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"john marshall" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:10 min | 2 months ago

"john marshall" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"But the dead by the John Marshall it's not the jingles be all you can be for the U. S. army and be a pepper for Dr pepper written by Jake Holmes he also wrote dazed and confused led Zeppelin a copy of the forty five is worth up to five hundred dollars you could add another five hundred dollars for the pictures find a value for any record that money music dot com others might be John and now back to my day job as we take your calls for you here John are there any Glenn Miller a collector's items baby original copy of but why don't know in the mood string of pearls tuck sido junction or Chattanooga Choo Choo no overall the big band era and not to collect builder are exceptions is a Benny Goodman seventy eight called written the Scotch it's worth a thousand dollars because Billie holiday's singing on the record so even a Benny Goodman is given the credit the reason collectors want us because of Billie Holiday the big band era overall not to collectible another band music two years ago yeah Daniel in the Elkton Maryland now hi Daniel hello yes Sir go right ahead yeah I don't know I got a question for your guest please yeah is sergeant grocery gore was blues where where would he would in may from goes though bundle by noon where is god rom where is he from yeah it will be backed up why do you need to back in the country there I I have no idea I'm not sure we know what we're more in the Hindu collectibility then yeah anything else here his first album though was very collectible yeah his first album was was quite collectible but that's about all the we've got here for you I'm a I'm sorry to to tell you.

John Marshall U. S. army Dr pepper Jake Holmes Zeppelin John Glenn Miller Benny Goodman Daniel Maryland gore Billie Elkton
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 5 months ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"And the custom when Marshall Becomes chief justice. Is that during these discussions. The justices may only have wine. If it's raining I assume that this was to cheer themselves. On Marshall's custom was to always ask one of his colleagues often associate justice story. You Know Brothers Story. We look out the window and tell us what the weather is. Story might say well. The Sun is going down and a clear sky marshal would say our jurisdiction is so vast by the law chances. It must be raining somewhere. The wine was served to the Marshall Court. This may explain the number of unanimous decision. I'm serious I'm serious about that. Because because there was this was a man who I mean except versus Jefferson. He really really liked almost everybody. Almost everybody liked him Justice story the first time he heard him as a lawyer. I love his laugh and I realize I've written a number of biographies. This is the first person who's a laugh was described. Wow did out in this whole like It's not that they lacked a sense of humor. But but this is the this is the first person I ever read the description of laugh and stories. I love his laugh. So that shows you you know what kind of a guy? He was one-on-one and that's how he ran his court. I mean he al- also. There was the power of his mind. There was the power of his legal reasoning. But but the first thing the sort of the first story of this personality is this this warmth this geniality this ability to get along with people and You know the expression herding cats. Well you know that that can be what what the Supreme Court is like or any any small group politics and Marshall had that ability. He had that gift and That that geniality that good fellowship was was a key part of it. Well Richard. You have an open invitation to join us at John Marshall. One time home in Washington. Dc The decor Bacon House. I've eighteenth and F- okay so you can enjoy some wine as Marshall perhaps enjoyed it With us in some other martial files okay. Great they'll take you up on that great. The book is John Marshall. The man who made the Supreme Court Richard Brooker joined us for a a wonderful interview. We encourage you to buy it All bookstores nationwide or on Amazon On the Internet Richard. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Garrett. Thanks for having me all right. This program has been brought to you by the James Wilson Institute on Natural Rights in the American founding. If you'd like to learn more about the James Wilson Institute please visit James Wilson Institute Dot Org. Thanks for listening..

