm. A'sun zeal live. The show told me he lives thing, they say you understand that show. No, it's insulting Portland. I think it saying that is the only place Harry Brown your dad to that's not even her name. Do you? See fucking bikini kill is touring. Fuck dude. I wanna see Keeney kills so bad. All right. Well, not brands in bikini kill but. I got to see that ever tell you. I got to see lati- GRA at the smell. It's like. Yeah. Man. They opened for brat mobile. Add the smell if you're listening. You don't know these bans, we're not gonna know what I'm talking about. The smell is like a tiny bombed out punk venue in downtown LA. Which is like if you're fan of no age, the governor of no ages first album is just a building with no Asia at on the front. No age weirdo rippers, and that's the front of the smell and originally like when I first moved to LA in two thousand the smell was an illegal venue where people would drink forties in the alley and shit and the toilet was smashed it was fucked up, and and thus awesome because punk rock, but anyway, Latigo is Kathleen Hannah's band after bikini kill or two bands after yet bands after but whatever they over brat mobile and brat mobile is notorious lesbian, punk bands a lesbian rag band. And I was like in the back with my friend, Ted. And we were like cool. We're going to watch brat mobile, and they started playing and all of these gay women took their shirts off and started marching, and then this huge massive lesbian lady walked up to us. And just. Made us leave. We just had to leave. You gotta get out here. Yes. So everyone in the room could be a woman, and we were like got it. All right, and we left, and we got dinner a real ally would ripped his dick. Got it. Totally. And that women who kicked me out was Hillary Rodham. Kicked three out. Kick me out Clinton. Okay to cough a bunch. And let's sit this week. We're talking about how we Montauk. And he literally was a doorman that use a doorman famous doorman, Howie montoc. We'll be back. The new I'm loved it from McDonalds coming in it. Written by busting Timberlake. Plus timberlake. But I'm kind. Up on busting. Hey. Sup-, dude. Common. Did this is? So what'd you do? So good damn. Did we? Dude, I'm straight up common in this soup right now, I'm really really happy about busting Timberlake. I'm very very proud of. I'm proud that. I said bust in Timberlake. I'm proud that. You said I'm coming in. And I'm really proud of this whole thing this podcast. It's come to Portland and see twenty twenty six in Portland of all places where they don't allow humor. Oh my God. Okay. This week. We are talking about how we Montauk. How we do that. How do we do? We do that would up. I'm how do obser-? I'm sorry. I believe. Sorry, guys. I if how we men Dell's name with how we do that. I would watch Steeler no deal. And I would watch America's got talent. That was his failed show. I'm being totally serious was how Mandel before dealer. No, do or whatever. And America's got talent. He did how. No, we didn't guy on. I think really. It didn't go like it was a pilot. That was like, okay, you're you're not fucking. I'm not fucking around pretty positive how I'm pretty positive. I'm not sure it's not is it never really gotten made other than like a pilot. So yeah, this is okay. So Aerostat who Aristotle who is not a cat. Our wonderful producers just brought it up. How do it? Oh, how we do it. How we do that would have been a better name Hammett. How we do. And how we doing? We because how do it? Also sounds stupid. But how we do that sounds like you're crying. We do. Yeah. Guilty. How do that is a rapper is a soundcloud rapper? Okay. So there's more there's multiple how how do you do debts? We do that. Damn five thousand followers. Okay. How we do that. Interior snus though, how do you do? How do you get back to the how how do you do? How how do you do Mr. cavenaugh? How we do that. Remember how are? How I do that. I was drawn. Talk to the people got blackout drunk with. Like, my friends, smell and pickle. Steve talked to the people. I was actively a huge piece of shit with throughout my life. How we do that. I don't do that. Your honor? I don't do. I don't do that. But how we do that? He don't do that. Ladies gentlemen of the jury. If there is neither an ODA of you questioning how do you have to do? What is morally? Right. Give this man the electric chair. We don't know when you do that. We don't even know that he do. So I don't wanna hear the question how we do. Anyway, thank bullet dodge tallymen. I didn't do the show. It was a little dirty and didn't want to touch it. That is funny. And I don't know what you're. Does he doesn't touch anything? Oh, I didn't know that lives in a separate house and his family. Really? Yeah. You won't even touch his kids. What's shaved his head? He's also like no hair on me. Wow. Well, I think it was balding too. I don't wanna shame someone's mental illness. But it's like at least can you take some pills to be a dad. Billboard pay. We've got a feel for your kids, man. Take some pills dad as a son of others. I am maybe being a little cruel. Right. No, dude. You're not being cruel. I think maybe I was shaming someone for having OCD. But also thinking of his kids like like men, I mean when you have kids I mean, how we do that. How? Starting to feel terrible to have sex to have the kids. You gotta have desserts. Good point. Well, yeah. If you're OCD allows you to have sex he goes into convulsions, this is really comfortable for him. So he kind of works around it. You know? I'm just saying did he live in another house man how he does. Did he live in another house? They in her while they were having sex is what I'm saying. Absolutely Email her. Should maybe he did. Maybe like, I don't know. How do you have milked? It was a good Seinfeld that how do oh city people. The dick sturdy the pluses dirty. Okay. This week. We're talking about how we do that. How iman? He is literally famous for being a doorman, and they're like famous people knew him. He was born in nineteen fifty two. But his heyday was in the nineteen seventies. He was a doorman at Harare dance to rea- studio. Fifty four and palladium cool the life huge dance clubs in the seventies in fuck in New York City. That's interesting. Yeah. And so, and he was like the reason he was about sir at all those places as that. He was like the bouncer who would curate your night got hired as bouncer and then pretty quickly. He was like he would decide who would come into the club. That's what about your does ensure so there's people on the list, and he would manage the list, and then you would let hot people in specifically hot women, but he's very much in that studio fifty four like I'm choosing I've seen that. I mean, of course, we're way too old for that. But like I haven't seen that movie. But I'll guarantee you there's a character that play. AM? Yeah. Because then then posing guy, but he is just like very few. He had an artist brain, he was very creative. He was like so important as abound at these clubs that he had assistance. There would be in front with him with the list. Yeah. And there was another another guy named Mark. Who was like similarly popular as about ser, and so they would look at the crowd, and they would be like, okay? You seem like a person who would contribute something interesting to this party. So like people who have quick question for clarification. Actually. So a bouncer a doorman are these the same thing? I mean, like, he's not like active. He doesn't like beat anybody abound. Doorman are not actually the same thing. But and like an interesting wrinkle with this dude was he actually was like really accomplished martial arts. Also fight people got. Yeah. Okay. So all right. He's what he was all. But he was like a party artist guy who you wouldn't think was good at martial arts. So fuck with them. And then he would beat their S, basically. And they would leave cool dude of know, you really is the guy ever. Yeah. And as I was reading about it. I realized like I mean, basically what happened at these clubs over the weekend is that they would never close the party would never stop inside this club. So he was looking for like drifters and weird artists and people like Andy Warhol's hanging out at clubs and wants to meet fucking weirdos to talk to on acid or whatever. Yeah. So people like that. And people who pay and shit like that. And so yeah, that's what he did. Everyone knew who he was. He did this into the nineties. But as a result of being such a known. Doorman? He then got into the creative community. And. Okay. Here's here's a story about him doors, just like. In the. Does basically a big painting in you in your house. It opens when God closes the door. Man. He opens a window manned. Two or man. Defenders tour, man. Would be awesome house shove people's window. Parking lot. He hasn't window at all times heads through like, oh, sorry, guys. I'm done my windows done for the night. I gotta get a new window. I'm done. I'm done, man. That's I'm done, man. I'm done. No. I already did one thing. Wow. That's so funny. So one of the. One of the big figures at studio fifty four back. Then was Mick Jagger, Mick Jagger, Andy Warhol, Jean Michel Basquiat. Like, these are all people that would hang out at these places. They're all the same guy. And that was yeah. You never saw them in the same room. But I was reading about it. I found out that like the star at these clubs in the Jagger family was Bianca mix wife Bianca who I think was a supermodel, I'm not entirely sure everybody loved her and make was kind of in that scene the one tagging along. So I don't know exactly what happened. But at some point Howie, Montauk forced Mick Jagger to pay the six dollar cover to get into. Get into whichever club Palladian physical currency in years. Yeah. It's a sterile totally. And I my guess what happened is he was like acting king shit and how he's like bianca's coming in quickly in Kant, and he's like Jagger, and he was like that'll be six dollars this. It'll be six dollars to be. Wanna go in? Yup. Man. What a tool I would love to constantly tonight. Mick Jagger things. God. Oh, sorry, Jerry. This is the last soda. Always supposed to live. You can't see it. But AMT his dancing MC Jagger Jagger right now, I've got like Jaeger. Hager Maestra there. It is. I moved out of our bomb. Yes. So like by just being a famous scene person. He started doing other things he he's started writing articles in magazines, like popular, New York magazines, like paper and details, and I didn't know this details is now just like, maxim and paper is what paper is we all know it as the thing with the broke the internet photo from that Kim Carter. Yeah. That's why paper toilet paper joke during that whole. Yeah. For should be called shit shit. Tickets should tickets, totally absolutely Sharman Sharman magazine. I did forget that. That was what paper is basically most known for now. Yeah. It was like did become like headache. Get your. Solely. Totally. Can you believe Jessica Alba is wearing this piece of plastic? Curls. Will you if you're great beer pong? Kill them details. Details all women are stupid. And all men are strong details. Yeah. It's garbage. But back then details paper, we're like New York seen what magazines cool as fuck magazines. And so he wrote for details, especially a lot. And I found this blog post if someone who used to go to all these parties, and she dug up a poem that he wrote about being a doorman that was put in details, and the poem is excuse me, excuse me, who's in charge here. I mean who has the guest list? I must be on it. I am personal friends with just about anybody. You have ever heard of a love this. Yes. Great, right. Honestly like was admiring that like he was writing whole scenes on cocaine everyone's partying twenty four seven. You get to a typewriter. What's crazy to is? This guy went to Boston University. I mean smart. Knows kung FU doorman studio fifty four just being like. Jagger to go take a hike and shit. Let's go. Let's go. Totally. He's just like an ape. But no, he's like, yeah. Coolest door guy of all time. Mr. T, Mr. T stars door guy start it up chains that we get left behind at the clubs and you just start putting them on. And that's how true that's literally out started. Wow. Just find that. That's just like that's very similar to me rollin story about how he was like, you know, this story of why he's in black flag just the audition story. But I mean, what more wasn't audition story the story that I heard was like he was like childhood friends of MCI. And then when black flag was in DC like Dez like hurt his fucking throat or something and Henry Rollins jumped on stage and started singing and they were like oh. This guy. Like, oh, this guy's just like, Mr. T. Pitying fool whose left and right. With. People next at the time. Did he work in an ice cream truck? I remember that. Yeah. Yeah. That story up fast, but story, and then I think he just made him come in one more time where they're just ask. So you know, what I mean, like, he basically the funny thing is that was basically punk music was though is the Mike would fall down all the time. If anybody knew the song. Yeah, you could reasonably pick it up and just start screaming into the microphone, right? And all I get green bit. Can you believe he's hitting the notes? Good. Yeah. So then he he also became such a big figure that he ended up being in movies because these like celebrities would hang out here. How do you? How do you? He's. But how do? He was in that movie downtown eighty one that starred literally star John Michel Basquiat. He played a DJ in crush groove. Cool. Movie called cookie that I've never heard of. Yeah. Then in the other thing, he started doing was that he adds. Yeah. Crazy. He became a producer and promoter of his own shows live shows, he. Had a karaoke show that he ran with his DJ called Anita Sarko and back. Then apparently karaoke wasn't a thing. People knew what it was. But it wasn't. You couldn't go to any bar anywhere and do it. Because there weren't these like program machines, yet show totally there had to be a DJ in a band there and someone had to have made the tracks. Yeah. And so that was really popular. But then he had this really popular show called no in days that ended up getting so popular that it toward multiple continents. But he hosted as this fucking weirdo. And he apparently like knowing ten days was one of the first. Like publicly known places where Madonna played he was like friends with Madonna and also the beastie boys. He had a big hand in breaking Madonna and the beastie boys as pop culture mainstream acts trying to make me Jill. So this really cool. Just like, Mr. T. Well, he committed suicide. Really? Shoot a draw on this. It's like he's read in high, dude. Yeah. I mean, the suicide is very sad. Yeah. I'll get to it in a second. But I do want to say real quick if you wanna know more about this guy, Google, Madonna. Everybody knowing ten days because she played her first single ever at the show, knowing where he's hosting and there's a video of it in one thousand nine hundred eighty two awesome. Yeah. And folks going to. Bono who on Noah ten days? Everybody performance CIA black helicopters lizard conspiracy. Definitely usually watch it because these Tim hosting and trying to get the crowd like into it at the beginning. And they're not. And he's basically like, okay, whatever you suck. You're like a shitty fucking crowd. All right. Here's Donna she's incredible. And then she murders and the crowd. Cheers. Yeah. It's it's honestly, I found it in that blog post someone wrote about it. I watched it. And I was like damn this might be the coolest video I've ever watched. This is like the video of the coolest thing I've ever seen in green day at their high school. Totally dude. Yeah. So in the seventies is when he became a door and became famous as doorman, and he continued doing that through the eighties while he was this like New York City pop icon also made it through the seven. Yeah. Hand through the eighties and then in nineteen ninety one he was diagnosed with aids shit. Yes. The sticky. Wow. His very tragic. This is not okay. Yeah. And like. From being to aids HIV now are not a death sentence. But they were then, and I also more than that than not more than that. But but on top of that like, it was a even more homophobic world. And so like, it was just tragic. I don't know I'm not going to be able to if you don't know this -tory aids. I'm not going to be able to tell it to you. But I would recommend anybody like really look into the story of the aids quilts, totally before your movie, the normal heart. It's like sad. It's just you know, but it's good to know. Dude. Also, you know, it's like was really cool watch as far as like gay culture in the eighties nineties as a person who wasn't a part of it. It was a little bit is the is the the assassination of Gianni Versace CI FX series hasn't seen that. It's like you should watch Netflix. Now, it's so good. And I didn't realize how much it was going to be about. Gay culture in the ninety s which was cool for me to watch. But yeah, it was like, I don't know the world was not good to you. If you had aids vampire, and so his so his reaction was very extreme. He was like fuck this. Okay. I want to say something before I tell you. It's I wanna say something real quick. We got an Email from someone awhile ago. And the the subject line of the Email was suicide is not DIY euthanasia. It's from a person who has a chronic or terminal illness. I believe it's they've chronic illness that causes chronic pain. They don't have a terminal illness. And what they basically said in the Email was, and I the reason I'm not reading it as I don't know if you want it doesn't seem like you want me to oh you can. Yeah. You can read my Email on the podcast, but don't use my name. Okay. Well. Spirit of brevity. I'm just going to sort of summarize it can read it later. But. Basically what they say is it I have chronic illness. And it bothers me how you talk about people who have chronic illness and kill themselves because it makes it sound like your saying. Suicide is euthanasia and youth Aneka is a medical treatment for a disease, and she is right. She's right about that. And she was saying that the David Rymer episode, particularly it sounded like the Lang to her it sound like the language. We were using was saying like that you should kill yourself. If you're in pain, because we that's way way out or something that we think is valid and I have been wind to say this for awhile. I don't feel that way. I really don't feel that way. I don't think anything I think that you should stay alive. I think your life is so worth it. No matter how much pain you're in because we all deal with pain and your chronic illness. Like, I see you. You know, what I mean, I stay here with us. The reason that we talk about it this way isn't because I ever think it's good that these people kill themselves grand cents. It's because suicide is such a delicate subject that we have to manage multiple things we have to manage on the one hand. Not letting anyone who listens to our podcast think that we endorse suicide because we don't we like we need you to stay here. Never do it. That's never our message. But at the exact same time, we don't want to invalidate people suicidal thoughts because we're trying to make people feel better and help them. And so it's tough to ride that line when we talk about things like this because we're like trying to at the same time say stay here with us. But also your pain is valid. So if in navigating those waters, we have made it seem like we think suicide make sense for those people. I am deeply sorry. I really really am. Because I don't feel that way. And I'm almost crying as saying this that I could have possibly made someone feel like I think they should die. Like, I don't feel that way. It's just very difficult because. To have a podcast where we're talking about understanding pain. It's stuff to talk about. And I'm sorry. I mean, we're we're clumsy. We're also done and we're not professional a big. So I don't think guilty of any crimes because I'm done. To them. You know, I think I'm not really trying to tell anybody how to feel about it. And usually my kind of take away with all these just to really not put too much judgment on whatever their reasons are exactly it's like, you can't really know. And that's the thing. That's well says that's what I was trying to get to both both stay alive. Please God stay alive. But also, we don't wanna put judgment on how you feel. And so that's why especially we say like we understand where you're coming from. And if saying we understand where you're coming from sounds like you should do it. That's not what we mean. Ever. I promise you also ever tried just chilling. The least helpful. I don't know maybe just take a chill pill. It does sound like us talking about it at all maybe trigger you, and it's a very triggering podcast. So like just please like in hearing talk about these things remember try to remember that we're coming from a place of trying to keep everybody safe in every way. And so we don't want to be any judgment for real was that especially the listeners for real for real for real. We really do like. So that said he got aids, and he was like I wanna die. And I think that's good bomber. To run a podcast. Dave over to my left. You're talking about how we would ever do that. How air style turn it into a cat over on my right? Neither don't think. That's good. Good repeat. I don't think. That's good. Yeah. But that's that's how he reacted. And it's like, and this is kind of what I'm talking about. It's a hard line. Right. It's hard to not to be like, I understand you're paying especially if you're living in a world where everyone's like fuck you if you're gay if you have aids your gay so fuck you twice. Ever straight outta Compton? When they the doctors telling easy has aids, but he doesn't it very well out. Hey. Hey, well, wait ago. Blew it. Yeah. No, one can talk to them. It's just like no one will visit. It's so fucking sad, dude. Yeah. No one people. They're all these scenes in movies. I've seen where it's like. Dallas buyers club. No. All of his friends are like you have aids. Fuck you all loses is entire friend group. Yeah. So this is what he did June seventh. He invited of bunch of people to his house for a party on June, seventh nineteen ninety one it's birthday party. It's your darling. We love you, very very very very very much since this started humming. And it was all out. This is very interesting. And then twenty people came to his suicide party. Holy. Yeah. Wow. So a lot of people who didn't did they know is going to be. Yes, they knew decided Vicky invited a lot more than twenty people and twenty people came and one of the people that attended the party by phone was Madonna. Actually, he invited away less and a lot more show, which is even weirder. A Facebook event the flyer. Free pizza here. I saw this on chuckle monkey. That's a reference. No one will understand maybe not even Hampton ninety than me. But it was the open mic list in the early. Two thousands chuckle monkey dot com. No, I didn't get the before. Alan the beckon comedy bureau. Boy got saved by bureau. Gour? So he's people come and he throws a party there. Like, there's like, dancing, and drinks and food and drugs and everybody gets fucked up, and then he takes five like in front of everybody is like by takes five second all and goes to sleep. And then the rest of the people continue partying kind of goes to, you know. Sleep. Yeah. But yeah, you passes out into slumber and everyone's like shit. Okay. Were partying him into the after. King Burson deep into the night. He fucking wakes up and people are still partying. The five off dead. It's a lethal dose. But it didn't kill right. You wakes up, and he's super fucked up people are partying and they've destroyed his house, and so he wakes up, and he's like fuck you for destroying my house. Why'd you destroy just like bitches everybody out weird. And then takes twenty-second all in dies. That's how this fucking do died. From. Fuck as into just die. Let's like a pelican amount of pills. Yeah. You can't swallow that I want. So it takes several okay. Just keep going from a minute of eating pills. They took all hundred aspirin. I'm like, she's what did they take him four days? So hard to get that build on my throat hard pills to swallow. It's hard to to take pills in order for me. Yeah. How bills did he put him in just put him at the bottom of his bowl? Makes cereal. Committed suicide. Well done. Fucking in saying, yes. Surprised? I mean, here's the thing that it's cool part of me wants to be like, that's cool cool store. But a part of me also like it is I would be really I don't think I could ever not think about how my friend killed himself in front of me. I know even though I'd be like I knew it was gonna die. But I would just be I think, well, let's the weird underlying thing this entire story. Like, we're I'm listing. All these details about this, dude. All we're talking about is how cool it is. 'cause this whole story sounds so cool. But then you take a step back. Like, basically, this guy just did drugs for decades and was famous for that for doing drugs and helping other people do drugs correction by doing drugs that best. Yeah. And so then he killed himself in this really dark fucking disconnected way. Everyone in that room was disconnected from real life to such an extent that they watch their friend. I and kept partying. That's why it's disco dude. It's disconnected from reality. It's just go. It's not disc. It was actually originally called. No, what's I guess. He couldn't. Couldn't get rid of the party culture. Yeah. It's a party knows how to express himself. Yeah. I guess or I guess like twenty I was just I don't wanna put a judgment on it. I just judging on it. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe it was like literally, maybe it's maybe it was like fuck. Maybe they just I wasn't that party. Maybe they were like, maybe there was all this crying, and everyone is constantly and they were like wool. But we and maybe everyone in that room truly felt like he had no other option. I don't know. And then he woke up and started yelling at us that we left a bunch of ships out. And we were like, oh, yeah. He. He must have dead like you. Checking all is like. It's like a tranquilizer. Right. Isn't it? I don't know what it is. I haven't done many tracks. I've only done Vicadin is that the tranquilizer, oh it is sleeping pill. Fuck okay. So we took five you should probably done more. If you're yeah. Totally done this drug culture for so long. Maybe just maybe should I do should I take a little league? I don't wanna overdose. I just wanna die. I'm gonna make cigarettes and we'd. Watch out. I'm gonna mix vodka with a little bit of nutmeg. Nutmeg? Yeah. Wow. Dude. That's crazy. So wait, he invited Madonna and she didn't come and she was like, oh, I have a thing. But I'll call it. I'll Skype I'll Skype into your suicide party, basically Lord. I mean, it was nineteen ninety one. She was pretty busy. Is point. That's why she's fucking vanilla ice. Fuck. Lucidly at the time is busy wrapping with turtles. Man. Yeah. It's weird. Isn't it? These these episodes we do where where it's like. I don't know this just tough where the life is very interesting, and it seems like a lot of fun. And then they go and a crazy way. It's like there's a lot of jokes to be made. And and there's a lot of like interesting story to talk about. But then you come around to like, I mean, it's still tragic. It's just always is like always would have been better if he had stuck around. Yeah. I mean for sure I mean, w if he hadn't got debilitating disease, but it's also like, you know, try and come to some of these stories with just understanding, and you're like, I have empathy for that. Totally. I like hearing that story because it also is very human. You know, sometimes like people do have these very exceptional lives that are kind of like, wow, they're crushing it killing it. And that's not like the takeaway the story. But it's like it's just interesting to. Always see these dimensions of people's lives. And how. Sometimes you can understand it. And sometimes you can't understand it. But you have to come at it with empathy. Human beings. It is very hard to outwardly show empathy for everyone, and like it's actually not difficult for you to do personally, but it's hard to be perceived as that definitely because right? Talking about because I say, I totally empathize with this dude who wanted to kill himself. And then someone else could be like are you saying I should kill myself. I mean, no, no, I'm not. Play the podcast backwards. That is what we do tell you it, syncs up instantly. Dude. Pink Floyd's, the wall, syncs perfectly with pink Floyd's dark side of the movie, you told me that came out later that the wall was about Roger waters girlfriend who dumped him. I'm going to have to go on this is that you. Yeah. I I've been thinking a lot about it recently. God I want that to be true so bad. This like epic thing that everyone who ever went to college is like he's talking about the system and just turns out he was said bring about building a wall between you and your your wife, and then she leaves you. See all the problems now to mean different things just break-up sometimes Walzer about immigrants than sometimes. It's about feelings, dude. Dude, I'm going to build a wall and make my wife pay for it. Being alone. Great again. That's what you got. I'm gonna make being loan. Great again, the new system PS four. I'm playing my new system. I really enjoyed that episode. Thanks so much for bringing. Thank you, man. Yeah. That was good. I hope listening. You got something out of it. You maybe feel a little less alone, a little less sadder or whatever scares who was tied horny less suicide less. A little less full little content. A little less conversation and guys check up patriots episodes that we're putting up lots of fun bonus content up there. Oh, dude kills himself predator. What movie? Risk cutter. The risk cutter. Predator does kill him. So yeah. Let's episode predator. Cool. Yeah. We're we two bonus episodes with both of us for the five dollar patrons each week. It's patriot dot com slash suicide buddies. We're going to that right now the sewed will be about the suicide in predator and. Yeah. I don't know. Just thank you guys for listening alive. Guys, check out tour dates albeit and Seattle may twenty fourth and twenty fifth, and then Dave and together in Portland may twenty six but feel free to check out rotates. I'll put stuff on. On my website. Dave Ross dot com by the end of today. Yeah. And yeah, we wanna come up. All right. Let's do the fuck it. Dude, fun. Thanks bye. Thank you so much for listening to suicide buddies. Remember, these suicide jokes that we tell we do it because we are dark people that joke around about our own pain. And we hope that that'll help you make you laugh, it's not because we think people committing suicide is funny or that we take suicide lightly. So if you're dealing with suicidal thoughts, please please call the national suicide prevention lifeline right away. The number is one eight hundred two seven three talk. They're always there. They will hear you. And they know you've been through so call if you need it or reach out to people in your life, or whoever there are resources feel better stay here with us on earth. Glad you're alive and thanks again. For listening. Podcast network.

Dave Ross Zalba Portland New York City Seinfeld Madonna Michael chiklis Jeff Ross Carl Heston president Hampton America Mick Jagger Montauk David Rymer Politico MC Jagger Jagger James Gandolfini John Wayne producer
The Ultimate Science of Success Handbook

