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"john marshall school" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:10 min | Last month

"john marshall school" Discussed on WGN Radio

"So you have to pick your poison carefully I suppose Doug Ducey center we got a tester as Hey I just found out I may have been exposed to the virus on April twenty fifth I've had no symptoms since that time since it's past fourteen days do I need to quarantine myself for another fourteen or am I good to go out with with all the you know prescribe precautions physical distancing the masks and everything like that April twenty fifth is when this person's learning they they've they've world exposed to someone with the virus so it should be answer I suppose is that there are a hundred percent sure that you know they they were exposed on that day and they've been quarantined for fourteen days yeah I suppose than than you would be safe forty precaution but somebody like that you don't know and so I would say for somebody like that I would get the antibody test on the person like that see you know see what you were supposed to and and and do you have anybody else to it I think that somebody who really sort of should be tested because of the close contact and certainly take all the precautions that they are talking about it seems like you're you're already thinking about that protecting others to a one size is what about the bandannas folded in thirds with with a coffee filter I thank her from number people they they do it without one of us have the bandanna version of the mass that's made you know I had do it yourselfers somebody in the family if not ourselves and then you put some the coffee filter in it does the car do you remember the study did address the coffee filter I don't remember but that what the coffee filter itself wasn't one of the best performers so I you know I don't know if the quote people to provide the actual quote unquote layer of protection but again the the hundred percent cotton or whatever the bandanna that folded over would be you know sufficient for what you're using the mask or out in public it's strange times a three time teddy I mean how do you handle do do you see a lot of streaming because I do see shaming people don't have a mass and they you know they they get a little too close even if it's outdoors I do see people sort of look at each other saying Hey well well well back off because it's your health you're trying to protect and and that kind of thing I guess there's a way to handle that that you know what what do you advise why does it open ended questions that it wants more than I had a question for sure yeah so yeah listen to me doesn't help anything and I I think each in their outside the risk is extraordinarily low especially with appropriate social distancing I think you more closed spaces it's potentially if it is more of an issue that's where would be of an issue but you you you know you probably use your self I suppose your behaviors my answer and you know I I and nobody can judge a jury on anybody else but listen there is currently correct if I'm wrong I'm wrong but there is a water that everybody who comes outside can't practice social VMware mapped that's what the officials are saying that we should do but again you know hi shooting people I don't know if that's necessarily the the right way either and you know those can lead with people in mental health issues that could lead to violent confrontation and as promised surgeons have hiking plenty of those things get out of here quick and road rage incidents somebody needs to police themselves and take some responsibility that's respectful about it yeah that's a great answer it's a great answer hate I'm just finally here just for let's go governor Pritzker is a staffer tested positive in a row now they're gonna do those daily press briefings kind of remotely via video conference just to be on the safe side whenever staffer even though they're they're they're testing you that they're testing the media members of the governor's staff now every day I believe it it doesn't take sometimes remind us if you might not show it immediately and then it may may take a few days before you test positive one of the one of the would be learning about that right I mean if you look at the literature across the board has anywhere from ten to fourteen days after exposure I think typically the the large amount of people we see usually within five or so days they're they're developing some symptoms but again if you have been exposed to around the person right kneeling quarantine yourself and and then again when when available somebody should get tested Q. we and if they are fourteen twenty one days out or something you know certainly antibody test it would be a quarter but yeah I mean I think they have to do that maybe they should have been doing those briefings all along separate I always thought from the beginning nobody should be up on stage anywhere near each other but that's my own personal P. all right thank you Dr Steve always good to hear your thoughts on on all things medical and all things about the virus and beyond it was great to hear your relationship advice on Friday to that was that was yeah twenty people thank you for calling really they're already already your wealth of information and knowledge back to Steve Saltzman green care medical is where you find thank you doctor Pritchett we're gonna we gonna take a moment here to pause and then we'll be right back with a law professor from you I see the John Marshall school of law actually and she's going to talk about the constitutionality of all these legal challenges to the governor's order that's coming up here on WGN right it's Jamie progressives number one number two employee leave a message at.

Doug Ducey
"john marshall school" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:53 min | 5 months ago

"john marshall school" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

"In America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other things.