John Marshall Marshall Court James Wilson Institute on Natu Supreme Court Richard Brooker F James Wilson Institute Dot Org James Wilson Institute Garrett Bacon House Jefferson Washington Amazon
"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Of a an account of the story and so two but to make this visit to the reader to me. I decided to for each one of these cases to go back however far that would be to catch the story at the beginning of it. And sometimes this not going back to colonial times The obvious examples Dartmouth Woodward and this is a case decided in eighteen nineteen. It's a fight over the governance of the college but The story begins Before the revolution when Dartmouth I gets its charter from George. The third and and the case will be decided based on the language of that charter and the structure that it set up at Marshall's decision that this this was a contract and therefore Something that the constitution prevents the states from impairing under Article One section ten. But but so I take it back to the very beginning and then carry the story up and similarly with you know with all the other cases the Cherokee cases where we have to start with what were the relations of the of the Cherokees With the United States Up to the point they get in legal trouble Gibbons Viagra and the steamboat case or or why did we have steamboats in the United States? Who invented them? When and how How did this monopoly? That's being challenged in the case got established in the first place and You know it it makes the story more queer. A lot of fun Sometimes they're real characters involved in these cases Some of the some of the back story is pretty jaw-dropping Fletcher versus pack cited by the Court and eighteen ten. This is This is a another contract case. Really the first important one and that begins begins the crooked land deal in the state of Georgia in seventeen ninety five. The state of Georgia is broke They sell thirty five million acres of land for a penny and a half an acre for land companies which were formed for the purpose of taking advantage of this sale and it turned out that every single member of the Georgia legislature that approved. This was bribed. The going rate for their vote was a thousand dollars and one guy took only six hundred dollars and he said well. I wasn't greedy. That's why they helped on my extra four hundred dollars. I mean it's it's it's it's entertaining you know and then you should be entertaining should I hope it does entertain the reader. But but these are also you know these. Are It also shows how porno these cases are because people? Don't go to court over nothing. You know. People would rather not do that most of them they go to court either because they really want something or they're really afraid of something you know. They're afraid of being cheated there or they're afraid of going to jail cases Aaron burr his treason trial. He would have been an act that you know if he'd lost that was the penalty for treason so he was fearful of his life and You know on the other hand people people want money Jefferson thought burner was a trader. He wanted him punished So so they're they're they're powerful motives On either side and I wanted to be able to capture not only the entertainment but the drama every one of these cases. Well we envisioned this conversation jumping around the book a little bit and I hope we get to talk about Some of those cases and the figures and the drama as well. But as this is the James Wilson Institute podcast and we have a nice robust constituency of lawyers judges and clerks judges among among them. We thought we would first focus on the most general question of how Marshall approached his role as a judge he approached it. I think I'll use the word conservative late. You know. Not Trying to invoke either side in in either current political debates or the political debates of his time. I mean this literally in the sense that as a judge you deal with cases. That's all you deal with. It was interesting to me before Marshall even get on the court in the decade or so that the Supreme Court existed before he got the job of chief justice there were several instances where the president or Congress s Supreme Court to do other things. You know asked for advice on Some PD question or asked to supervise tension. Requests of revolutionary war veterans. There were several instances. And then all those instances the court said now you know. We're not going to be Jack of all trades. Our job here is to be the Supreme Court for cases that arise before the federal judiciary. That's what we do. That's all we do at that informs marshalls behavior. He you know. He sits there with his colleagues five of them. At first and later they become sixth court increases from six to seven justices and they wait to see what lands and their laps. Now you know. They're not. They're not blindfolded here. They they are aware of what's happening in the legal universe. And they're certainly aware of the politics that that swirls around them but they he added they are there to decide cases now the the innovation that he's often credited with and this is in his. You know his first monumental case Marlboro versus Madison at eighteen now. Three this is the first time that the court strikes down. A portion of a law passed by Congress And this is Yeah this is rightly considered a landmark decision. I wonder if it isn't a little over emphasized because Marshall wasn't making the doctrine of judicial review out of whole cloth in eighteen. O three right. This is already a concept that people understood. It was already out there Alexander Hamilton had written about it and the last of the federalist papers where he covers the judiciary at the end of the series Marshall himself had spoken about it at the Virginia ratifying convention in the summer of seventeen eighty eight. He was one of the delegates to that convention which was going to approve or disapprove the key the new constitution for the state of Virginia. And he he was pro-constitution then he gives a speech one of the speeches. He gives us on the judiciary and in the course of that speech. He does expert on the principle of judicial review and There was even before Marshall even gets on the court the there was a case in the seventeen ninety s involving the constitutionality of a tax on carriages Now it turned out of the court decided to this tax was okay but they were certainly in a position. Since the question came up to go on the other way so the que- the constitutionality of a law had appeared. Ask a question before the court before Marshall even gets on the court so yes margarite is is. It is an important decision. It is First Time it's done and then it's very rarely done there after I mean the the most famous time it's done as dreads Scotney. Seven this is this is decades after Marshall is has died and a A A judge pointed to me after my book came out. There were a couple of cases with the Marshall Court decided in the eighteen twenties having to do with WHO owned It was either the shoreline or the islands and Mobile Bay. Was it still the federal government or was state of Alabama? This is after. It's become a state and the court There had been a law passed by Congress implying that the federal government could still dispose of these lamps and then the court set now. He can't do that. It's now state Alabama's now state therefore it has control over these lands so the point is there was another. There was another instance of the court. overruling a portion of a law passed by Congress much less famous or notorious and dread Scott but But my only point is. This wasn't happening a lot but It was a principal that was that was already understood and and Marbury famous. Because it's the first time it's actually made real. Yeah I see it as as twofold one. You Misunderstood more being twofold. Fold one as you articulate the misunderstanding that the case established judicial review merely articulated. How it was always They're in the constitution under our constitutional scheme but the second is this strange misunderstanding. That judicial review means judicial supremacy. And how when the court decides Case it is binding as a constitutional amendment is passed through the power and logic of the supremacy of the Supreme Court within our judicial system. If you can talk a little bit about why what why there exists that confusion well Certainly other branches Have have challenged that notion that you just articulated marshals on lifetime. Andrew Jackson.

Court Marshall Supreme Court Marshall Court Congress s Supreme Court Congress United States George Dartmouth Woodward Alabama Georgia Aaron burr Viagra Virginia Madison Fletcher Alexander Hamilton James Wilson Institute Jefferson
"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