Stansberry Investor Hour

58:58 min | 1 year ago

The Ultimate Science of Success Handbook

"Wjr Broadcasting from Baltimore Maryland and all around the world. You're listening to the stands berry investor our Tune in each Thursday on I tunes for the latest episodes of the stance berry investor. Our sign up for the free show archive at investor. Our DOT COM. Here's your host Dan Ferris Hello and welcome to the stands Berry investor our. I'm your host Dan Ferris. I'm also the editor of extreme value published published by stands Berry Research. Well dear listener of mine. This is it our last episode of Twenty Nineteen and what a year it's been you know the stock market up like twenty seven percent or so here still twelve trillion of negative yielding bonds in the world. US House representatives is trying to impeach the president. It would only be the third time in our history and I mean it's been a little crazy hundred under twenty thousand Dollar Bananas This guy that we talked about last time Hussein by by it all by it. There's no such thing as riskin can stocks. It's getting a little weird great here and stocks a little weird overall now. It would be sort of typical to to do a look back at two thousand nineteen right the typical thing. I don't want to take the typical look back at the markets. Anybody can look back to what happened in various price movements and markets markets and. Make up a reason. Why tell you what it means? But you know it's all it's all backward-looking we know where we are. I mean I've certainly talked about it to death you know. And it's a kind of a typical mostly useless sort of an exercise. Although there are a few sort of annual looks back that that are kind of valuable to me one by a guy named Dave column who you can find on twitter at Dave Columcille L. L. U. M. and he. He publishes a nice look back. So you know go read his look back and just leave it at that. And then there will be a Zillion more looks forward to twenty twenty and it's all kind of useless exercise because what happened happened. What's going to happen? Nobody knows so. What should we do instead? Well this week I will look back but I'll look back at all the non investment topics. We looked at this year which we got a lot of great feedback on. I have to say people really early enjoyed this stuff because all of that stuff is probably much more timeless it can help you not only become a better investor but also become. I'm a better person. Hopefully a happier person and yes you know. Hopefully a wealthier were to write. We spoke with a lot of guests who dealt with a lot of different sort sort of general life wisdom topics and how fitting the first one of two thousand nineteen was Shane Parrish from the Farnam Street website. Eight who we spoke with during episode eighty four published on January the tenth among other titles. Shane is the wisdom seeker of Farnam. Street read Awebber site. He started anonymously while working for an intelligence agency. We spoke with Shane about a variety of topics. The most important one in my mind being mental mental models the mental. Toolkit we use to understand the world. Shane lists are hundred thirteen mental models on his website. I'd say that makes him an expert on mental models okay and he came out with a book. This year called the great mental models volume one general thinking king concepts. It's the first by a five volume series that they intend to do at Farnam street. I have on my shelf. It's a highly readable resource that deals with nine general thinking sort of mental models. The very first chapter is called. The map is not the territory. That's the first mental model. He discusses losses as the map is not the territory. It's sort of explains itself quite well. Doesn't it the model you have in. Your head is not not reality. And what perfect. What a perfect way? What a perfect I model to start off with in in the book series that he's doing and and I sure wish the folks modeling risk and mortgage securities had taken heed of this back before the financial crisis? Right if they had we might have avoided voided crisis and and other things too. You know like long term capital management. They were modeling. Bond markets in a certain way and they didn't behave that way and they blew the the heck up. Shane says his work is about learning about the world in a multidisciplinary way it's about applied thinking thinking about thinking is is what he told us I highly recommend is book has website his work. It's a great way to learn to think about the world and by all means check out that episode episode the very next episode after that one with Shane. Parrish was episode eighty-five published on January Eighteenth. That's when we interviewed Aaron Edelheit. Aaron is an entrepreneur investor. Who wrote a book called the hard break? The case for a twenty four six lifestyle which advocates taking one day a week off from work email and smartphones to be more productive and healthier more creative and have a more satisfying happy life. I read this book and and I decided that I would not work on Saturdays anymore. When you work at home like I do you get into into this? Rut where you feel guilty if you're not always working every single day of the week because you're working always just a few steps away and it's kind of beckoning to you all the time fine. But that's really unhealthy. So I decided I'd just take one day every week and Saturdays it and I've stuck to it and it's made me not less productive but more war productive. I know that no matter what. I'm always going to honor my need for a hard break for a day of rest once a week. So you know I can really push harder on the other days. I also try not to work past five o'clock but that's harder I get up at five in the morning and tried to work no later than seven so five. IPM's ten hour day. That ought to be enough. If it's not enough maybe I should do something else reliving Aaron talked about his own struggle with being a workaholic which really messed messed up his health. While you're wound up in hospital messed up his relationships he talked about how stressed out he was because his fund was down just five percent in two thousand and three the year the DOT COM bust bottomed out. He also talked about how he started. Buying rental homes after the housing bubble blew up including including one year when he individually bought two thousand times. I mean that's a lot of homes that's like what one five a day or something as ridiculous so yeah work a holic and our conversation just let us into all kinds of areas for example we talked about a phenomenon called the garner effect. Aaron Erin said quote it's from Bloom Garnic. A Soviet psychologist who noticed that waiters could immediately remember unfinished orders but had trouble trouble remembering completed orders. A restaurant and this has been duplicated a number of times and if you think about the modern email and the tasks they're they're always unfinished tasks so this is part of that were of technology of e mail notifications and there's constantly someone to reach out to respond to something to do. And that's why you're always on the phone and that's why it's so exhausting. End Quote when the flip side of that. I have to interject here. A similar effect is discussed in a book. I recommended called how we learn by Benedict Carey and carry notes. That when you're practicing your Violin L.. Enter your peony oil or studying for your test or doing work or whatever you should stop when everything is clicking in your all warmed up not after. You feel like you've done everything you wanted to do. Cut Yourself off to get that side garnic effect of not having finished and it helps you remember and it keeps it alive in your memory. Umbrian much of learning is just remembering so my point is this. I garnered affect our describe is a double edged sword but I think he can manage it to your advantage. Aaron's got a a great story. I strongly encourage you to read all about him in his book. The heartbreak which is one of the few titles. I keep right here on my desk. I've got a bow. Well I don't know eight hundred bucks in the office here now. I think and I've got just like maybe thirty five or so that I keep on the desk at all time at arm's length and the heartbreak is one of them all right so next published episode one Zero Three On may twenty third. It's called how to succeed in the stock market and in life and in this episode I discussed one of the most important of these mental models like recovered in. Shane Parishes episode sewed and and like he covers in his book and it's called Circle of competence. This is what I said. It's called circle of competence. This idea was created by Warren Buffett as a way to help investors stay out of investments. They don't understand now. Imagine a circle with a smaller circle inside of it the bigger outer circle. Well that's what you think. You know the inner circle is what you really no. It's a subset of that bigger thing that you're true circle of competence. That's what you really know. That's what I said on the episode. So circle of competence is a great way to reflect on you what your real strengthened skills and talents are and and what your limits are two right. That's what that circle is. It's a limit around your real talents and strengths. And I've struggled with this my whole life. I used to always always wanted to do more than I could realistically expect to do. And I was always saying. Yeah Yeah let's do it. Let's do more and you know things pile up and they don't work out the way you want. One example of how I've improved on. This is with my my interest in music. I'd love to play everything classical jazz rock blues. Show tune standards. Just everything everything. But I'm really best at classical guitar. That's what I studied in college. I've been doing it for what forty years now over forty years and and and not many people are really very good at it and at this point in my life. I'm playing pretty well and I can play stuff that nobody I know personally. These days could ever hope hoped to play. It's been a long time since hung out with lots of classical guitar player. So I'm sure you know I could quickly change things so that no longer be the best classical guitarist I know but the point is my current circle of musical acquaintances. You know. It's a random enough sample of musical. Humans and none of them are really good classical players so you know that that kind of lets me stand out a little bit and l.. Let's face it you know. Most people play the guitar not like a really good classical player so I feel like it's something I had to keep doing and because Huzzah that I've gotten better at it so I thought you know well right if this thing. Is You know most guitar players. Don't bother with it. That's pretty cool right so I focus on that and wouldn't you know it. It's helped me with those other styles because always cheat a little. I go into the next room. Picking my electric Har- every now and then and play some jazz and stuff stuff. So I can still dabble in those other things primarily because I pay less attention to them and the most attention to the one most suited to to me which also just happens to be the most demanding one technically allowing me to pick up techniques and other disciplines much faster so by giving up those other disciplines as a primary focus. I actually got better at them. A totally unexpected and fortuitous outcome resulting from me trying to figure Al What my true circles competences and trying to stay within the limits where most effective I think good mental models are like that they lead need to these non linear effects which is mostly a fancy way of saying you never know where how they're gonNA benefit you. The unintended favorable consequences consequences. That practicing a good mental model can provide. There's also this other book that I discussed this year and recommended you read called models behaving saving badly by Emanuel German d. r. m. a. n. a physicist working as a Wall Street quantitative analyst among other things the book teaches you the difference between models models and full blown theories Durman writes quote theories offer us the most successful and accurate way to describe the physical world they are deep and difficult to discover. They require verification but no explanation they are right when they are right models however ever live in the shallows and are easier to find. They require explanation as well as verification. We need both types of understanding understanding and quote. I think that's really cool that we need both types of understanding and so you need to learn about theories and good models including these mental models his talking about like computer models and things but they had the same. They're the same rough thing as the mental. All models were talking about because they just kind of approximate reality and they're easier to find an theories you get it. It's IT'S PRETTY NEAT so one financial thing that I do want to sort of point you back to is episode one. Oh six published on June thirteenth. Where I talked about the basic sick mechanics of how to value a business? I think this was the most concise explanation I've ever given the basic idea behind the valuation. Work we do in the extreme value newsletter published by stands. Barry of course which I write with a guy named Mike Barrett who does some really good work and and that work that we do there. It's unlike anything done by any other. Publication at stands berry we do real deep bottom valuation work what most other people do is like relative valuation. They do kind of pricing where they say you know the P. of this company is ten the PT of all the other companies in. This space is twenty. This one has some upside like that. We don't really do that. We we assess bottom up valuation in a completely different way which I think is really really valuable. I think you have to learn to do something like it to be effective in the stock market. All right next in episodes one eleven and one twelve episode one eleven. We spoke with poker champion author. Annie Duke who wrote a book called thinking and Bets and then episode one twelve. We spoke with someone who's actually a friend of hers. Michael Mova San who wrote a few good books to one of which is called the success equation untangling skill unlocking business business sports and investing and Mohsen gave his little tip on how to figure out if their skill involved in a particular activity. Instead of just luck he said you. Just ask yourself if it's possible to fail on purpose with roulette or slot machines. It's impossible to fail on purpose right. It's luck it's pure luck. There's no skill you can't fail on purpose with basketball and tennis and other sports as just you know one kind of example it is possible to fail on purpose. It doesn't mean luck isn't involved in those sports. It just means there's plenty of skill involved. As well and motion orbison did definitely affirm that with investing. It's better to be smart than lucky because over time investing skill will win out. Even if you're unlucky sometimes that right. That was the good news that we got from him. And Annie Duke dealt with some of those same issues like when she taught us how the great hand that you might be playing a game of poker has no bearing on the quality of the decisions. You'll make about it so the game involves some luck because if you're delta fantastic hand it's better than being delta garbage hand for sure but real success depends on your ability to make decisions and that's a real skill you can learn if you recall our interview with any Duke. She also came from a really competitive family. And I'm sure that didn't hurt her. Either okay so there's there's lots involved here but but that intersection of skill in lock. They both talked about it and it was really really an interesting and I think valuable conversation. Okay in episode. One Twenty three published October tenth a recorded the show in Las Vegas during the annual stands Berry Conference and in net episode. I really did like a podcast version of the presentation. I had done there which really covers a lot of my overall views on stock and bond markets and has a few funny bits in it that I think you'll enjoy to for example I did. I did my impression of the now former European Central Bank President Mario Draghi. I did my impression to these two German bankers. So if you WANNA laugh go back and listen to episode one twenty three and then in episode one thirty published on November twenty-seventh I talked about Henry Singleton an iconic investor and businessman and we talked about share repurchases which has become a very important topic today. A and you can go back and read the transcript. Listen to the episode. But the main point was that singleton pioneer share repurchases and later in his career noticed. Everyone was doing doing them so he said at the time. That must mean there's something wrong with it and it was right. Nobody does share repurchases as well as he did it with his sense of discipline he he issued stock which is really like selling it when his company shares were super expensive and he used the shares to acquire cash flow positive businesses then when the bear market came he used those ample cash flows to repurchase ninety percent of his company's stock which made the shares soar into the stratosphere this fear and created a huge multi bagger return and just overall though it's one of the most brilliant careers all finance and it's something you ought to know about that intersection of like the businessmen and the investor and there's a lot of other kinds of life lessons in it for you and pretty good account of Singleton's career in net is in a book called the outsiders by William Thorndike and that book has great chapters on seven other brilliant investor. CEO's does besides singleton including people. Like Tom Murphy Katharine Graham. Warren Buffett and John Malone and others you might not have heard of but also deserve your attention like Bill Spirits of Ralston Purina and Dick Smith General Cinema. And like I said it's it's it's a book look about investing but it's a book about business thinking too so it's pretty cool. Okay and one more really important thing now looking back over the year my favorite interview of the year was definitely definitely episode one. Oh eight published June. Twenty seventh guest was Albert Laszlo Bossy and he wrote that book called the Formula The universal laws of success and as I said during that interview. I read a lot of self-help books when I was young. Just trying to figure figure things out like everybody else but I wish I had not done any of that. I wish I'd had borrow Bossi's book the formula instead because his work has a solid scientific underpinning rooted in math and science of the math and science networks. which itself is rooted in something called graph theory that you know I don't know anything about out and and we had a wonderful conversation which I think is really super valuable to you and so you know we wanNA replay this this interview for you? I hope you enjoy it as much as as I enjoy doing it. We got a lot of great feedback. So I expect if you didn't get a chance to hear it the first time you want to hear it now and if you did the first time listen to it again man it's that valuable so without further ado let's replay are wonderful interview review with Albert Laszlo. Borrow bossy right now. I this is border stance Berry about twenty years ago. I I settled change financial services forever by creating stands by research providing our customers with high quality investment ideas at a very low price. Today I'm trying to change men's shaving and the same way I built the world's best razor it's called one blade uses the world's highest quality Japanese steel. It has all kinds of different innovations to make sure that you get a barber shop. Straight Razor Quality Shave at home safely with every shave gave every morning. I urge you to try our product. Our core razor starts at only nineteen dollars and for a limited time all Stanford Research Search listeners can also get twenty five percent off store-wide just go to. WWW dot one blade shave dot com slash stanbury drier product. You'll be glad you did. Today's guest is Albert Laszlo Borrow Bossy. He's the Robert Gray Dodge professor of Network Science and Distinguished University professor at Northeastern Turn University where he directs the Center for Complex Network Research and holds appointments in the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Central European in university in Budapest. A native of Transylvania Romania. He received his master's in theoretical physics at the forgive me for the pronunciation at Devos University in Budapest Hungary and PhD at Boston. University barbecues the author of bursts the hidden pattern behind everything we do linked linked the new science of networks. He is also the author of Network Science and the CO editor of the structure and dynamics of networks and network medicine the titles titles have been translated into more than fifteen different languages. His work has led to many breakthroughs including the discovery of scale free networks in which continues to make him one of the most cited scientists today Laszlo. Welcome to the program. Thank you for being here. It's a pleasure to be here. Thanks for inviting me so so Laszlo. The first thing we need to do is you're not our usual type. Guess we usually have people who manage money for a living. So let's just talk about what you do as housing network scientists. My Wife said networks people networks or computer networks and it's all networks right. All of Dub Bows Network Science manses Disciplined that was born about twenty years ago that tries to develop a language to think about all kinds of networks that provide our our life. And you know this is kind of grew out from the patient that just about everything we do we do to networks. We communicate through networks. Oh our friendship. Sent professional links can be really Perceived US whenever can have to be perceived as the network business ties are there but even are very biological existence is made possible by intricate metabolic and genetic networks within ourselves. And it's about twenty years ago. A movement has started in science to quantify these networks and hence today and I'm a network scientists who studied all all of these networks and many more. Okay no I wanNA talk mostly about your book the formula which I could not put down I. I think it's an excellent book and the first question I have for you is you said a couple of times in here. How the the the the book is about the laws of success? It's called the formula of the universal laws of success. Are we really talking about like the Law Law of gravity type laws. I mean that's what you say in the book is it's really that kind of a law. I tend to think it is. These are patterns that we extracted Gi by studying the career of millions of individuals. And if you are in the right conditions of your career we think you cannot avoid that hence they really elevate the level of loss now does not all laws always apply to us. You know as I'm walking around talking me too you know. Their new lease law doesn't apply to me. Take forty five star to fly which is a guy slow then. Suddenly the only reason airplanes can fly me is because the Bernudo law apply to us so fundamentally when these laws apply to you depends on the circumstances you find yourself often what these very generic patterns that like to all individuals at that stage of their career. Is it accurate to say that you basically study anything that behaves like a network and the phenomenon of success among human beings this is a very scientifically hard version of that. Success is a science a real science. Well we certainly would like to think so and And the reason why I got into this. Is that much the studies that we've been doing over twenty years focused on and how the network looks like how people in time and so on and about ten years ago we started to think of a complimentary problem. Okay I'm not. I'm not in the network. How does these snowed affect my success? Dot It's helped me does it fool me back and whether there might positioning the network would really turn me Mike Longterm success so we've entered through this question and then realized that if we want to ask for it we need to step back and address much deeper questions like what is success. What is performance? How do they relate to that? Yes so let's talk about the difference between Performance and success an ex you gave great examples of performance with Tennis players like And Golf you know. A WHO. Who'd you talk about Roger Federer and Tiger Woods. They're examples a great performance right. So what is interesting. Is that as we grow up. One of the things we learn in schools and running running soon everywhere else would work. We go is that you need to have performance have success in a way that performance really drives success so the question is was the difference between gun because in our will capillary. We often use it interchangeably. Thanks to the strong belief the relationship relationship between them and from a data perspective. Since I'm a network and they found is we have to be to distinguish them so out. Approach was relatively it was simple and straightforward performance. Is what you do. How fast you around? What kind of deals she put together? How do you invest your money but kind of paintings thank you paint however success is what does the community knocked loose from duck performance whether it technologies and whether very towards you for that in other firms your performance is about you but your success is about us we at the Community Guti Ward? You'll be success for your performance and from a data perspective. That's a very important distinction because s Lucy during discussion. Soon as they're now discussing the formula in many areas performance very difficult to measure a individual but success because it's a collective quantity it's easily measurable because moved to pull data points around you that pertain to your success. So measuring success and Success becomes the data problem. So let's talk about a concrete example. Let's talk about the difference between you know Tiger Woods and Roger Federer verses the artist you mentioned in your book Diaz and and Basquiat what's what's the difference. Sports is a very special area and kind of unique in terms of human performance. Because in sports we have very accurate measure performance. If you are around there I can. I have a chrome you can measure your speed and your speed uniquely determines remains how will you are regarded ser and indeed. We actually ended up analyzing the tennis players. Like Roger Old men and women's tennis players performance. How they do on the field as well as their success in terms of how many people actually followed them? How many people who visit their Viki? PD UP H how many people search for them on Google and so on and what we found is that in those cases performance uniquely determine the success that we were able to actually build a formula. That if I've plock thin where did federal play last week. Against whom and rather lost or one that formula tells me uniquely how many people went and visited. He's the page. So starting from a performance former measure we were able to very accurately predict a success measure which is careers if the about the particular player but as I said this is unique a unique to sports because in sports we have chronometers. We have accurate measures of performance. Most of us have ever leave in war in areas where performance is much harder to gauge. And this is not to say that you can distinguish good from bad but there are actually chilly many individuals with kind of comparable performance. Now coming back to your question you know. Sports is voluntary ever performance. It can be very extra measures. Other extreme were performance is inexorably impossible. To measure is arts. Is this microphone on the table in front of me. Is this an artwork. or it's purely a microphone for right now in front of me. It's a microphone if you see it on the pet surly Moma under a glass box. It's an artwork. Read you be able to look at the object and make distinguish whether it's an art or ordinary area object in contemporary art. That's actually possible so therefore you cannot use performance measures really see how what are does it all depends handsome context. And then then then you have to start developing other rules and tools and lost to describe how success emerges when performance performance is not measurable and I was fascinated by the difference between the two artists you talked about. John Michel Basquiat and his partner. was Aldea's and their work. Some of their works were virtually indistinguishable yet. We don't know nobody knows who diaz houses but lots of people know who bosque ideas and his work sells for millions of dollars. What what was the difference between the two of them? I'm glad you've kind of pointed out out indeed for me The other Diaz and bus Croats exemplar is a perfect example for what we call the for. A slop is that went. Performance can't be measured networks thrive success and indeed. We're dealing with which to artist. Who started their career together in the nineteen seventies in York nowadays their career to get there but they really worked? They're under one single name. The name Samuel and they did graffiti art and they did support about a year and a half when they broke apart and be into yours their trajectory completely diverged Diaz is still alive today working in the New York art scene. If you haven't heard about team there's a reason however bus Kat. Two years later paints a painting that became the most expensive painting sold by by an American artist a few years ago. And so what's the difference. Fundamentally networks when you look at the career of the two individuals rejoice under the approach art from performance perspective to say you know. It's about making the right awkward at the right place I've ever ever bus K.. Up immediately bickering is that he has to himself into the community of Artistic York and he befriended ended within a few months in trouble. Some of the biggest names so the artwork like Andy Warhol and and and actually moved in and leave didn't go grocery department who later on became of course today is the biggest art dealer out there so bus chaos has mastered the network doesn't really matter to death month into art galleries and other artists all Diaz however then you to approach are from a performance perspective perspective as trying to produce more and more worse and of course the difference is huge and what we did is that of course. The book doesn't only rely on anecdotes. I have had the possibility to get access. Thanks to MAGNA's thrash a gallery in New York and New York to an exceptional data. That allowed us to track the career of every single artists in the last four years Both America and abroad. Half a million archies where in the database we could fully reconstruct their career and what we found there that in case of artists were performances. Performance is unmeasurable. There's a heathen network of institutions that could be mapped out. We'd these data and that network uniquely determine their success and this was not only kind of finding that that that would determine their success. But we're able to turn that one into predict to such that if you give me your favorite artist name and the last five exhibition that he or she had. I can fast forward her career and tell you what level of institutions would actually be really excavating in ten or twenty years from now and the reason we can do so so accurately is because for four months is not measurable. All the predictive power is in the network. Were you are in the network module connected to what is the prestige. He's level of those institutions so art is a perfect example of the first law of the formula saying Ren performance is not measurable. Aw It's networks that determine success now I'd like to skip over if you don't mind The Second Law of success in your book which is performance formats is bounded but success is unbounded and I want to talk about the third wall which says that previous success times fitness equal future success. Can you tell me what's fitness. How do we define fitness? Sure The end before we go to fitness. Let's first talk about the previous lecture determine success and this discovered I made almost twenty years ago why we were studying the World Wide Web and trying to understand. Why do we have certain pitches pitches like Google and Yahoo Becca death time who had such an exceptional number of links from other websites? And why is my website Harley early acquiring any links from outside individuals and what we realized there is that the only way to explain mathematically medically what's happening and what drives the merger of these hubs and that is that is that success drives success that he's Damore links links. Serfdom backside has the easier is to find it and the more likely that it will actually require further links from other websites and and then we realized that this is not only unique to the world wide web but in all areas where you have some measure of success is through his socially through four Ramani people kind of tend up acquiring money in proportion to how many already had if nothing guess that's what compounding interest is. It's seems to be true also for scientists how they acquire impact that the number of citations might papers get is proportionate to how many got in the past. Now the problem with this rule is that it just simply says if you have a lot you get more. Well how do you get the lot to begin with and weakness comes along because we realize that there are differences between besides some sites like Google are acquiring links much much faster yesterday in mind not only because they have more links but because they offer services are more desirable to the public at large than say. What my website website offers and so we named his differences fitness fitness is the link the notes ability to acquire more links the person's ability to acquire fire more money during more money Your the acquire more France and the way this works is that you know how popularity Jio determines how easy you are to find but once I fund you. It's your fitness that determines whether on the link to you whether I wanNA give money to you without would I wanna become friends with you. Were the right to paper which us a scientist so what so really and fitness is unique to each individual. And it's not it's something that US and individual determine but it's something that the community assigned to you based on what you have to offer to the community and this fitness is actually measurable in many contact with the words. What's fitness website and therefore we arrived to disturb law saying it's preview success assist times to fitness that? Determine your future success that if you have low success to begin with high fitness you will acquire links faster and could be very very successful that you have a high level of sexes. Before whatever your fitness drops then you will actually stop growing and you will stop doc actually acquiring for door links or further money. And so on. And and the occult we slow down so Laszlo fitness to me. Sounds like it's another way in which you're saying. This is the networks assessment of your your performance or your fitness. They sound very it. Sounds to me like it's the network saying whether or not you're you're good enough whether or not your performance is good enough. Is that accurate. Absolutely no absolutely absolutely so. It's a measure that the community assigned to you and it's really a competitive measure. How much more attractive you lard and the person next to you and of course? This doesn't happen by simply comparing pair by by before but simply if you have a large community was choosing between in different individuals it's been different services before different songs. They through their joint action. They slowly start. Assigning fitness to each note wrote and that fitness which is not written on any of that but it kind of measurable eventually determine their girls rate right and it depends ends on the network is looking for for example. You know if people like a good female singer to also be very pretty a better female singer singer who isn't as pretty might not be deemed as fit certainly but also depends Linda. Bit Of what community are looking looking at the drive. So I'm I'm sure that my parents generation would assign a completely different fitness measure to Britney Spears Song than my generation ormat children's generation right so so the fitness is kind of incorporating these subjective judgments about whether I like it or not but because because so many people are voting on on the object or anew at the end there's a unique number that allows me to say how fast you would be going in depth but Kareem were one of the things that gets me about the emphasis on previous success. When I got to that point in the book I was kind of depressed because I thought well you know? I've had some success us but maybe Maybe not so much. Let's say but you give me hope with your fifth law and I'm skipping the fourth one for now we can get back into it you you give me hope with a fifth law because this law is with persistence. Success can come at any time even late in life. No I'm so glad at the John Deere because that's who really my favorite law and let me give you some background just past fifty and because and based on old data Out there my chance of creating that innovation writing research papers that would overcome my earlier work so typically as close to zero. What do I mean by that? It means that when you look at the career of high performing individuals there is overwhelming data to indicate that many people make their most important discoveries contributions to society to art relatively early in their career in their twenties and thirties and and this is so severe and soper system that I signed once claimed that the scientists who doesn't make his big discovery by the age of thirty would never do so so the question we asked well. That's certainly very bad news for me because it suggests that really. I should stop up doing what I'm doing. which is running lab and trying to make new discoveries and publish them and maybe I should just write books? You sound. Sounds like you're like my book. Maybe that's my next career because the chances are of making a discovery that would be bigger than I did before it's close to zero. Well we were curious. Let's look at the data and and let's not only look at genius is. Let's look at everyone else. Cough South's is it's really true that only young people tend to be nomadic so we analyze life for example all the careers of all scientists from nineteen hundred to today all disciplines and wigwam front that seems to be the case that is most. We'll scientists ride their most important paper whether that's a noble prize-winning discovery or something that no one remembers ten years later. I they do still sort of people in their kind of like you know ten roughly ten years or the beginning of their career which is what we call deck cage so we confirmed what believe that was out there for a long time but then we're data fan too so we started looking a little bit more carefully the data and look for the placebo effect. What would happened punt if I make my discovery completely around? That is what happens if any of the papers that I ever could be the most important people of career what happens if any of the business deals you put together could be the most important business deal for your career. What is completely random in the space of the deals news of the papers? You're right and so and so we said let's see what happens to the pizza for Endo Careers and Dr Surprise with your life indistinguishable distinguishable from the real ones and wants to make this long story. Short what would realize is. That's really what changes during the career is not not the creativity but the productivity that is young people tend to lots of projects out and as they H. The number of project decreases the TR- there. People are not trying any longer however what we show is that each project the Science Bryant puts out as exactly the same probability to be the highest success project in his or her life so a little bit. You know discovery is like buying lottery tickets. You know every lots to get has roughly the same chance of winning but if you buy most also for lottery tickets when you're young. It appears that you have to be young when you win the lottery. And he's appears that all people cannot leave. GALOP win the lottery so the end. What the fiscal does it summarizes really the key discovery that we made a few years ago in my lap? Yep that's really innovation is not about age innovation is about persistence and does individuals who keep trying can can be truly innovative. veritably lead in their life and my favorite idol in that space example is what I discussed into Formula John. Flat Johnson is a scientist who was a chemist and he worked at university and at age. Sixty five or seventy actually. He was forcefully retired by the university in the eighties seventies and eighties when there will still retirement higher Monday jr and and he was full of energy so instead of actually retiring and leaving his lead because they they closed down he moved onto another university Virginia Commonwealth University Stock Research Lab and it was was there where he published his greatest discovery of his life about electro spray ionization. That fifteen years later at age each eighty five lend team the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. And I don't want John Flint especial. I think John Plant is just an example of an individual who simply believe creativity doesn't Wayne with age and he just kept trying and I'm trying and trying and he's just actually passed away a few years ago at age ninety something and you know three days before he passed breath away he was still in the lab working on the next research paper. So that I take. That's a message of great hope for me because I'm almost I'll be sixty sixty three years and I really have no interest in slowing down at this point Anna and you. You're giving me a lot of hope that my efforts will not be in vain because success could come at any time but this topic is really good for investors. Isn't it because you know by portfolio stocks not knowing which one will be the best performer if we knew that we only by that one so we buy portfolio. Because we we and we persistently you know change. The portfolio over time never knowing which investment will become our greatest investment. But the point is to stay in the game To survive and stay in the game. It's a wonderful message. Absolutely and if I may add something to that before you think that this is only something apply scientists. I think twice because after the formula was published a colleague of mine to colleagues from Northwestern University and MIT have looked at the age effect for the funders of the start companies. And if you WANNA think of one area where really youth really dominate. They that's silicon valley right and the belief that you have to meet your needs to start the next phase will and you know that's certainly to some degree through and held very closely by the community. Because if you look at The biggest silicone valley war. They all go to people in their late twenties or early thirties. And when you look at the major firms the major five perms and as distribution old with the funders of the company. They support for the first time. It's late Twenties early thirties. So there's a deeply held belief that if you WANNA make it in the city going belly you need to start early and you need to be successful yet. What my colleagues have done is they look at the non? Only what age each do they actually get these kids doing vestment but they also asked rude. They succeed that would accompany resold as an IPO or be sold Organi Pew so they measured success in terms so is there a successful exit and what they found that yes. A huge number of investments. Go to young people for the success. He's not staying with them and actually a fifty year. Old Thunder has about three times higher chance of having a successful exit than a tw- Thirty euro funder so yes. The belief is very strong. But it doesn't doesn't mean that actually leads to success. And and you know silicone valley is no different from the other areas over four months you have to keep trying INC and often. The biggest success is really come relatively age time so yes. The founders. Were young but they needed an Eric Schmidt to turn into Google goal yesterday. Wow that's great. I had never heard that before of Laszlo. Were were actually towards the end of our time here. So I I I usually like to ask you know if you could just leave our listeners with one thought about your work with success and networks. I realize realized asking a lot because you've done a lot of work made a lot of discoveries but if I ask you to leave them with one thought what would it be. The most important thing I learned from thrown the formula is really that your success is not about you but about us that is that if you WANNA be successful it's not knock enough to have performance. You really need to see how the performances bank achieve recording is in and And the community around around us and to me. That's a very humbling experience. Because I really helped me understand that everyday season I go for going forward wrote East. I care about successes that particular domain. And you don't always have to care but if you do care about success you need to go outside. Ended up yourself and look at your community because they are the key to your success. Don't hide your light under a Bushel. Absolutely thanks for having me. Okay Laszlo thank you so much and I hope we can have your own again some day. Are you working on another book. No after every book I I like to have a four five year your break so so yes I am working on the book but that's much more technical book not General Defense Writing with my former student Industrial Bank of beauty eighty per book about science of Science. That is really taking these ideas into the scientific place and rethinking how science works. Okay yeah well I guess we'll have to wait a few years for for another book like the full but it'll be worth it. I know thank you so much for being here Laszlo. It's my pleasure. Thanks for picking being death formula to feature in your podcast. Hey guys real quick I just WanNa tell you something. As host of the STANBURY INVESTOR OUR PODCAST. I also enjoy listening to other podcasts. It helps me figure out ways to to make the stands. Barry investor our a better experience for you one podcast. I really like is called. We Study Billionaires hosted by Preston Pitch and Stig Broder Sohn of the investors PODCAST DOT com. It's the biggest investor podcast on the planet enjoyed by thousands of listeners listeners. Every Week Preston in Stig interview legendary billionaires like Jack Dorsey founder and CEO of twitter and Payments Companies Companies Square and billionaire investor. Howard marks whose book the most important thing of recommended dozens of times sometimes Preston and stakes spend the whole episode reviewing lessons learned from billionaires? They've studied like Dell computer founder. Michael Dell Tech Industry Maverick. Peter Tail and macro trader Stanley druckenmiller before starting the we study billionaires podcast Preston went to West Point Point and Johns Hopkins Founded Investment Company and his finance videos have been viewed by millions. Stig went to Harvard and worked for leading European energy trading firm. They're smart experienced. Investors who know the wealth-building secrets of billionaires is better than anyone and their listeners. Love it and I'm one of those listeners. Head over to the investors PODCAST DOT COM and check out we study billionaires with Preston Pysche and Stig Broder Sohn the investors podcast dot com. Check it out in our next episode which airs in January. I will you know again. Try to avoid. Avoid doing what. Everyone else does by making predictions about the coming year. You know it's kind of silly to make predictions what I'll do instead. It'll sound l. like predictions. But what I'm really GONNA do is. I'm going to start out by figuring out what expectations appear to be baked into the financial market. Right right at that moment and then we'll try to figure out based on that you know what would the opposite thing look like what would surprise the market cricket in Twenty Twenty and yes I got that idea from a guy from blackstone named Byron Wein. Who every year for like? I don't know thirty years or something. He's put out his this ten surprises for the coming year and hit but his surprises really like predictions. And I'm not GONNA do that. I'm going to say this is an alternative scenario that is not baked into securities prices. Right now so like I'm not going to predict you know who who's GonNa be the next president or or things like that like he does. I'm just going to do something a little different. I think it'll be a lot of fun. And it will fulfill this part of our mission Russian that I think has developed into a really good conversation with us about things that go against what you might believe right. You're you're looking for alternative the ideas. Maybe you're bearish like me. You gotta look for things that would result in the market going up right and and you know that goes for any of you that you might have. Some people like to say that you should have a strong viewpoint loosely held. I definitely have a strong viewpoint. But it's kind of loosely held because I'm ready to be wrong about it. So that's what we'll do. We'll look ahead and we'll say you know how. How could the market be wrong right now? In twenty twenty money as things play out over the coming year. I hope that sounds like fun to you. I'm really looking forward to it and it's been a really great year for me here. Thanks to you without is out you. This podcast is not worth doing. I'm really grateful and you know as tired as it's become to say this I'm humbled by the many listeners. Download and listen every week. Thank you very much for helping to give me a purpose in life. It is really truly a privilege to come to you this this week every week. I know your time is precious. I'm thrilled that you've chosen to spend these weeks here with us for an hour every week. So on behalf of PODCAST podcast producer. Justin Mattis an engineer. Greg baths I thank you for listening. We have some really cool interviews lined up for for the coming year including including like some honest to goodness. TV Stars you probably know more about financed a lot of people in the finance world and we'll have that in a lot more in twenty twenty. I hope you had a great 2019 and happy holidays. I will talk to you next year. Remember go to. WWW DOT investor our dot com and and sign up. Put your email in there and you'll get all the updates and send us lots of feedback questions comments politely worded criticisms and go to apple. I tunes download stanbury investor. Our give us a like that will push us up in the rankings. Invite more people like you into the conversation Shen which is always a good thing so I will talk to you next year. Bye Bye for now. Thank you for listening to the stands Berry Investor Fester our to access today's notes and received notice of upcoming episodes go to investor our dot com and enter your email have a question for Dan send them an email at feedback and investor our DOT COM. This broadcast is provided for entertainment purposes. Only and should not be considered personalized investment advice trading stocks locks and all other financial instruments involves risk. You should not make any investment decision based solely on what you hear stands Berry investor hours produced by stands Berry Research and is copyrighted by stands Berry Radio Network.

