23 Burst results for "John Marshall"

"Why Should We Take the Bread Out of the Mouths of Our Own Children and Give It to Strangers?"

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:27 min | 2 months ago

"Why Should We Take the Bread Out of the Mouths of Our Own Children and Give It to Strangers?"

"Is a crisis on the southern border and it does not involve robert francis aerobic and so robert francis rourke the fake irishman another fake hispanic irishman. He's very much irish. Thinking of running for the governor. The governor's mansion in texas doesn't involve him but it does involve the millions of people that are illegally flowing into our country. John adams famously. In a letter to the secretary of state. John marshall said why should we take the bread out of the mouths of our own children and give it to strangers. Frederick douglass. Who was incredible. And frederick does not get enough attention. In my opinion by republicans by conservatives by commentators said the old employments by which we have heretofore to four gain our livelihood are gradually and may it seem inevitably passing into other hands. Every hour sees the black man elbowed out of employment by some newly arrived immigrant whose hunger and whose color thought to give him a better title to the place. He's making a moral argument. That when you form a government your duty. Your responsibility is first and foremost dear fellow-countrymen to your citizens not to the foreigner not to the newly arrived person

Robert Francis Rourke Robert Francis John Marshall John Adams Frederick Douglass Texas Frederick
Learn the History of Jacobson v. Massachusetts

Mark Levin

01:47 min | 2 months ago

Learn the History of Jacobson v. Massachusetts

"Case in the case, known as Jacobson vs Massachusetts. Jacobson. His lawyers argued that the Cambridge vaccination order was a violation of the 14th amendment rights. Which forbade the state from depriving any person of life, liberty or property without due process of law. Question then was whether the right to refuse vaccination was among those protected. Of the personal liberties, the Supreme Court rejected Jacobs argument and doubt the anti vaccination movement is stinging loss. Writing for the majority Justice John Marshall Harlan acknowledge the fundamental importance of personal freedom. But also recognize that rights of the individual in respect of his liberty may at times under the pressure of great dangers. Be subjected to such restraint to be enforced by reasonable regulation, says the safety of the general public main demand. This decision established what became known as the reasonableness test. The government had the authority to pass laws that restricted individual liberty if those restrictions, including the punishment for violating them were found by the court to be reasonable means for achieving a public good. Bottom line. There had to be some kind of real and substantial connection between the law itself and legitimate purposes. The Jacobson decision provided a powerful controversial president. To the extent of government authority in the early 20th century. In 1922, the Supreme Court heard another vaccination case, this time concerning a Texas student named Rosalind sucked, who was barred from attending public school because her parents refused to have her vaccinating. Zach's lawyers argue the school district ordinance requiring proof of vaccination denied her equal protection of laws. Under the 14th amendment. The court disagreed. Justice BRANDEIS wrote in the unanimous decision long before the suit was instituted, and they cite Jacobson vs

Jacobson Justice John Marshall Harlan Supreme Court Cambridge Massachusetts Jacobs Government Rosalind Zach Texas Justice Brandeis
"john marshall" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:07 min | 10 months ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WTOP

"24 73 65 Listen, live on air on a light. Or in the W T o P F 7 28 traffic and weather on the eights Married upon those in the wtlv traffic Center. All right, thank you, John, thanks to our listeners who always keep us up to date on things and they're selling you. This is definitely a geographical storm. If you will, and Matt will tell you all about it is moving from the west to the East. It's coating roadways farther west in the Shenandoah Valley like 81. Only a single lane getting buying some locations. 3 40. I 70 years seeing heavier snow and you're seeing more code of roadways closer to home. Not so much what pavement listener was on the freeway 6 95 heading the Southeast freeway westbound around the curve. After the 11th Street Bridge of Mia said there was a crash solo spin out, blocked the rightly and asked if it's snowing. She said. No, it's what So she also saw hail on New York Avenue. So it depends on where you are. We do know. In Capitol Heights. There was fire activity. It's a structure fire along Benning Road Watch for response just north of 7 25 more liberal pike. He should be on senior Clovis Avenue and possible direction. There again 95 in Maryland from the capital Beltway through the Baltimore Beltway running without incident, But we've had a lot of colors about the large flakes that are coming through. In Virginia. Interstate travel Doing well least incident wise, 66 coda from front Royal and moving East very rapidly, be prepared extra time caution, stopping distance and be sure to have your lights on. Same 3 95 95 note incidents currently has from the 14th Street Bridge from running into Fredericksburg. EZ Pass Express would point North bound on an early Sunday morning, but not a lot of vehicles on the main road. So yeah, there you go. You may not want to pay for that. But It is available to you. We do know that on Bueller Road north of 1 23 between 1 23 and John Marshall, Dr Rain, sleet or snow. There's still the delivering produce two vehicles at the nervous Central farm market there the Church of the Holy Comforter, so watch for vehicle traffic stopped and direction as you go through Married to pump the W T.