11:00 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Hello my name is Garrett's networker. Welcome to the James Wilson podcast. Today we're joined by Richard Brooke. Eiser Richard is the author of many biographies of the American founders. Most recently he has written a biography of the great chief justice. John Marshall the man who made the Supreme Court from Basic Books Richard. It's a pleasure to be speaking with you. I'm joined by one of our interns for the James Wilson Institute Josh Hero and were just overjoyed to be able to speak with you before we dive into our questions. We noted that in your acknowledgment section. You mentioned one of the close friends of our founder and director. Happy arcus as one of the influences that you're writing a book Michael Woman and so before we get into the book itself. We were hoping you can tell us a little more about how our DEA friend Michael was a helped you writing the book well. He was very helpful. He steered me towards The best the Marshall Scholarship I never even watched to law school so I was coming to this from the outside and that that's an obvious disadvantage. I think it's an advantage because it means that I am looking at everything crash and I have to make sure that I understand it myself. Which helps me in explaining it to most of my readers who are also going to becoming to it as non-lawyers on Kamla professors about But that means I need some helpful Indians to Just guide me through the Marshall. Scholarship and Michael Uelmen was was certainly very helpful. steered me towards The best box Marsha books out there which is one of the reasons I decided to do. He seemed to be relatively under done considering his importance. And there are excellent books on him. But it's not like someone who's been president for instance or war Benjamin Franklin or Alexander Hamilton. Even before the musical there there was just a lot more about all these guys and relatively little for the great chief justice so So that will seem like free field and Michael UELMEN was one of the Expert Helpers who gave me a map of that before I punched him excellent. I think your your book is very clearly written to an audience. That is familiar with Marshall. But you don't really take for granted the reader's knowledge. Would you be able to tell us a little bit about the narrative framing process that you employ in the book and why you specifically made decisions to focus on Marshall and his relationships and what is it exactly about his personal connections that served as a backdrop for discussing Marshall's understanding of law and politics overall? Well I thought to personal relationships which were most important to his public career were first his early contact and his almost boundless admiration for George Washington. And that's second his lifelong animosity with his second cousin. Once removed Thomas Jefferson which was returned in spades by Jefferson. Marshall volunteered at the age of nineteen for the Virginia militia. In seventeen seventy five this as soon as the news of of Lexington and concord it spread throughout the colony and then the following year. He joined the continental army and he was in free. Battles Washington demanded it Brandy Wine Germantown in the fall. Seventeen seventy seven monmouth courthouse. In the summer. Seventy eight and between Germantown and MONMOUTH. He was at the Winter Encampment Valley forge where Washington was also in command show. He saw the commander in chief and victory. He saw them defeat and he saw him in this very trying winter and his conclusions from these firsthand. Experiences was that Washington was the man who had guided us through the revolution. He was the man who saw through. Who who made it a success and he never forgot that it was imprinted upon him when Washington at the end of the war returns this commission. Congress in December. Seventeen eighty three Captain Marshall Rights as old school. Fellow James Monroe and he called Washington the greatest man on earth and that was an opinion he would never change and he would follow. Washington's lead throughout the rest of his life When when it becomes a question whether we need a new constitution in seventeen eighty seven? Eighty Eight He is one of the lesser followers of Washington pushing for the ratification of the new constitution. decade later WASHINGTON summons him to Mount Vernon to basically ordered him to run for Congress when our first two party system has already developed federalists of of Washington and Adams Hamilton versus the first Republican Party of Jefferson amount and again Marshall follows Washington. He is a federalist and he agrees After some persuading To RUN FOR CONGRESS. And He is the congressman who tells Congress a year later that Washington has died and he calls him first in war first in peace. I in the hearts of this country and this is an attitude that he would keep for the rest of his life. The only book ever rights as a five volume biography of Washington the policy preferences that he has as chief justice are those of the federalist. Party He believes In a federal government in which in crucial respects the federal government has supremacy over the state governments He believes in the Commercial Revolution The Hamilton Vision A lot of a lot of that. The hammel Tony and vision is sustained by Supreme Court decisions that Marshall Issues so this is the lifelong fact of his encounter with George Washington. Now the the other important man is his cousin. Thomas Jefferson and the animosity. The animosity begins in the Washington Administration when when Jefferson is Washington's secretary of State It it exists. Swin Jefferson is struggling with Hamilton over Hamilton's financial program. Jefferson is very skeptical of it He he is skeptical of it. On the merits he also thinks unconstitutional. They have such thing as a bank of the United States Hamilton argues brilliantly. That this is an implied power under the constitution and the reasoning that Marshall Himself Will Echo in eighteen nineteen when he decides McCall versus Maryland which relates to the second bank the United States. But what really turned him against his cousin is Jeffersons attitude to the French Revolution Like the other members of Jefferson's party Jefferson believes this isn't on alloyed. Good thing he never turned against the French Revolution. Even through the reign of terror. The only point at which he finally abandoned says faith and that is what Napoleon takes over but for that first decade of the French revolution from seventeen eighty nine To to the end of the century Jefferson Madison his Bernie. They are all in for the French revolution and they seem to Marshall to be as patriotic towards France as they are towards the United States. If not more so and this is Tha Marshall Unacceptable He believes that the Jefferson is lacking in proper patriotism. Any also feels he's been disloyal secretary of state president want because although he terry's out Washington's neutrality policy officially he's also trying to undermine on the side and These are unforgivable offensive to Marshall. Both because he's a patriot and kneels during the revolution and he is such an admire of Washington so after the seventeen ninety four him. Thomas Jefferson is permanently in his in his black letcher. There is no possibility that Jefferson can ever come back for him. So those were the you know. Those are the personal relationships that I Ramified through Marshall's life now the other the other structural decision I made I mean writing a biography is. There's something very easy about it because they all have a similar shape. I mean there's a person who's born and then he does stuff and he dies right the structure you don't you don't get away from it. But the the one modification for this particular book is that in Marshall's most important career which is chief justice. This is the last More than a third of his life thirty four years from eighteen eighteen thirty five where he is chief justice that careers memorable largely because of a number of landmark decisions that he hands out and that his court agrees with so these cases are very important and each one of them. I realized is a short story They only come to the Supreme Court at the end of their course. That's when they've you know who the parties have been fighting about. Whatever it is they go to court. It comes through the lower courts finally at arrives at the Supreme Court and the Marshall Court decides what it decides bad and the justices are interested in that they are interested in the arguments that are presented to them. Now of course there's also politics swirling around a Lotta these cases. They're also aware of that but they come in at the climax.

John Marshall Washington Thomas Jefferson Supreme Court Alexander Hamilton George Washington Marshall Scholarship Marshall Court United States James Wilson Eiser Richard Richard Brooke Jefferson Madison Washington Administration James Wilson Institute Garrett Congress
"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"For a horseman. Well, can't wish you anymore success in lock than I than I already have. I'll reiterate I think it's one of the really pleasant and happy results in particularly in the northeast the have colonial comeback because I think people had completely written off. And just because it didn't seem that the the gaming side of it had any hope at at a certain at a certain point. And then all of a sudden it did. And it's kind of amazing the way the way you were ready to strike, John. And that's a testimony to you and your tan Virginia racing commission as well. Yeah. I mean, everybody just a strong group with a passion for the industry that helps bring this back to life without idle for far too long. It's only appropriate for Jill burn didn't carry that torch beginning with the ceremonial burn the Turks force, but only. Only. He'll be here all week. He'll be here. Believable John Marshall revolutionary racing. And or is that name was that was just a working name is that name dissipate? Now believe it or not that is the name. Okay. It is that'll be maintained as the as the corporate entity. Oh, I'm sorry. You're talking about revolutionary or is that was that Jackson is very famous name in Virginia thought you're talking about the John Marsh? Oh, ask me is your name, really John Marshall. Well, of course, it is strangely enough in Virginia. My name's John Marshall. And I never have a problem. Getting a reservation in town. That's the name revolutionary racing. Our parent company Pacific, peninsula Pacific entertainment. Okay. So that's our parent company and colonial downs group is the subsidiary. I head up with Jill support to revive live racing at colonial down since two thousand nineteen. It's market down and included. If you've never been you're gonna wanna go. Everybody loves it. One thing we didn't say about the five o'clock start. It it might be three degrees cooler at five o'clock that. This anywhere. Anyway, around the country, and you know. Maybe you predict some some warm weather. So that was certainly one of the factors that went into it. And but great. Yeah. It's a win. Great ship in time to. Absolutely each traffic and other. So a lot of a lot of work went into that. With the horsemen to help make that decision. Trying to be everything is about being horsemen friendly industry-friendly and putting on a great product for people to wager on Joe McKay who's up in the in the Baltimore area. Joe is wondering if it's going to be a tournament you're gonna tie at all with h c b CDC humidity NTR a now and have had discussions about hosting NHCD tournament. There's well so Michelle raven craft talk get with her Keith and the group and tiara and will certainly want to put some things together to tie in with that. It's a fantastic Tien excited for you both and for everybody that is going to get a chance, and I mean, the jobs and everything that it does for the the region and for Orsmond up and down the eastern seaboard, colonial down C N L, you'll you'll see I don't know how many horses are out there running that still have CNN on in their PP's. Seattle of that. Yeah. That's absolutely. Yeah. They do. Yeah. That would be a while. But I remember this property it is seven six and seven year old seventy that that probably at the two year old horses. The horsemen jockeys have participated there in the past. It's a very very big list of of support..