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September 16: Smoking gun

As It Happens from CBC Radio

48:57 min | 5 months ago

September 16: Smoking gun

"I'm Justin link host of the village from CBC podcasts for years men were vanishing from Toronto's Gay Village The community had always suspected a serial killer and in the end they were right called a podcast that transcends true crime by the New Yorker and recommended by the Atlantic and esquire find the village on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is. PODCAST. Hello. I'm Carol and I'm Chris Hayden this is as it happens the podcast edition. Tonight Smoking Gun Former California Governor Jerry Brown tells us the fire is in his State are the direct result of inaction on climate change and that Canada should get ready for a wave of American climate refugees not in vain. Our guest lost his wife, his kids and his mother-in-law in the crash of a Boeing seven thirty-seven. Max, now, a new report from the US Congress giving the Toronto man hope that their deaths could help change the airline industry. Will be served chilled as restaurant owners wonder how to get through the winter. One restaurant tour hopes his customers will warm to the idea of all season Patios in Winnipeg surround sound a sailor whose vote was encircled and then attacked by orcas off the coast of Spain describes their seemingly coordinated assaults in the eerie noises that came with it at the moment that when video director Uncle Ralph mcdaniels describes. Last night's auction in New York where among others storied items from hip hop history biggies plastic crown on the block and getting the show on the road by getting over the snow on the road. New York state announces that successful remote learning means no snow days this school year development with chilling implications for cold weather tradition as it happens the Wednesday edition radio that would take any force in a store. He knew California would face a climate change reckoning Jerry. Brown. Didn't think it would come soon. The former California governor and longtime lawmaker is now the chair of the California China Climate Institute and living on a ranch north of Sacramento seeing his State on fire has led him to speak out about the ongoing emergency and to look back on what could have been done differently to tackle the climate crisis we reached Jerry Brown in Williams California. Mr Van would have you seen and fell to the fires where you are north of Sacramento. Well. Would I feel at this very moment is the barrier here are the smoke the material that is blowing? All over our sky and and the whole atmosphere. into the fires came within about seven. Of My ranch where I am today out in the country we're living your off the grid in an old a stagecoach stop. Getting more. It's a little more smokey right now it's been this way for almost a month. There fires on all sides and So there it is makes it very difficult to function because to. And breathing in this era has chemicals and I can hear it in your voice. I mean everyone we have interviewed in your state has had that scratchy sound. How is it affecting you physically? I feel fine My wife gets a little depressed by because she's runner and get run in this kind of weather. So it's quite a vivid display of the power of nature and what we can expect. Increasing, doses over the next few decades, and that's really the big takeaway. It's not just what's happening now, which is horrible enough. But that because of the continuing emission of billions and billions of tons throughout the world of co two and other greenhouse gases it's GonNa get worse. So all around what has been predicted for twenty years is now coming home the chickens are coming on. and talking about responsibility for that because as you know, you've what you presided over the state governor for two terms. This is the state for those who visited there. We'll find it in your cities. You have vast urban sprawl freeways choked with commuters, air-conditioned houses, how much responsibility for the if you're talking about climate change being major cause of this or fuel for this how much responsibility do people in the state have to accept? Or a hundred percent not just the state all over the planet but we're a part of that. Seven point seven billion, the whole industrial process that creates our well being has the dark side that is radically altering the climate. And that's the way it is and it's California. Yes and our lifestyle. Yes. But. It's also the failure of the leaders of the world and Canada for years was a climate denier earn the previous premiere of their and American now's going in horrible direction with trump and even in China where. Trying to meet the Paris accord, they're building new coal plants all the time. Right. But so you were one of those leaders as your ten years government in lawmaker. Do you feel there was more that you could have done more that you should have done to prevent this day from coming? No. I did everything humanly possible in fact, most people did too much now wasn't enough tow. It's not enough but I'm telling you as a guy who's been around the political world for fifty years I pushed the politicians to the limit. The fact is the political class in America with maybe a twenty percent exception does not want to make the hard decisions because they cost money either require a price on carbon and require regulations that constrain the way we're functioning today. You know that President Trump insists these fires are created or fueled by bad forest management in your own state does he have a point? He is a very good point. I will have to say it's his responsibility in the first instance because the federal government owns sixty percent of the forest in California. But yes, as governor we there's something we didn't do enough of yeah. There's a lot of culpability to go around. There's a lot of support also for Donald Trump when he says and what he believes is that there's climate changes is not the cause of this that he has said in recent days in on the coast he said that the. Cooler just watch He says, he doesn't think the science science knows what's going to happen a lot of people believing what he's saying in California's support that. So how do you? How do you turn this around? If there's that level of climate change skepticism? Well, that's a good question. We may not turn around hopefully the first sign of our doing is whether or not trump is defeated. That'd be the first step by the way If he says things are to get cooler, he's right because winners coming. But if he means, we're not going to have these heat cycles driven by climate change. Then of course, he's wrong and what? The tragedy here is the wealth that we enjoy a human beings as taken. On an annual basis, forty, billion tons of co two and greenhouse gases, and we're increasing not decreasing. So we need some radical change and has to be everywhere, and that's GonNa take an awakening that hasn't yet occurred like I would say these fires have done more to alert Americans to reality endanger of global warming than anything else in my lifetime. A lot of people in your state are talking about whether they should leave whether this is the right place for them to live because we're now they're now understanding this is going to be possibly an annual event. What do you say to those? WHO BELIEVE THEY SHOULD LEAVE? Have you considered it? Well, my wife reminds me that her grandmother was born in Canada and that we ought to be looking for some property because of this smoke doesn't clear. She doesn't think it's livable. So I would say that's a real possibility course Canada's not letting Americans in So we'll have to solve that problem. If you WANNA, have a little in Migration California which you may not want. But do you understand people might WanNa leave your state Oh. Yeah. They are leaving and when might we see you and your wife Immigration to Canada? I don't know that my wife she is more bothered. She's a runner. She does not like these bad air and by the way from the climate projections California, and the West in America is going to burn candidates can have a lot of Nice. Now nightspots it's going to have the water So yet you you'd better be on your guard because I, think you've got. Millions of people it. Maybe at your your way, you might tell them that we have had some devastating fires in recent years and that people in the cities of Canada and the West Coast are saying, they can't breathe out because of the fires in the US. So it's it's there's not many places to run at this point but you think people still becoming too to Canada. Oh yeah well. Life is migration. The people that came to north. America. Fourteen fifteen thousand years ago across the Ice Bridge they're on the move and human beings never stopped. We will leave it. There Mr Brown. Thank you. Thank you very much. I enjoyed this. Jerry Brown is the former governor of California. We reached him in Williams California and you can find more on this story on our webpage at CBC dot Ca Slash Ah. If you live somewhere where it snows for months on end, you might already be dreading how isolating it could be living through the winter during a pandemic and restaurant owners across Canada cold weather blows in a whole host of other concerns as well. Patio Service has been essential as diners returned to restaurants. So some in the industry are wondering how they're going to cope as the weather gets nasty. Mark Turner is the owner of the Amsterdam Tea Room and bar in Winnipeg? He has to close his patio after next month but he's hoping to convince people in his city that they should eat on Patios. Year round, we reached Mark Turner in Winnipeg. Mark can you just explain how you envision a patio in a restaurant in Winnipeg in the winter? Yes Winter Pachu in. Winnipeg it's very much kind of like I've been thinking about this for the last year or so is to have like a covered patio. So people can sit out if it rains if it snows, but also wish he limps as well. So do you see them huddled together under blankets Yeah. Actually finally off when we first opened the patio, we did have customer blanket that people would like wrap up in in we do like obviously like tea coffee, but we do like breezy bt's cocktails as well. Then people would just kind of wrap up and then have nice Jews and have that kind of winter cozy atmosphere which obviously can be can be tough when like minus thirty minus fourteen. But. When we dropped to like minus minus fifty, and then there's no wind, it's beautiful outside. Okay but I I know that Winnipeg irs have to forget how brutally cold it is in the winter otherwise couldn't continue. So are you just having a lapse of memory as to what? It's really like when you're faced with a a Winnipeg Winter It'll actually and when I remember my first year here because I moved here, six years ago I was chatting my cousin and a member of the first time it went down to minus headlines Twelve. And was like this is freezing this is really cold, but then it goes down to minus thirty minus loyalty when the weather goes back to minus ten, it was like this is beautiful. It's a warm outside was. Quite t shirts, but you know the. And I think now especially with the pandemic and a Lotta people still reluctant to come and dine inside. So people are looking for more reasons to still have that restaurant experience but the outside. So if we can provide them with an environment where they're comfortable then I think people is is definitely a good time that people are starting to come round and a great idea to push the outdoor winter patio. But officials have raised the potential safety issues with the idea haven't they that includes certain concerns that the lamps could be a fire hazard on semi-enclosed Patios are you concerned about that? not for the route I want to go down I don't want to use grow pain like kind of flame tanks I mean I've seen I mean I'm from Glasgow in Scotland Originally and I've done a lot of. Travel and living in other places in Europe and what you see a lot of is ten title like umbrella areas and they use these electric lamps got run switches as well. So the customer would press the switch. to give them like thirty minutes of He. So there's like no power wasted and then these ones I like a lot more secure and safe, and obviously what like city code employees qualify electricity everything I don't think I've got time to say this this year, but this is my long term goals. Now you know that this is this point not going to happen according to the city that the permanent Patios like yours have to close by the end of next month and the city has provided restaurants with more flexibility during the DEMOC. But how hopeful are you that you would actually be allowed to have a winter patio in Winnipeg? I'm always like I mean. Changes, good. slow as it's done like in the right way and like you said with safety measures in place I, think this is going happen overnight something that actually before it came to light on the news that something I've been thinking about when I was going to stop pushing the city this year as well. Said I really think this is going to happen this year. By something that I'm definitely gonNA keep campaigning towards and keep pushing over the years. But. I mean there's so many questions that you're going to have to try and solve not least among them that even if you had enough of an enclosed space with his heat and everyone huddled together under blankets I, mean there's still the issue of how do you make sure that this is Kobe free or how do you prevent people from from getting too close to each other with our patio We actually built dividers and then we've got enough distance in the middle the more the two meters apart. We've been actually very busy since we've reopened in the of July 'cause people feel safe and patio because they divided and we still have all about cleaning measures in place as well. So like. The each between customers. Adhering. Strictly to the manager of the health guidelines as well So I I'm not worried about. My customers being protected once we have the heat lamps and everything else. Without having the Patty without being able to do this, how bad do you think the winter is going to be for your? Business? Seriously, going to impact the business the patio right now with our capacity in capacity inside the patio makes up seventy percent of our revenue. So it's something. That will obviously concerned about and we're right about and we're like trying to think of just like every other businesses small business like myself is trying to think of. Other ways and other revenue streams to bring people in. Food and drinks to the public. I'm sure you have good food and good drinks but I guess what you have to on is the place knowing that Winnipeg there's. Are a spirited bunch shoe who laugh in the face of minus fifty with wind chill. So maybe you'll be able to lure the mailer them into the patio and with this idea of A. A patio in the winter in Winnipeg. Lovely on I have all the confidence and faith in Winnipeg I love the people and that's why I moved here. All right. Mike. Thanks. Lovely thank you very much. Mark Turner is the owner of the Amsterdam tea room and bar in Winnipeg. A spokesperson for the city told the CBC is exploring the option of all weather Patios and considering what the requirements would be. If you're sailing in the ocean, there are obvious things to worry about the height of the waves are abrupt weather changes but you tend not to worry about orcas because orcas are social, curious and gentle. Except when they're not some sailors along the Spanish. And Portuguese coasts report that their boats have been attacked by ORCAS and scientists don't know why. Victoria Morris is an avid sailor whose eager to understand what's going on because she was crewing a fourteen meter sailboat weeks ago when it was set upon by nine Orcas, they rammed it damaged it and left it adrift. In the Strait of Gibraltar we reached Victoria Morris back on the water. Victoria I understand that you are just heading into the Strait of Gibraltar in a gale. But you are heading to the very place where you encountered these orcas. Are you seeing any orcas today. I'm going to hope. We possibly could. We're actually right now probably exactly where we were annexed actually and it was about the exactly the same time as well. Say. You hope not but. When you encountered them before initially quite intrigued was lovely to see the ORCAS I understand. Yeah Yeah I mean I've encountered in. Zealand and they've always been really friendly. The About five ten minutes being lovely playing around quickly changed. Change to what can you describe what the ORCAS did a just started almost surrounding the circle. Coming to the rhetoric. Keelan. S-. Tide ramming the kid no and you could hit and scratching get which which we now know was they would biting with teeth and you could hit him on the rotor and Spinning. Around. To own which and disengaged as well So they they. For. And at one point you hot to contemplate abandoning ship. Yes yes. So there's a possibility would've capsized. So we had to go down get ready get ready as we look to. When you went down below, you got a sense of the sound describe it with that was like it was like a whistle very, very loud whistle. To them maybe about four or five of them doing at the same time and it was just so loud those service down there trying to get everything ready and we couldn't even hear each of the tool. Did you feel that it was coordinated? Yeah. Yeah. Definitely. I actually I said it was orchestrated arch I said it as a bit of a pull at the time and it's it's been used everywhere. you sent a May Day, how did they respond when you had said that you were being attacked by Orcas? Almost they didn't believe a first. They asked us to repeat quite a few times. Carry Levy still under attack. When you were able to get the boat out of the water to take a look at the damage, what did you see? There's two thirds of the growth a missing. The hot one, half the sun witch and the Keel was scratches and bite marks. All for it. So Nobody had any doubt as to what had happened after they could see the Keelan the writer. was completely over the I mean even when we check out all the people around us so stop spot and couldn't believe what happened. Really. You know that the you're not the only one in that area that. Had An ORCA attack that there are several boats that had the same experience. What are you learning as to why? Because we're doing this? It's hard to say, mean, even the the scientists who study the ORCAS in Gibraltar in had him for yet of completely Busselton still have no idea and I think since all of this global pandemic gone on this just not getting that much traffic and they've almost gotten used to that, and when recently things opening up and being a little more traffic and noise, maybe they just used to having it almost themselves being not so many fishing boats because. The fishermen of alone to attack the all his post, the ORCAS trying to get tuna from votes. The these are endangered species, this pod of orcas in the Gibraltar straight fifty of them left, and so they have been struggling to survive designees theories among the whale experts that the ORCAS are are angry I I mean, I don't want to anthropomorphized this, but is it are they attacking because they're furious for the sound and the competition for food? It's very possible. They do have the capacity to date angry in very the very intelligent preaches. But if if that is true something these be done I think it's as bad as all these attacks have been happening in a way. It's also a good thing because it's in the spotlight on the that there is appropriate know selling has changed a scolding city. Sending a message. Yeah. The reports of what's happened do that pod that? So many of the mothers have last their cavs their babies they have sustained tremendous injuries because the as you mentioned, the fishermen don't want them there and I guess one of the biggest problems is is sports fishing that will actually do damage to them quite. Quite severely when they come through so. They're fighting so many fronts aren't they? Yep definitely, there was two babies in the attacked us and I think especially when they've got young ones with them, they will definitely be way more protective and way more aggressive to anything that could be a threat to them. You hearing anything about the which was saying that the there needs to be more done to protect these Wales that they are actually if they are sending a message that. Should heed that message I think that's One. Conservation. Group. I think trying to put full with something to try to limit the amount of noise and traffic in the Straits but I mean it's such a major shipping lane. It's the main way to get into the Mediterranean so I to limit how much traffic is going on there is GonNa be almost impossible. I'll. I'll let you go. I know you're in a gale and you probably need to focus on that Victoria I appreciate that you'd find time for us. Thanks for Oakland. Thank you. We reached Sale Victoria Morris, as she was passing the same spot in the Strait of Gibraltar where her boat was attacked by Orcas this summer for more on this story and for some pretty striking photos, set your sails for our website CBC DOT CA Slash Ai H. Now New, York City school students, they are getting a break today school is closed for the day but for those wind chills into double digits Zeros there is the possibility that some schools could be closed tomorrow the only and as the wild weather approaches many are asking will there be a snow day today marked the first day of the season for most schools in the area was very worst many school districts across western New York are preparing as well in. May. Made that call to close early in his patient storm. As an adult, you might feel a mild wash of relief when a meeting is postponed or if they call off your partners, uncles, birthday party but these up feelings of reprieve are nothing compared to the heart swelling I watering ecstasy kids feel when school is cancelled for a snow day snowball fights, Snow forts sledding. What are you? GonNa? Do I mean what aren't you going to do? WELL IF YOU'RE A student in New York state. Tell you what you aren't going to do this winter. You aren't going to have snow days. February twenty, seventh two, thousand twenty could go down isn't day in Niagara Falls Infamy is the last called Noti. That is a school official in a report on western New York's WG ours at television addressing yet another of the garbage life changes visited upon us by Covid nineteen because all students there can apparently learn remotely there will be no snow days in the whole state of New York, this school year or as New York Education Department spokesperson Nathaniel Stiers, Sola Sleep intoned we are utilizing all of the lessons learned from remote schooling this Spring to maximize our students instructional time. And this may have ramifications far beyond New York. State during the pandemic school boards all over the US and Canada have relied on remote learning which could mean the end of a centuries old tradition slowly but surely. And The theatres have closed, but the show look I'll. Play me podcast is thrilled to present a new series. The show must go on featuring provocative productions from some of North America's most acclaimed creators for the stage. Sit back and experience everything from chilling thrillers to Gut wrenching dramas to irreverent comedies each month experience the exhilaration of theatre from the comfort of your own home. Available wherever you get your podcasts. Hi, I'm Josh Block host of uncover escaping nexium. From CBC PODCASTS I pull back the curtain on the secret of self help group that experts call a cult and follow one woman's heroin journey to get out the podcast was featured in Rolling Stone magazine and named one of the best podcasts of two thousand eighteen in the Atlantic. Listened to uncover escaping nexium on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcasts. Three hundred and forty six people died because of a flaw in the Boeing seven, thirty-seven, Max three, hundred and forty six people whose families are still mourning them. Now out of Washington is condemning both Boeing and US regulators for the two crashes that took their lives. The report by Democrats on the US congressional transportation. Committee says the fatal crashes were the result of design flaws by the company, a failure to fix those flaws and a severe lack of government oversight. Paul Jerome Gay lost his family in the easy opium airlines seven 737, Max crash, his wife Caroline, his children, Ruby Kellyanne Ryan and his mother-in-law, and he's one of several family members of crash victims suing Boeing. We reached him in Toronto. The head of the committee that wrote this scathing report Peter Defies Yo, he said that quote this is a tragedy that never should have happened. It could have been prevented. What did you think when you heard that? Well. It's not something new to me. It shouldn't be new to the public has well, we know that the crashes while preventable. Obviously the report from the House Committee confirms that even the crash of Leilani flights six, four zero was preventable. And Daddy's appalling it is appalling to know that my family died because of the gross negligence by Boeing as well as the lack of sight by BFA. I. Want to ask you about that because the the first crash it was in two thousand eighteen that was out of Jakarta. There was the lion air flight. If there had been a review if there if they had recognize what was wrong the flaws in in that craft and that airplane. How would things have been different for you? What what do you think would have happened to change things that have occurred in your own life? descibed Cheney's that we know that principals within Boeing they knew that the plane was Ted closing in the design in the couldn't drink themselves to a point where they could ground the plane. At the end of the day, what they wanted to do was too much mayes trophies is so they knew that in as the public, we were not informed at that time. If I was UNIN SOM- dial person, I could not have put my family or my in on the in plane that I knew or maybe pointing that's not something that I'll have done if they were keen on these than they would have grounded the chain before this earned crops, and if they had done that they had done what they should have done. Your family would still be alive. Yes to some us to some US I have been alone. And I tell you that my mind is always they any to appear that they never leave my mind. The thought of what my wife and my children went through Dadi something that keeps recurring in my sleep in that, you know agreeing This location, the pounding of the hot. It's not something that goes away. You know it's something that I have to carry with me as I move forward in life. You lost your wife Caroline your kids. He Ruby Kelly who has four Ryan who was six? You. And Your mother-in-law, your wife's mother. You told the committee you when it's committee that's reported they were deeply moved by your testimony you told them. What you imagine was happening in those final minutes of their lives. Can you tell us what you told the committee that moved them so much? I keep thinking about a dairy -sition in my wife's money that you know this plane. Is GonNA crash in She's GonNa lose a life along with our three children Hama in the terra. That she must have experienced. He was very very curious and you know seen all that have been. You must've have lost his mom so many questions. He would ask me those questions if I. was there. A day never process without me thinking that I should have been with them. You know to answer those questions to hold them as we go down, we should have gone down to get. Your story that you told the committee is the beginning of this report and the testimony in front of these members of Congress they were weeping as you told them, what happened and what your life is like in the absence of your family. What effect you think you had on this final document. It I I know I I mentioned. In my thought about Boyne and just been consigned on. Making money at the expense of safety. I talked about the Regulatory Cup CIA of the FAA Boeing and you know I do believe that the committee has done an intensive investigation uncovering. All these issues, this report that was done by community is for the people. It's for them to see that avoid plane will kill again. We know that the in this report and it's important to note that it's not just blowing that house do where the responsibility the Federal Aviation Authority which was supposed to be regulating. This is also takes a lot of criticism industry port at the same time. The FAA is saying that these this plane, the 737 Max is about to be cleared to fly again as soon as this winter perhaps. How does that sit with you? The 737 Max would take flight again. In light of this report. What should be happening of this moment is The production the recertification process in the ground in process of these of the. Much should stop. Up until Boeing is able to revamp its corporate governance it up until the FA Cup chats, its authority as long as there are these gaps in tunnel edition of processes. As long as we have employees who've been going senior engineers as long as we have the the FBI administrator defending. Their actions in defending their internal procedures I. DO believe that out. We're going to have another garbage in garbage out kiss. Your testimony, your story, your willingness to speak about this as painful as it is has obviously had a large effect on what happened in this in this hearing and also people's understanding of what this plane did and what this story to to so many lives. Does that help you cope at all that you know that you have been able to have such an effect My family, my wife, and my children, their lives were just lost in instincts. If they are dead. Should not be in vain. In I hope that might testimony and I hope that myself in the families of the victims coming out I hope that it's going to improve a vision safety. At the end of the day I still live in isolation in pay buddy AAs being strong in mice have been strong if it changes anything. I'm just happy for the people. And you're doing that for your wife and kids. I'm doing these when I my kids. and. Polite I I really appreciate that you'd share this with this. I'm so sorry for what you're going through and how painful it must be but. I appreciate your strength. Thank you. Thank you very much feral. By. Paul Jinro gays family died in the European Airlines crash in March Twenty nineteen, he was in Toronto. In a statement Boeing said, it had learned lessons from that crash and the lion air crash of two thousand eighteen and it is working hard to strengthen safety. A deal's a deal that was Ursula von Der Lions forceful message today directed would seem at the UK's Prime Minister Brewers Johnson the president of the European Commission delivered her first State of the Union address outlining her vision for the future of the European Union a future that will obviously not include the United Kingdom. This week Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his government passed a so-called safety net bill that would override parts of the already agreed upon legally binding brexit deal signed back in January. With the EU and even members of Mister. Johnson's own government have acknowledged the bill violates international law which doesn't sit right with President Von Lion here's part of her speech today. This withdrawal agreement. Took three years to negotiate. And we worked relentlessly on it line by line word by word and together we succeeded. And the resolved guarantees are citizens, rights, financial interests. The integrity of the single market and crucially the Good Friday Agreement. And the European Union and the UK jointly agreed it was the best and only way for ensuring peace on the island of Ireland. And we will never backtracked on that and this agreement has been ratified by this House and by the House of Commons. It cannot be unilaterally changed disregarded or discipline. This is a metro. And Trust and good faith. I. Remind you of the words of Margaret Thatcher. I quote. Britain. Does not break treaties. It would be bad for Britain. Bad for relations with the rest of the world and bad for any future treaty on trade, and of course. This was true then and this is true today. That was European Commission President Ursula von Der Lion delivering her first State of the Union speech today. When photographer Baron clayborn was hired to shoot the notorious B I g for the cover of rap pages magazine in Nineteen Ninety seven he had a clear vision. biggie. Was the King of New York and the King of rap. So big you should wear a crown. will now that plastic crown originally purchased for a reported six dollars has sold for five, hundred, ninety, four, thousand dollars us. It's one of an astonishing number of items from hip hop history that were up for auction last night at Sotheby's all told the first of its kind bidding brought in. Cool. Two million dollars and it was a pretty cool moment for Ralph mcdaniels Mr mcdaniels better known as Uncle Ralph. mcdaniels is a veteran music video director who's worked with the likes of nausea and the Wu Tang clan. He also runs the Queens public library foundations hip hop programming, which will benefit from proceeds of last night's auction. We reached Ralph mcdaniels in New York, city. Uncle, Ralph mcdaniels, which I didn't know you most excited to see on the auction block last night. Well, of course, I had my. Original Wu Tang clan jacket and my Nike. Twenty. Fifth Anniversary. So between my wife and my daughter, they were all cheering as people bid for it but. I was I was excited to see the crown of biggies crown and so what did your jacket itself for? All. My jacket soul for a ten thousand and my. Twenty fifth anniversary sneaker so-forth Five. Thousand and and Background the jacket. How did you? What's its meaning to you? So I started this program in New York. City in the early eighties call video music box and I started working with the Wu Tang clan actually before they will clan and so I was like a video gopher for them I directed a bunch of their early videos directed song cream for them. And and so I was part of the family. So when they started, you know like, Hey, how can we take care of the people that a part of the crew they made these jackets and they were limited to the members of the group in a couple of people that from the record company in those jackets yeah. Wow and so this. This may be gives a sense of what the collection was like. I mean, all this stuff from hip hop that decades of it right so what does it? What does it? What does it tell you about that air? What does it say about the music? Well, it gives hip hop. It gives it a benchmark on the value of some of these things like this is the first time something like this happened. So you know you had a rock and roll auctions and you might have had other fine art and things like that. But from a musical genre, it was the first time for hop and that's awesome because we knew it had value. We just didn't know what the value was. It just seems like such an irony when you think of Sotheby's which is a bit I know maybe it's not. But. But a bit high art and highbrow and to see that that that history that that that not just music it's it's a culture. It's a way of thinking and and living it's to see it all together like that in bits and pieces must have been quite extraordinary. Just. Very extraordinary. Hypocrisy has become something that started in the inner cities and now has grown to everywhere in the world. I mean candidate you have you guys have the number one rapper drake you know in the world and you know so this music has gone so far and evolved from how it was in the late seventies in the south. Bronx where were you know burnt down buildings and it was a lost cause out of that rumble in fire in dust came this art form called hip hop, and now here it is forty seven years later and is pretty awesome. What else was there? What else did you recognize of the material that was in the room? we had Fab five. Freddy of was a host of a show on MTV is ring a diamond ring that he used to wear on the show. A John Michel Basquiat vinyl record that he did the album cover four, which was very rare and There was a wall of what they call the wall of Guam which will all of the boombox from the eighties and this guy named Ross one collected? All of these boombox is. Made it into one wall, which is you know somebody probably have a pretty big house to put this. And Ms Artwork and photos from Rockingham and to park and Biggie and and other hip hop pioneers. The to pock. Contribution is really touching. Isn't it? Because user love letters written by him when he was in high school? Yes. Yes and you know into air some of his songs in the words in you know the emotions that he put into it and those same emotions in those letters that he wrote to his, you know sixteen year old girlfriend at the time. You know it was pretty awesome. Somebody else wrote about it that it it seems at this time when with black lives matter this. Awareness of this sort of the lives of black men in your country, the vulnerability of those men and that. People reflecting on that too potlucking Biggie were both shot dead within months of each other in the nineties and that hip hop does speak to that vulnerability and perhaps that's part of the reason why this was so. Of such interesting people didn't get possible. Absolutely I think that in early in the late eighties, there was a group called nwea is Cougar and Dr. Dre. Part that grew and they talked about you know straight straight OUTTA. Compton Compton City in California where they came from, they talked about police brutality and the things that were going on in their community and we couldn't picture this. I'm from the East Coast I always thought that California was just palm trees and you know an ocean and the beach boys you know and and. There was a underlining thing that was happening in California and we saw it with Rodney King and wwl talked about it in erected. So hip hop has always been kind of the CNN, or to the street you know like it's always been this kind of voice of the street and it comes out of hip hop music, I and we hear about it and then all of a sudden mainstream and. Say Hey I. Heard you know my favorite rapid talking about that ten years ago and just the fact. That hip hop is you know it's for everyone but it started off in black communities and Latino communities, and now is serving the world with the art and what it was made for to be loved and you know, and that's part of what black lives matters is all about as well and do you know what the money from this action I think part of it is going to charity you know I think about that. Yeah. So I work with There's a number of charities I can tell you about the one that I work with the Queens Public Library. So about five years ago I started doing hip hop programs for young people first of all to get them off the street and to get them involved and to bring them to the library which. You know they might have to come there every once in a while to do some homework, but I wanted to do other things. So we can engage them and just keep them out of trouble and so we started getting folks coming. You know fifty kids show up to do a DJ WANNA one with one of their favorite deejays and they wanted. To learn how to Dj or we did a book talk with Ll, cool? J.. Or you know people came in and they never got the chance to meet some of these artists. Now got the chance to meet him take a picture with him. Hear them talk about themselves growing up, see the parallels. So apart of the money from the suburbs or in. is going to go to those programs so that we can continue those programs and pay the you know the DJ's and get equipment and have a safe space for young people come in and and be part of what we do at Queens Public Library. That's just great uncle. Ralph mcdaniels it's good to talk to you. Thank you. Awesome. Thank you. Bye. Ralph mcdaniels is a music video director who also runs the Queens. Public Library foundations hip hop programming. We reached him in New York City. You've been listening to the as it happens. PODCAST Marshall can be heard Monday to Friday on CBC, Radio One Sirius Xm following the world at six. You can also listen to the whole show on the CBC listen APP download it for free from the APP store or from Google play. Thanks for listening I'm Carol off and I'm Chris Ouden. For, more CBC PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT. Ca Slash podcasts.