Boston African American school Boston public school Black school principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter school Texas John Marshall School champlain Elementary School Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University of Louisville professor Louisville US John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee WanNa
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 5 months ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
"john marshall school" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall school" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Weather center sunny to partly cloudy skies high seventy nine then drops to sixty four later on this evening with partly cloudy skies this evening right now we're looking at mostly cloudy skies in seventy four degrees at o'hare gossiping at fifteen miles an hour barometer steady right now seventy four at midway sixty nine in fox lake in sixty seven along the lakefront peng in the wgn newsroom ready to join the conversation live whenever a story changes on chicago's very own seven twenty wgn thinking big thoughts so you don't have to thank you dom john williams john williams we are here weekdays one to three and on saturdays from ten am until twelve noon we also do a podcast it's called mincing rascals and that's where a bunch of us rascals sit around admits we talk about current events we post that on thursdays on social media i'm wgn king john king yeah they wanna be someday i think things will go a lot more smoothly please for me if that ever happened wgn king john on social media puts them stuff up on facebook over the weekend i tweeted a picture from pride couple points about all of that in just a minute i i just wanted to congratulate congressman russia krishnamurthy and also congressman darren lahood darren is from the eighteenth congressional district down in peoria and bloomington all the way over to iowa he's a terrific guy he is a republican i used to live in his district i used to live across the street in fact for the guy his dad worked for and that was congressman bob michael so there's darin lahood the republican and he comes up to the chicago area at the john marshall school of law downtown right across from the linear park and the congressman from purity is there with raja krishna murthy from the eighth congressional district north northwest suburbs raj of course is a democrat so here we have congress people doing town hall meetings which congress people don't like to do these days republicans don't want to meet their constituents face to face there's some democrats who don't like what they're facing out there but these two guys not only will do that but they will do so on the other guys turf krishna murthy went down to conservative central illinois and sat there and espoused his views for no purpose because they go and vote for him they can't than to have a civil conversation with an opponent on stage and you get to ask questions i can't overstate how i think important that is because too many congress people facing wrath from their constituents three they're not conservative enough or liberal enough they support the president too much or not enough whatever they just don't wanna do it anymore and they take the easy road and they say well why don't you mail questions in or you can watch my livestream now you gotta be on stage we got to be able to talk to you and we got to be able to have tv cameras there channel five was their props to marianna hernan gang over nbc five they'll probably have a story about that probably cut me out but that's okay so then they they did it in peoria and now here comes lahood from peoria up to arrages home turf and by the way lahood from downstate illinois is a graduate of the john marshall school of he's also a five time marathoner there's krishna murthy who actually spent time in peoria our local democrat but he spent time in peoria as a student he got a degree in mechanical engineering there no no no way no his dad was a professor of engineering he got his degree in mechanical engineering from princeton and then went onto the harvard law school and lords resumes stellar to great education great public and private service and now both of them are representatives in congress and so the first question was about the immigration debate i said is the no tolerance policy what do you make of that and they both spoke about it is funny because you could just see there come moments where either of them would say something at a good host like me would say no way what do you mean run a and then they would have engaged me.

seventy four degrees
"john marshall school" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall school" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Eight one seventy two hundred a quick note here i wanna do a shout out also to cindy is hit maitre and may t r e and eric crawl the husband and wife from wheaton were in our studios the other day they were the top bidders at a gala and part of the price was a pete mcmurray guided tour through the studios of wgn you will not meet to nicer people than these two they were just delightful a bumped into a couple of times they stood in my office and we visited pete was of course a great and gracious host so it was nice to meet a couple of listeners to cindy and eric thanks for coming by and thanks for listening to wgm also you can google congressman raja our a j a google vat congressman raja it'll take you to a linked to congressman raja krishna murthy who has a sukagaw suburb congressman he is a democrat and when you get to his web page congressman raja i'm not gonna tell you how to spell russia krishna murthy that if you just do that you'll get to his page google congressman raja and there'll be a big button on his page to sign up for a town hall meeting that i am going to emcee on monday we'll be at the john marshall school of law which is downtown chicago right across from buckingham fountain if you are looking at a map you see buckingham fountain on the other side of michigan avenue is the john marshall law school and there we will be a ten o'clock monday morning for what they are saying is the only town hall meeting of its kind in the united states it'll be hosted by two congressman one republican and one a democrat congress people these days don't even wanna do town hall meetings some of them literally stopped doing them they don't do them you can call and they do videos but they're just so terrified of what they're going to hear from their constituents anymore that nobody wants to do them god bless these two congressmen krishna murthy and congressman lahood danny lahood from the eighteenth congressional district downstate peoria illinois where pete and i and actually krishna murthy and lahood are all from least i've spent a lot of time there so the hood is the central illinois congressmen and christian murphy's from around here all going to meet at the john marshall school of law at ten am on monday it's free but you need to sign up so just go to the website by krishna murthy and the way to get to that is by just googling congressman raja are aj and they said you know we'll both make a little short brief introductory statement and then bring it on this is not combative in fact the point of it is to be civil but will they talk about immigration.

google lahood illinois danny lahood congressman lahood michigan chicago john marshall school of law krishna murthy russia sukagaw wheaton cindy eric christian murphy peoria united states john marshall law school buckingham fountain