John Marshall Virginia John Jill Jackson Joe McKay John Marsh Seattle Michelle raven CNN Baltimore Tien Keith Orsmond three degrees seven year two year
"john marshall" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WDRC

"Back to the LARs Larson show. It is a pleasure to be with you and a special pleasure to speak with Richard Brooke is from national review, the author of many other biographies that you should read. But the one most late the most most recent one is John Marshall the man who made the supreme court. So here's John Marshall appointed to the supreme court as chief Justice by the lame duck president John Adams as he's leaving office and Thomas Jefferson is coming in. What was he real as reluctant to take on that post as he had been to take on running for congress at the behest of George Washington, his hero. Well, you know, I think he saw he saw the importance of the political moment. But the federalist party had just been shellacked. The election of eighteen hundred was a Blue Wave Jefferson and his party. They had taken the White House. They had flipped both houses of congress. The. The only branch of the federal government in which federalists still prevailed was the judiciary. Because that's who all the judges were. They'd all been appointed by Washington or Adams, so Marshall saw this as a very important job to have politically. And he's also, you know, he's been a lawyer all his adult life, and I think he's confident in his legal abilities and legal opinions. So I think he he probably took the on in the spirit of the soldier. He had been during the revolution. Here's my. Here's my new set of orders. Let me go. Do this job. Now, he did he see in the supreme court something that truly would be made into something. Great. And not as John J side is this this place with no dignity, and no wait and no consequence because these days, you know, how Americans view this the announcement of a new supreme court decision on virtually anything is is viewed as as extraordinarily consequential. And and something that is effectively lifelong meaning when they make a decision because of starry decisive. You're you're probably going to be stuck with that decision in that interpretation of the constitution for at least several decades before it will be looked at again these days. Right. Well, one change that Marshall makes mmediately in the first ten or eleven years. So the supreme court justices gave their opinions on a case one after another call Syria. Oh, the first Justice would read his opinion on the second would read his you'd go through the whole court. The Marshall court began to give opinions of the court usually read by the chief Justice sometimes read by other justices, and these were often unanimous opinions now justices were perfectly free to give either currencies or descents that could currencies when they agree with the majority opinion, but they've got a slightly different take. So they you know, they they give a concurrence or if they disagree with it. They they give a descent, and so those still happened -cational. But for the most part, you're getting unanimous opinions many in some delivered by the chief Justice himself, and this imparts a kind of a wait to the whole court. It's not just a collect. It's makes it seem like it's not just a collection of individuals. It's a unified body. Giving a collective opinion on the law. The other justices object to this particular method of doing it. They realized that it would give their opinions more weight. There was one Jefferson appointee. William Johnson who who is kind of uneasy with this for many years, and at the end of of the end of his life. Marshall flight he begins to descend more frequently. But for the bulk of his time on the court. He goes along with this. And he has an interesting correspondence with Thomas Jefferson in the early eighteen twenty s this is almost twenty years into his own time on the court, and he explains to Jefferson how this process worked. He said when I first got on the court. I thought I'd give my own opinion. But then I just got lectures from all the other judges telling me, you know, if we were sniping at each other this this makes all of us, look bad. You know, you shouldn't do this. How accurate is this description? I mean, he's telling it to Jefferson who doesn't like the court periods. So maybe he's trying to tailor it to please his correspondent. But you know, certainly he had felt pressure to go along with his brother justices, and for the most part he done it. So. And I think this is a result of of Marshall's great skill and what you might call small P politics. You know, how to manage your colleagues how how to lead your colleagues, and he does it by being genial? I mean, that's just who he is. He everybody seems to like this guy, Thomas Jefferson, and he likes everybody. He does it by being deferential. If if there's some Justice who's more expert in a particular field of law. He will let that man do the decision let that now take the lead. And then of course, when you do that you get deference in return, then the third thing assistance quality of his mind, this intelligence that he had and it just impressed. His fellow justices. That impressed the lawyers who argued before him, and you know, you put all that together. And then you add in the fact that he just stays there year after year and. It it builds up this internal mystique of the court, which which is also public mystique people begin to to see it as this impressive body that we have to pay attention to the book. I'm speaking Richard Brooke Heiser, it's author about is John Marshall demand who made the supreme court. So Marshall is on the court for thirty years. This is a four thirty four still a record for chief Justice. It is an and well with longer lifetimes, these days view, suppose, we'll ever see that record eclipsed. Well, John roberts's pretty young. There have been a couple justices who've been on the court longer than Marshall. But but no chief Justice of all the cases he held you described them as dramatic cases England included involving businessman in scoundrels, a native Americans and slaves. What was the one that stood out to you? Well, they were so many of them were were interesting one that was both interesting back story and very consequential. What's your veep tack? In eighteen ten and this was a case about a land sale by the state of Georgia, Georgia sold off thirty million acres for a penny and a half an acre. This is what's now. The states of Alabama Mississippi Georgia was very poor state was the only way they could raise money. Now, the problem is every single legislator in the Georgia legislature had been bribed to make this sale happen. The going price was a thousand dollars a vote one guy took only six hundred dollars and he explained I wasn't greedy. You know, the people of Georgia got upset about this and elected a whole new crop of representatives. And then they passed a repeal act saying, Nope, we take this sale back, and we're going to forbid it from ever coming before. Georgia court anyone in a court in this state who treats this actors having been real will be fine two thousand dollars. So they're repealing it and squelching litigation in Georgia. You can read the history of all of it in John Marshall, the man who made the supreme court is author is Richard Brooke Heiser, Mr. is have been more than generous with your time. And thank you so much for this. And for all that you do for national review as well. Thank you for the time today. Okay. Thank you for having. It is a pleasure to have you on. You're listening to the LARs Larson show. Laursen show. This is FOX on Justice. There are five justices.