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Claire Danes

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

1:04:52 hr | 5 months ago

Claire Danes

"You know I just liked playing some buddy, a woman who was so muscular and unapologetically commanding and brazen because we never get to be that way, and I just suddenly had like full license. This is designed matters with Debbie. For Sixteen years has been talking with creative people about what they do. I've got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working. On this episode, Claire Danes Talks about her long career and what she learned about spires from playing. A lot of times, spies, Mary spies, right for obvious reasons. Same reason actress Mary Actors. Here's Debbie I of a couple of messages. Then her interview with Claire Dates. I'm a native New Yorker but since the beginning of the pandemic I've been living in Los Angeles I missed my hometown but I love having more space more sun and a big garden and almost nothing makes me happier than tending to the tomatoes and the Fox club and wildflowers by listening to powers of music. sonus move is the premium portable smart speaker and IT companies me wherever I go indoors outdoors and even in my car. With an eleven hour battery, I can spend the entire day pulling weeds, planting seeds and streaming tunes free and easy from Sonos radio through the APP the designers world class and this sound is breathtaking. So not only works with experts and sticks in engineering, and then collaborates with Oscar and Grammy Wing Producers Mixers and artists to ensure an unprecedented state of the art listening experience. If you want to know more about the best beautiful sound system in the entire world, please go to Sonos DOT COM to learn more. And finally a little personal ask from me I love making design matters and I'm always trying to make it better. One Way to do that is to hear a little bit about a you. If. You have a few minutes I'd be so grateful if you took a short survey about how you feel about the show at survey nerds, dot com slash design matters that survey nerds, dot com slash design matters. Thank you so much. There's just something about Claire. Danes. That makes her hard not to watch and we've been watching for a long time. A teenager in the nineteen ninety, she played Angela Chase in the much loved. But short-lived television show my so called life after many film and theatre roles she starred in the much loved long running series homeland which won her a few emmy awards for outstanding lead actress homeland just wrapped up after its eighth and final season and you can't help but wonder what this actor will do next to compel us to watch her again Claire Danes Welcome to design matters. Thank you so much I'm thrilled to be here. Thank you, Claire I understand for a time you owned a hula-hoop made by artist Jean Michel Basquiat. Did you come to have that. I've. been looking forward to this question Yeah. That is true. Hot Pink with white stripes all around it. My parents owned actually still own with another couple a loft on crosby street and Basquiat was a renter I was about four years old at the time. And I do remember seeing him in the elevator and he was very charming. And some grownups really register with kids. You know they're like on the plane and I recognize that he was one of those people and yeah he eventually moved out and left a few objects hot pink hula-hoop being one of them. So you grow up in your parents artist's loft obviously in this same building with John Michel Basquiat, Yup your debt studied engineering and biology at Brown University, and then transferred to the Rhode Island School of design in the nineteen sixties where he met your mother did they were generally WanNa be designers? Yeah. So my mom was a textile designer. She studied textiles at wristy and was one for ten years might one of my first memories was watching her paint an endless series of flowers while watching or more listening to all my children. And and my dad was a photographer and he had built a darkroom in our loft. And that's what they did at the start of their their young lives They went to the bowery I after graduating from his D. and. Then eventually moved to so but yeah, and then they did other things My I have a older brother Asia seven years older, and then when I came around I, think it was time to make some more money really, and my dad was a contractor became contractor a business called overall construction good name and where the ever is degraded. Definitely he is Pun stor. And my mom ran a toddler school and Daycare Center, I saw two different names for your mom's toddler school, the Crosby street toddlers group and the crayons street toddlers tribe. So I think I should clarify for the record which was the actual may was much much easier to say and more literate of it was crosby kids. Because it. Yeah and Yeah there were six kids in the morning and six kids in the afternoon and she started that when I was about four years old, she taught one and two year olds and she ended when I became this like actor teenager person. But yeah, it was a funny way to live. Is it? You trampoline a trapeze installed over the kitchen table in his swing suspended from the living room ceiling in the apartment? Yes. That's all true. But that was all pre nursery school. Life, in the in the Danes households. The great things about a love is that you have this you know uninterrupted flat plane. Just expanse of of wood floors. So it was an ideal roller rink and guess my parents really believed in fun and then I had to share that space with other little humans, which was what was it like for you to share your home with a classroom full of toddlers in the morning and in the afternoon. You know. It was tough I've I guess, I, struggled with feelings of jealousy. For sure but I adapted and they were amusing and you know I encountered them every. So often now as fellow middle aged people and it's always a little startling, I understand that Lena Dunham was actually rejected. When she To be part of the toddlers. And my mom. My mom was amazing. She was really excellent what she did and There was a long list of people who were eager to send their kids there and and Yeah Lena when I met Lena years ago and that was like the first thing she told me was that her mother was still a little annoyed. I it was not personal I. Know that to be true I know I. Do I mean I do know a lot of nursery rhymes now? Just helpful having your own young boys? Yes that's right. I understand that you discovered the joy of dissimulation when you were three years old when not wanting to actually taken up you pretended that you were sleeping by mimicking some of your mother's twitches and body movements while she was sleeping, how did you figure out how to do that with your own body and to pretend that sort of seamlessly I think it's just a natural human impulse and instinct to to mimic to observe and to imitate I. Don't know why that's the case I'm sure it's served US evolution in evolutionary terms but look I mean kids are taking in so much I I'm just shocked by. How perceptive and sensitive might now toddler Rohan is, for example, but Cyrus was the same way. It's almost like the younger they are the more tuned in they are to every detail. I do remember that experience. It really was like I think the first time I. Stumbled upon something like acting and I. Was Delighted by the experience of it and the challenge of and it still at the root of what I do now. It seems like you are rather headstrong from the very beginning of your life and at five years old while singing and dancing on your parents bed you sell Madonna on television and suddenly realized that performing could be a job. What can be the sense that Madonna was actually working that it was her job. That was another epiphany this moment where I connected an action to a vocation. Even at that age, even at five people will ask you like, what do you WanNa be when you grow up you know I guess. I knew that was something to consider and. I don't know I just saw stars. I was just so inspired. I do remember like I couldn't contain the excitement and I had to release it by jumping on the bed but yeah, no Madonna was a major force and. Influence and aspirational figure it was. She knew that have you ever told her? I've met her. The Courage to actually admit that to her I was probably playing it. Cool. But I was charmed by her when I met her I was she has a great sense of humor and She's kind of salty and she didn't disappoint. She liked delivered full Madonna when when my wife met her, she interviewed her for I think Harper's bazaar and you went over to her brownstone and Madonna, offered her what she called summer lemonade or something like something really funny and it was Rosa. Some water that was it similar water Like some some water and it was. And I just thought that was super finding. To Steal. Yeah, some water. When, when you were six years old, you started taking dance classes with Robert at the dance theater workshop, which you continue to take for ten years and Ellen that you were a risk taker and improvised full blast from the start and in thinking about your childhood, where did that fearlessness come from? It seems like just from the moment you popped out you were really certain about what you wanted to do and how you wanted to do it. Yeah I. Guess. So I guess I was that way I mean there's like there's a family story about how I would camp in this little plot of Land Massachusetts every year and pick blueberries, and of course, I insisted on carrying the bucket of blueberries down the hill and I spilled the mall inevitably maybe I insisted on doing it again I spelled them again. So yeah. I was a very determined person I can't account for that I I mean I'm just so grateful that. Parents who were patient and encouraging and didn't Swat that passion or. Enthusiasm away they not only let me be whoever I was, but encouraged my curiosity about. and. Then ultimately, performance art I think just the zeal was huge and irrepressible I although I say that and I'm sure there was a way to repress it and they didn't at six years old you started therapy which I believe you still continue to this day and. I understand that. I've been in therapy for thirty years with the same therapist and you've said that you think it's a helpful tool and a luxury to self reflect and get some insight what motivated you to start. So young I didn't start until. I was in my twenties unfortunately. Yeah. I went through a difficult time at six. I saw ghosts and other creatures. Or do you think you were? It I don't I think I was very confused at the time the typically there was a Garg oil. WHO QUOTE UNQUOTE? On, the pipes of our loft and would make me do things and. I think it was more like maybe burgeoning OCD or something. But I have to assume that I had a really. Unruly imagination and maybe I was confused about how to harness it. I- densify it just kind of. Coexist with it. Once I went to therapy my parents therapist I finally realized that I had a problem and just that that acknowledgement was sufficient to puncture the neuroses and they naturally dissipated I mean I remember getting said, can you anticipate when you're going to see these creatures I, guess I had to admit that I I had anticipated them and he said well, then you can also make them go away. But yeah, I mean I was dogged by that that anxiety like well into my twenties I was really Afraid of the dark. I'm not anymore really proud of that when that shift happened, but I was going to ask you about that. Actually have that happened I remember in College I. Called my boyfriend in the middle of the night so that he could escort meet to the. Dorm bathroom. So I didn't have to go alone like they was still had a grip on me. How did you get over it? How did you get over that? Fear the iphone flashlight maybe Technology the mini uses. I don't know think look I still have a lot of questions about what lurks in the ether and I'm really really endlessly fascinated by the subconscious. And what happens when our brains go dark at night? So my big my big phobias. Are Go sir rats and cockroaches and I realized they're all nocturnal. They're all numerous like if you see one, you know there are countless other early. It's that kind of deep stuff that defines and motivates us that we can't know fully right but I also love that yeah, I'm fascinated by it as well. What happens when we're not thinking you know what happens when we're not saying. Yeah I it's. It's like the ocean. I. Mean there's so much of it and so little we understand about it. When you were eight years old, you were bothered by a male classmate and became worried when you considered the possibility that he could your mind and discover your revenge fantasies and ask your mom if it was possible for people to read your thoughts, she replied your imagination is your own. You can do whatever you lake with it. And they're right. There is evidence of good parenting. This. Isn't a wonderful thing an absolutely. To say, yes, I I'm getting goosebumps as you say that it's true. Was So. Relieved. Really. Because the vision I had was pretty A. Busy. What were you GonNa? Do I did I envision dislikes circle of people he was in the center of it and I guess people just went in and like beat them up. Like. Remember back in the circle in another prison went in and. I don't think I would ever allow myself to go there even like now as an adult but I'm it wasn't release at the time. Yeah. I think that's a similar. That's similar stuff I was wrestling with I mean I think that was what? That was related to this business of the ghosts and why is a a fleeting thought and what's real and How do I negotiate all of that and water my boundaries and? Where do I start and end and how do I engage with the objective world you know but that's also a lot about acting to. Of course that is that's a lot about acting and you know there has to be a porous nece there between what is conceived what is imagined? And what is actual and you have to kind of float in and out of those two states of being I guess I've always been really consumed with thinking about that. Well, it's interesting because it was also at that point in your life, you decided you wanted to be an actress. Thought was so interesting that you were worried about not being able to make enough money and you decide that you're going to become a therapist for your day job and teach acting workshops on the weekends and I'm wondering we worried about not making enough money or were you worried about not being successful? That's a really good question. I mean it's really calcified over time as my being nervous about being uncomfortable physically not having enough money to support myself, which also had to do with a feeling of freedom I wanted to. Be Independent and have a sense of expansiveness in my life I. Think it was more about pat but yeah, maybe there was the fear of doing away that. Wouldn't connect with people or you know. Successful. Yeah Mate. That might have been part of it I. Love the fact that at ten years old, you formally announce that money or no money you have to be true to your art. There was no plan B. You were going to take the risk and become an actress. You decided this at ten years old I believe you announced this at the dinner table You went out and found ages. Ago. Independence. How did you find an agent? Did you up in the phone book? I mean. My best friend Arielle mom is a woman called Tamar Rogoff. WHO's a choreographer? So Arielle had done a student film and that same director was was doing his next student film and loose asking for a reference and. Tamar suggested me. So tomorrow was kind of my first agent and then you know that was my first experience working on a set. In front of a camera but I guess before that I had I guess I. Move that I make made was to take classes to acting classes at least Strasbourg at ten and. Totally. Loved it and and then I. There was a performance junior high school called p. p. a. s., which is still around in its first year of its existence and I met other kids who were working professionally and I I had this student film under my belt and and I guess some other student films to like. I was in that world. Yeah and then it was at that school through those other kids where I learned what agent was and what a headshot was and we had this dark room in our loft and woman who is renting. It took my head shop photos and we've printed them right there on site. And and we sent them out and people answered agents answered, and then they saw little film that I had done and I guess that was arresting enough to have them hire me but it was really funny because I I would just I would rollerblade from audition to audition arriving a sweaty mess but the stakes were so low like I had a day job of being a kid and going to school and it I mean of course, I didn't feel like it was extracurricular because it was so clearly my life's calling. But not a whole lot was riding on it and I was just grateful to have a chance to do it. I. Just loved it so much like I didn't have to get the job I was reading sides with the casting director and that was another another turn. So. So I don't think I had any smell of desperation you know could being rejected at all upset you or did you were you aware of it? Yes and the closer you got to getting a job the more painful. The rejection was unquestionably sounds auditioned in like six times and then you'd get flown out to California and you'd be put up in a hotel and then there would be a screen test and you know when it was down to you and to other people and you didn't get it you felt that in your bones or I did. Yeah brutal many many tears were shed over lost gigs but. You know when you were twelve, you were offered a part in the soap opera one life to live and I believe you mentioned was that the soap opera that your mother watched while she was making textile she was an all my children person. But yes but you turned down you turned it down because you were worried that taking the part would mean selling out at twelve. That's really felt. Yeah, I really did I mean I knew that I was still learning a whole lot that I was uninformed as an actor and? I I didn't want to develop bad habits which I might do on us soap opera so I did take. God said I. Guess so I remember going go I mean I got close to doing it and are Like yeah. They wanted me to color my hair. I don't know I just didn't feel it didn't feel right. I know I had I had a lot of integrity when I was younger I. Lost It. And we Say That's the moment. The I got confused. In my late teens early twenties I, guess right after Romeo and Juliet when I suddenly. SURFACED IN A. Major Way and and was getting offered a lot and. that. was like a whole other skillset. The that I had to develop an I just didn't have it yet and I may have had insight into acting at a very young age but I didn't have any insight into movie stardom. I didn't I. Didn't have any point of reference. And I think I was just making a lot of mistakes about what that meant. And I, got a little lost but it's also at that time that I stopped working for a while I definitely want to talk about that when you went to. Yale. But but before that, you won the part of Angela Chase in the now beloved television show my so called life which not only brought you to national prominence. You also were nominated for an Emmy Award you want Golden Globe award you with thirteen years old when you shot the pilot, you were fourteen. When you shop the series, your cast mate was jared Lido who played the heartthrob Gordon Catalano. I was already in my twenties when the show was aired but I truly thought that Jordan Catalano was the most beautiful man I'd ever seen I mean it was he was just glorious. You were fourteen and he was twenty one in real life. What was it like kissing him? Yeah I. So there was a scene like our I make out scene. There was a stage direction at the Angela kisses Jordan's face. That was very confused by and. I Yeah I guess I asked the director what that meant and but he wasn't your Jarrett's he wasn't my first kiss. No but I was not. Very practiced in the art of making out at that point. Yeah. So jared. Interjected. Explained what that might mean and I don't know. It was weird I. Mean my mom was. A village watching all of this I was I was just so tiny that it I think I couldn't even appreciate the awkwardness exactly I just. Like pinched my nose and like jumped in. It's a show that I think really provided a lot of palpable feelings especially for those of us in our twenties that were watching it and. The show ends in a cliffhanger. You don't know ever if Angela is going to go with Brian, AKA brain or sword. Which I love that that I still do that I still make that spelling stake in every single I do think the show. Who Do you think Angela ended up with. Oh brain. Brain. Yeah What's brain doing now he's probably running the world. You Kinda, wanted her have both both experiences I don't think she would have ended up with either of them. That's true. That's true. I don't know I'm still really good friends with so many people from the show. And a Winnie is like my fairy godmother? No, it's. It's still a very vital connection to her and into to that experience, and it was just miraculously to get that piece of material. And I was really unhappy acutely unhappy in junior high 'cause DA. And you know but I, I think I struggled even more than a lot and to just have this brilliant author right my diary entries for me and give me a chance to release of this. Angst. was just a mercy and it was such a healthy little culture on that said, and it was my my initial entry into this business and. They was foundational. I believed that world to be a safe end nourishing one. You know. So I'm just very, very lucky. The show ran for one season it ran it aired nineteen episodes. It was cancelled I didn't even realize it was canceled at the time I remember talking to a friend who worked in the television business at that time who told me that no one expected you to do more than one season of the show because you were destined for much bigger things in the movie business we you disappointed when the show ended. I was but the show didn't get picked up initially after we shot this. Perfect pilot and I went to high school and my heart was so broken then and then it did get picked up halfway through my first year high school. I was already quite jerked around by it. And as we talked about, I'd already experienced quite a lot of rejection just being a working actor it's. It's such a defining part of what we do does it ever get easier. No, thanks so much. Easier. Does it With something else will come along. It was 'cause we we weren't able to ended consciously or say goodbye but that it had this incredibly robust afterlife unit got picked up its online different networks and it's still in circulation. Somehow, by Nineteen Ninety Nine, you had filmed thirteen films in five years you've worked with the likes of Oliver Stone, Francis Ford Coppola Buzz, Lerman Matt, Damon Mickey Rourke Liam, Neeson, Numa Thurman, Leonardo Di Caprio. You were also offered the role that Kate winslet. Titanic with Leonardo. You turned it down. Did you just have a sense of? Just too much. Yeah. I think it was definitely part of that. I had literally just finished filming. Romeo and Juliet with will in Mexico where the titanic was going to be filmed. Another epic romantic drama. It did feel. A. Little repetitive I mean obviously. It's different than a lot of ways but Yeah. I, think I had some wonder lost and I think there was. Part of me that anticipated that that might lead to a different level of stardom that I wasn't braced for I was pretty clear about that. I didn't. Yeah I've risen. Separates none yet? No. I wasn't conflicted in any way and I remain. So it was not. Mine to take it just didn't feel like mine to take. You decided to put your film career on hold and attended Yale misstated and you mentioned even just now that you've felt lost at the time I read that you stated that you had played so many roles but didn't really know who you were going to yell help that so much so much I needed to just stop and give myself a chance to see who I was and I didn't go to high school really I was technically enrolled at a school in. La. But was primarily tutored on set which was a very lonely way to go about. Go about such a thing and I'm I don't know I was starting to feel a little strange I mean, I was I guess always mature precocious or something but that just became relief etched when I was strictly surrounded by adults and I didn't know how to like hang out I didn't have friends independent of the industry who were my age I really needed to make some and I also. Wanted to give myself a chance to explore different ways of thinking and different subjects had decided that I wanted to be an actor when I was very young person and I just wanted to. To make that choice as more of a realized. GROWNUP human. Of Things did you study it? Yeah I had A. Great Time, and in fact, my favorite class that I took was a graphic design class. No. Yes. Really mom you got some graphic design Chaffetz. I yeah. So my you know my parents obviously were artists and so I grew up drawing and we had so many mean it was like a wonderland officers the trap in the swing but there was also a light box and you know cutting board and my bed this incredible rubber stamp collection we had just so a surplus of materials I still do. My craft section in the basements. Berry serious. So I used to draw a line and then in junior high when I was a miserable misanthropic kind of pecked. Person I would just kinda retreated into drawing. So I became pretty proficient and so I took a lifetime class and it was so humbling because I I had I stopped drawing didn't kind of put it together didn't realize that I had stopped doing that because acting had become so consuming and suddenly it was like I was drawing with my left hand and I I was really I was just shocked. And mortified anyway so I took this life finally got that muscle working again, which was great and my mom suggested I take a graphic design class. She said, you know clear your your work is quite stylized. You might like graphic design it was like, oh Really Stung a new that was code for you know anyway. But but she was so right the first lesson we had as one of the best lessons I've ever had ever and she gave all the students, the same sheet of paper, the same ruler and the same pencil, and we all had to draw lines from the top to the bottom using the ruler and the Pencil, and then we tacked all of our drawings on the board and they were so different. It really has always stayed with me you know. Just. Do what you do as well as you possibly can don't try to be interesting just do you really mindfully Yeah so interesting to see the perspectives that people have when given the assignment there was no room for Creativity Blake. Just draws out of lines and. Even men your self is expressed. It's amazing. After two years at Yale you return to acting one of your first roles was a part in the hours which was based on Michael Cunningham's Pulitzer Prize, winning novel and acted alongside Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore, and one of the scenes of your scenes was a rather heartbreaking conversation with an elderly Julianne. Moore and. I got the sense that you were the only really kind interaction. She'd had with anyone in a long long time. Do you remember that that particular scene and what you were experiencing because I thought it was one of the most beautiful scenes in the movie. Oh that's so nice that you say that I, you know I loved making that movie I mean obviously was such a special one and it was my first time meeting and getting to work with Merrill and it was such an effortless seen between the two of you. You're so comfortable lying on the bed and talking as mother and daughter was it was a really beautifully new on scene? Yeah. I I mean Gosh it was. Just so thrilling to be that close to the genius who I had you know admired and studied for so long I mean when I saw Sophie's choice at nine I knew I needed to do this thing I mean Madonna? Yes. But then, merrill? Mind no that. He's been referred to in your early years of acting as a young Meryl Streep you. You Must I came that you must know. Yet. But there are a lot of other young actresses who have also been called but she's like you know it's just she's the bar you know she's the example of. Of of greatness and now she's you know Mamie. Her daughter is one of my best friends. So I now, she's like maimings mom. So that's funny but and Michael is now a dear dear, friend did another movie that he wrote called evening where I met Hugh, and he married us and were in a ulysses book club with him now I mean. Yes. That's what we're doing during our pandemic as some. as. We are reading might do a visual interpretation of that book really Someday Yeah Yeah. So you've gotten through it I took a class on ulysses in college and fell in love with it, and there's a line from the book. The longest round is the shortest way home which I've decided like the motto of my life. I'm having I'm having it carved into steps to my house so that It's sort of just there as part of my life. Well, that's a good tattoo. Anyway. So it was it was it was a wonderful re entry into acting again excellent material with excellent actors and Stephen Daldry who's Another very inspired person. You return to the small screen in two thousand and nine when you played the role of an autistic and brilliant woman in the Hbo Film Temple. Grandin. You follow this role with playing Carrie. Mathison the brilliant woman struggling with bipolar condition on Showtime's homeland. How has playing these extraordinary women impacted your own brain or your own brainwaves district? INTO THIS I really was so thrilled to play. Women who were autonomous and defining and driving their own lives and the story animal. It's like a little sad that they. Need. To be. Extra. In order to warrant pat but yeah I I mean I was very privileged to get to consider temple in a deep way because she is an actual hero and I've always been really really interested obviously in how people work but especially, really interesting people. And she saw things differently from most of us and she was able to make the world better because of it you know and she suffered enormously and kept advancing her self and her interests in her work despite all of that. So, yeah. I guess I just felt very privileged to have a chance to illustrate that and hopefully engender empathy and and people and audience members who might not have understood how somebody like that thinks is an exists. Another thing these parts had in common was how many awards e one playing them, which included three Emmy Awards, a slew of Golden. Globes screen actors, Guild Awards, critics, choice awards, people's choice awards and more, and yet you said this about winning, it was a period when I won all the things for Temple and then I won a lot of things for homeland. So it was like Oh my God this again, which was very nice. But the gift of that is that you learn at it doesn't really matter. Clare tell me more about that. Why doesn't it really matter? It seems like this is like another benchmark that an actor. Sir. ALPA. Chino, in the Green Room at some awards show and he was up for something and he was Kinda Green, he just looked miserable and he said. Out Loud he said. These things are dreadful. You dread losing them you dread winning them you know and. So I couldn't have. said it better myself I mean there's so. Nerve racking and and they feel something outside of the actual experience of making thing. It's a whole other industry like at this point and yes, it is. It's hugely validating and but the can't define you, I mean nobody does this so that they can accept an award at the end of it. You know and I think we can get confused about that are interesting in can be important markers about what we value in our society at any given moment and what we recognized to be excellent work but it's also a little arbitrary and you know those standards are set by. A group of people and. It's not always selective of what is really deserving of attention. You know I don't know I think it's also dangerous to be critical of them in anyway like don't want to be seen as. An grateful or on the outside or sounds like Al Pacino's comment is pretty accurate. Yeah right like yes. Got It. So right, I just will always take his line. Homeland debuted in two thousand eleven and had show finale earlier this year. You played the role of Carrie, mathison a counter terrorism operative for the CIA and I read the writing team. Had you in mind for the role from the beginning in fact, their first six drafts of the pilot they call the character Clare at the time you were also up for Rolling Clint Eastwood's movie about J. Edgar. Hoover what made you decide to choose homeland You had no idea that it was going to become what it became. When. I i. read that script it was of course, wanted to read the next one. It's their incredible writers, Alex Howard and boy do they know how to craft a cliffhanger but I just thought? No, that's way too much. I mean I understood what the commitment of television show would be and she was under such duress and she would be forevermore. You know I just didn't want to invite that level of suffering into my life but it Once I realized that. I was just flinching from the level of the challenge I realized I I had to do it, and it was really scary. It was really scary but you know it's not very often that you get well one to play character that is as dynamic and robust as Carrie Mathison is and I had incredible team I mean Alex surrounded himself by other exquisitely talented writers it he had the courage to do that. Every single person on that writing team had been show runners themselves. So just they were all really really skillful and Mandy Patinkin was my partner and. You know it's like it's much harder to do technically easy seen. That is poorly written than a really exacting seeing that is excellently written. And so I just got an. Endless stream of. Excellently. Britain very exempting. Scenes. I just was so amazed that I never got bored I. Mean that was like ten years of my life and there was. Always. A new facet of the character to unearth and the writers were always very good about doing that I mean they also didn't want to right themselves into ruts and it was almost like an anthologies. Series in that there was a reset, every year and. We would be based on a new location and we would focus on a new theme. So yeah, it was it was very stimulating and I got to learn a lot about the bipolar condition and about the clandestine services. was doing amazing going to spy Cam these do exist. I WANNA meet. So here. In the dark corners I'm to the show eight. Season One I actually. Watched the show by accident I was watching. So my family at the time we were all hooked on Dexter and we were all getting together to watch the season finale of Dexter. Ended and somehow we just left the television on and all of a sudden. It was the season finale of season one of homeland and I and my brothers were out and about and doing things and I was like holy. Shit. What is this? On the lawn screaming in front of. Demon Lewis Brody's house in his family and I it. I was hooked I ended up watching the entire first season in a ben and then for the rest of the rest of every season since and watched how Kerry changes and you stated that the experience was your first time aging with a character and experiencing her develop and change. What do you think was the biggest thing you learned about carry over the ten years you played her? Well, just that wonderful tension between her vulnerability enter her super strength. Right was endlessly enjoyable to play with and that she was her reason for being was always so unwavering and so clear, which was to protect your country and I thought I mean her being bipolar was really relevant to that because she's obviously Cassandra figure but you know for somebody who is struggling with with that experience i. mean they know that their minds can go boom right that they're they're. They're world. Can Be in disrepair all of a sudden without any warning. So they just are not ever comfortable. They have to be hyper vigilant, and so I think it was a natural extension for her to imagine the world as a place that needed her constant attention. So yeah, I thought that was that was interesting and you know when she had so little to lose I mean she wasn't. Ever really going to partner with somebody in a conventional way and have a nuclear family. It's not something she could do and it's not something she was that interested in doing. which allowed her to have all of these kind of outrageous. Adventures. I just liked playing some buddy, a woman who was so muscular and unapologetically commanding and brazen because we never get to be that way and I just suddenly had like full license and we've seen what she can do. So you know like nobody dared challenge her it was just a given after a certain point that when she walked into a room, you fucking listened you know I was just like awesome. So that was. That was a great gift. The first few seasons of homeland are centered around relationship with Damien Lewis's character Brodie, and then you also have an intense but very different kind of relationship with Rupert. Friends. Character Peter Quinn who by the way I was just devastated when he was killed off the show just had a mad crush on him. With the mentor slash father figure relationship, you have, with Mandy, Patinkin character Saul Berenson is the one that I just found. So endlessly fascinating after ten years of working together. You stated that you knew each other's rhythm. So intimately, it became cellular. How does that actually happen? How does that momentum bill that mutuality grow? Well just lots of practice I. Mean we just put in so many hours together and I really liked the propulsion of nature of television I like. How much material you have to produce in a very confined amount of time. So I couldn't indulge my neuroses or get at anything like precious about the work just had to. Keep forging on and yeah I mean you live your character's backstory In our eight season. The catalog of experience that I shared with Mandy on and off the set was just huge. There was just so much material to draw from I. Don't know it feels like you're cheating almost but It's not something you have to imagine it's been lived. Yeah, and he's in. Amazing. Partner he's he's just so good and he's so deft and tuned in and Flinch Sing and you can't believe it's the same person, right? Yeah Yeah. No, that's right. That's right. But he's he you know he's just truly playful and anything I would offer. He would receive an you know make something magical out of and he's obviously very musical his rhythm as Saul with. So wonderfully opposite to my rhythm, carry it kind of worked and it worked from the very beginning like in that I, read through in the pilot as soon as we started. Kind of flu. So yeah, there were two scenes with the characters Saul Berenson that I wanted to ask you about the first is at the end of season seven after you released from a Russian prison after nearly a year where your medication was withheld for bipolar disorder and when you released during full psychosis. You sort of see Saul Berenson we think that you do but it looks and it looks like you're running towards him because he's air to receive you from this present but you run right past him and that's the end of the season and we're all left with like holy shit where she running to. Was that improvised or was that in the script that's my question that was that was in the script. Yeah and he grabbed her and she doesn't recognize I just thought that was beautiful writing God's so wrenching i. mean we know that this is Really, her most vital human connection and. She's so far gone that she she can't identify him. No, it makes me cry thinking about it. Yeah you know and we shot a lot of material that was used in flashback in the final season and that was a little frustrating to you know have that I'll be for naught I mean obviously it wasn't but but it was much more powerful to just imagine what she had been through and it was very suggestive. But yeah, they really do know how to write an ending even in the pilot that was clear. I think that I was almost most struck by the potency of the ending the night that I was anything else and the ending of that season or the ending of the show in totality the pilot when I I I I, read it. You know I just thought. I wanted to read the next one I imagined other people would feel similarly. The second scene is the scene where you nearly kill him to try and find out information about one of his informants. Do you think that carry ever could have actually killed solve aaronson. Well, it's interesting because obviously, there was a lot of discussion about how we would and our show and we always went straight to the crux of it and to the center of the conflict and this was inevitable right but yeah, Kerry is massively transgressive and even corrupt in some ways. But only for the right reasons I think. But we could never forgive for that I mean she can't kill saw and remain a hero and that was like it was an interesting practice right or meditation like what? What are the requirements for heroism in a piece of fiction and? It's that basically so And that's what she so frustrated with Saul because he can't kill this woman you know because of his personal connection but actually in moral terms, he's at fault there carries right it's not commensurate. You know one life does not equal hundreds of thousands but yes so it's interesting I mean we are not rational creatures. Yeah. What was it like when Saul Beckons for you and he's like? Dead. Or nearly about to die and he beckons view and you think he's finally going to tell you who the informant is to save his own life and you come close to him in your face to face and he whispers with all his might fuck you. Well. I mean that was a part of our dynamic throughout the series. So, yeah, I. Think I told him also at one point like fuck you. Maybe it was the beginning of the third season I distinctly remember that. In a hospital drugged up. So yes, we were exchanged many many fuck you. But yeah, that was the that was the ultimate one. But but yeah. So much of the show to is about. The loneliness of being a spy right and that's kind of the the sacrifice that they make. They can't really in joy the pleasures of. Domestic life for intimate connection you know it was so so interesting talking to actual people on the business a lot of times, spies, Mary spies, right for obvious reasons. Same reason actors Mary Actors. But. But so so they work together. They have to have their fights in the shower or out at sea, and often the relationships would fall apart when they were done with an assignment or opposed, and they'd come back home and they didn't have the Adrenalin to keep them connected or afloat. So I just thought all of those particulars about what might actually be like were were really interesting. And it's not a natural. Fiction. There's some really great fan fiction. God. ANGELIKI GROWS UP TO CARRIE mathison Gideon. Jason Gideon grows up to be Saul Berenson. It's so incredible I had much. In, that can only imagine I can only imagine they carry ends up in Russia living with I. I don't know if the term is right or a Russian operative she ends up the sort of Edward snowden character. But in the very very end, she begins to send Saul Information and so for my own personal fan fiction from the character yourself do you imagine that they're able to have any kind of friendship again, I can't help but hope so that they can. That was pretty inspired again, all credit to to Alex and company. Yeah. I mean, as I say it's so much about there being alone in the world and the cost and the pain of that but her connection to saw. Everything like. The way I understood it she she couldn't attempt these risks or these. daredevil moves if she didn't feel supported and known. kind of held by him. So yeah, I I love that idea that that line was not severed right and I mean and they're kind of mean for all of this leading US, they're pretty monastic like they're so devoted to this ideal this cause which is very abstract. Yeah. I need for them to be united sort of eternal infinite. No I. Don't know maybe maybe not I don't know but it almost doesn't matter. You know that they're still communing. Somehow spiritually yes. In the dark. Last thing I want to talk to you about is your experience in the theater. You may your Broadway debut in the two thousand, seven roundabout theater production pygmalion, and then stored in the world premiere of Sarah Burgess Dry powder helmed by Hamilton director and very, very dear friend of the show of Design Matters Tummy cal which I saw him was wonderful. Any future stage plans assuming we can ever get back into the theater. Yeah I. Don't know I mean sure. I'm not really like a stage beneath now. My husband Hugh is an amazing performer on stage and he really came into being through the theater and I love the theater as well. But I think I really fell in love with film and discovered myself as an actor. In the world of film that said, it is also true that my first professional experience was as a dancer at ps one, twenty two when an old. Yes. and. Then, I did I did a solo dance peace with my besties mom WHO's an amazing artist? Tamar Rogoff but yes, I did I did a solo with her again at ps one, twenty two, which was beautiful. My early twenties s just leery one or on the PS one twenty, two lifetime achievement award, right? I guess I did I did that was very special that was one of the most meaningful awards I've ever gotten and so actually working in the public felt really familiar in a way that working on Broadway didn't a again I would love to do more of all of it because I love every version of this acting thing. In every context and every medium. I, I'll read a book on tape all. Human I are always wrestling for the books reading to Cyrus and row in. You know we're just we're just like total hams but yeah, I, Love I love those intimate spaces I do a lot of work with performance space and I can tell you without a doubt without having desk anybody else there. We'd love to have you back and he died yeah. Yeah. No no no I would. I was really exciting to do a play that had never been done before and obviously Sarah's. A legend she's such a bad ass but yeah to get to make your mark and not have the shadow of previous generations of it. Yeah. And Tommy is like a total dream right I mean yeah. The whole thing the whole thing was great and and you know seven minute walk from my house highly recommend that my original question for you was going to be are you still afraid of the dark but we've learned that you're not and so we can. Forego that question. But I still I am still afraid of. BRATS so. As. Clear I just WanNa say thank you so much. So, much late in the world and making such beautiful characters complex really interesting characters come to wearing and thank you for joining today. Oh. Thank you I really I love you and your show so much I am really unlike Ed Diehard Avid Fan so he was just like such a treat an honor. So thank you for having me for the time being you can see clear Danes on Showtime in Homeland and on Hbo Grandjean and. Wonderful. Hopefully infinite reruns of myself called life. This is the sixteen year we've been podcasting design matters like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference. We could make a difference or we can do. I'm Debbie moment and. Talking to you again soon. Matters is produced by Curtis Fox productions. The show is recorded non pandemic times at the School of Visual Arts Masters and branding program and New York City, the first and longest running branding program in the world. The editor and chief of design matters. Media is Zachary petted and the art director is Emily Weiland.

Madonna Angela Chase Emmy Awards Saul Berenson director Alex Howard Debbie I Saul Tamar Rogoff US Claire Danes Mandy Patinkin Mary spies Mary Actors partner Showtime Jean Michel Basquiat Claire Cyrus Hugh
The new science of success