John Marshall supreme court Thomas Jefferson Marshall court LARs Larson Georgia John Adams Richard Brooke Heiser national review congress federalist party Richard Brooke George Washington John roberts White House John J president Alabama Mississippi Georgia Syria
"john marshall" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"New biography of John Marshall. Compels me to go very quickly here because John Marshall is a life fully live, and he is involved intimately involved legal practices, eight Virginia. And also the politics and statesmanship of the United States of America. Which at this point is going through a transformation from the articles of confederation to a constitution. Which is then blessed by all the conventions, and George Washington is elected the first president, I need to go all the way through Washington's two terms to come to the farewell dinner March Friday, March third seventeen ninety seven is my date when Washington gathers everyone including John Adams who will succeed him in the in the Mara. When he's sworn in as president. He he he greets small, and he gives them a toast. It's his farewell toast. But importantly, this is a moment to explication the tensions that have emerged in. Washington's two cabinets Harlow. I my notes down to Jefferson. Versus everybody else. What is Jefferson that is distinct? They're all they're all Virginians. What is his distinction from Washington? And from the other federalist well Jefferson was sent as ambassador to France by the. Confederation. Congress before president president washing was elected, and he spent several years there as a bachelor and became enamored of the French revolution. And the takeover of government. The overthrow of the monarchy takeover of government by ordinary people on the streets by revolutionaries. He really just absolutely absorbed this into a system and when predator Washington was elected and had to form a cabinet. Franken was too old. He needed a secretary of state Franklin was the most obvious candidate. But he was too old. John Adams would have been a great candidate. But he was elected vice president. So the the only man with real experience overseas was Jefferson any name Jefferson secretary of state, but from the first Jefferson was a thorn in Washington side, and especially in Alexander Hamilton side Alexander Hamilton, also a hero of the revolution. A great officer. What at Yorktown was Colonel was an aide to Washington for many years in in during the war. He was a federalist of believed in a strong federal government to get this nation going and get get our government operations. He was named secretary of treasury. Well, he and and Jefferson were at odds from the beginning about what type of government, we should have a strong executive. Or a week executive a figurehead Washington was not about to be a figurehead and little by little Washington strengthened, the executive branch of government until now it's time to elect a new president and Jefferson runs against John Adams of the vice president under Washington and Adams wins with Jefferson getting the second most votes and automatically in those days becoming vice president at from the first he starts fighting atoms. And indeed Jefferson almost on the verge of committing treason. He asked state legislatures to nullify federal laws with which they disagree saying that the constitution got it all wrong that this is not we the people that this is a compact among the states and the states have the right to determine which. The laws are legal or.

Jefferson vice president George Washington president Washington John Marshall Confederation United States executive Virginia America Alexander Hamilton Adams Franken Congress France Yorktown officer
"john marshall" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Thanks. List? John marshall. As we look tonight at the list of the most valuable Christmas records, and by golly right there at number six on the list. That's so cool. I do that was your favorite chair by absolutely. Five gala Peavy. I want a hippopotamus for Christmas. The original forty five on Columbia records with picture sleeve up to two hundred fifty dollars two minutes, basically because it is one of the very first picture sleeves ever released with a forty five not so much because it's the hippopotamus. And if you want to housebreak one, by the way, it will take more than the Sunday edition of the New York Times just thought we'd pass that along. Call from Dan in canton, Ohio good evening, Dan. How you doing fine? Okay. I just cut the middle of your show. So I don't know if he ran across this one yet, but I have the Elvis Christmas album. It's coming up the Macau. Yes. Boy, listen, let me tell you that we're going to hold off on that, Dan. But suffice it to say don't touch that. Dial. Okay. You you don't wanna miss it depends. But but yeah, you a boy do you want to hang around? Just maybe just maybe who knows to David into Bedford Texas on the Jim Bohannon show. Good evening. Yes, sir. Harry all doing we're wealth. And this is this isn't a Christmas album. But when I was in my early twenties, I was a studio musician, and I had a chance to play with gene Pitney for about six years. Gene Pitney album that he gave me that was what the trio. Iraq of buying the cradle of my very first album. I never opened it. I didn't know the performed with the trio. Core. Do you have what label? Do you have it on David? Oh, jeez. I don't even know it's stacked in there with a whole lot is other members feel your pain. Well, I guess you might want to take note of what John has to say. Depending on what John has to say. Go ahead. John JC Penney. Extremely popular. Great singer. Not extremely collectible. But most of his albums are going to be on music core record. That's right. That's right. Okay. Okay. No about that one. Right. Her he'd made an Email another. Yeah. Go ahead and John. Let's let John giving you the rest of the information on what on what they might be worth. Depending on the particular record label. Yeah. Well, his albums on music who are all up to around thirty dollars on the not extremely collectible. He did some with think Montgomery at somebody else, and they would be in the thirty dollars price range. So he's not extremely collectible. All right. Very good. We got John now in fort Walton Beach, Florida on the Jim Bohannon show with that other John Marshall. Hello, john. Yes, you're on the radio go right ahead. John. What do you have for us? Maybe quicker than that. John. Did you wanna talk to John Marshall? Well, I guess we're having a little little bit of difficulty. They're communicating somehow. But let's go back to our list. We're up to number five now on the list of the top twelve most valuable Christmas records, and that would be what? Well, again, Motown very collectible this album is called merry Christmas. From Motown, featuring the miracles Stevie Wonder, the temptations and the supreme. the temptations that narrator voice, Frankie Valli, by the way. We turn to John partial.