The Science Show

53:49 min | 1 year ago

The new science of success

"Are you a success. We owe kids grow up to be the next SCO. Mo- will be on say the next Ash Bharti or terrence. Tau Is it possible tail. And how could you measure such a thing success in art music science. That's what today's program is all about. It was a success. I know you've heard of his dad but the sun and what about then gough. The artists or even poor young fronts Schubert upped today Sanchez. One of those possible pieces of research ahead of its time looking for ways to tell the shape of good things to come will it at work just listen and and science is based on the premise. The natural phenomena can be quantified understood and predicted Komo. Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves a century before they were detected. But what if we replace natural phenomena with human behavior and say human behavior can be quantified understood and predicted. So let's let's see it. Sounds like science fiction Shen now. In the age of big data some scientists are convinced we can predict human behavior new uh by one by random. Today the science show takes us on a journey into a new field of research. Science of success in the program is written by Annamaria. Tell us and presented by me Simon gnashed last year we spent the equivalent of two point eight million years. He is online day after day. We generate an astronomical amount of data stored on DVD's the stack would reach to the Moon and Back Khameini Times. Ninety percent of this avalanche of information was produced just in the last two years and it's growing at an ever increasing rate. This date not created the unique opportunity the opportunity to quantify human behavior. We have a lens on social life. That has only just come into existence as we tweet sin texts emails upload photos videos conduct searches and shop online. We leave our digital fingerprints behind as sensitive as we he might be about. How privacy analyzing all that data could be a good thing for the network Science Pioneers Albert Laszlo bad about she and Duncan Watts this universe of big Dada opens up the possibility of understanding and how our world works society in a sense? 'cause lots of people lots of individuals interacting with each other and this is always how sociologists geologists have thought about the world. But you could never measure right you could sort of look out your window and see a crowd of people but you couldn't actually tell which of those people knew you which of those other people. What were the consequences of that for how they behaved after they walk out of your view and do something else and within the blink of an eye? We've come to a place where we actually can one of the questions. That fascinates professor watts is why some people or product doc succeed while others don't of everybody likes ACDC or Shakespeare or the Mona Lisa. It's not really a problem. But there's two cents in in which it might be a problem one. Is that some decisions that we make societies have irreversible and potentially terrible consequences for us. We elect to run out governments. What was we decided to go on? There are certainly choices that we make about who is in charge that can have very very large consequences and if those outcomes have been driven by luck than that may be something that we worry about but the other point which is less obvious this is that it changes how we think about how to treat each other so if you think that everyone who is successful deserves to be successful because that's just how the world works so if they weren't good and they didn't work hard then they wouldn't be successful and if you think that everyone who's not successful doesn't and deserve to be successful must have done something wrong and that's why they're not successful then everybody's gotten what they deserve. You shouldn't help people. You shouldn't do you anything. You should just accept that all of the inequality and differences that we see when we look around us is there because it reflects uh intrinsic differences between people. So what kind of world do we Livin. Even is it a world where true quality prevails or is success down to random luck to answer the question back in two thousand thousand six Watson. His team created an artificial music market on a website. They called the music lab. We took a bunch of songs by bands of people hadn't heard of and we. We recruited tens of thousands of people online and we had them come and listen to the song. What they didn't know is that some people were just being shown the names of the bands? The songs and other people were also been showing how many times songs had been downloaded by people ahead of them. In addition where you could see the downloads. We further partition people into independent worlds. It's where they could only see the downloads and the counts of of people in their world so we created many different copies of the universe in effect. We'd like to think that quality prevails and the popularity of the songs would be the same everywhere and surely enough in the control group with with attains couldn't see the writings a sense of what people like best emerged but in the worlds of social influence each group developed a different tasted music. A song which was successful within one world sank to the bottom of the pile in another clearly. It wasn't talent that was driving success. The first people who came along had quite a bit of influence in how trajectories evolved so. You're the first person there. Nothing has any downloads. And so you just kind of do whatever you do. But then the next person comes along and they can see that someone has been there before them and has downloaded some of these songs they think. Oh maybe post did some work. They learned some things. I'm GonNa take advantage of that information. I'm going to listen to the songs that they listened to. That person has already been influenced already more likely to pick the more popular songs and so that get out in front and once that happens. It's difficult to undo it and what we could see is. Is that relatively quickly. The world's would lock themselves into a particular ranking and once they were locked into that ranking it tended to reinforce itself so that ranking thinking wasn't completely arbitrary though some songs that really were better than others but it was more than fifty percent abitrary as a result within each swelled the difference in popularity became greater and when the scientists looked at the overall popularity of songs across all social influence worlds. There was an even more interesting. Finding the same song could do very differently. It was one song long. For example that was the most popular song in one world and it was fourth last forty four thousand four hundred songs in another world so that song soaring during woman's swings in popularity across different worlds since the popularity of songs depended on what the first listener happened alike. Success success became unpredictable in other words if he ran history again something different would happen. The music lab experiments suggest that successful successful people might not be the most talented but the luckiest. I think we see similar things in the real world. Where certain books movies AUTISTS whatever they get locked into this pantheon they become the big things that everybody's talking about that everyone's paying attention to and then we regenerate stories narratives about why there are whole world sort of reorganizes around him and then once that's happened there there. It's so even if it were tunnel. Lactic got them there in the first place. Once they're they're they're really sort of locked in to professor walks by and large were in the hands of fortune but a Dutch psychologist found a way to control that role of the dice. It's possible to be the one who was handing out the luck to play lady for tuna and allocates successes successes to song and with Volvo successes to others inspired by what's experiment on November elite. Wanted to test the idea further. It is really important. Study Indebted Show through a beautiful ingenious design that the successive people and products is fundamentally unpredictable. What I was inspired inspired by Me Think is to what extent is is really happening in the real world so I wanted to know. Is it possible to show that the world behaves this way. He did this on kickstarter which is an online crowd funding platform and people vie for the generous dollars euros of other individuals. They propose a project is can be anything from making a movie or developing some kind of science closing people might like or anything else and looking for some money within a certain period of time and they run an online campaign ventilate chose pool of projects. He thought were good enough. We selected projects that just launched an headed race. Any money yet. And we didn't flip the coin to decide which of these deserving projects would get our money in which not from two hundred projects thunder. It contributed money to half and designated the others as his control group then. He sat on the sidelines watching their fates. Unfold will happen this dad over the course of following days weeks those projects that we had given this initial advantage subsequently also attracted donations from other individuals too much greater degree than the projects that we hadn't given his initial advantage. The results were striking. Those who received vandal. It's donation doubled their chances of attracting further funds. Vastly outperforming the AVAS. He chose not to support. Vandalise initial nations will mocking project's success. He steered the hands. Hands of Fortuna. Kickstart experiment does reviews. In a live system. Arbitrary things can become successful simply because our coin flip decided that we will get some projects. Some money abroad no money and is showed what what's a challenger artificial setting that is how many systems in the real world were. He was the proof that even in real life things can be successful courtesy of luck however luck is not fairly distributed. Life is not like a thoroughgoing got going on. There can be self reinforcing spirals of success. Do you get lucky early on Dan. Everything goes your way there people who miss out and they end up living very different from lives however I think that in our culture our default interpretation of any success is that individual is personally responsible for success. I remember having this discussion many years ago with an editor who was perfectly happy to accept my judgment that Madonna may have been a fluke history. But as soon as I mentioned Bob Dylan he said No. No no absolutely not Bob Dylan is a genius. There was no way that that was lucky. He was destined to be successful. But if you look at Bob Dylan's career. There are plenty of moments where it might not have worked out the way that it did in history and we're very very reluctant to accept Jeff that kind of judgment we keep wanting to think well sure everybody has these sort of random successes and failures in their careers. But there's this true talent want some people have and they will succeed no matter what that even if they have setbacks and values they're going to pick themselves up and they're going to succeed and that is guaranteed. I think we really believe that. Of the artists and other great figures that re- revere let me see superstars these individuals Israel's possess some kind of incredible quality that other individuals don't have but I think that a lot of research that has recently conducted once in a different direction one one seemingly whimsical finding this area. Is that in order to be successful. You need to be born in the right month at least if you want to make your mark in life this is sports star Tadic Jane Animal in the Netherlands used to be the case that in soccer teens September I was the cutoff date. And so the oldest kits were born in September number work tober and he's ended up as it turns out also the superstars in the Dutch socrates so if you look at the distribution of birthdates in the Dutch soccer not what you would see as a large concentration of individuals born yet at the end of the summer the beginning of the fall but this is far more than just coincidence in the ninety s is Scott. This changed so where the threshold used to be at end of the summer. It was changed to January first beginning of the year and what we now see it is precisely the effect of that. Most of the star players are all born at the beginning of the year. January February one explanation is the age difference. The children were almost five. Years old are much better than children of just turned four and so they are faster they are stronger. They outperformed the other kids into into team. But what's even more significant is another affect. The coach will encourage these better performing pliers. They get special attention the go then to soccer practice more often the barons think of them as more successful is more able and a are putting a trajectory to become a star soccer ochre Blair. The selected plays received bid at teammates and more opportunities and as a result they become the best players as adults fulfilling the prophecy that they are the most talented and is otherwise unnoticed effect that scientists have uncovered juices. At an early age sped. Between successful missile and unsuccessful able expected brilliance encourages brilliance. It's a powerful force. We could all use to see success. Yes the desire to understand. Success is also the passion of Ivanova Scientists Network Pioneer Albert Laszlo Bashi. I'm an interest scientists. I've been trying to understand the different types of networks works around US Social Network soon. We talk to subsidize networks. Gene Simmons cells are connected and how the breakdown metro police took disease communication networks and so on networks science has revolutionized how we think about epidemics power failures and fighting disease. Much of the research we have done in. Twenty years was really focusing on how the wittily quantify these letters. How do we describe hype them? How do we talk about them? And how do we measure the properties. Six or seven years ago we became interested in a different question. We Arup notes in the network. We are no in the social network. We're not in the professional network that connects us to the other colleagues in our profession. And we're curious to one does the network affect our life our success our ability to get ahead or when is it that actually pulled suspect suspect intriguingly Barabash. She's first discovery of success started with a disaster. I had and a fabulous student Daschle Lang who was just finishing his first project that focused on mobile phones and disasters bike than there were a lot of new. Oh studies about human behavior. A lot of these studies were about human behavior under normal conditions but in fact a lot of times. He's Astor's or emergencies happen and often. These are the Times that the models or our them school fail he asked. Could we use the massive data on the phone call patterns of individuals to detect attacked where some emergency sticky place. We had a great paper to show that really the mobile phone patterns change and that could be detectable. Well actually from looking at default data. We told this going to be for disaster relief for just simply figuring out. There's is something wrong going on and being resources there so we wrote a paper about that but we were lucky the publication process we we sent to several journals and one juror after the under one ejected. The paper even lost paper for several months. So when this this project was winding down Deshaun came to me and said what's next. What should I be doing next and I asked him what you WanNa do? And he said Oh whatever it is just not what the other disaster so we had a big laugh about that and I said well how. `Bout success then how about the science of success It was meant to be a joke but then we kind of looked at each other and realize this is interesting and we started discussing and we've started realizing that indeed the two of network science could actually offer us an angle to really explore success or lack of it is scientific terms jumped on it right away during my time there I probably was involved among the most projects that failed back. Then there were bio- group there were math group or control group and we gradually we call ourselves to success group but in the beginning I remember a lot of people joke with me and all signs of success sounds like a funny term. It wasn't taken more seriously so it was actually interesting to see now is Worry flourishing community merging around it Desheng Wang Wing and Barabash. She sit out to tackle the first project. They asked how to success emerge in academia they based it on a massive data set. It called WEYMOUTH size containing more than thirty seven million papers. Six hundred seventy million citations and more than eight million authors from nine fifty five to two thousand fifteen dollar first alleger into success was to try to understand other reproducible signals. In the success of scientific papers our goal has been to understand the packers that characterized the career of a scientist. At first glance. It didn't look do promising promising. If you look at the citation of each individual paper over time is a remarkable annoys pattern which is intuitive because there there could be many many different factors that determine the impact of each paper but being adventurous they built a model that incorporated the three key ingredients. They they thought would be essential for successful papers. Number one ingredients is the idea that higher side of the papers. Morad hands are more likely to be cited again again if you collect them more citations than your chance of. Being cited increases the second ingredient is aging more. Recent papers are more likely to garner more attention because as fresh but with time is attractiveness expected to fade away and the thirty ingredients is that we have to acknowledge that person personnel. You hiring three different the interval novelty or the size of all the speak too soon enough. A patent emerged to their surprise. It had the path of prediction is actually what we just discovered. Robert is a universality that was unknown to us before we started our study we actually find. There's a remarkable amount of regularity the underlying the system. The MODEL was not designed for predictions is really the minimum model is really taking into account only the factors. We absolutely have to take into account given that simplicity of the model. I think in the end the predictive power we document it in the paper was at least quite surprising to me so an our you mentioned this model would have actually some degree of predictive power and we ended up building a very good predictive although that few months or a few yourself papers. Publication good foretell is long-term history could ls twenty years down with anybody care onto paper or not at all or how many people will continue citing it. Even without reading eating a word of any of them Wang in Barbari she could predict the success of individual science papers turns out they shed just one characteristic juristic the total impact of research paper is not determined. By how fast the paper choirs detention hop prominent prominent to alter SAR where was it published but is determined by a single parameter to fitness parameter fitness. This is one St.. Contrary Speaker and my excited about do I want to continue that research retired about or I just throw it in my drawer and move in other words. Success originated in the network from the cumulative response of individuals. Why why is it important for us to know the future impacted for research paper well because it takes time and if it takes time to acquire impact then junior researchers will always be a disadvantage a senior scientists has published many papers so already has a good track record and measurable impact impact junior researchers those starting their career? Don't have the track record. And maybe he or she just published a paper for which twenty years later. We'll get the Nobel price. Well we have no way of knowing because not enough time has passed for paper to choir. It's impact Efe if however I can measure fitness Bamadoro for paper soon after its publication which we can then I can fast forward death research paper and potentially decided to S- career and tell you about his or her future. I can tell you this. Scientists may not have had that impact. You expect right now former Nobel Prize winner but the way twenty years and she will be in in line for the next lower price. The finding also has a much broader significance. It's a realization that instead of being an individual phenomenon. Imminent success is a collective measure it's driven by forces. No one could see unless looking through the lens of big data. We we study. We go to school. We exercise we practice such it. Weakened increase our performance expectation. Being that if I have performance silence success will come but very very different performance is something that you do half fast. Huron what kind of painting superbeing issue. Being what kind of deal super together as a businessman success however is about what the community not deceive your performance. What did they acknowledge it? And by their daily reward you for it or not your performances about you but your success is about toss it's about publicity so therefore when we think about success we cannot just look in `isolation at success we need to look at the performance. Devils the roots of your success. We need to look at it. SPEC knowledge moment and acceptance is it by the community and we need to look at the networks that brought your success to Tashin off your environment Wang's first paper to two years to complete and was published in the most prestigious journal. Science in running from disaster they'd stumbled across success. What Barabash Shan Wang will learn about their own field old was fascinating and it quickly became clear they could use the same approach to examine success in other realms did the same patents apply to sport art? Could they foresee which movies or books would become a sensation but about she and his team started together. Massive data sets from very different fields. What we have done? That is still reconstruct every individual's career whether that was successful or not we deconstruct career of all artists Ole award. About half a million upton whether they made it into Moma or deferred Thursday they got is to show in a corner gallery and we look at all times place whether they became number one or two hundred or never even made needed there. And the reason we did is because we wanted to distill what really distinguishes the successful from the not so successful because if we look at only individuals which he certain level of success we could throw completely wrong lucious in order for really understand one. What distinguishes successful individuals from those who tried and failed it? We need to look at both of them. And that's exactly what we did but before they began they had to do a bit of data cleaning accuracy of the. It is very very important for us to get started. Once we had that we used to power of big data to characterize every single career career and to understand what are the patron saint law that distinguish those who really go on to become very successful from those who don't achieve that level of prominence. The next challenge was drawn tangled performance from success and Barabash assigned onto a young Turkish researcher. bochu juice soy. We wanted to see what is individual performance and then from individual performance. How we turn sleek that into success in general in terms of popularity and society like now and we looked at tennis players and the reason we looked at tennis players is is because that's one of those areas where performance is very accurately measurable? We know whether you won or lost. We know whether you're better than the other tennis-player we can very accurately measure your performance and changes during your career but it also offers us the possibility to measure success that is how does the community as well as the population is large. View your performance. Are they interested in you. Are they going to give you awards. Are they going to visit your Wiki. pedia pitch are going to google you so sports really gives us a playground where we can look simultaneously at performances. Norman says success. Luckily there was a huge to study and useless to unveil the relationship between performance and success. So we we took all the first rational tournaments in the years at V. Look at the data. You look at the Vince and then how much they increase in the rankings. Winning winning a smaller tournament is not as important as playing more bigger tournament. So those kind of dynamics sort of known by the teen tennis enters yes but he you had to vigorously look all day than show. Yes this is. Actually what's happened. Winning in tennis is a clear cut got case of performance. What's the measure of success the define success as fame and popularity? How well known you are as is the measure of popularity? We wanted to see something that is kinda changes on a daily basis but overall is robust and kind of tells us the overall popularity of a tennis player and that's why they used. BP Patriots so how many people look at this tennis and his players VP debate on different timescales to begin with juice so we had to download all the data files that showed how many times each wikipedia page page was visited. Then she could start. Retrieving information for tennis. Players for years ago at the time of Kapadia had a huge data dump trump which contained all the VP pages in existence. Working from two thousand seven and how many people click on those pages on an hourly basis. Those files are very big so you have just go in there and basically slept the correct ones and way that you're not biasing results basically basically so you have to be very careful. It's a nice challenge. I get excited about it. Actually one by one Jew so reconstructed the popularity history of all tennis tennis players. She then search for patents in popularity in performance. The process took almost two years to complete but it paid off. What what the scene when we did? The research is that except for a few and easily explained cases. Whatever the players did on the field was immediately and very accurately reflected in how many people were interested in that play? Aw You just see the performance and you can tell you this. Many people. Click on this person's page tomorrow. In a week or after that events or after that play retired appeared that many people will still be clicking on this page on a regular basis can predict all that very accurately just looking at the players performance apartments so that was very nice in tennis performance and success were closely linked allowing precise predictions. Our predictions are very accurate for two reasons one is that performance is a good predictor of popularity. But on the other hand you also have a very well working model because we based on big data where performance can be accurately measured. It drives success but this is limited to some very specialised fields tennis. The hundred meters dash rush and Chis- most of us however work in areas where performance is much more difficult to measure. There's often not a single number number that will tell our performance. There is no chronometer that would allow us to gidget and this area where performance is simply not possible to measure it. All out aren't is very special. Place from the sexist perspective is because it's impossible to look into art and understand it some value out of context if you think about duchamp famous war defunding. That really changed history if you look at it. Could you decide whether it's a valuable work or it's simply a piece water. What was and Dax fan series that no you cannot decide in order to understand the value of contemporary? Aren't you need to understand who did that. Were was the war by the same mocked exhibited before and what happened with the artist after that exhibition. And how is that art work integrated in the history of art. The value is not purely into artwork itself. But it's really in the context of the art district discourse but she had a long standing interest in Baden. Auden hot and was keen to find has exists emerges in the art world artists. Personal for me. When I was in high school? I was preparing to be an artist. I will studying drawing join and sculpture and my ultimate dream was to become a sculptor. I had the renew depth when I was an assistant Professor University of Notre Dame where I have taken Most of the art classes available for students. Even though I was a professor I would actually sitting on the bench with the rest of the students studying black and white photography art history three and so on a few years ago I was already working. Networks suddenly oppportunity to explore. Art opened up. I was visiting one of my colleagues slap at the Network Science Institute in Boston and during the discussion idealized at one of the Post. Docs of the suits. Sam had accessed an amazing missing data. Set that captured. All the gallery and museum exhibitions surround. The board no matter of an artist exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in in New York or in one gallery Melbourne Budapest. The data contained all artists in the last forty years and their exhibition histories and how much they work sold for an auction. This data set really contain about half million artists and about ten thousand museums and galleries by connecting connecting art through museums and galleries and the results of auctions data scientists Sam Freiberga and Roberta Sinatra made the invisible network of art visible. And we did this by using a network analysis. We basically look how artists travel from Gallery to gallery from gallery to museums. We asked was you were exhibited in gallery worded artist. Go next museum the or gallery be this Dros cops links from one gallery to another guy from a museum to another museum and we construct a Turkey complex subject of nodes and links it described old artists movements around award even in the small exhibition Misha's basis and once we had to career individuals. We ask the question. Why do certain artists become really successful? Auditor's bit often indistinguishable former fart are totally unknown to us When it comes to success? John Michel Basquiat. Aldea's offer a kind of twin study. You're not a striking example of how people with a common beginning experience. Wildly divergent. Outcomes is very young students studying getting into same art school hoping to become one of her students name was obvious and he was Damore experience depair a few years earlier. Norman Mailer wrote the book of the Graphic Design in New York City included him in his work in his book. The other will totally unknown at that time yet. Two years after the pair broke up and they continued to do art independently unknown artist and did up painting a S- call that decades later sold for one hundred ten million dollars becoming the most expensive work of contemporary art in America that unknown students name. Is Jean Genre Michelle and so the question is front of us. How is it possible that two artists who start together paint indistinguishable official work thirty years later one of them becomes the legend into artwork and defined the Canon and the other one? The US is still during the New York senior. No one knows really about his work for scientists. This is an ideal twin experiment to understand how value is created that they needed to track the trajectory of individual artists through the network and these data set allowed us to do this data that allowed us to determine the invisible networks that create value that is for example in order to arrive in Moma. You don't actually get exhibited in moment just by the value of art that you produced dead decision collided. ex-deputy Mama depends very much on. Where was your arc exhibited? Before what other curator's what other art critics considered your work Orca fat you. The outcome of the research was a majestic map. There was a constellation of exhibition spaces dominated by a handful of stock. Ah Galleries totally amazing. There was one dense island at contained ought all the high value institutions Moma Guggenheim gallery. The museum on do go see Gallery base gallery you name ain't and there were down Connected because they kept exchanging artists window but these high value cluster existed of many islands. That were totally is lit from the center of the art. These were big clusters of many museums and galleries. That exchange change art is between them but had no path for ARC is to go from island to the center of art for for the high value. Is it mended. You could be an artist in Australia and Oceania and have day after day major exhibits locally but none of those institutions since has ended things too big European American institutions to really jump. Start Your career and move it into where value is so what the map showed us that the key to success in art is word. Start on this map if you start right in the middle in the high value cluster. You stayed there for yourself your career if however you started to Perry Very. It's very difficult for you to get into the center. If you will one of the five hundred thousand artists you can let yourself in the map and even more incredibly. If you've had head just five exhibitions this art world network can predict your future. The surprising result is that the first thirty five exhibitions basically determine the success of an artist. Later is a shocking. You'll do five exhibitions in about two or three years and this has an effect even twenty thirty years later really shocking result this algorithm was scaring the accurate we assess. Why are we so accurate? So the reason why we were so good at predicting the future career of these artists is because all the knowledge needed is already in the network that this devaluation is already gained. What were the galleries accepted your work? An and interconnections does galleries and museums had to the artwork at Larch so once I knew where you started your career we could actually follow the network Torque to predict the possible future path for you. And whether you're going to go up stay where you are or even go down. And also we can predict the likelihood that our days will have a hip in the auction market. or whether the Diet is will have museum acquisitions Sir. Now number of success brock's these these findings take his one of the main principles of success when it's measurable like running one hundred meter me too. Race performance is very closely linked to success but win performance copy mission like the quality of an artwork. It's the network the the drive success way you are in the network determines your fate which brings us back to LDS and jean-michel basket basket. What was the difference between them on deals approach art from Duke Performance Perspective Bus? Kat was born networker as soon as he ended his collaboration with the US. He sold a postcard to end the war. who was just beginning to become? I'm Doug Granddad. You'll do art scene in New York City. And then within a few months he really entered the network of artists determined arts in time in New York City and a few months after they broke apart. He sold his work for twenty thousand dollars which was in the ninety. Nine hundred is an exceptionally mild. So we have to artists whose work is practically indistinguishable one of them continue simply painting the other starts networking and aggressively entering the scene by relentlessly building. His celebrity connections best gate went from homeless teenager to a-list artist in under two years delays on the other hand continued to perfect. What is underground street art? And that's where he stayed. Whether or not linked to performance these experiments show success emerges from the social world how our community seas performance own the big data approach to investigating getting success resulted in another inside the nature of success and performance. A fundamentally different Perhaps the biggest surprise for me was that performance and success are mathematically very very different objects to understand what I mean. Let's take running gatling Berlin vans as ahead of the field uh-huh Tex can play six. You can measure precisely how fast someone arounds we also know who is the fastest manoeuvres. Which is your same bold and we know that because he wins one competition addition after the other one is the busters on the planet? But when you look at he's and his competitors you realize that aren't so different from each other. The fastest earth is not training twice as fast as he's competitors the difference between the winner and loser at any competition is typically one percent or less and not only that you same boat it cannot outrun his competition. What he's not running twice as fast as I do and I'm not a runner? There is early to be small variability the ability in performance in other mathematically what we learned is that performance is bounded we say that performance is bounded ended when is described by Abella curve or some other exponential distribution telling us that most people have roughly the same running speed. There are a few little bit faster than average but dudes are not significantly outrunning the average person but maybe by ten twenty percent or so the bounded. -Ness of the performance has important consequences. The most important consequence says that at the top there will be a few individuals whose performance is virtually indistinguishable and you need need very very accurate measurement to select chronometers to really dug them apart and even in sports often. It's impossible put them apart. My favorite example is the last Olympics scenery. where in demand swimming tree swimmers were the Bronx Bronx because Singapore has won an Olympic gold medal? Judge of schooling trip away. Second CARACAL fouts tablet and Laszlo Chair have all got a silver medal. Why did they have to share debrosse? bryce price wasn't a decree awry. I oh it was pretty clear. Because they're video recording showing us which swinger touch first of all the reason they have to share debrosse price is because the jury could not decide which of them swam faster because a- curiosity of the swimming pool was about one inch and the time difference between the finalists was less than it takes To swim one inch DIS- so even in areas where we have video recordings and chronometers we are unable to distinguish the number one number two from number three. Then what do we expect in most areas where we work from teacher to Dr to scientists scientists to a sales person. How can we ever measure who is number one in who is numbered? We simply can't and so. In most areas of life other factors like biases and random luck are the handmaiden of success. But we are yet to reveal. Neil the dirty secret of success. Why performance is bounded? Success is unbounded and away. We know that is that every time we're able to measure success. We see very different distribution that we think performance when we measure success. Yes we see what we call the power or factor distribution telling us that most individuals have very little and then a few have an exceptionally lot and when it comes to success the difference between number one and number two is not one percent but can be an order of magnitude took but how could a small difference in performance translate to such a huge difference in success. It's because instead of giving opportunity to newcomers. We usually endorse the superstars. The rich get richer and Abbas just as talented arrive about studying. Science of success has fundamentally changed. The way I approach. Success changed the way wise. My students might Mike Trainees about their life and their success. It helped me understand what matters. And what doesn't it helped me understand to spend performance is crucial but only after a certain point and once he reached a certain level of performance. Dan Dan Ending. Fine person really makes no difference. Success is not purely about performance S. I thought it was before I started. Did you speak church or I will still like my teachers and nine. My parents success. Who's about performance and the recession of performance Tsk? I also learned. The delay performance translates into success is not Randall. Mental very precise is loss and patters that describe how a given performance become successful or fails and much of our research is about about the loss that described his transition. How and when can we quantify that? And how do you as an individual mutual take advantage of this law to further your career that he's to translate your performance debt. You have into the the success that you deserve Keven the Mount of work you put into to restore performance instead of waiting for a lucky win. enfor we now have signs to help us achieve success. The science may be new but the Matt's is not it underpins millions of individual individual stories each which can be understood through this new way of looking at the world. You Eh you heard. Simon gnashed with a sign show Britain and produced by Anna Maria towels with technical production by Simon Breath White and and scientists producer David Fisher and before I go one more success. An Order of Australia to Dr Gael Jennings Science is reporter very high standing once of ABC. News and quantum. I'm Robin Williams

scientist tennis US soccer Simon gnashed New York City Dan Dan Ending Bob Dylan professor Norman Mailer Albert Laszlo professor watts Mo Moma Einstein Volvo Kickstart Barabash Shan Wang Schubert
Episode 460 - #Megxit

Ross Patterson Revolution!

1:17:51 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 460 - #Megxit

"It side gentlemen who come to the rocks. Komo news by KGO SPENT DOT right car at that. Needs how you today. I'm great. How are you better than better Jabes? There's certain stories that go out into the world. I give people a false sense of hope. False sense of reality. In in a in a bombshell one just dropped opt this morning that when i read it I was like all right. I want to see what this is. If it's real and then to like I I've I've started following on instagram now. It's a seven year old. Who They're calling the preschool Picasso Genius branding by the way really genius Genius Brainy Boom Preschool? Picasso was in was like what he's taking the art world by storm and he's only seven and he's a prodigy and they've said please dealt with fame for more than half of his life. Oh we have since he was three and a half. This is on like Yahoo News. You know the most basic the new site you could possibly get the most generic besides the AP most generic should ever so they don't really have salacious made up stories so therefore I was like well. Fuck doc I gotTa look this this little kid up. Who is this little? Shit you know turns out He's German as his name is Miquel Akar Ak A. R. and he's from Cologne and he's really is really for real. I looked up on instagram. I I came on the show started following him and I was looking at Shit and I'm like dude. He's seven our kid draws right. He's he's five years old. Yeah At no no means what I say. He's the next Picasso or a bank see or BOSC yachts what's But the shit that he's doing is pretty complex and I'm always weary when I see art art shit blow up like expensive artworks or bottles of wine because we've seen all those documentaries were all that shit ends up being fake. Somebody else could be paying for this kid. I don't really know I'd like to put them in a room and then have that videotape slight catfish remember. Catfish the movie. Yes he falls in love with the no he first starts talking to the young girl. And 'cause she is like this art prodigy and then falls in love with with the older sister. None of them are real. It's all an old lady fucking so this I'd like to get him in a room. I like to paint this shit But I will say this his attitude the way he talks he already sounds like an exhausted board artists so that that kind of leads me too. Maybe this Israel I mean I'm going to read you. Some of his quotes again. These aren't like the parents So you never know. Do you really know he has been doing interviews so like this is real and like he said this is an interview interview and first of all the dad was like hey man. We didn't know we didn't know anything about this. The first picture look fantastic and I thought at first that my wife had painted because there's some artwork that my child is brought home from school when I was like. Oh my God you do this and then you're like I did. Yeah you're like a good artist right. Look you've got to do some stuff and I totally get it right so I it's understandable. He would say this he said. I thought maybe it was just a coincidence. By the second or third pictures sure it was clear that he had real talent. God dammit man. One of his first work sold for twelve thousand dollars and gave the proceeds through a children's charity. Keep Out Their family didn't now rich already or I don't know but In this interview he tells the press that his his idols are Jackson. pollock Michael Jackson which hey man you should probably flip at seven. ooh Boy Imagine of this kid of imagine if Mj was still alive now and he could get his tongue wrong in that seven year old behold for this kid of of an artist you know we would've fucking tried right We've all seen the dock at this point and by the first I by the way they those kids appealed. That thing is going to trial. So they're going to get a little A little hectic for the MJ state here over the next year and then John Michel Basquiat. S- Sean Michelle. I'm terrible those names. Well what does it look Clayton. M. I c. h. e. l. but is it is that Michael Only took the artists like I don't know Michelle would be. Oh what whatever whatever do artists artists you know what I'm saying. I WANNA call him John I would. I would have said a hard Jane with gene. You Know Sabine Jean. Jean Michel Basket Bass Queen Michael Basque weights. But yeah. So here's the problem. We have all these people from all over the world. Now who are watching buying this kid's things and he just says his portraits and people people are like critics are saying the balance and harmony of composition. I wouldn't expect that from child and you're like Oh boy no. I got a good Morgan Freeman and on. Oh we go. The kid will be Odeen on drugs by the time. He's twelve because if you've got art critics from around the world flying in viewing your shit. He had an exhibit already his own exhibits and ends boy. There's this is going both ways here in this article with a look as long as there's somebody that supporting him in non exploiting in him and he's a great future ahead of them He the kid says look. When I'm older I WANNA be a football player? Each painting is quite tiring for me. Sometimes it can take a long time especially with boxing gloves. He Paints boxing life And they're cool Shit Shit like I looked at all the portraits a boxing glove in the middle of these things. I don't know why somebody's making him do it. seems right now like kids. Don't if something's tiring and they don't really like it they don't do it. You know that right and if they WANNA play football they go out and play football. You know what I'm saying and by football soccer because it's in Europe right but if they WANNA play soccer they go out and play soccer if they wanna paint eight they paint. They did not do anything unless it's homework they don't do anything they don't WanNa do. Parents telling his last game eight zero on the soccer team and he was pretty amped about that I if parents say look he only paints when he wants to. Sometimes it's once a week sometimes. It's once a month we don't now we do know is this. The father has stopped doing real life jobs and now he's the kids manager so tell okay. Well that's going to be if you hate if you're Michael Jackson. Once you get Joe Jackson and see how that turned out that worked out fucking garage like a Goddamn sweatshop with your father cranking up the heat and be wary of anyone that wants to mentor him. Yeah roof with a slow hand. I'm GONNA be honest. It's okay it's okay. He's seven seven. You said he was seven. You said that was unimpressed. Art Critic at a Gallery Gallery like that. You got pulled out of your Hollywood hills home to come down to this art gallery in Santa Monica Right now honestly with this. That's how it is now. I'm looking at it and I'm like I'm astle people know that contrive. Okay okay. I'm an asshole. People know that I think it's great actually so and I'm not I would tell you if it was shit. I think it's pretty great. I don't know if it's him doing it But it's pretty goddamn great now. My biggest issue with his entire article and the Preschool Picasso. Is You you get these news. Stories sent to your phone. Most every white woman in America with an IPHONE. You know wasn't programmed at properly not shitting on that because you're getting news and I think that's helpful. The problem I have with it is this. They're going to wake up. Read this story raffling. No but they're going to wake up. Read this story. And then think they're seven year old is going going to be the next Preschool Picasso and I'm just like Melian it'll be. It'll be a trend for a little bit with the mommy the mummies right. Yeah but look boy. Whatever you the easiest the painter I'm GonNa be honest to the easiest painter to just to do exactly as Picasso for child who for anybody uh-huh for anyone okay? I don't know anything about. Have you taken like an impressionist or something. Come back with a monet. I'll have a preschool monet. And then we'll talk may middle school monet. ooh You gotta go keep the M.'s. Consistent I get an boy away oh boy I just think of some woman in Arkansas right now in a in a looking at her iphone this morning morning with his story pops up and they're just like oh my on my fucking kid. Who can he drew two tires on a man's body and L.? Yeah he called Trans Man and your Shit Shit Man. Yeah it can be shopping that everywhere you know going down to the Denny's knees. Hey you might if we hang this trans man sketched up here right above the hostess. Stan Right No. We don't all now. Now hear me out here and now I'm going to sell it for thirty five and you're going to give fifteen we deal shake hands bidding it spinning shake my hand. That's what's going to happen. I think to somebody's some of these people. We've seen some of these parents right down. My kid is gifted and who've Louis don't have that we don't have to worry about that we'll never be pulled aside and be like you know yeah. I think he needs to be Dan Gate. I think he needs to go to astronaut camp. No no he's fine. He's going to be really good looking That can take you far enough if in this world so I'm proud of that at least yeah but the rest of it. It's normal kids shit. Normal child nothing special about him. Sure sure no cure but this one boy I just. I woke up with a good hearty chuckle. And then you got a new follower Mikhail a car. I'm I'm fallen you. I can't wait next moves I ooh. Yeah bussing them. CRAYONS is in Cran is at the medium. No that's all paint. It's for real. I'm not into art that much. But it's really fucking cool and I'm a minute a minute. Some you gotTA follow instagram. You can follow him and he's got lake. It's called like portrait Sir. The crazy on their Mikhail a car. You're looking forward to his next works. Jacobs you know what I'm saying. Sure Jesse's Jesse's not impressed if somebody's out there. Can we get a gift of Jesse's face from the show on on Youtube and just Jesse's not impressed I want a new Michaela's not impress ebbing. I've never lie. I haven't heard weaken unimpressed by a seven-year-old unbelievable painting. Uh God so good so good. We're We're back in the real world now. things are things are slow down so to speak since the Iran thing was just like they kind of truck sat on back down. And it's just like all right great. CNN is is ramped up the impeachment. Again you ready. They're supposed to be now. They're saying into as of today they're supposed to be impeachment trial next week possibly Time magazine is an interesting photo. not that I've lifetime or of ever given a shit about time am but they've got Pelosi on the cover in black and white Looking real terse goof off into the distance thousand yard stare or she could be seventy eight years old near death right Either way whatever's there that is gambler's choice right It says her gamble on here and I. It's interesting because that's what we've said for all right. The only thing left was to gamble on this impeachment piecemeal thing because after that it's it's over right they haven't she hasn't given the articles of impeachment to the Senate pretty do now. What do you do that? Nobody really cared. Stock Market is crazy. Iran backed down after blowing up. Dude like you do now is if you lose this on top of all the other shit. You've lost everything over four years or three and a half essentially If I were them I wouldn't have this go to trial and just be like great. Here's the the fucking things. Go vote the way you're gonNA vote. We all know what the vote is going to be in. Let's get this over with and then try to focus back on the candidates The Iowa caucuses coming up. I sixth so we are shit. Twenty seven days away. So you're gonNA know who the winner of the Iowa Caucus and who. The front runner is at that point points. I'm looking forward to that circus. Show coming back. Yeah I don't own it starts. I think January thirtieth January thirtieth back. Yeah 'cause they're getting on the trail with this guy's right yeah and then lead into the thing The hilarious thing is for super left. Show having to cover this. Yeah they're really gonNA have their work cut out for him. Yeah I mean it's It's going to be hard. It's GonNa me interesting because I'm I'm I'm actually looking forward to that because the president has doesn't have to do anything. Yeah it looks like January. Twenty six Oh Jen Twenty six. So the president doesn't have to do anything and they're going to have to go after these people on the left and it's GonNa be it's GonNa be good. TV that's easy for them. They're very cannibal. cannibalistic they are. It's it's fun TV. Oh Yeah but I'm just saying like Democrats in general so yeah. Yeah but now. They're forced to only focus on that. Because there's there's nothing you can really do From the president side like he's going forward in the two thousand twenty election now. It's just going to be up against him So I'm I'm actually genuinely looking forward to that With those fuckers Ho Ho boy tried to come back the guy who got me to which Mark Halperin oh he did yes and what happened He. He wrote a book and it sold like one hundred sixty seven copies or something like it was. It was a crazy bomb right So he's I think he's gone for good now. Yeah but yeah. There's there's so much shit coming coming up in the next lake month with everything going on the Weinstein thing that starts started yesterday yesterday He is using a walker and just like an old man actor combat old man actor but tennis balls. He's got tennis balls tennis tennis balls on it really going method and many sightings of him without the Walker so very controversial. He's been out partying in New York with with like twenty seven year old women no Walker and apparently there was an accident an August which I thought would be news. Would we hear about Harvey Weinstein getting into a car accident or you think or they really bit. That under wraps may be maybe. was there. No car accident probably. He's he's pulling a cosby. Oh this is a harder percent cosby on the Sich and then He. He tried another tactic yesterday. That I've I've never seen in court. I thought it was really interesting. So the judge sits down and he's on his phone like this texting. Okay and the judges like hey man put in found fucking jail like you can't bring being a phone in accordance taxed like this and it was just like And the judge goes. Do you really want to spend the rest of your life in jail over texting. He puts down the phone immediately after this is over the his lawyers file a motion and say I want this judge out. He's Spice I. I WANNA new judge so they deliberately tried to piss him off so that he would say something like that. Everybody knows you can't use the phone to text at the table table during a court case really. I didn't yeah. I think it was all setup. Now they're trying to get a new judge. All of this is just delay. Delay Delay Delay Delay since the charges were filed against him in L. A. recently. Now he's trying to say hey. We need those charges. Are we need to delay this his trial because we can see what we're up against out in Los Angeles. It's become a whole thing. I think of the judge in New York. Fuck around like that. This will this will definitely we go down this year. But man he is pulling out all the stuffs. He's got to backed up against a wall yeah I know we talked about the FCC thing in every day it seems like more and more things are popping up and the one this morning. That's crazy fascinating pictures. Clinton on the plane with the girl elite express the other people that were on the plane now. I don't I know where these pictures keep coming from. Or who has them and why but now. They're starting to trickle out right. So this morning case ace that was against him a long time ago. Who is then leaking these? I guess so Clinton. That's why I don't believe in conspiracies. Nobody can in fucking keep the shit under wraps dude at very eventually. It will come out if there's anyone that wants to do the right thing out there. They're just has to be one person Clinton and was on there. The three separate photographs of Clinton dropped rent. The only thing I will say is the girl in the picture. The young girl who was with Prince Andrew or whatever whatever she said on this jet the pictures were all from this jet. She said that's bill. Clinton was the only one that was gentlemen men out of everyone and then he was a great guy. I was surprised by that and I was like. Are you getting paid for that biggest that because he doesn't like it to be consensual cool so if you're into it he's not I don't know he likes a good rape. Yeah Oh jeeves. Who knows who knows but The other ones were wild Kevin Spacey that what he was on the plane Chris Tucker Okay right after the Friday shit like a young Chris Tucker He was on the plane. uh-huh and They were they asked this woman. Where do these pictures come from? And she said there was a humanitarian efforts in Africa. Gotcha and the three of them had gone over to this thing with Epstein on his plane and And they were like what was it like lake and they were like well they just kind of talk shit and played cards the whole time and then they all this was fascinating to me and then when it got into like late into the night a movie be screened pulled down and they watched a movie and they were like yeah. Most of them fell asleep on the floor like and sleeping bags and then was like a big summer camp and I was like the island. No this was on the plane Lolita Express on the way over to Africa. She's like look. I can't speak peak as to what went on in the other flights or whatever but this one particular flights that I was on and yeah okay My the most interesting thing I took from all of this is to be that wealthy and powerful powerful and say. Hey Man I'm picking up 'cause Chris Tucker. The time was a fuck. It was right after was the movie. Jackie Chan Rush Hour. Oh to pick up. Kevin Spacey Chris Tucker in in the president of the United States and he'd be like hey man we're gonNA use my jet as opposed to anyone else's private jets in America. That's wild to me. And how do you become friends with someone like that. Which one Epstein? What's the connector there? Besides I'm a rich guy unless you're not doling out. prostes the girl of the Madam Yeah she there was a photo with Clinton in her She's the connector because she is Her she has a family name and family money and family connections. I want stores. That's what I said since day one if you can find her and when we think is you can't convict your. I think she was part of that. Other case that got sealed in the problem they tried to do all this. So I I looked it up and It it turns out they are actually trying to find her okay what she was like widely known where she was well. They're trying to question I. That's what I thought too but apparently certainly that photo and Santa Monica Photoshop. It's like yes. She was there but they photoshop background was gone and they said it appeared that it was four days earlier than what the background was changed to. direct is on that one but that they're trying to question Russian. Hurry and get a hold of her right now to see some of these other cases she can answer for because people are suing. Obviously some of these women these women are coming out doing interviews and Shit. Didn't like that was the one who buried Prince Andrew and all that stuff and she's been staying I guess with all of Epstein's powerful friends uh-huh hiding out in their houses. All around the world was what they've said but she doesn't look that old. I pegged at probably what early fifties many forties howled was epsteen. Seventy something. Yeah she's she's up there for sure do you think so Mhm they were like around the same age she might be a little bit younger than that would shoot down my theory of like look man. That's a long time to be on the Lam. She was late forties. I mean you're pregnant until you're seventy s you know yeah Thirty years a lot. Stay on the Lam. So so we'll see but the more the more and more of this These stories these pictures that keep coming out and She's fifty seven. Yeah the longtime the more and more than I. Something's gotTa happen. Eventually I would imagine yeah. Something's gotTa break in this so we'll see Speaking of breaking how about megs it adds hashtags it. Megan Markle is running the royal palace. Now I see we make her queen. God what's Jade's saves. She said well wouldn't she just love that to tell people what happened here. We don't really follow the royals. The other people would happen because she's gone. She got them. They're going to Canada. They're going to move to Canada. Leaving the they're they're they're stepping down from their role in the royal family which is like pretty high up there. It's not one that you can leave without without a bit of trouble a lot of trouble. So the Queen is not happy for sure. I don't think they care. Nor should they like I said like they have no real like they are high up but they have no go nowhere. They're always going to be on the on the sideline. So what was the story with. Yesterday there was a letter saying they were going to be financially independent from 'cause that's the only way to do it so if you are going to leave you're like totally early cutoff. Okay the only reason they all stay and you know to me. It's like Megan calm down. How much should make suit student? How much did she not that much on? For thirty seasons I feel like I I mean it was a constant joke for me. Yeah for years of like Oh did you catch that new suits no no you haven't. It's been on for thirteen years and no one has seen in this goddamn show up so I loved it. They're calling it makes it. It's not exactly her fault but I hate her so that works great marketing. Great Marketing Marketing No He's wanted to leave for a while. There's like old interviews of him like not wanting to be there and he doesn't like it. So and what did he do for a living. He's got some some bread stash away. You know what I'm saying. What did he do for a living? Besides the only prisoner Roy. Yeah so he's only been a royal his entire life. What did you swipe necklaces? How does he think he does? Appearances and has like charities parodies and does other has been doing other things for a while. I don't know how much that brings him and I don't know what their life looks like. If they don't have up that cash flow like all of her outfits are bought by Prince William. Yeah so what what is what is your life going to really look like I know you really want to. It's like the the wife wants to really leave the super rich controlling husband pump. Just this pump the brakes your life is going to look Awad Different Ely so just really make sure that that's something that's okay with you before you leave and if it is Godspeed look Prince Harry can get a job at Taco bell if he wants you know why because anyone can do day there. There is a shortage of workers who WANNA work at Taco Bell. Starting to her their company they're offering a hundred thousand dollars for managers Taco Bell hundred thousand dollars a year S. One hundred grand I mean that is crazy man so says it says the company is going to test the higher salary and select restaurants in the US Midwest and the northeast boom boom. Obviously that's probably the highest concentration of Taco bell you leaders in where the Midwest and northeast. Let's face it when it's cold Oh you WANNA do grab a ten pack Tacos and some mild awesome hot sauce party size for yourself. Not as bell `Grande Large Baba's drive home and eats the whole entire thing We've all don't the current salaries are fifty to eighty K.. Right now bumping this up to one hundred zero six figs sir. Harry could be up there in Canada Chiluba loop TACO A. Yeah actually man Candida Candida. If you're going to move somewhere. The property values up there is is the worst. It's high shit they're guy in Vancouver My taxi driver in Vancouver. who was like? Hey Wayne in town. 'cause you eat it is fucking Ringo Starr all of a sudden Williams. Yeah swing on the road He was like hey. Can you go to Tim. Horton's while you're here I was like. Oh that Super Canadian thing. He's like well. Yeah there's a lot of restaurants in there but he's I two of them like you own to Tim Hortons driver and I go you own. Them is yes and I go. Why are you? I was like no offence. Why are you driving taxi? And he goes well because my home one point six billion dollars I was like no offense to you us but he didn't own those I I think he did. I hear. Here's why say that. He said he franchise them spent the money on the franchising of them and everyone everyone knows those words. Yeah totally right like anyone can just say them but then he had three kids. I mean it was like dude to buy a small house here. One point six million alien dollars and I'm fucked and he goes everybody's going through this housing crisis. I guess you would call it. I mean as well and it's like like how much you making off the Tim. hortons about one hundred hundred capeeze. I was like shit all right when you start telling it up from one point six million dollar house you pretty close pretty close. It's the same. Yeah definitely lied to. You know. That's the same thing about it if you're we're making two hundred grand in La and we're we're paying on a one point six million dollar house with three kids got private schools and Shit Stretching it right are you. I mean Gosh. Yeah you property brothers. Yeah Yeah Yeah I I just. Don't the taxi driving thing. It's an interesting choice. Visit Uber. Taxi straight up taxi from the airport. I just walked out in in grabbed it and like by the way very finely dressed most polite until like I believe associate I mean really I mean as we drove oh by. He pointed out the Tim Horton's that he owned. That's a weird flex. If you're fucking line about owning to Tim Hortons in Canada. You know as I can. I didn't go to Tim Morton. I apologize if you're listening to this show right now and you're like Oh man. I wonder if he ever SOB story. Yeah I wonder if we ever went this whole shit man. I didn't well well didn't go. I will say this the when I got in the first person who checked into my hotel which is like the Sushi and it was like now and there were like eight is dynamite. The ocean waters right there easily. You're so easily if Jim Jones was there you've been like I'll go. Oh Jonestown seems awesome. Yeah whereas White Pants and white tank cabdriver cabdriver owns to Tim hortons like go to bed. Sir Are you are weary travel. TRAVEL-WEARY ROAD RE weary now to homosexual property brother guys every time. If you notice go watch the property brothers. Is Everybody asks where that shot Canada. That will explain to you the very top of the show. Okay now the house you want. It was one point two million dollars. We made an offer of one point one eight one nine eight five and you got. Let's they didn't accept it so we went. Oh above you saved a thousand dollars. Yes look you don't want that house on the market anymore. You're going to be a bum. Rush for it cools so has a thousand below ask was how really know how to wheel in deal. The Look of shock on the faces between the Ma- the husband and wife and they're like okay. Okay yes we're GONNA fix it up right chippers. Fuck those two. Oh yeah because they don't have fucking work. The real estate guy doesn't do shit talk crazy man he literally just always puts an offer over ask and it comes right back. Hey good news. Yeah I bet but but that's candidate for you. So get ready. Max I can tell you this the best weed on the planet. That's legit and smoke that before. All of this other show Jesse I see. I'm just wondering like what did you drink a little bit on the plane. You got into the cab. I I did two drinks drinks. And no we'd appoint none when you're dripping by telling her of to Tim Hortons cannot S- drive by there and do that In say that because I could walk in and be like Oh man bill or whatever the cab what does he care doesn't but I could have gone in life stop. Why drive drive by the two that you own say that's it and that's the other one I don't know I don't know why anybody does anything that they you know what I mean like? There's answers absolutely unbelievable but I'm pretty sure that everyone hearing that story was like Nope I I believe that he owned to Tim. Hortons kind is in full heart and he was very nice. Oh well then there you go far enough. He's driving a nice car to sold Meals to Tim Hortons Vancouver. So if you're out there bill Bob Bilbo Bilbo bags BAGGINS I believe you're out there. He didn't go first of all well. And secondly he believed you and I do not I do I definitely believe what like one of those. What Jesse it's beer fest rate or the guys like drunken he's dancing and you? They keep flashing back how he sees himself and how it really is going. That's how I'm seeing this like this. This situation is like how you thought it was. And you're like being escorted around by the owner in his dress so nice and it's a nice car but like when people are like when you really flash back to what it was it was like this crazy psychopath. Liar compulsive liar a really nice man and I believe this whole shit. Believe this whole shit and the fact that you are taking the time to pull down you know what just I guess as a woman. I have to be a little bit more cautious than you do. This can just go right on that. You can go down that whole road. As soon as he said the F- that he owned a Tim Horton's and pointed the first one out. I would tell I'm this is my stop. He's too. This is my stop. I'm going to have to get out because this is fucking crazy town full conversation. I don't know where I'm going. If we can find him in Vancouver I'm GonNa look up the the owner of Tim Hortons if one of these if if flees to restaurants match one name you Jesse Sleep in the garage. Oh Wow yeah. ooh A boo boo. I don't have to sleep with you. You're a trash person who sleeps with garbage gazette. You're insulting Binghaman. I'm not a more insulting you. I don't know him. I'm insulting your naievety. I'm you're young. You're young `Mushie mind when I'm insulting speaking consulting Jillian Michaels Oh yes went on she. What did she say about insulting so anyway she was on this Jillian Michaels of the biggest loser? She was on some radio show or whatever and people they were talking about how they loved. Lose out on this show and she was like or they were saying. Isn't it great how you know her body positively right like we're just so into her like her body positive positively and she was like. Why are we celebrating her body? Why does it matter? That's what I'm saying like. Why aren't we celebrating her music? 'CAUSE IT'S GONNA be awesome if she gets diabetes. I'm just being honest. I love her music. My Kid loves her music. But there's never a moment where I'm like. I'm so glad she's overweight like she. I don't care. Why is it my job to care about her weight? I love it. If you're offended by that my show. If she gets cancelled for that my show will be canceled in a second because either way like does it have to like what it seems like people are more into her weight than her music or equally right I love her music and I also love that. She's just like like fat and doesn't Care Right. Those are things that go hand in hand when you talk about. Liz Oh yeah and Jillian Michaels is saying. I don't care about one of those things like I really like her music. And she's a fitness expert. Like she's not going to be happy that someone is unhealthy but especially when it's a woman if it's a guy we can say it. Right pits like Jonah Hill or whatever we can say he looks a little unhealthy. He's bigger and he looks a little unhealthy. If it's a woman we have to just be like gear great you. You're just the way you are. And then she dies. Yeah I'm with you on this lake. I don't it's strange. There's no need to fat chain. Shame or fat glorify. What do you mean? It's like we like her music and and she seems fucking happy right so only ask you this. Do you think part of it people celebrating. Her music is because of the way she looks. Maybe and I think that's probably Jillian michaels issue is like why. Why are we talking about her weight right now? Like you like her music right like me to don't want her to get diabetes and die his all I'm GonNa say but like I don't know you think she sticks around long haul. It's it's tough. who was? Oh I think so no side of that for me. What do you think's going to happen with her? Look it seemed the habitable zone where you know you know the crazy easy breakout year and you can't just because you've been writing and working on and dreaming of your whole life usually the first album. Now they're gonNA rush her on the second album and you'll be able to. I find the real talent one who handled it. Great was lowered. Her second album was a banger. Amazing producer way. Yep that's you know that's part of it post Malone Yeah fucking triple the album that the first one was in the first one is great. I don't know that she's on that level of talent we'll find out We have some sponsors James. Put this whole fucking thing together but on the air keeps going thing. Keep us moving and writes all night and keep it right in a bid dot com shrinking. Brose from the top emergency emergency session shaves go sped is extended the deal Oh yes till the fourteenth fourteenth per Schwinn thing five percent off off every till the of my of my show interesting to show drinking Brett's there it is proud of you. I'm proud out of you and I can't wait occur shoe drink in bro at subscribe on Monday. Nobody can wait. Everyone is no subscribe on Monday. Super Super Nervous. You're yes really. Oh my gosh I have a really as you know just a healthy crippling sense of insecurity you know just crippling insecurity healthy levels. I'm being crazy just debilitating time learning a lot about you. Well I'll tell you the second one is to get to the sponsor One of it involves not a bed but a forest teepee You're not here's the thing you're not supposed to listen. will their editing. Here we edit here we have a fucking full studio so I'm hearing as it's going on. I don't have a choice. Jamie can't avoid some headphones on friend. Something's he cannot hear. It was gone so I cannot blame the son. Jamie a Other young editor. Who is trying to you know? Just transfers transfers footage and it was like. Oh Hey what's that story Either way she was not having sex in a ghost bed from go sped dot com for slash drink bros.. She was having sex on the ground. Like a dirty whore. uh-huh a yoga mat was a Yoga Mat. No it was sort of like a thin like Foam Lake not quite as big as a blow up up gross. Gross look at you. We'll talk about it in a second. Okay Dot Com. Go to my show for drinking bro State. This will get get the people going to the show Jason Go. I'm not talking about it with you. We're going to talk a little bit about it. We need them since subscribe. Subscribe Brother here's the best thing about. The goes stringer Brazil of twenty five percent of everything in the store. The thirty six month page program is still applicable. So I use that. It'll knock it down to like fucking twenty dollars a month man for three years. It's crazy if you didn't get a mattress or pillow sheets are all that stuff adjustable basis to it now Best deal on the planet only available. It goes by DOT com forward slash drink and Bros.. You know what it's like to not be boned on a mattress story that I overheard was a coming out of a young editors room nature pimp. Yep Yep yeah on hikes and things to have sex with you took me on hikes under the guise of going on a hike. And then we'd stumble upon different different places one time it was a teepee a full on teepee. I'm like Oh my God. And it's like kind of dusk nightime. So you're you're like I royal into the sky. I mean enough that it's not like I know you well enough hiking no not that I like hiking but I'm from Ohio and the only the only way back in the day for you guys had called the Sax right so like us if we wanted to go. Oh like get together and party. There's certain places that you go and it's all hikes or things in the woods so I was very outdoorsy Z.. Before I realized that I didn't have to be okay and I was like Oh cool de just like not do that great. I'm never going to do that again. Either way it was a funny story. I'm looking forward to the show three times the last time I go. Oh why three little shack. It had some little shack up in. Why did you keep fucking him? Well it was before the days were. You knew you didn't have to it. Sounds like it's not rape is not least not consensual. But you just don't as as women you know you every time you had sex. You haven't haven't completely wanted to okay. You're fine it's okay. But you weren't like about it amped about it right. Gotcha you do what you gotta do. You can get back down the mountain. Do not like found out that he was very like he was a little bit aggressive. We found out later. I don't know if you heard the whole story. It didn't it. Did Not want her to aggressive in real life snippets. Yeah so in real life. We tried to go on like I was finally. We need to go on a real date. Like I'm not going on a fucking another hike with you. We've with the JIG is up thrice thrice times. The JIG is up with the hiking right so but I had to work a little bit later and I worked at this bar in Ohio and like we're supposed to go on this date but I had to like work and I I was just there late. I didn't I wasn't able to call them. We didn't have cell phones. Whatever SPEC back in the day and so he shows up to this place with a shirt that was ironed and he's like I ironed a shirt for you pissed aggressive? I was like Oh thank God. You're dating stories by the way our horrific from their great podcast. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. You're well I because I met WHO. And we've shared this story before I met one of the people. You dated that dirty mechanic. Yeah and I was like Whoa. What great guy is that all I had to do like what was that like? He didn't clean himself before coming out to the bar covered in oil covering an oil. I mean literally. I'd like gnarled hands. Oh I mean it was everywhere you look just literally Jiffy Lube. I was like what the fuck like from there to the bar where it was just like what the fuck and he it was maybe five three like he was a little guy. No He's not no he wasn't he was because I'm a giant but yeah he's like six one. I think he was six sixty James James no for sure much five three. That was another one. You're getting to the two one you've met two of them but you like you're getting getting them getting them mixed up like height wise. Who's the other one? I met movie with him longtime ago. Oh yes getting those like heights. I think mixed Hannukah all right. Well either way. Yeah so yeah I mechanically vibes lives and Yeah as I say on the show you know. I can give you on advice on all different kinds of drummers. 'cause I've dated all different kinds of the drummers drummers whole drummers very specific it's very specific type of guy and anyone who knows knows it's like the worst part of the band you know it's the most important part of the band but they're always the biggest shit shows classically ringo time a I duNno I guess certain type of vans type advance. Let's Compare pair them to like blink. One eighty two right all right because of the Travis because of the era so like a punk that you can still like dance to and not to be like ooh God. Yeah Yeah we're like I'm so we but it's not punk light the way it'll be fun tune into drinking bro. At S- Monday night that will be available everywhere audio I tunes spotify pod Being Himalayas. You name it wherever you listen to podcasts. This will be on there and it will also be on the Youtube Channel. We've combined everything into one on a drink and browse podcasts YouTube page. The beauty of her show is there will be about nine dropping on the same day so that way you can really get your feet wet and decide if you like it or not and I think that's the biggest problem with new podcast today where it's like. They'll put up a trailer three weeks later. They'll put up one episode three weeks. The pope another episode. So I think by the time if you listen to all of those by the time you get to current you should a no if you like us or not that should be enough time one or two is not enough with every show I think with every show especially to girls so I think that's enough time I'm we really do get to a good place with that and then by then. I think the Bro as well caught up as far as like nominating drinking bro. It's the week and giving US comments comments and we'll be kind of engaging with them at that point awesome so you can Sign up for the facebook page now. facebook pages live drinking bro out. Stinking Bro at podcasts. podcasts yes drinking out of the week to your inbox there. I know you believe instagram started arrests. So we have both of those Yeah we'll be doing a huge launch next week so looking forward to it Next Shit sponsor wise strikeforce energy dot com search bum-bum-bum-bum-bum-bum-ba ship blinkers Brooke. Are these all the same. Oh no I'll bring right now take with you. What's her? What's her flavor here What's your favorite? I think she lemon or orig-. Oh what do we do linen. Lemon beautiful take Ted with white cloth. Yeah it does shit actually lemons. The that's the best with white. Call you right now. It's hilarious classic. Brooke is she was the first White Claw Queen in our our neighborhood. There's always one and then the rest of US got on the fucking train. Yeah I like I did. None of the Celtics. We reach out to the Seltzer. There's the sponsors and they were league. No thank you know not not so white clawed did drink and Bros for low bits and They bounce after a couple of Holocaust jokes whatever people would have drinking waclaw during the Holocaust Either way the other Seltzer. That were out there. We're like no thank. You were exploding. And we don't need any marketing whatsoever. No life will they have to keep they have to keep keep up with demand already. Don't they I mean I think. The white costs one point. Last year they had sold out. There was a shortage of it. I know they called back up but everybody else like natty light and all this is is. We're like for local everything Bro. We know what the market this shit. Everybody's doing it for us. And it's amazing. The explosion of that market his been crazy to watch where it's just like fuck. Yeah every stadium now all these these live events we go to their in in every single stadium in your leg. It's stronger than beer. And it's it's I have to say I do like him at a stadium but anyway they're not it's great. They're not a sponsor no they're not a sponsor but strike for because and this is why is low the long way around to get to this. But if you these things still don't have enough tastes from me like white claw and shit. You always need a splash of strikeforce to has enough taste. We're talking about law saying if you look everybody's ringing my cost take fucking strikeforce. Drop a little in their boom. We're good to go carbs sugars in this either so and its last five hour energy. So you're going going to the LSU comes in national championship for example for example. Are you getting racks. Like the CONOR McGregor fight next next weekend for example. Or if you have like daddy will be there along flight to Vegas added work all week. Yeah you know everybody has their stuff take take it with with you. I do know I every time I travel. I've got like fifty of these in my fucking bag. They'RE GONNA Strike Force Energy Dot Com Promo Revolution Twenty percents off subscription of the month club Still Rocking your face off and tear on your balls off. You can use it for grinder subscription prescription. Can you get one prescription tapie. I'll ask my fever for strikeforce. Blam Blam Kerryon prompt revolution two percent. Strength Percentage Dash Cam Minelli MINELLI STRAIGHT RAZORS DOT COM. ooh That's a clean cut soon. So Ed is j's ring kind of a rush version Gordon Wagner is still are MVP. I like this is late in the show of Gordon Catches this this one always does the time code for every single one videos. Best in the business and the best we love Gordon Wagner Look I love sure razors dot com. Clearly if you're watching the show on Youtube alive right now get a moustache. That is many feek some people call me getting there. It's at the stage right now where people don't make those jokes anymore of like you got a little something on your face right but it's not quite to the majestic but it's it's good enough but from what I I mean. If people didn't know how well you can grow the mustache sweet but I know that it can go real three three dog night's so I know that it's very much in the beginning S.. Phase one phase will phase. One is a little cookie. You Miss this hoop. That's phase one s face to is. Okay you have a moustache then face three as holy. Oh Shit Yeah. I'm sorry. Are you able to hold your penis and balls or should I have for you. Yeah it's amazing sir. Your moustached can I hold your entire pack in my hand and I think you owe it all straight razors to be on a deal down the bureau's conditions and then the straight razors. Obviously you're second to none and look going to be honest with you though when I have a moustache like this The aftershave I'm going to to use half my face it's great. I went to shave half my face. It's Nice it's Nice Japes Big Fan about and that. I get a real big mustache. He's a real big man. GOES STRAIGHT RAZORS DOT COM Promo Code Revolution Twenty percent off. Get yourself a the people have asked for this shapes. It's nine days into the new year. you've not done a crime corner corner today. Oh I do I Do Fire Away. James Crime Corner Crime Corner Crime Corner K S. I need to shout out. My detectives and some honorable mentions because people have. I've been flooding right but it has been craziness. I cannot catalog well anyways. This one is coming from detective of Chuck Nasty and no more normal name Chung it nasty. I'm big fan of that. And no more cans Wichita and then we need honorable mentions bt Bates. I see you and I really need to use that. One at some point Aaron Shea Smith and Kokatay cocaine with a K. A. N. E. A.. Eight to three. I'll get you great. Thank you thank you to everyone. I see all of them. Some of them quite depressing guys. So yes some of them say hey and I hope this isn't too dark. It's always like somebody raped and killed and you're like technically yes a crime. Yes but read the room so anyway Meth fueled mud-covered naked. Florida man shakes off to tasers bites. Canine and fistfights officer officer then spits on another lock going on here guys who happy New Year Right. Here's a question what did you do for. I just WANNA compare and contrast so so what did you do for New Year Watson. Pack but I didn't bite a dog like a canine dog. Just like compare and contrast to like we Much the ball draw. Aw watched cabin in Lake Lure with our family the New Year's rocketing And Donald Watson thirty eight very different. Okay where was this Florida. Yeah okay interesting that you had to ask that strokes for different folks officers. There's responded to a call of a man doing meth. I mean it's Florida's so what do you mean who called it in exactly somebody. That was pissed off at him because he was in in a mobile home. Doing math victimless crime. Yes why do the cops need to come right but you know maybe people saw that. It might have escalated escalated. There could have been one normal person in the in the Florida trailer Park Right. That was like I see this going bad. Let me get the cops here. They thought they'd retired to a nice mobile mobile and they were like buyer's remorse officers responded to to a call of a man doing math and when they showed up this guy was but ask naked except for being covered in so completely covered in mud. Real question it's absurd but that this this is small say but ass naked in the these ones like they really try and be funny which you know I hate it's like. Let's leave the the comedies. Let's leave the comedy to the Crime Corner. Pros am I right. But they do like to be funny in these so when they showed up the guy was but asked naked except for covered except for being covered in mud and it also says I commend these officers for not shooting him right there because he was all brown so anyway a euphemism for shit or is it actual mud. It is mud okay. But the joke that they were trying to make is that he was. He looked black but they didn't shoot him. Okay there is a rich it is a reach but it says before you guys give me Helfer saying that of course of course so To No one's surprise he ran into a nearby modal motorhome. A mobile home. He proceeded to come out the door. Swinging resulting in a fistfight with one of the officers which led to two different tasers deployments which he just like shrugged off no bigs Craig Happy New Year and I I have to say like we did have a great time. We had a great time for news. But when I see this here the story it just Kinda makes me like miss doing crazy stuff on new year's no just just this right so the tasers surge deployment. He shrugged them off. As to be expected from Florida man. He ran off into the woods and the police decided to call for some backup Yup upon the arrival of backup which included a canine. They proceeded to follow him. They pursued him And he was in full primal mode and when the a dog caught up to him he turned around strangled it and bit its ear. The Dogs Canine Dog. The dog managed to fight back and bit had him on the head. And that's when officers got him down But at the very last second he decided to spit on one of the officers which brings us back to the list of things that he did right which was he was mud-covered meth fueled shakes off to tasers. Bites Bites Canine and fistfights officers then spits on another and I was in league clearly with some mm champagne and probably asleep. I'm just trying to. I'm trying to figure out eleven twenty. I probably fell asleep. Yeah you spit and then punch no. So he was being subdued so when they finally got him like dog he bit the dog. The dog bit him back. He's like okay fine they get him down and then he in a last bit of like craziness spit up at the officers greats just to have that little button. He really wanted like a button on the story. Sure I appreciate to Is this young man as he entered prison. This young man. Yeah for sure okay. I'll look I don't know he probably spent the night there you you can. Have you know. I'm sure well fist. Fighting the officers if the canine I think biting the Canine will get you get get you more time in jail than this fighting officer. Well if I'm a police officer somebody calls me and I'm a police officer in Florida. Somebody calls me in for somebody. Many do math. I don't answer that. I can't believe they went there either. Fuck it fuck that guy let him fucking take shit and the trailer who cares. Let don't fucking cover himself with mud like if you didn't get involved what would have happened right if the escalate this situation to what it is price them do gooder and I just went back in his mobile home. Dude yeah maybe I don't know the mud rock why naked covered in mud but again again only donald can answer that either way. Come into New Year's Canine on the air. You don't say that's tough. It's like who's doing it right. You know I mean we have this conversation all the time Sir then there's really we know right answer. Is it better to be bored or legend. I don't know I mean I. Air On the side boldness as just may board blow boldness. Yes Jesse I'll be bolt. Okay so you say you say be. Maybe he's doing it right right. Yeah we could have been known to boulder. I don't disagree sixty nine. You know could have done something really. Bold Jesse on New Year's Eve have already discussed. Is this on my show sixty nine well turn that frown upside down. Turn that wide on until Smilon Salon. It's good to drink in no wrong. Show boy all right thinking about goes I am you need a revolutionary figures I revolution for the day. I I've we've done a lot of shows this week. We're back at it with a vengeance of vengeance This was going to be pit. Brad Pitt Gosh. This is going to mark my words right now. Okay this this is going to be his year Cubans. Brad Pitt assaults I'm not sure but I know that he last year was not put assaults a pit Assan so last year was not his ear really really not right. A lot of things happened he had to get out of the limelight he was always just like tabloid fodder. I think this year he's really handling. He's like gray speech. Going loves great speech. He went on. Marc Maron you guys were were in the right industry. Him and Leo just went on Mark Book up together. Yup Brenda right at. What a great day for podcasting? Don't you think like they all. That's huge huge. Put us into a different stratosphere. He's talked about his relationships and like he's just horrible. His his personal life is just trash like but the way that he's handling it the way that he's talking about it and the way that now the tabloids and the press is starting waiting to talk about him. I really think it's his year whether he wins or not. I think it's going to be back to pit the way we remember pit. I so I can't wait. Wait you're not going to get hit the way you remember pick. I'll tell you that in a second His Revolution Finger of the day. He got up on stage after accepting an award last last night. The National Border Review which is big. It's typically a precursor for the Oscar and he won the Golden Globe. Now one. This is a good shot at it for him. This sure did shot shot. He said on stage last night. That's he wanted to thank Bradley. Cooper because Bradley Cooper was the one that got him sober yes. He just was spotted last night or the night before two nights ago coming from his house and I thought what are they working on together I guess sobriety breath over. Jank's saves me a coke coke coke and eight balls worth beginning sober Hilbert you only some co cocaine. Gosh I hope he's not so maybe he says I could see reince over for sure. Yeah that's probably where all this great stuff is happening to him. And I know that if I stop drinking it would but I just can't. I mean like every time they stop drinking their dislike whole life. Get so much better better. I'm going to be and another ways. No I mean I'm going to be real. It doesn't really. I usually clean out for the first UJPEST two or three months every year. You know after after new years and cut out the booze and it's like I'd love to tell you that Oh man you're fucking clear head or whatever and it's not because alcohol is Alamein Vice is something I think. It just doesn't matter if I do it or not but with that being said it remained vice. Well that's for another show James. You don't want me Aaron this out today. Oh okay okay. You want me to tell them you know. Go ahead go ahead. I can't live without or something. Go ahead you know what I can't live without S- okay and go and I'm looking forward. JC JC JC. But you know you are having you know. JC problems and issues. Right now no being like not boozing like D- they feel zero different than using like but I think it puts you in a club right so it's like what club. What is that sober club of Hollywood and like there are a couple of them and they are very high up and it's like scientology? It's like anything if you if you align yourself self whether it's like gay. Mafia Jewish Mafia fucking sober Mafia. There's there's like these things that you will get your resume and go. Oh my whole life changed. It was like 'cause you started going to meetings with Bradley. Cooper and Bradley Cooper is now you know what I mean. It's like and now you guys are working on this together and it so yes yes and no right right so for the average Joe might be a little more clear. But you're going to have to make your own fucking destiny right all right CECE. IDC I D. C. J. C.. There is a little weird club there where she's like all right cool down in junior is probably like I will say this like it was once. There's one super famous actor that we with cleaner and he was kind of China's wagons drinking emotionlessly. WHO said this? I'm not going to say this is what we had to bud lights. At that point I was like man. And I'm like and your E. L. Buckle up loser rose I'm like I'm going to be really here You WanNa see me chasing if you rest bottle in front of Daddy's face you know like we can really tie one on. But I had to bud lights at. We're watching some like doc band live band came like a two hundred person. Venue you know and I was just like you. Were not to be lectured house. What are you fucking sober? And he goes. Yeah I've been sober for years. Whatever and they're not they're like cross-fitters? They're not shy to tell you everything about variety and everything else. It's like all right cool. Oh Man Yeah the conversation I was like and that's allred. Everything's going for you but for me bragging to have ah about four or five more of these guys tonight and then figure out what the night takes wish she would say the name of it because of who it was because then we could be like does sobriety really help you out wherever this person is right now is it a good place are bad. Place his career. We're still doing great overtime overtime. Going into overtime over time. Owen into overtime He's married someone older than him but his career is still doing. Great Sal. I'll tell you soon as we get off the air. I don't want to bury him. They're nice enough dude. Do you guys still talk no to twice about it and who cares fuck. It was Ben Foster really knows these sober. Everyone knows I didn't I didn't know well. Yeah well now now And so yeah that's a great. That's the that's great. This is why I wanted to say is doing awesome awesome. He's real yeah careers great. I think he's married to Robin Right now. So you're doing you know what I mean awesome too yeah just two totally different things slightly different things I never auditioned again I. I'm a comedian. I didn't Song I was up against that dude so right just as intense in person yes okay but it's that's a person that needs as to be sober. I think he's very intense right. It's like that on any other substance. Probably it probably an interesting sky. Just you know it's very intense. Yeah I don't know either way I have never liked that in my life of Lake. Sober people lecturing other people which is like him. Would I like a sober persons like Tam. So lucky the fucked up right now right. That's when and I'm like all buddy right. I like you doesn't usually work that way. You can't get that no doesn't does not. Yeah but only film a couple times in the next. I will say this. The next time I saw him I felt bad about drinking at another bar and that was like it was Kinda like hiding it behind sober people kind of like hiding behind my back and it was like wait a minute. I don't really know him the fuck. Do I care judges and you're not like you go through the motions and your ad. Yeah well fuck you dude. I'm GonNa drink this and then you go for a handshake and I had to kind of put the bottle behind my back in the other hand and just say Nice to meet you. That's why I was dating this another drummer. You're going to do in overtime at some point in this but what you've got to balance being another drummer that back it was like a first date kind of we were on the phone. He was trying to tell me where his place was and I was asking where he wanted to go. And I'm like Okay Day drinker at that point Mike. Hey where do you WANNA go play pool drinks blah. And he's like oh I'm so like I'm like Oh so you're boring. What happened? I mean it was silence for a second. He's like yeah. I was like the beginning of the end. That's my thing that did I say. I don't think it's funny but it's true. I think he's my honest boring but I just always feel I feel bad. Yeah here's my honest assessment of an look. There's a lot of people that need help right and they should be sober Cher and it's a great thing it really is a lot of people That is something I haven't struggled with. I can't relate but look man I it's not a negative thing that you're fucking boozing so it is what it is. It's not but eight. It's such a positive hard fucking thing to do like it is so fucking admirable and like like that no matter what you're just GonNa make even without trying you're GonNa make me feel bad because you're so I can't even imagine doing that right and going out and hanging out with drunk bars fuck. No so it's not like you're trying to make me feel bad. I just think that that's so insanely Ainley hard. And such a like amazingly hard choice to make an actually follow through with that. I'm like I'm a piece of shit and that's not a fun feeling to have when you're drinking so that's the the only thing I say. Now that you're boring. I'd love to hang out with you outside of a bar but if we're at a party drinking like it's going to be hard for me not to feel bad about myself. I know me like if I'm around if I'm sober. Run a bunch of drunk people. I'm just like I'm I wanNA bounce anyways and it's it's probably from being a bouncer always uses borrow just like fuck. I mean after a while I was just like to put up with every drunk. astles coming out of the fucking let's start boozing. Just give me a couple of Beers Is At least then Dan. I'll be like all right. I get sloppy fucking head on down the puppet trail. When are we GONNA do? None of that's real and actual sentences being formed a puppet trail but it sound great when it came out of my mouth and a couple beers in. And you're like all right. I can tolerate this a little bit but otherwise fuck man if sober and you have to go to bars and 'cause you know all the Hollywood should've you're out at bars drinking or drinks launch your meeting somebody for dinner. Whatever it is and you're just like creased I grease man? That's tough tough. Yeah like that's why don't we don't go out when I'm pregnant but like you know you can only have two drinks drinks and people look at you weird when you smoke. I just don't do it right. Yeah me uh well all right James Okay well I have to go now hop on down the bunny trail gesturing. Roz Patterson this is the puppet trail good night's everyone uh-huh the.