John JC Penney John marshall gene Pitney John Jim Bohannon Dan David Peavy Motown New York Times Iraq Columbia Frankie Valli Stevie Wonder Macau canton Ohio Harry Texas
"john marshall" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Utilizing the building. And I think there will be a need or interest to have educational footprint on both of those campuses now for broad rebel, given that it was a high school facility most recently. And we believe we've addressed the you Liz ation of a high. Boo facilities. The preference right now would be to look more towards elementary or middle grades is is we think about education footprint there for John Marshall because its location on the far east side or more flexible, there could be high elementary or middle grades. But we're excited that at least there's some interest, and we could have a solution as early as twenty nine thousand nine hundred for either facility, here's an idea and this was a freebie because for me why not just take central office move that to half a broad ripple make the other half elementary middle school. And then just, you know, Lisa's place out to somebody who wants to be known in the middle of bustling growing downtown, you you take care of your school district facility. You got your school engineer this Bill even charge. You a dime for all that? Yeah. So that's that's one consideration. We actually have already moved people from central services in Tobar ripple. That's how we were able to sell our. Facilities management building. That was on sixteenth street backing up to the on the staff members have already relocated into schools and schools bay. So we've done that. We're we're open to doing it. I think you know, like, I said earlier we have to think about. Do we utilize all the space? And I think we've drawn from those.

half elementary middle school Tobar ripple John Marshall Liz ation engineer Lisa Bill
"john marshall" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WGN Radio

"John marshall. Oh law school. I mean, perfect Chicago chops, right? And then look at us professional career amalgamated Bank of Chicago mayor Brown and Platt the law firm, he was on the board of Fannie Mae. I would love to be on the board of Fannie Mae. I love the turtles. Anyway, he went on to be US secretary of commerce under President Clinton. He was chief of staff to Barack Obama yada yada, yada. He's more than just the daily. Right. You're not just getting another guy riding the tail the coattails of his brother, dad. I mean, he's been hustling. All right, fine, fine making the mayor. I don't care. I don't know what he's going to be on our show on Friday or on Monday. Today's Friday he'll be with us on Monday to talk about his candidacy. I guess he wasn't going to run if Rahm had stayed in the race. But runs out now, everybody's running. Speaking of take this moment to throw my hat. Actually, I can show your head in the ring 'cause you're a resident of the city. That's right. I'm. I could be a legal qualified. Boy, I gotta hit a bunch of signatures, though, are you registered. Yes. Okay. Good. Although I do not have a vehicle sticker yet registered voter registered for something. So so you're scofflaws telling. That's gonna blow up on the campaign. You cannot run if you will for parking sticker. I hope not. Take line to this is Mike you're on WGN. Hi, mike. You're on the air. Hey, what did he say? Guys, say doing good. You were recently talking about the jury selection in the the makeup of the jury in her nationality, and you lead lead to that. There's only one African American that's on the jury of the twelve the alternate routes and blacks. Yeah. Yeah. I guess the real question is how many were selected how many of each nationality was selected in. Did it pass? We ordered a whole lot of people that didn't get accepted. How many of those were not accepted because of their bias? Or maybe they showed some all for what reason I don't know all of them all of them the people that it's against the law to exclude somebody because of their race. But you can exclude somebody if they show a bias the black looted showed a bias. Well, that's the real number to focus on not how many were selected at how many were selected for duty or not chosen because of their bias. You're looking at a very very small percentage of the people that were pulled to be the jury what you're looking at is people that were acceptable to both sides. Okay. So we're going to throw some numbers real numbers of that's how how many American native American Indians were part of that group. How how many Asians how many Russians how many we could go on and on and on and on? I mean, Chicago was a very very diverse city. It's it's kind of a silly argument. I'm sorry to disagree with you. But it's not the native Americans or Asians who are the offended party in this case. So I don't think that quite apply to descriptors that matter in this. Degree in a lot of things on the other end of the radio hold on. For what they are fine. Things essay present themselves. The argument. Okay. But I I'm sorry. I think there's this two variables here that matter. It's a racially charged case. I guess I mean, that's the concern. Anyway, to be honest with you, I don't even see it. I don't even see it that much in terms of race. I see it as a case of police brutality too often that's cops on blacks. Although as often the cops are black as they are white mean demeanor in this case, it's just an instance of excessive use of force by the police, and it's on this young seventeen year old black teenager. But if it's a racial issue, it's white and it's black. It's not native American or Russian. And I think that the race of the jurors matters. Now, of course, the first thing that matters is the person's ability to listen to the case and render a fair verdict to do their best to be fair to judge it in Chela gently. That's the man. And then colored as it matter. Right. That's the perfect world. It's only that we're all colorblind. But I don't think we are. I think the filter that everybody brings into a case where they're trying to be fair includes the color of their skin. And I think if you've only got one black on that jury, then I think it makes it a a different jury than if it was eleven blacks and one white or one Asian I think that is part of the equation. I don't I don't think you should start there. But I think that does matter. So that's where I am on that one. I appreciate the phone call Mike, thanks for listening and seeing things as they are whatever it is. You said you do. About an hour from now, we'll give you a list of some fun things to do in the city are recommendations, the bright side of life comes your way on Fridays will start your weekend to forty with that to forty. We do the bright side. And remember this we're doing an encounter with teddy Roosevelt and John Williams. That's me in Elgin community college there. This is going to be November tenth at ten thirty in the morning. Whatever happens at the midterms know that the Saturday afterwards the greatest president in the history of the United States. Don't tell Thomas Jefferson. I said this is going to walk onto the stage. And you will believe I'll talk to teddy Roosevelt for a little while. He'll tell great stories, and you will get a sense of what leadership is all about whatever you voted for in the term, whatever Senator congressman or mayor, whatever you're going to vote for what you really want is good competent, honest and courageous. Leadership and that was teddy Roosevelt. And I'm telling you, you feel good about us and about him after that. And this is a guy that is often as anybody is compared to Donald Trump. There are differences, and he'll be happy to tell you what they are. So we talk about history, and what it was like one hundred years ago. And we talk about what it's like today..