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Material 250: Power Thoughts

Material

1:37:38 hr | 11 months ago

Material 250: Power Thoughts

"Don't good morning good afternoon. Good evening what time is it. I am so tired. This is the material podcast episode number. Two fifty I am your host Florence. I on I am joined here by India NOCCO. Hi Andy I'm so tired. Oh I'm so glad I'm even so glad to be able to talk to tired flow. Yeah I know I was just like Oh man and he's going to get really tired kind of slogging flow. That's okay. I mean this is my reality. So let's just Leinen live in a moment. This is the moment and the moment is i. Don't get as much sleep as I use to. Which really sucks. Because I'm an earth sign and I was always sleeping a lot. But but on the plus side you have an adorable bundle of loveliness and adore ability. She is extremely adorable. I can't help but kiss her all the time but she's absolutely a pain in the area because she's a demanding little baby and she has learned how to do fake crying crying. Do when you're when you're not actually crying tears. But you're like this is really upsetting me and I need to like. Make a stink about it. And it's and she also has developed a new wine like this whiny voice that she does when she's getting really frustrating and it's just like oh my gosh like this is this is. GonNa get bigger and bigger and these are just going to get louder and louder so but I love her. I'm definitely in love with her. So how yeah. That is one of my life. See that's good. You're lucky to have gotten one of those babies that you can love magic going through all this hassle for just like a rental baby trill. Yeah she's just She's a lot she's my world. I I completely understand okay. I don't mean to get like earlier today. I had sent Andy a message. I referred to myself as Mommy and I realized that I accidentally let out the rhetoric that I've been using with my husband. These last eight weeks or so because we referred to each other as Mommy and daddy now and also in the third person because we're trying to use language around her and you're supposed to like you're supposed to be very explanatory with the baby because that's how you whatever cognitive etcetera brain development whatever By the way I don't have any sources to site for that it's just something I I feel like. I picked up that I need to do anyway. So I for myself as mommy today so that everybody knows and then I apologize. Say let's see that's okay. That's okay because of Clark. Kent doesn't refer to himself as Superman you know. It's true rather he he he has to. I'm sorry the other way round. It's like he does in his art can persona refer to Superman as another person because in a way like when like when you're in your civilian clothes your flow however when you're covered in spittal and vomit and stuff that is your superhero uniform. And that's you can't you can't you can't have the kid realizing that Flow I on Intrepid Tech Tech reporter and super. Mommy are in fact. The same people right Well Andy I don't want to just talk to you about the child because I feel like we're GONNA be talking about the child. I mean. Now she's she's here part of family. I have her. She's going to apply in our conversations. I've actually really looking forward to talking with you about the shows that I've been watching began because in the beginning it before before the world turned sour which Andy and I agreed that we were not gonNa make the show about all the sorrow and such says hanging over our heads. We decided that this is a pandemic free zone. Yeah as much as it possibly can be because obviously there may be mentions here and there so we can't completely now. I mentioned it before the world was you know Sour We were watching a lot of TV. Obviously because when you're defeating and taking care of a newborn that's you're just kind of as Ambi- with the TV on in the background. And I caught on that Pluto. Tv has a midsomer murders channel. So I started getting into midsomer murders which is a basically the British version. Believe it's BBC version of Colombo it aired in the nineties into the early two thousands and when you watch these episodes in succession you start to see a lot of popular British actors. That have come up in the last few decades For instance the actress who plays Catlin Stark? From game of thrones. She was one of her very early. Acting roles is in midsomer murders. It's very interesting to see these people just like super young or sometimes you'll see people in their child form because their child character on the show. So it's a nice little slice. We also started watching murder. She wrote which had never actually watched before. Even though it was rerun like constantly and I have to tell you that I thought a lot about you while I was watching it. I mean obviously because she lives in a quaint seaside east coast seaside town which you know reminded me a lot of your dwellings. Can I can. I say that I have I have absolutely used that analogy to friends who have yet to come and visit saying if you Ross like the opening titles to murder. She wrote from the first season where she's in her little bike the waving at like boats and stuff like that that is ninety percent of my neighborhood of what a lot of my life is. Now your pure even when. I never realized it before I never really watched it but is just so good at playing the slake pure person who can just deal with heroin destined burgers just happening in front of her and she's just like you're the murderer and it's just the dichotomy is genius and I can see why people were so attracted to Indra. Lansbury is character. I didn't oh absolutely I mean. Of course I know her. My generation knows her as Mrs Potts from beauty and the beast. But that's why I say that for. That's that's an interesting comparison generations. Because my I I I knew her as a as a moody the pie shop owner in in Sweeney. Todd like many. Todd yes the slightly more than slightly batty pie shop owner. Who SUGGESTED SWEENEY? Todd that well look you killed this guy? He's dead. That's a lot of great meet and there's a we're we're this close to cutting up cats for buys your own body anyway. Oh my gosh. Well those I didn't mean to intentionally go down a slew of murder shows. But you know it just. I don't know what it is about those particular murder shows. But it's very interesting to compare the way because you know. I was watching Colombo and I was watching the terrible garbage silk stockings but that was still burger show and it was very interesting. Just see like the tropes used every single series the differences. How each series put his own spin on things And so I guess now. I have to write an essay about it. I didn't intentionally mean to. I mean that's what we do for a living right. We do a bunch of stuff and then analyze it and write about it so experienced analyzed monetize. A three step process relent success. I mean and I am really doing. These days is watching a lot of TV. Because it's really is all that you can do with a newborn. I mean she doesn't move Y- I mean she just sits there wiggles like it's quite interesting again. I don't want to make this all about my baby. Would if I did not put this on the show notes but I have had to add the two shows that I'm kind of I wanted to throw it off to you. There's been watching while I've been gone. I am really should. I am so interested in what other people are watching as well. I'm not Yes I did watch that. Show that that documentary series on net flicks. That now too. Many people are talking about now. I kind of feel as though I don't need to add to that Vocal Cup clutter but so I I discovered the first of all I was really looking forward to what Haiku Tim Gunn's new like fashion competition. Reality show making the cut it. It launched on Amazon Video Just like a week or two ago and because Tim I think that Part of the soul of kindness on television that That used to inhabit Mister Rogers. At least part of that floated free and landed in Tim. Gunn because particularly on the on the original project runway. You just see all he wants to do is help these poor people who are in feel as other in over their heads. They're stressed out. Want them to make make sure they know that. Hey they can find a way through this. This is the end of the world so I find. I always find that very soothing. The new series. I like as well but I'm trying. I'm only to only started last week. They're only two episodes that have been out there. Doing they're doing like two episodes a week. Or whatever The only thing that It's the difference I think between the two is that on project runway. I'm used to. They have like twelve designers and they tried to get every person that they cast for the show they. I'm certain that the producers believed that is capable of winning the entire show. It's not like it's not like the old American idol where okay. This is someone that we're going to make fun of. Which is why didn't like American idol. But you always have the silent cal for but yes so if you had twelve designers you'd have to maybe even three per season that you you your head is just so far out there. There is no way you are. You are more of a creative artist. Who has chosen clothes as a means of expression as opposed to somebody that if you approach to say hi. I'm a postal worker. And your challenges to make me a pair of pants and a jacket that whereabout delivering mail they will basically make you a two dimensional eagle costume. That's with flashing lights on it. And then you get like the pros that a few of them that are established pros who might even have their own businesses. You have some people who just got out of Design School. These the people they have on making the cut. It's interesting because they're they have all established themselves in some way shape or form some of them even have like successful lines and stores in La. So it's not so. Hey I do a mail order business where I designed Prom. Gowns is like no. I have a retail shop. I've had the shaw flex six or seven years. Your pictures of like beyond say like getting into a cab where wearing wearing my scarf or whatever and so as a result it's interesting because now you've really don't see when they do like here's here's the runway which they're show. Here's what you here's what you made. It's you don't see those type of complete failures. They're all like really really interesting on the other hand. Sometimes that was interesting. They they also as far as things go for now. It doesn't seem as though we're going to have the you have thirty minutes in this pet store. This is the unconventional materials challenge and drug to make it out of like a a the the the the urine absorbent pads you buy for for dogs. Leashes crunching up Dog Food that's not what it's about. It really does seem to be more professional which is good and certain way not as good a certain way. I think the problem is that a lot of these people are They vary in ages. But they're all very very adult and secure in their in the way they go about business so it's not as it's not as though I was watching the show hoping to see meltdowns but in terms of seeing someone who's a little bit too enthusiastic but they've and they've bay seem to have lost the plot and Tim needs to sort of get them to question some of their choices to people who are They're kind of like treading water but they they're determined to persevere. You're missing some of those stories so I'm still enjoying it. Thank goodness for that And again I'M SO GLAD TO HAVE TIM. Gunn back because I say I need him in my life that the other show is much is completely different. I didn't know about this. Let's say a Japanese show called documental. Where Imagine I've been? I've binged watching the entire third season and I've been saving like the first and second seasons for for other bench times now. Imagine big brother. Okay no yeah. I'm reading the Synopsis. Go ahead of preliminarily reacting. I apologize because it is something kind of special so imagine big brother only instead of like a big brother House. It's sort of like a big brother Studio apartment. That's a set like on a sound stage and instead of going for twelve weeks it goes for only six hours and it's all like comedians Japanese comedians. I'm guessing mostly like actor. Comedians as opposed to stand ups and yes. There are being covered cameras the entire time. But you don't get voted out you get cut. There is a very very famous Japanese. Tv comedian who much older. Who's watching all this on cameras and you get people get thrown out of the studio apartment if they laugh or smile or somehow dropped like a serious countenance. And they're they're the ill. Though they'll you'll they'll kick them out immediately if they go back. But if it but if there and that's like immediate like red card you're out however if they just see that you just sort of chuckled or even if you just sorta smiled they might give you yellowcard. Meaning that you your your. You've got three steps and you're out three strikes you're out you're strike once. We saw yama smile by it was like how he describes like. I noticed that you seem to have been reflecting upon some sort of private joke. That only you knew that was enough of a and so as a result you have these comedians who are very very comedians. And they know that they'll get one hundred thousand one hundred thousand dollars. Essentially if they are the last one standing and so they're going to try to make all these other comedians laugh. But it's not like okay and now here comes the standup challenge. Now you're Jack. You're going to be standing up at the microphone while everyone else watches. It's no the Leech base bring like. Maybe a bag full of stuff to surprise each other with or might be just a quick or a reaction to something someone else's said And you can tell that all of these. Comedians decided to bring like a neutron bomb. Sort of thing that I'm going to save this for only three or four people left and I really need to clear the room. I'll bring up characters. They'll like big getting costumes and it's like the most fascinating it's like a really fascinating thing because these are these are professionals again. It's not hey we got some wasn't any sort of a TV call. Where hey are you? The office cut up. We've got an opportunity for us. It was like they cast people who are known to apparently Japan known people at it really. It's the you immediately. Notice the subtle way the comedians interact with each other. Where Vader They don't want to be one hundred percent on because they'll be they'll be perceived as completely lame in front of everybody else like anytime you see comedians in cars getting coffee or any other like a panel of Comedians. Like the person who like trying to be? Who's doing standup bit? That's the person you can see the expression on the other comics faces like Oh my God dude have have some pride now. The only the only bad thing so it's really interesting and really really fun. Oh the the other detail is that I think this is not a stunt but The people who are on the show received invitations and they are informed that yes. The prize is One million yen or like a hundred thousand dollars but you have to you have to bring in. You have to contribute like ten grand. Put up ten grand of your own money. So it's costing you money to participate in this so in a way you're trying to at least defend your own money now. The only thing is that This is only in. I've only seen season three By the end it gets a little intense where I should say. These are all male comedians. So imagine how like mail can be imagine how like imagine how down and dirty and demonstrative a comedian can get if they know that's like one hundred especially if they know the one hundred thousand dollars on the line so by the end. There's like you're doing some stuff that I don't really prove that I'm not really sure that I I if I had bought this. Dvd Set I would have regretted spending twelve dollars for this. The I got this for free as part of my subscription. So that's okay and also the for the first six or seven episodes. Were not you doing that? Gross thing that totally worked at totally made this person laugh because out there but it was a little jackass you know in the T. the TV former. That was like that was. Yeah but I don't like jackass when it was on. I was never as never into that was not A. We're not going to talk about the merits of Jackass comedy or not. I don't I don't have I. I liked about that. Sometimes it was the most most truthful. Like Reality T. truthful reality television because again. I don't WanNa see okay. We're all GONNA get naked soap each other and then we're going to like okay. Whatever thank you regulations on being a thirty eight year old man with mentality of like a nineteen year old? You know Frat boy who has no sense of self worth but there are. I still remember when it was this. What must have seemed like an incredibly funny idea like on the Whiteboard is? They're planning the stunts they're GONNA do. We're Johnny Knoxville. With the guys the office by Said Oh well you know there are there. Are these companies that make these like non lethal projectiles like for crowd control? Like what if like we? We call these companies. Maybe they would be. They let us like go there like shooting range and they can shoot us with the stuff. Oh that'd be great. That'd be so fun I could see how how you would be like big peeing your pants but when they get to of course that's just in my mind all I see. Is that these three guys who have never who are standing fifteen to twenty feet because of that maybe like ten yards away from what they know a working off the shelves shotgun that is going to fire something into them and so and so and the people who and they're not the engineers who built this so they the people who are they who who designed the stuff they know that they're going to get bruises but nothing we've these are not fatal designed to like make you think twice about moving towards the office or whatever but the family and they edited so that the expression on their faces. It was just so truthful that this could this was such a bad idea but I can't get out of this is not funny at all. It's like one of the most dramatic and potent things I've ever seen on television and of course the rest of the episode will ruin it by doing something Jack Esi but that was something that if I saw it online I would probably right into the desktop. Because there's a certain even a lot of documentaries don't get to that level of truth one screen shot. I see from this is a man about to flick a rubber long rubber band. The back of somebody's head I would like to. I'm not I'm not recommending jackass at all. I'm just saying that the now I'm hint. There is something about Japanese reality TV and I learned this after watching terrace house. There's there's A. Maybe it's not just Japanese reality. Tv maybe it's all reality TV outside of the few networks. That I watch. It's just there's something a little more a moment in time about it versus you know what I mean sometimes the rally TV that I watch is very much scripted and if not like explicitly scripted. Somebody has thought of a storyline in their head. Which is why everything is a train wreck but I feel like I don't know I'm curious I I'm curious. I'm maybe I'll try episode again. I'm no documents again. One of the earlier ones would be early. Episodes would be better than the later ones but the NFL. It's it's a s that's what I that's another very very specific. Change in culture did between my generation yours because I grew up with thrill worlds. I'm talking about like the first three seasons in which while those people my age who are facing my kinds of questions in my kinds of uncertainty and problems and what would I do if I had a plan if I had goals for my life and someone said great weeble puts you in a city where you can do whatever you want and to pursue your goals matter what they are you will live there rent free for for three or four months that we won't tell you what to do or anything it will just be go out live. Your Life tried to make the most of this incredibly unusual opportunity that you've been afforded and for the first couple of seasons. It was exactly like that it was. I mean for me. It's the season the San Francisco season the first San Francisco Season Jarod winick and Pam Ling. I think where she's she's in San Francisco because she's in Med School. He's he wants to be cartoonist. And now and get A. They felt an attraction but they knew that on the set of reality show even back then was not the time to see if that was going to develop in anything but they got married and now she's a medical professor at San Francisco State of Simpson's university as well as a leading researcher in San Francisco. I think she's at UCSF UCSF. Sorry and and the and he says of six the cartoonist and writer in artists hugely successful series of books. That's what I'm talking about. I don't WanNa see people who Means before I can get Aga- drug and I'm GONNA be a star based on. This was with Boston Boston. I thought see I if we could talk about reality. Tv All day. I mean some day maybe I should write a book about it. I don't know I keep thinking. I'm going to write a book about all the time watching. I'm just not quite sure what it is going to be yet but oh I could talk this. I could talk about the stuff with you for a long time but I missed the hell out of you flow. Yeah I I missed you too. That's before we started recording We were just shooting it and then after about half an hour's probably should probably start the podcast. Let's take a quick little break I think so and then we'll come back and talk some more. This material is brought to you by winnowed whether you're working on a personal project or managing your enterprises infrastructure. Lynn has the pricing support. And scale. You need to take your project to the next level. 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So that's something that interest you go to Leno Dot com slash careers to find out more once again that's Leno Dot com slash material and the Promo code material. Twenty Twenty for that twenty dollars credit our thanks to Leno for their support of material and all of really FM. So I'm not actually in the market for a new pair of ear buds. But I know that we're nearing that time. Where the Pixel Buds? The second generation Pixel Buds. Were supposed to come out. I remember Andy when you and I went to the Pixel event back in October Google announced that it would be doing springtime. Release for these buds and well. It appears that The buds are imminent so they were expected later this month. In April or early next month in May Four hundred eighty dollars which is about on par with a lot of other buds in this price. Range think the air pods are one hundred ninety nine The Jabr elites those are one hundred ninety dollars. The air the Air POD IT DEPENDS. There seemed to be now three tiers there. It is truly under hundred bucks. Which is just. Give me truly wireless ear buds. That makes some sort of annoys. There is one hundred or two hundred dollars where it's being made by a really really good name such as Apple Google. Then there is these vendors but let me let us go through the slide deck about the audio and the noise cancellation. And the yeah. I thought you were talking about apple for a second bear because I thought you're bringing something up that I didn't know about them from tears of the area but they still have the the air pods nothing for like mid one hundred and one hundred and fifty I think don't they got the price down a little bit but the air pods pro are still like two hundred and fifty during sixty which for me. I cannot I cannot spend two hundred. Fifty dollars on wireless ear buds. I've I just feel as though for once once you got up to that level. I need wired. Headphones set are stupendous. Sup- SUP- Panda Sleep better than whatever I have right now and even then I'd be waiting for four months decide to really WANNA buy. I know that I really liked them and I try them on. They do sound great. But my really gonNA spend three hundred dollars on a pair of freaking headphones and then one of them falls into the subway checks never to be seen again. I owned by own a pair of original air pods. I now own the case to them because at some point during the commute I know that I must have taken them out and put them in a pocket. Sue put her pocket of my shirt or pants somewhere. I know there somewhere in this house but the size of two of acute tip broken in half. That's if you don't find it in a week. I hope that Jesus cobbing is enjoying them. They took them back. If I were more responsible maybe I could spend two hundred fifty dollars near Buds. I don't know if you're going to have this problem with the Pixel Bud Stu because I mean we saw them in person they were on display at the Pixel. When we went last October in New York City when Andy Negative gloriously meet for the first time after two years of joins podcasts together so Chicago retailer called abt the appeared to have jumped the gun and put up a preorder page with full product details for the Pixel Buds too so lots of the android blogs of course got very excited over the Google today has only said that sometime in the spring. So this was they have not actually. They have not announced a date. They have not I think they I think they did announce one hundred seventy nine dollars but everything else other than that is pretty much. You're not supposed to tell people about that I told you about then disgusting word on my foot in confidence so there are a couple highlights in the preorder pages. Kinda like quickly. Go through them. So one of them was that It would appear that there is actually no active noise. Cancelling in the Pixel. But Stu as there are in as there is in the air pods pro. And some of the other ear buds on the market price range However there are Mike's that are focused on your voice to make sure that the background noise stays in the background so not exactly noise. Canceling more like Noise deferring I want to say. I thought I thought that that was. I was hoping that they were going to announce noise cancellation. Because that's kind of what you have to do now to be competitive above the one hundred one hundred fifty dollars price range and so when I saw. This is the that was the actual text. Mike's concept focused on your voice. Make sure background noise stays in the background. So they're trying to say. Please please think that we're saying this has noise cancellation when all we did was decide. Not to point the microphones in a direction where they would pick up too much background stuff or or I would like to offer a another perspective so actually having noise cancelling on these particular buds is maybe not the best idea because granted. I understand that you want to cancel out the world when you're sitting on the subway but I would argue. That can actually be very unsafe for you to be walking in you know I. I've just sorry I'm stopping myself mid-sentence I'm just realizing I'm talking about walking being out in the world. Sorry we said we're not gonNA talk about it. I know it's really hard because cloud hanging over anyway. Do Not know that it is very safe to have all of that noise canceling so. I wonder if this is something that Google's going to try and pivot is like see. Actually the safest earbud so that you can wear out into the world because you will be able to hear if there is a pigeon coming for your face. It's what I'm that's what I'm relating to right now. That's just my idea and I'm also I'm assuming that not having noise cancellation also has to do with something to do with the assistant or maybe that'll be what the explanation as well in order for the assistant to be your assistant in this world. It needs to hear what's happening in this world. Which is why you shouldn't be blocking it out during the world. Maybe not. I have like you like I've we. I get all kinds of ear. Buds and stuff in the office And the ones the ones that work with Apple's digital system I get so worked with Google system and also it's nice if you can turn them off you can turn noise cancellation off it was. I'm sure it was a price cutting thing because It's it's it's they. I guess they really wanted a you. You can choose to have features and value or you can roll the dice on saying we were promising superior audio quality and worship. We're promising superior. Noise cancellation again for those people who are about to spend two hundred fifty dollars on a two sugarcubes that are probably going to get lost their or washed well speaking of washed. I'm not sure that the Pixel bug. It's Ken holy a handle a wash in the washing machine so the page was published by this car. Retailer had said the Pixel Buds are safer sweaty workouts and rainy days but the ad copy doesn't actually mentioned a specific standard certified level of water and dust resistance only that the pixel buds are sweat and water resistant. They aren't afraid of a little water so rainy. Days and sweaty workouts are no problem but there's nothing specifically says. Oh if these accidentally made it into the Washer and go in for the whole forty five minute cycle that they'll be okay. I you know I guess we'll have to wait what I'm more worried about. I'd be more worried about like if I'm on my bike and stupidly decide. Hey It's ninety seven degrees outside but I haven't been out of the office in two or three days. Now it'd be a perfect day to go for a long bike ride. I would be more. I would be more worried about just all that swept getting in there and then suddenly I've just thrown away one hundred and eighty dollars because it doesn't work and can't be fixed and I would think that these things would be Trying to think of the word Something to do with. I would think that they would be. They were made to be conscious of the body. And what body produces on your ear. And you know there's no the kids music up here. It's just disappointing that they if they say. Hey this is. Ip Sixty eight water and dust resistant. That means that when they are engineering them. They knew that at some point. We're going to have to submit this to a test procedure. And it's going to pass that test procedure in and stead in this in this product development. They were told. We're not going to be support. We're not GONNA be sending this to anybody to verify anything we said. So we're just going to say it's okay for workout and it's okay for a little a little water but that doesn't mean that if someone destroys their headphones normal us we're going to give them a free pair or anything so just so long so long as there's plausible deniability use the. Us use the good. He used the good adhesive that breaks down in thirty days instead of two weeks. Some we'll call. That water does resistant. I'm chuckling because I've totally done the same thing in my writing a listen. I have no problem. Admitting it sometimes it's just you know I don't Wanna I don't WanNa site that as a fact so I'm just going to say in a way that doesn't make a fact but more of this is what I think so that way. It's my opinion that I should after all this time. I should have that as a keyboard macro just as a in the form of the maker claims that insert one however comma insert to exactly a another. Little Tidbit is that we were talking about the assistant. So the Google translate real time in ear translation is it is coming for US. Who need help navigating the world in different languages so the Pixel Buds will understand the world around you get retirement real time translations right in your ear whether ordering a dinner. Tokyo or visiting your multi-lingual family. Yeah that's possible. I mean I would like to teach Mona Spanish and Romanian being that they are both Latin languages and they share a lot of conjugation and Verbs but English is also. She's that's all. Come in handy as well. But there's that's that's that's how you convince people to buy your buds. Even if they're not necessarily interested in them that is a back when they had the wire to your rudd's that didn't really work all that well. That was one of the easiest things for them to demo the Google. Where you just have the phone on the table in front of you. You have the ear buds in and it is just as as someone is speaking mandarin in front of you. It has been translated into English into your ears and both people have that then they can both like listening go Not only that but as somebody who? I don't know what I was doing that. Maybe this is just my the price of living this long but my hearing is not as good as it used to be particularly in like crowds and like noisy restaurants and I would love it if it was just even if it just did English to English translation like subtitles for life. Yeah exactly like sometimes. Well sometimes someone has like a voice or a cadence that you just can't lock into and if You know how I know how to listen to the Google assistance voice. Because it's a very and I can see I can if I don't like it I can. I can change it to something else that I like and like I'm okay I'm thinking about. I'm thinking particularly Norm Macdonald here where I think. I think he's a good comedian. I don't find him not funny but but every time so I see this new like interview date or this whatever. I'll be interested enough to listen to but it's like star and correct that's CRA- I don't know what I can't. I can't hear him so if I would love it. Here is mumbled translation or here is like Gaelic accent translation so I hope I hope that. That's a real thing. I hope it's better. I was wondering if that was something that would work with just normal headphones and normal like Bluetooth headphones. Because it doesn't none of this ad copy is boasting about. Here's the immense processing power. We've packed in these tiny little ear. Buds which is something that apple will do at the drop of a hat so they seem the all the ad copy make sound like this is just a well designed fairly normal pair of ear buds with Google branding and the design language on them. So that if you happen to have spent one hundred dollars on something already you can still get a lot of these features on your phone. I hope I bet that there are just going to slash the price for this and that they're going to be included in future pixel sales like hey gets his phone and then get these matching ear buds and imagine them trying to push this along with the Pixel for A. Let's suppose to still make it this year and I feel like that would be a really nice little package to put together kind of the same way. The Air Pods. Go with either of the IPHONES. I mean I don't know it'll be it'll be interesting. I so Abe was accepting priore doors. But then cancelled them and a cancellation email had quoted the cancellation email. They sent out quota. Google saying that the buds are expected at the stores warehouse in late April early. May So we're still going to be kind of waiting. But I'm reading at nine to five Google to fully expect them in July so released early to mid-july yes I think no. I think that there's another update that came out that confused me to their apparently a couple of I think the ninety five Google article says that certain colors are not going to be available until July. Four black or white will be they don't know but but they don't know but I'm guessing it looks like lady won't be too far away from late April or early. May although I do like your idea that if they're planning to release a pixel for a that they want to do that as part of the same announcement and also give people an incentive to say here by the size of bundle for a certain discount to don't just Scott six. Don't just think about buying these things please. By these things. Competing with a nest mini at home. Runs maybe maybe they should like to say here is for for eighteen dollars will sell you like a molded plastic like Instead of a headband. So that you can basically put like to nest minis like click into them and where the M- like you know Princess Laya episode magically. Not The two quarrel ones on either side. You know what? Now you're making me think I mean I actually have extra minis that I'm not doing anything with so and I got free time now. I'm just in the house. So maybe that's a weekend project. Andy Are you going to buy these because I might? I was at the when they announced them in the fall. I was between doing well. Yeah was waffling. Also I had recently. That was about a month after lost my my air pods and have had accepted that. I'm I'm not going to be able to find them ever again and so well. That'd be kind of cool because I kind of I did enjoy having having the air pods. I wish they work better with my android phone. This might be a better way of this will designed by Google Search. Should work fine then. What happened was the I caught wind of Sony's W. F. Dash only Sony names products. This way. Should we call them? Ear PODS NO TO RECALL THEM PIXEL BUDS. No we should call them the. Wf Dash One thousand x m three but they are like a air pods pro. Style like true wireless ear buds that promises. Hey Look how look how. Great the the sound is has noise cancellation has like all kinds of really cool feature. You can active assistant just by tapping it. Change the volume. Do All the change tracks. All this sort of stuff. Normally they've been they were. They were released. I think last summer and they got really great reviews by people who are generally very very antsy and kind of a pill to begin with software so if the audio people were saying Oh actually there are very very good despite being Bluetooth wireless headphones and so but they were like two hundred a at the ritual price was two hundred nine thirty dollars. One hundred eighty eight dollars right now is on Yup. But they must guess. Sony is getting ready to release new stock. Somebody had like three thousand refer pairs for ninety nine dollars. Oh that is what I say. That is what I want to spend on our phones. The fact that they sound good and have noise cancellation are a bonus. But that's what I want to spend on this So now I again. We all knew that the Pixel for Pixel buds to were coming. I was aware of this. I didn't say you know what I feel as though Google is going to give us a lot of razzle dazzle with these upcoming earbud. I Don I know that's a great deal. I'm going to be kicking myself later on if I know no I bought them. They are wonderful. I love them particularly for ninety. Nine Bucks I look forward to if if Google pair to check out I will look forward to that with great anticipation I will in all with an open mind but no I. Don't I again your your mileage may vary. I am not one of these people who should probably be spending more than ninety. Nine dollars on wireless ear buds Well I have the Galaxy Bud so I'm stuck on those Which is fine. They're great. They're perfect for what I need them for. As we move on from Earbud I think this would be a good time to mention that Google Stadia has officially launched for real for those of us. I mean who are at home and maybe needs something to help. Pass the time this is. I mean this is the time that Google should be doing this. This is everybody is at home. You need test subjects. You need people to tell you what's good and what's bad about your product. Why not just make it free so everybody can come in and use it so it was a first released in the fall as kind of part of a Beta program of sorts. You get access to it through the hardware bundle so you had to have an invite code so even if you download the APP would say what's your code and you couldn't get any farther than that now. You can just download it and get it on any compatible stadia device and then as long as you have a compatible controller. You can play the games that are offered there however however You do need to pay for the Games that you WANNA play if you are nine sign up for the trial or paying for the subscription so you can sign in with your g mail account. Get the APP on your android device. And then they'll give you two months free of stadium Wpro just for signing up so if this is something that maybe you WanNa tried out. You don't get charged. Just make a reminder for yourself in your calendar to unsubscribe or immediately unsubscribe and then just wait out the rest of the trial period but who knows maybe you might want to around so pros normally ten dollars a month which includes four K. streaming instead of the usual ten eighty p streaming Elson could discounts on game purchases and access to selected free titles. Otherwise you are. Defaulted to the studio base addition which has no monthly subscription fees. But it can be anywhere between you know ten dollars. Two hundred twenty dollars was the biggest bundle that I saw on stadia so you can pay for the Games effectively. It's just that they are being They live in the cloud. So that's how you own it. Basically own a quote cloud copy of this game. You don't own a physical copy of it and it is completely tied your Google Account and whether you WANNA play through Stadia. Probably a good idea if stadia is something that you have on your mind just to even try like down the line. Just get in there now. Just download it. I did it really quickly before. We started the podcast. I wanted to log on and see what it was about because I couldn't log in before and it's pretty simplistic again. The cheapest game is ten dollars. The most expensive game is the hundred twenty dollar assassin. Assassin's creed oughta see stadia ultimate edition which includes all storylines so. That'll keep you busy if that's something that you want to do. You can see the compatible devices list. There's probably probably accidentally a good time to launch it. I I'm still person who I can't I like Games. I like watching other people play games. I'm not sure if I want to spend three hundred dollars on a console to play the myself but if I could if I could play them on my phone for without having to buy anything else maybe if all I need would need to do to play them on my four K. Tv would be to buy one hundred dollar controller again. That's a maybe a I guess I guess when you lower the minimum buy in forgetting these like tier one game titles view. Hopefully you make the tent bigger and invite a lot more like weasley people like myself in because I actually I will say not only is the the the expense and also having another gadget plugged into my TV and have to find a shelter for it. But it's also and I'm GonNa it's GonNa be a gonNA buy spend sixty dollars for the racing game or sixty dollars for like this really cool game that everybody's playing and I see the videos. They look really really good. And I'M GONNA get in there and just like what I'm figuring out. What button is a which one is be whole bunch of people are GonNa kill me and then insult me got killed so easily and when I say that well actually I just bought this game right now and just getting back into gaming and I'm hoping that there are people there with you? Have any tips for me and the tip. Will you go home? You big piece of suck do your Newbie