teddy Roosevelt Chicago Mike Fannie Mae United States John marshall Barack Obama President Clinton chief of staff Donald Trump Thomas Jefferson Rahm WGN secretary Elgin community college president Brown
"john marshall" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"The posts adams turn ran out however before john marshall who was then secretary of state could actually deliver the commissions of office to some of the designates you understand marshall was secretary of state involved in the matter he could he he time right before he could deliver the commissions of office to some of the designates marceau's successor is secretary state was james madison and he refused to deliver the commission's as president jefferson's direct directed and william marbury among others filed suit in federal court seeking an order rhythm and damis directing madison to deliver his commission as justice of the peace marshall along a rival of jefferson's in virginia politics is one of the most articulate leaders in the federalist party the atoms party marshall at served in the virginia state house the us house of representatives as one of president adams representatives to france in seventeen ninety seven and then as secretary of state was nominated to be chief justice by adams and assume the post on february for eighteen o one exactly one month before adams presidential term ended with a republican majority elected to both houses of congress in eighteen hundred marshall realize that jefferson and his republicans could denude the supreme court of authority that he is now chief justice and could be impeached and removed from office marshall understood that in the marbury case if he ordered secretary state madison to deliver marbury is commissioned office jefferson world order madison to ignore the supreme court's writ and the courts authority would be seriously weakened and marshall was also concerned that he not be seen as protecting the interests of federalist jurists like marbury would assumed his position as justice of the peace and have been hearing cases issuing judgments for a year bearing all this in mind marshal's decision in marbury versus madison while upsetting the constitution's balance of power in the relationship between the federal government and the states was a master political stroke marshall stated that marbury consistent with legal doctrine at the time had something akin to a property right to the office to which he had been nominated and confirmed marshall also said that the federal judiciary should be able to issue an order directing the appointment of marbury but because the constitution did not enumerate such an original right for the supreme court the court was powerless to do so okay fine but there's more marshall went well beyond the specific issues in the case he said that the court had a responsibility to set aside acts of congress that violate principles enumerated in the constitution so having already ruled in a way that settled the issue this is where the seizure of power occurs he wrote in part between these alternatives there is no middle ground the constitution is either a superior paramount law i'm changeable by ordinary means or it is on a level with ordinary legislative acts like other acts is alterable when the legislature shop pleased to alternate if the former part of the alternative be true any legislative act contrary to the constitution is not law the latter part be true then written constitutions are absurd attempts on the part of the people to limit a power in its own nature illimitable certainly all those who have framed written constitutions contemplate them as forming the fundamental in paramount law the nation consequently the theory of every such government must be that an act of the legislature repugnant to the constitution is void the judicial power of the united states is extended to all cases arising under the constitution could it be the these are the with the important parts could it be the intention of those who gave this power to say that and using it the constitution should not be looked into that a case arising under the constitution should be decided without examining the instrument under which it arises this is too extravagant to be maintained so marshall's federalist party had lost the presidency and congress but marshall was determined to fight back and so the doctrine of.

adams john marshall one month
West Virginia lawmakers OK teacher pay raise to end strike

News, Traffic and Weather

02:04 min | 2 years ago

West Virginia lawmakers OK teacher pay raise to end strike

"Virginia teachers are headed back to school along with the state's quartermillionplus public school students the teacher's strike is over w t r f tvs page madden the sense of excitement outside of john marshall high school was almost tangible due to the promise of a five percent raise in the end of these statewide teacher work stoppage this is a good thing it's it's being fixed we will be part of the process to business and we'll come together and we'll work on that for a long for not just teachers and service personnel but for all public employees west virginia naturally wanted all along many teachers say they want nothing more than to be back in the classroom and they plan to use this experience as a lesson for their students of virginia man facing charges of marijuana possession and driving while intoxicated after a police pursuit and ended with him running over himself fairfax county police say 30yearold isaac bonds who got out of his car in tried to run but he forgot to put the car in park and it ended up hitting him he wasn't seriously hurt jim chenevey cbs news it's 1205 the beer is new station kcbs partly cloudy today with a chance of showers by tonight wednesday evening the morning i'm larry sharoni here's what's happening the san francisco corners been called to the scene of an officerinvolved shooting in the city's mission district shooting happened at about ten 45 last night the 21st encamped streets frank ponsa lives in the mission and saw what happened he tells kcbs officers stopped a vehicle and we're trying to get a man to come out of the truck lady police officer was quoting a guy into problems because it was a guy to come to get out to show his hands and he showed that but then he rolled over and he had a gun ice you know i could see that he shock first and then they just uh let loose on this is the body's now in the street covered with a white sheet the ads he saw woman in the back seat of the vehicle she was arrested the there are no reports that the officers were injured san francisco police remain on the scene with.

Virginia Jim Chenevey Larry Sharoni Officer John Marshall High School Marijuana Fairfax County San Francisco Frank Ponsa Five Percent
"john marshall" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The civil rights cases akil there's so much to say about this but i want the audience to understand the legal stakes on what grounds did the majority hold the congress lacked the power to pass and civil rights act of 18 75 and what was the grounds for harlan's descent so start with harlan's descent whether name john marshall who after john marshall and i think the descent better challenger at channelled john marshall because what did john marshall say in mukalla lesson mike told you congress should have broad power the constitution doesn't say bank doesn't say airforce doesn't say in the uh visual mandate but congress should have broad power when actually implementing the great purposes for which the constitution was established at the founding what's that purpose national security above all in a bank is useful for national security than a banks are very helpful to win wars and marshall mentions that mccullough now after the civil war the federal government's basically given a new competence on a new focus civil rights thirteenth amendment in slavery and seconds clauses congress shot power and the language used to patrick power to pass appropriate legislation the word appropriate actually taken from mukalla chris's maryland so the framers of the thirteenth amendment ending slavery what congress abroad power to end slow avery the framers the fourteenth amendment have this language but they also have language at the end of the fourteenth amendment saying congress how broad mccullough power so john marshall hollywood says what was the basic problem that generated the reconstruction amendments it was racism in america and congress has broad power to try to end racism his sentence that you we have up on screen says no state shall but ranked before that sentence is up one more of its actually pretty important all persons warner naturalized and the united states subject to the jurisdiction they're up our citizens to the united states and the state where they reside anyone born in the united states is worn citizen warning equal citizen or all worn equal were all created equal that's link peace idea gettysburg channelling jefferson and if we're all born equal and congress has power to enforce this harlan says congress should be able to prohibit race discrimination in of the combinations hotels theaters all the rest so harline says let's read congressional power broadly in the spirit of john marshall and mccullough reading in amendment that actually borrowed language from mccullough the word appropriate what is the.

congress harlan john marshall mike maryland united states gettysburg jefferson harline marshall mccullough john marshall hollywood america
"john marshall" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WRVA

"On news radio eleven forty w r via big change in temperature is you'll notice today high temperatures not making it out of the fifty as we stay cloudy through the day today with some light rain possible especially during the afternoon and evening tomorrow we do rebound will start the day cloudy with that we'll see some sunshine in the afternoon high temperatures will be near seventy degrees clemency twelve i'm meteorologist megan wise but newsradio eleven forty two 1143 rva it's mostly cloudy m fifty five in the west on news radio eleven forty w time 700 one john marshall lost its homecoming game yesterday moved up a three hours because of social media threats embassy twelve reporting school leaders did so because of those posts the dance which was planned for today have been cancelled but there is hope it may be rescheduled at a later date hanover deputies arresting a man and they think played a major role and distributing cocaine and heroin throughout the area surgeon james cooper's same when corn cory stanley was arrested he was carrying over a kilo of cocaine investigation began back in the summer of two thousand seventeen when investigators identified stanley as a possible major source of cocaine and heroin distribution in the head over in richmond area couvert says it's still too early to determine exactly how big an impact this arrest will have republicans apparently pushing for a fairly quick vote on tax reform this is changes are already being made that would mean more middle class income would be taxed at a higher rate republicans are telling their members you have to.

megan wise john marshall cocaine cory stanley social media hanover heroin james cooper eleven forty w seventy degrees three hours
"john marshall" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WRVA

"On news radio eleven forty w r via big change in temperature is you'll notice today high temperatures not making it out of the fifty as we stay cloudy through the day today with some light rain possible especially during the afternoon and evening tomorrow we do rebound will start the day cloudy with that we'll see some sunshine in the afternoon high temperatures will be near seventy degrees clemency twelve i'm meteorologist megan wise but newsradio eleven forty two 1143 rva it's mostly cloudy m fifty five in the west on news radio eleven forty w time 700 one john marshall lost its homecoming game yesterday moved up a three hours because of social media threats embassy twelve reporting school leaders did so because of those posts the dance which was planned for today have been cancelled but there is hope it may be rescheduled at a later date hanover deputies arresting a man and they think played a major role and distributing cocaine and heroin throughout the area surgeon james cooper's same when corn cory stanley was arrested he was carrying over a kilo of cocaine investigation began back in the summer of two thousand seventeen when investigators identified stanley as a possible major source of cocaine and heroin distribution in the head over in richmond area couvert says it's still too early to determine exactly how big an impact this arrest will have republicans apparently pushing for a fairly quick vote on tax reform this is changes are already being made that would mean more middle class income would be taxed at a higher rate republicans are telling their members you have to.

megan wise john marshall cocaine cory stanley social media hanover heroin james cooper eleven forty w seventy degrees three hours
"john marshall" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"And there's a big river that flows right through the middle of spokane and they thought well maybe somehow we don't know how he might have fallen in the river because there was no place else to look and they searched the river and walked it all the way up and down through the city never found anything now he disappears on january twenty fifth on january twenty six it eat fifty eight a m down river they find somebody calls in and says there's a body face up in this river they go down and they find it it's john marshall and he found just below the rapid sitter about fifteen feet high dick come down and there's a there's a predominant place where it's settles and this is where he was found now they pulled his body out of the water and in this west front pocket is an ipod an unbelievably the ipod is completely dry and the detective's couldn't find a point where his body could have entered the water meetings slipped down an embankment fellow for a railing any witnesses nothing well they knew he had to go over the rapids so does a pull them out they in the corner start looking for vegetation that should be on the body because a tumble down these false it was not now the police are getting suspicious because they're not finding a things that should be relevant in this dry obvious drowning case and they tell his wife we're not sure what happen but apparently you drowned so goes to the corner with wife right it right away know something's wrong because john's a great swimmer he's a superathlete he just you know multiple towers in afghanistan he was a battlefield physician she was like the optimum guy you'd want working on you and be in your body so the pri starts to look into this and it starts to make press and the i said publicly he didn't believe john ever went into doubt water went down those false the pierre publicly said john how'd you have been placed in the water somewhere because the remember the ipod was dry and there's no way to go over the falls and have it be wet well the coroner stated that the body was in the.

spokane john marshall ipod pierre afghanistan fifteen feet twenty fifth
"john marshall" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"And there's a big river that flows right through the middle of spokane and they thought well maybe somehow we don't know how he might have fallen in the river because there was no place else to look and they searched the river and walked it all the way up and down through the city never found anything now he disappears on january twenty fifth on january twenty six it eat fifty eight a m down river they find somebody calls in and says there's a body face up in this river they go down and they find it it's john marshall and he found just below the rapid sitter about fifteen feet high dick come down and there's a there's a predominant place where it's settles and this is where he was found now they pulled his body out of the water and in this west front pocket is an ipod an unbelievably the ipod is completely dry and the detective's couldn't find a point where his body could have entered the water meetings slipped down an embankment fellow for a railing any witnesses nothing well they knew he had to go over the rapids so does a pull them out they in the corner start looking for vegetation that should be on the body because a tumble down these false it was not now the police are getting suspicious because they're not finding a things that should be relevant in this dry obvious drowning case and they tell his wife we're not sure what happen but apparently you drowned so goes to the corner with wife right it right away know something's wrong because john's a great swimmer he's a superathlete he just you know multiple towers in afghanistan he was a battlefield physician she was like the optimum guy you'd want working on you and be in your body so the pri starts to look into this and it starts to make press and the i said publicly he didn't believe john ever went into doubt water went down those false the pierre publicly said john how'd you have been placed in the water somewhere because the remember the ipod was dry and there's no way to go over the falls and have it be wet well the coroner stated that the body was in the.

spokane john marshall ipod pierre afghanistan fifteen feet twenty fifth
"john marshall" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Van der waals again videy john marshall in 1966 lunch at one chapels at night but the song by gamblers and and and look great availa that lawyer hold vibes were thought the 45 five but the album of the same day is up to us you can find the value of any record at money success as we look back on the words give us just a moment ago by new york times investigative reporter mike mcintyre with his book champions way published by norton subtitled football florida and the lost seoul of college sports now of course he picked florida state as one example there are hardly hardly the only example out there so if we stepped on your your seminole supporting toes why our apologies i actually have four friends of mine who are are very strong of supporters of florida state so i uh ever told you about this book i have another couple of friends of ours who happen to be very strong supporters of the university of florida gators and let the bar the book they'll enjoy it but but at the points that that mike mcintyre brings forward i think are worth discussing and worth discussing at one eight six six five oh jimbo one eight six six five five four six two six it is bothersome to me of the hypocrisy that the grips college sports the notion of the student athlete is not entirely rogge and in many cases it applies perfectly but it at many large socalled power schools of football and basketball it has become something of a joke and i think that's unfortunate uh i have nothing i have no problem with the notion of essentially paying student athletes i mean they're not there let's just be honest about it they're not there for the degree in many cases even though a lot of good certainly use it because not everybody who think are going.

john marshall mike mcintyre norton seoul rogge football new york times investigative reporter florida university of florida gators basketball