like I was a good. I'm glad I spent four hundred dollars in that console and sixty dollars on this game. That was that was a great experience. It would be in line with my first time playing dungeons and dragons with a story that I will not at summer camp. I will not tell the whole story but I will. I've told the story to friends of mine who are really into Deity. Usually when they've invited me to like play a game with them and tell them the full story and there is like eight seconds of silence and they've just put like sympathetic arm on my shoulder and said your dungeon master was such a jerk. He should not have done that. That was that was terrible. Yeah Anti do you WanNa read our last little bit for this For this this this is this is Something Fun you can do with the Aghoul Arts and culture APP or if you don't care about that it will explain why you might be getting certain kinds of images in your in your instagram fees and your twitter feed Google Arts and cultures added a new art transfer. They're calling our transfer camera APP And so you can take a picture with a with a camera within the APP or point this feature towards a picture taken and it will Redo it and the style of a specific painting known to arts and culture. Now this this is I rolling Lee Boring on some level because almost every scammy free to download eight hundred dollars a month subscription like camera. Selfie APP says it will we can make you look like a look like a Renoir and Picasso. And it's not like that. It's actually a lot more so it is more sophisticated than try to. It's not even necessarily just for self as a lot of these Our transfer modes that. I've used it. Looks terrible on human being but he put it on a landscape. It looks great if you put it on like the in my case the collection of half drunk the cans of Seltzer and cables on my desk and makes it look really interesting but also exactly They haven't also they. They've Gone Kinda deep catalog. So it's not just renoir and Van Goghs like here's the Mike Rothko color field painting and like. Wow what is this? What is the self portrait? Look like as a mark Rothko those paintings where it's just like here is a blurry rectangle of orange and then a narrow rectangle of like Maroon and another wreck saying what again. What does a portrait look like? In that mode they got Kinski. John Michel Basquiat And also it's not so much of here's a way to sort of wile away your time wasting time taking pictures. It's also here's some history about this painting that we're using here is how it was created. Here's what the style means. So it's it's very much in line with Google Arts and cultures brand which is if you really if you just want to use it to horse around while waiting for a bus and look look at pieces of art that are kind of similar to other pieces of art or take tours of museums take tours of places in virtual or just your desktop realm. It's great but it does aim kinda higher than that that you can accidentally learn some stuff about the stuff that you're just using to pass the time with so I liked it a lot. This is a good time to go in to go into of your brain that you've never gone before. Don't worry you don't have to go into that room where you've locked away all of your emotions that still deep deep down in the sub basement. We're talking about this way. You're distracting yourself from your true feelings. Precisely righty on to our next little bit anywhere. Don't you lead us off into this Well it's it's exciting. We didn't make a big deal of top because we wanted to save her three thousand four episode two hundred and fifty. So I'm really tired understandably saying I just you know the time stamps or sleepy so yes I didn't know we've hit a magic two hundred and fifty episodes it's the quarter century and unfortunately I'M NOT GONNA make a big deal is normally. I would use this as an excuse to go by like celebrate. Tori cake at Ray we usually do I will. I will still do that. Unfortunately there is of course the grocery store that usually shop at a still open but they are limited hours so I could not get in there but essential. Well cake is essential. Cake is essential sometimes more pretty frigging central but yes also we've been doing two hundred. It is I know it's an arbitrary number and Lamey if you're one of those people hundred episode one hundred. Whatever hundredth anniversary is just a year man? Okay it is a year but it's really. It's five almost five years of episodes going on material yet sell. That is a big deal. The fact that we haven't been given the BUM's rush off the Internet means that at least we're developing some sort of value commish of value end at least determination and consistency. So yeah so pretty. I'm pretty pleased by this. We should probably start off by coke. Sharing the congratulations with Founding CO HOSTS RUSSELL IVANOVICH IN OF. I've find the third the triumvirate the the one that have that the one. That's the great thing about them. Leaving is that it's not as though there's some sort of a pay dispute or because I became so obsessed with producing studio albums that I was destroying the live band that Russell has made an I originally found in they left to discuss. It was because they had really really great opportunities of Yes main course leftovers left to work for Google. She appears to see him to be every time. I see her tweet. She's seems to be having a really really great time. I actually had a bookmark. This There was a twitter feed a couple of weeks ago And there's a link to the requoted. Jokingly brought up an idea in a meeting director like the idea brought it up to the VP VP. Likes the idea and wants to make it a thing. That is awesome. Yeah and now I'm wondering too. She remembers that. I'm a journalist. Because if she's forgotten that she if I asked her she might tell me but she remembers. I'm a journalist. She's definitely not going to tell me what it is because now I can. I cannot think of anything else. But what did she suggest she's a she's basically? She's in charge. She works on. I still on the material team essentially making evangelizing. Defining material gives me the material design And working with developers. So I'm not put a pastor to say that to think that maybe there's a brand new APP that only the wonderful mind of Evian could've come up with and she was just wait there just waiting for someone to arrive for meeting and said wouldn't be great if we had an APP like Google photos but it did this and then now she's like vice president in charge of this thing. I would not put it pastor. Yeah I agree It's been great watching. Yes means career just as effectively to flower before our eyes. It's been I'm super proud of her and I just every time. I see a tweet like that from her win. I just get so. I'm just so happy for her. I just I love to see my friends doing well that that and especially right now like that is bringing me a lot of happiness. So as mean yes. He has mean a Russell left because his pocket casts he was The part way more popular than us. Let's be real. Well he's he's. He's helping to build out the infrastructure of joy on this planet or Regard Sadaqa Casts. You might remember that in two thousand eighteen. The company he founded with his partners podcast was acquired by a brand new coalition in two thousand eighteen of broadcasters including NPR. This American life and lots and lots of Independent. Npr stations. They look they because what the but shifty jelly was doing with podcasts. Wasn't simply that. Hey people creating podcast download our APPS for their phones. We can make one of those. It really was part of seemed to be part of a design philosophy that this is the web browser. This is the modern web browser for audio. That this is how people are getting get. There's going to be their viewpoint into information and entertainment and opinions and points of view and could be so much bigger than just simply. Here's how to find. Here's how clicking clack the brothers old episodes come in and it was no no no surprise that NPR and all these heavy hitters decided that hey that we want to we this his mission. Their mission is in alignment with our mission. So we want to be in business together And Ray. I didn't see this news for some reason. I miss this. This happened in March. Bbc The invested in podcasts BBC. That is and so there's The press release. That's going to straighten strengthen that existing coalition and also enable podcast to continue to enhance the APP. Which is absolutely great I Love Russell Love his APP the fact that I continue to use it after God knows how many years it's not because I like him personally like this because it every time I check out it is just like just like you said. There's a satisfaction seeing a friend. Do so well. Yes my friend Russell. I'm using his APP. Well it's not just Russell's APP I mean. Obviously it's there it's there but but you know what I mean but I continued use because it continues to be the best podcast APP. It is so aligned with exactly what I want a podcast APP to do and the fact that There is so much ambition not only brought by its developers but also brought by its financial backers. So there's not going to be a wee you worry about some sort of a meeting in which that Russell didn't know about in which people he's never seen before are in the room already and he's told the close the door and pull the shades and said that we feel as though relieving some money on the table by not properly off vibeke not making use of the data that we could be collecting from our us from your users and yeah but that would be wrong. Not by are not from our perspective. That would be so monetarily right so yes. I'm so glad that everything has been working so well both as a youth for selfishly as a user and also as a friend of Russell's that things have been going so extremely well for him Russell Russell. Thank you for them. I guess so happy when I get to interact with them on. Twitter just feels like. Oh yes being like the tweet of Jesus reading or the fact that Russell and I added finally added each other on like Nintendo on switch. So when I'm playing animal crossing he sometimes will log in but he hasn't opened his island to me at so Russell. Open your island to me. That's anyway so this is episode two fifty and usually we like to do some fun stuff when we have these special episodes even though we're super tired some of us no no. I'm exhausted on several levels as well. Even though I don't I don't I have not been run. Physically ragged with a baby. I'm mostly there's as I have been run physically ragged with the baby on top of a bunch of other stuff so ending AIA birth very tired. But we're doing our best. Which is what we're doing every day hanging in hanging in hanging on. Let's let's talk about the. Let's talk about the president in the future. Yes the sucks things about Google. This is our new year. I thought that I thought it'd be interesting to just talk. In general about what we think about. Google not necessarily run through everything that they do but areas in which for satisfied areas which were not satisfied And hopefully they will now I should we? Should we should renew a something Send Upper Chai re that. The Google was cancelled completely as opposed to being turned into a A virtual is thing a we extend our offered to Sundar if he wants to deliver the keynote. And all the ounce who's going to make as a guest on this show as part of this collaborative spirit were willing to lend to him the audience and the machinery of the material. Podcast can reach those people that he was intending to reach. We promise we won't be mean like even if even if like. We know that you can't get your haircut. Ls sort of stuff. We won't make fun of the hair where we all have our own problems. I guess I certainly God knows got mine. This is not a video podcast. It's only audio. You won't even need to trim the beard. So that's we just want to put on anti. We'll have to see you. So which means you get to see my roots. Which means you get to see by actual hair-color. I do appreciate that. You're bringing up the fact that a Google I O was cancelled because I was thinking around. This time is when you and I would be getting all excited about what's to come. You know I would have my hotel room all picked out in mountain view. I'd be looking forward like time away. I was actually. I was actually planning on leaving the family. For a couple of days to go to Google I o and so part of me had a bit of trepidation because I was thinking how am I going to be able to handle that time away? From from Mona. I guess well now now I get to see. I don't know if it's necessarily a problem I think it was just more realising why people say it is difficult to leave anyway. Sorry again getting very personal here but yes back to our Google scorecard What are we expecting to see from a Keno? I can even wrap my head around at this point with everything else that that's filling up my head. You know what I mean. It would have been weird to To have even CEO of one of the most powerful successful and influential tech companies in the world. Pretend as though and now we are adding dinosaurs to are augmented reality. App like really. That's what that's what's important right now. Do you think was on our mind as we started this livestream that I just? It just sickens me. That can only get circus animals on my desktop but no but the the things keep going through. The World Keeps Spinning Yeah it was. It's I I would want to ask him about like the future of chrome because it's now The chrome browser has become oof it was launched with such fanfare rightly so and it was launched as he lives. Here is everything that is terrible about existing browsers. We're GONNA EVEN GONNA Commission A comic book to explain why. The architecture of this browser is Scott Muscle different from understanding comics And and it was a solution to problems and now it's went quickly. Apple had the apple had the success of the iphone where it went from this. Gosh it is such a competitive market cell phones that we will be lucky to get two percent of the market to going down to know. They are the company that you can't compete against now. Google had that exact. Same thing with chrome where it's like. Oh my God they're really Introduce brand new browser to now the default even if you run windows seems to be chrome but now chrome is a chrome is known to be resource. Hog is known to be kind of bloated. Just look at your memory Panel exactly it's it's I have on ever all make computers particularly my Max. I have a I have safari which is retained in reserve. So that if my if I'm on deadline something really needs to be done like in the next half hour and I don't have time for any spinning Kershaw of any kind I will force quit. Chrome launched safari just to make sure that it's not dealing with these resources. Also it's not now it's The way that The makers of other browsers are inflicting damage on chrome is by saying our browser is way more stable. It is way more secure me as far fewer bugs to it and also it is. We don't have any other agenda in our back pocket. We are not going if we give you a quote adblocker unquote. It's not because we are trying to promote our own scheme of purity tests for ads that worked for that. Help OUR AD business. But don't help anybody else's it's no. We were all as including Google's ads as the enemy so now there are in the Goliath position and Goliath is kind of smelly and stinky and he leaves his barbecue rib bones like everywhere set of putting them nicely in a container so vets. I I don't I don't think that much about cromer talk about it much. But this is the area in which If there's a if there's an APP that is ripe for revolution that Google does. That's a successful APP. That can be pulled down. I think it is chrome. I think this is a very timely thing to bring up Also I know said we were talking about the pandemic. We're not talking about it but we are You know I heard from a couple of neighbors that they had to go out and buy an extra chromebook because so many kids. Are you know Doing schooling at home and because these schools are using chromebooks there are some nuances to the to the operating system that don't necessarily allow for multiple users on the same machine which can be difficult in a multi child households and especially if you are going to a school that maybe he doesn't send you home with the machine. Maybe you you know you can use them at school or something you know sort. I just think it's interesting too that I've been watching a lot of tweets from parents complaining about the things that like chrome for education is not doing very well so bundle this in bundle. Those I guess complaints in with the fact that Google tried to push a chrome tablet on us and that didn't work at all either and so now we're trying to figure out like this new form factor. I have talked about me looking forward to the surfer studio. Like that's just something that seems really fun. I just played with the LG sixty which has this removable. Second screen and I can certainly see like what the future might be like for Android in that realm. But I'm having a hard time thinking about. Well where is chrome pass just like a desktop so to speak operating system? There's definitely there's a lot of tweaking that needs to be done into it and this is kind of a bummer about not having not even virtual goliath event because I would love for there to be just an addressing like I feel like there should be a state of the Google Union and that they should just do it on Youtube Youtube live and we should all just tune in and get to watch this. You know I mean a lot of my favorite parts of Goulet oh used to be just the QNA's yeah where it's just. Here's an open Mike here are? Here's open door. If you do WanNa make fun of by here. You are perfectly welcome to do. So 'cause we're not screening people and so that's where a lot of real conversation seemed to happen and also it's it's where Senior executives and leaders of Google have to answer questions off the cuff as opposed to. I have been prepared. We've prepared a statement about this. This future product were service. Here's the message that we want to stay on. Its well you have to off the cuff. Suddenly say that well. The thing is Well until I was twenty seven I used to part my hair in the middle. And that means that there's a cow lick that can never really tame so I started using this sort of. I don't know if you call the poem out again. It's not like he hasn't run this past seventeen different people But yeah there's there there's a lot to deal with also chrome Os. I don't I never know how to how to interpret the success of Chrome Os. I think the the the the ground that they seem to have seized his This is the perfect. Ls perfect hardware for people who want something that's practical and boring and cheap which is great because there are people who need a functional two hundred and fifty dollar even sub two hundred dollar computer and Chrome Os. Laptops are exactly that It's I think that it leaves Google with the problem. Of How do we? How do we grow chrome Os and his capabilities without alienating the people who don't want to have to learn a new way of dealing with notifications that don't WanNa have to deal with a new document manager? They don't care about our theories about how this will make a collaborative workspaces so much easier to manage. We just want to open up. The little laptop gave a web browser type in where we want to go and go there. We Wanna go to Google. Docs and get a doc. So it's I as as much as we can Speculate about how envious apple has been about their Google success with chromebooks and education at an enterprise as opposed to apples insistence over the past ten years that the IPAD is just as good as anything else on the other hand. My goodness you see where they've taken the IPAD OS and what they've been doing with these devices and at least as people like us who sit outside of reality sometimes and try to look towards the future boy. That's an interesting. Engaging is just that you want you want to make sure that your engineers are eric. Cited about what they're doing Because it's otherwise it's like being a mechanic for a fleet of Ford Crown Victorias. It's like this is a practical car though the oil the if you change the oil it works the oil. The oil filter is a place where it's easy to get at. It's easy to maintain your guy. I'm not a foregone. Who will say I've always liked? I've always been attracted to fleet cars like the Crown Victoria because for a number one a Gal. I know that we're going long so I'll I'll I won't make this into a thirty minute podcast episode about Flea cars but number one as a when it comes to cars. I am that person that I want to open up the LID. I want to see a bread browser. I wanted to do what I want to get into the car. I want that car to start whether it's twelve below or one hundred degrees and I might be able to drive that car. One hundred two hundred fifty miles without worrying this going to break down when it does break down or needs service. I don't want to be told that. Oh they haven't made this part in fifty years and four. Zero Serpentine Belt is supposed to be replaced every seventy five thousand miles and whoever designed this engine designed it so that you have to drop the entire engine to get at this part. That's designed to be replaced. It's GONNA cost you four thousand dollars I want to. I want part the part of the product. Catalog of of a fleet a fleet vehicle is not to people like me. It's to the person who is buying like two thousand of these for like a company or for For rental car agency. And they're saying that and your in house garage will be able to fix everything just common hand tools for twenty seconds but the other thing I like about it is that and I've I have friends. Who are real car people and they make fun of me for this. I like this. I like the design problem of a fleet vehicle. Where it's you every it i. I think it's very very easy for a designer to be told. Go Not Stu. Whatever you want you don't have to eat. It doesn't even have to be practical for the user. It doesn't even have to be manufacturable if you decide that. You want to design a homer mobile with like. Two passenger bubbles eighteen couple. Just go ahead and do it. I think it's very interesting when they say that here is here's our target are going to be rental car companies. It's going to be taxi. Fleets IT'S GOING TO BE. It's going to be police. Fleets which means that if you put all kinds of stupid body trim on it. That's just GonNa fall off and make. The car looked terrible. It has to be able to see. These people has been fixed so I think it's very it's nonetheless they. They can't not be designers. So it gives them limitations. They will still try to build the most elegant the most beautiful the most satisfying thing they can do under those limitations so as a result. I think there's a certain beauty to them. That is that is we're not GONNA put a we're not gonNA put a fake Fake Air Scoop on it. We're not going to be put Like all the stuff that does nothing but makes it look more expensive than it is so vast and also also will be more practical here If they've made like this sleep vehicle for twelve years. It means that there's probably some police department or there's somebody selling five year old one for like six thousand dollars and it's easiest to get them fixed okay. I thought you're going to say there's if the police are using them. That's definitely a car that you can ram through a bunch of gates and get away unscathed Didn't y'all miss me an Andy in our and our yellowcard Andy I feel I feel like there is just so much more that we could look to the future for for Google and I feel like maybe maybe we should be. We should think about it in pieces. Because we don't have google. I O talk you know coming anytime soon. I mean maybe we will will surprise us. All look surprised. We're GONNA do. A thing. Should be. Maybe he's going to do like a house to house sort of thing where it's GonNa be a hi. I'm Dr Pichai I've got stay here on the front doorsteps for six feet away and I'm just going to spend if it's okay. The next forty three minutes explaining what also do you know? Mrs Calva Hatch across the street because I have forty two westview drive for her but she moved seem to be home convoy consisting of that episode of Bar when he falls on the well anyway. in he gets that little anyway so we can talk about this very very smart but I I do think that we should because this is episode two fifty and we are marking a point in time so we kind of talked about in this episode. Like what's been going on around us in the world. We mentioned it even though we didn't make the episode completely about that or bringing news items about that what I really note in our notes about talking about our own individual plans for the future and I really like that because I feel like right now. That's kind of all that I'm holding onto is what I'll be able to do in the future because we can't really plan for the right now except what am I going to eat. And you know is my baby. Okay that's all that's on my mind on top of the other heavy things that are on my mind. That's all I have room for So I'm looking forward to things so in the short term just to Kinda start us off. I'm looking forward to my daughter to Golden Gate Park and just sitting at only gay park What are you looking forward to you andy? In the short term short term for is in the short term That I'm this is. This is unusual. Unusual situation for other reasons like my My leg is finally nearly completely better like I. All all that happened was I just pulled the hell out of a hamstring or something right here. It's doing it wasn't like permanent damage. Nothing needed to be a surgically tend to it was just GonNa take big inflammation that was gonna take a while for it to unwind and also is going to take me like adding the daily stretches because my hamstrings said. We're super super tight as you can imagine. That's why this happened but it went but has gone from in like the time. It's the first time I've really the first time my dad wanted a hamstring was wanted to tell me that it was upset with my behavior to like not even be able to like get out of bed without feeling like. I've been shot in the hip or something to now. I don't need I can walk around the house without needing crutches or anything Walking around the neighborhood I will use one crutcher a cane just to remind myself that I still need to take a little bit easy. Take it easy and I fi- I've finally last week. Like got the bike ready to go. I I'm used to putting on like maybe ten miles maybe fifty miles a week at minimum and the have not written it once since October. So I'm getting so I'm looking forward to a really getting to just Do that sort of idol. I don't know what I WANNA do. I WANNA get out of the house. I think I'll just take them by. Read have no real destination and just ride around. 'cause that's that's that's my wandering. Unfortunately I can still do that again. I'm not this is fortunately. It's not a tandem bike so I will not have somebody within six feet of me so I can do that. He tend to bite with six feet. I'm just imagining. It made me chuckle. What about big picture so i. I guess I'm going to start us off on this one big picture. I have been working a lot on my website which might not which at first. I didn't really understand why I was doing this. I just had this inclination to do this for myself as this project And I've been working on my website for years not for years but for many years now and to some people They may be thinking well. Of course you need to have Florence. Ion Dot COM. Because that is where you can host the work you've worked on. That's where your bio is. It's you know it's indexed in Google. Search that sort of thing and like you just you. Kinda have to have your own space on the web but adding to that. It made me realize how much I am sort of missing the grind. Not I don't mean the grind in like that evil capitalist way of like I'm Gonna I'm just GonNa work in have no boundaries and work all the time and working with my life what I mean to say is I missed the grind of of what I do for a living like just really being into a story and you know Having a lot of having a lot of juggling plates and just sort of feeling like oh I'm I'm being fulfilled. Creatively like through my work like. I'm really enjoying the work that I'm doing and it's not to say that I haven't enjoyed the work I've been doing but When I got pregnant my life just sort of became like this is what it's about I got you know. There was morning sickness and so I was dealing with that I was doing all the changes in my body and part of the change of the happen with that is my brain. I had to slow down so much and that was really hard for me. That's very hard thing for me to do. And so I kinda poured myself into this website. After I had the baby because I wanted to work on something that I had control over without being worried you know having licken editor somebody you know Ed could do this. Just on my own terms and it's just now it's making me think about all the things I wanna do and it's helped a lot. It's actually helped a lot with my confidence like just being able to like. I published a review today of the sixty and I wrote it and I edited and I put together this whole layout and I made a style guide for the whole website and all these little things are just really helping and so I guess what I'm looking at. Big Picture is just hoping it'll take me to kind of my next major professional endeavor. That's where that's what I'm looking forward to. I'm just not quite sure what it is yet. You know what I mean. Not Quite sure what it is yet but I I got. I got a taste of it again and I was like. Oh yeah that's right. I really like this. I really like doing this so I think it's and the responding to you also answering the question that the more the better you know yourself. What makes herself tick? And just the general thing of what is my life's mission? At least a two wonderful things happening number one you become more emboldened to simply go out and explore and wander As opposed to I was told in my research. Told me that my pot of gold whether it's actual wealth or happiness is right here. I went here and it wasn't there. What the hell man. Whereas if you just a if you are guiding yourself by here's what moves me hers. What interests me and make that the compass for your adventure. You will find yourself someplace you had never planned to go to and you'll recognize this thing that you're meant to do immediately and that's worked for me a bunch of times Where the vert the difference between the version myself in my twenty s where? It was like years later. You are a freelance columnist freelance contributor. Now you want to become like a contributing editor. And then maybe if this working out with you want to become an editor of this and then Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and he made it through my twenty s and realizing that actually. I don't want to be like I'm defining myself as I want to be an editor someday or I want to be on this masthead of this no I don't I just want it's Later in life realizing that I won't I won't talk about it because I won't talk about. What my mission in life is. Because it's something that's easy to under for me to understand impossible for me to explain but that but that really. Desai's here's what I WANNA do for fun and I excuse me to again as a nourishing thing for me to do whether it's pleasure or just feeling as though I'm making good use of my time And that's leads to good things if I find that When I would not know how to apply for a job at NPR when an opportunity to do one or two things for them popped up. I found that because of the work that I've been doing for the past X. years both career wise and also the past three or four years specifically when a kind of got frustrated with regular tech journalism and started saying I want really look. I want to talk to people in government. I Really WanNa talk to people who are in policy. I really wonder stand all of this. I found myself accidentally in a really great with a really great venue. Talk about these things that interested me and that job at the Boston. Npr would not be nearly as interesting. Had A not again. Done that sort of one. Wrong so So in terms of like large format big picture stuff and this this is gonNA sound a lot serious more serious than than it is inside my head but the the older I get. I assure you I'm not old and middle aged. I'm not old okay. I still don't get the senior discounts at Dunkin donuts and they were very very liberal. They don't even ask. They will just get gave my aunt the senior discount. She was steamed about it. So I'm saying but but nonetheless I just keep reminding the older I get the more I realized that if you can work on empathy every single day It makes every day a little bit more pleasurable a little every day. A little bit more valuable and at Lea- leaves you in a state where you're able to make more satisfying Choices Day to day in the future and May I say that empathy also include self empathy that Don't get on so I'm saying that it means that when you empathy means that when you see somebody in a store and their kid is just totally misbehaving and the parent is not doing anything about it. It's not my job to. It's not my job to say to thank. God says what a horrible parent would horrible kid. She should be doing something. It's also not my job to think. Well it's the. There's probably good reason why that's happening. It is probably my job to realize that she's got her own stuff going on. This is none of my business. She's not hurting the kid. She's probably got stuff going on. And it really is mental bandwith about judging other people is bandwidth that could be using for my own purposes. Much much better but there is such a thing as self empathy and that is like if Again this would be a longer conversation that we don't have but After a really close friend of mine died was also journalists It Really Kinda put a an underscore on some lack of satisfaction. That I was having with my own work and I took not even not an announced breaks now so I stopped working for certain people. It was just that I'm going to figure out why I don't like why certain parts of my job are have now become annoying and others have become offensive to me The non self empathetic response to that would have been for. God's Sakes you're lucky to have a job anyway particular job. That's as good as this. Don't complain about Oh. I don't enjoy what I'm doing. Well you know the person who puts fifty pound sacks a peat moss in the back of a pickup truck all day long this summer you think that he or she enjoys what he's doing. That's not a self empathetic way of approaching. You have these self empathetic way of saying okay. Well let's explore that. What what particularly is the last time you did this. Which is part of your job if you really came really board your plane home feeling just in a bad mood. What do you think caused that? And then what are? What do we have to do that? And if we have to do that. Is there a way of doing that differently? So that we're not quite as annoyed or if it turns out that yes it has to be as as horrible that can we've worked on ways to have perspective on what we gained from having done that unpleasant stuff and sort of think of the think of the these and tedious and sometimes annoying things as a form of meditation that we're doing a form of prayer that we're doing giving our offerings not necessarily to God but just to existence that sometimes you do have to have that sort of lack of ego and accept that this is going to be what it is? That's what I keep trying to focus on because I'm I don't know where I I don't know where I picked up this corny expression. I think I I think I was young enough that I initially adopted. Ironically that I am but an imperfect vessel to continue to hold the perfection of the universe Oh Wow that's heavy. Corny sang and it turns out. I've come from like recovery or something. I truly don't know where it comes from. It might come from recovery because it is because the more you let that marinate the more like you know what there is perfection up there in the universe. I am an imperfect vessel with which to contain and hold it So all I can do is do my best and try to you. Know take as many steps forward as I possibly can. So that's a long winded wave of saying it but I have ice also have career goals. They're things I'd like to accomplish the next two or three years there steps. I'm taking to try to accomplish those things but really when it comes down to it. I want to be able to be a better person without judging. Nba Better be better person and not be a bad person to myself. Yeah I'm still working on that. Last part is a daily task. You took note on the Monitor. Say Treat Yourself Nice. You Owe yourself a lot. I actually my current desktop wallpaper which I just Put is your. Your ideas are worth pursuing. So I feel like that's very much the realm of what's going on right now so We'll see very before we before we go. I mean that's that's very very valuable When we go. It's actually on the desk behind me. Then I will own share with the public because again it would be out of context would make any sense but part of that process. When I lost my friends started thinking about new stuff I really did wind up printing out signs for myself of things. It whenever whenever a phrase or a way of expressing a thought On this larger subject occurred to me and ECHINACEA. Oh Wow that's true. That is a really big important truth. Yeah exactly I'm going to make I'm going to put the I'm going to make a sign for that on eight and a half by eleven streets piece of paper a a as a way of growth but also because I got lots of cool fonts and I kind of like designing size and so and so and there's a little a little clip on the wall. Sometimes I would put one of them up so I could see them all the time. That stuff really does work because talking to other people work getting professional help if you need it also works but sometimes you do have to be the administrator of the bad. Hundley complicated rain you have to you have to be able to. You have to be able to facilitate from the inside. I mean I I hate to put it that way but I mean I mean look. This is a really morbid thing that I say but I say it to my friends and for some reason it always strikes a chord with them whenever we're talking about even like the most benign thing but I always tell them remember you die alone and I know I know that it's really. It's really morbid. So thank you for everybody for accepting that I just said that And for taking it because for me. It's kind of like a big. It's just an important notion about how important it is for me to be able to facilitate these things for myself so because we anyway there's we could go very deep psychology of why I had to adopt that sort of life a life lesson but anyway again once you've you stumble upon truth you can immediately recognize it for what it is it. That's one hundred percent Which is why we we're GONNA CONTINUE TO PURSUE. That material is wearing continue to pursue the truth about this brand that we we love very much and I know that it sounds maybe silly in this age to talk about loving a brand many. Oh brands brands brands but Google's a pretty big part of the world and I mean just think about the fact that they got cited as being one of the biggest resources for finding out what is going on in the world you know. Just try not to say the whole thing and so I think it's important that we continue to really really look really look at this entity in our lives this blanket entity that is Google and to forget and I. I'll just finish by saying that. This is why I love doing this. Podcast particularly I enjoy doing it with you. Because we've talked about a really sketchy reality show. In Japan. We talked about why we may or may not be buying headphones and then by the end we got into really really deep life philosophy And so that's why No no one. Host of the show is better than any other but I really think that it was a wonderful wonderful wonderful thing when Russell approached you to come on to fill yes means vacancy and I think it's a wonderful wonderful thing that you're still around. I look forward to the next two hundred fifty with you. I look forward to the next two hundred fifty with you and then by then I'll have a five year old. I just listen. I do is think about her. And now you're just going to hear you talk about her so enjoy everyone. And that's what you get. I realized I although I would have been pleased to have children enjoying the good part being an uncle either genetically or just by friend relationships right most of the best parts. You got all the pictures you don't necessarily have to pick them up in from county jail after after after after they after. They bumped the COP car at age. Sixteen some there's a lot of projectile bodily fluids coming out your way and so. I do a lot more laundry than I used to put that way. So yeah I'll say over the next one. Thank you everyone for tuning into this special episode. I know it doesn't seem special. Because we kinda downplayed the two fifty part a little bit and we talked about the news but I think I think this was a good way for Andy United. Come back together after being away for a little bit and after us just kind of trying to manage what's been happening in the last couple of weeks Because that's definitely that's definitely. Yeah it's a thing it's just the thing that we've been dealing with. Some of us are eating a lot of cookies. Some of US have sourdough starters and some of us are just talking into a microphone at our desk trying to figure out what it is that our brain is attempting to Parse so thanks for everybody for tuning in for that And IT HEY. If you want more of this you can actually subscribe to us and become a member. Let's not forget you can become a member of the material podcasts? Subscribing member And if you want you can call yourself. A founding member will allow you to say that we won't give you a card though for it. I E relay DOT FM slash material. And we've got different tiers there and remember that you're not just supporting us. You're also supporting the relay. Fm Family and there's lots of you know this is a network of wonderful podcast tune into especially right now. Maybe you're feeling a little stuck at home and well. Why not have us in your ears? Andy what would you like to leave everybody with before we take off for the week? Just that old. That old phrase another favorite favorite phrase that I've thought was by Kurt Vonnegut but turns out by his son he was but he was quoting his son in the book. Read it this. Remember that in times like these and every single day. We're all here to help each other through this thing. No matter what it is I'm GonNa leave it at that. Thank you andy. And until next week everyone warned.

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