John Marshall 11th Street Bridge of Mia 14th Street Bridge Shenandoah Valley Capitol Heights Matt Maryland Virginia Baltimore Dr Rain Fredericksburg
"john marshall" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:25 min | 11 months ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WTOP

"S Navy Memorial and John Marshall Park for permitted First Amendment rallies of up to 100 people. They will be met by U. S Park. Police escorted through magnetometers. The closures will be in place through at least January. 21st The log unstained w T o P knows and his preparations continue for Wednesday's inauguration. The Secret Service says security precautions could evolve even after plans are decided they're subject to change to one bridges across the rivers will be closed when they will be. We opened. Which specific bridges those will be Matt Miller, Secret Service. Special agent in charge says people who live or work inside established perimeters could get questions answered by building management. Each has a dedicated secret service. Contact their special accommodations, which need to be made way also have the ability to do that sign up for information alerts by texting a knob 2021 to the number 888777 Christi King w T o p noon and in fact, tonight bridges are being affected at this point. The security situation is making that necessary. The Arlington Memorial Bridge closed tonight It will be closed through Inauguration Day. We're also told the Roosevelt Bridge and the eye 3 95 14th Street Bridge will be closed that planning to be close starting six AM Tuesday through Thursday morning at six. Virginia's congressional delegation put out a statement about this, They said the plan is part of the strongest security response in history without in its words going too far. It's 9 35. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has announced a new effort to review the security breakdown last week, and she has a warning for lawmakers. Here's W T. O P S. Mitchell Miller, the House speaker, says retired Lieutenant General Russel Honore, who was involved in the response to Hurricane Katrina, will carry out a wide ranging review related to the attack on the Capitol inspectors general from the Justice Department and several other federal agencies will also undertake investigations. Lucy became emotional as she pointed to a rioter who wore a shirt bearing the name of our Schwitz to see this punk with that shirt on, and his anti Semitism to be part of a white supremacist raid on this capital requires us to have an after action review. Pelosi also says if any lawmakers are found to have provided help to people who were involved in the rioting they could face prosecution. She did not say when she plans to send the article of impeachment against President Trump to the Senate to start his trial on Capitol Hill, Mitchell Miller W T. O P. News. Pelosi is expected to send that article of impeachment to the Senate sometime next week. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan has declared a state of emergency as the region prepares for Wednesday's unusual inauguration. The action allows the state to better coordinate support and lend assistance to other jurisdictions. Hogan has also asked the White House for a presidential disaster declaration. To cover the costs of its response to last week's capital riot. The governor says Maryland will do everything to help secure the nation's capital and ensure a peaceful transition of power. 9 36 Finding great candidates, the higher Converium like well, trying to find a needle in a haystack. Sure you can post your job to some job board. But then all you can do is hope the right person comes along. Which is why you should try Zip Recruiter for free.

Nancy Pelosi Secret Service Arlington Memorial Bridge Roosevelt Bridge S Navy Memorial U. S Park Matt Miller S. Mitchell Miller Senate Larry Hogan Maryland Special agent in charge Lieutenant General Russel Hono Lucy John Marshall Park Street Bridge Virginia
National Mall closed to public ahead of Biden inauguration

Pat Thurston

00:48 sec | 11 months ago

National Mall closed to public ahead of Biden inauguration

"Authorities warning police nationwide Extremists are planning more violence leading up to Inauguration day and in the wake of last week's U. S. Capitol siege in Washington, D C National Guard members and local and federal authorities in lock step to protect the nation's capital ahead of the inauguration. Core areas of the National Mall already closed. The National Park Service writing areas near the U. S. Navy Memorial and John Marshall Park have been designated as demonstration areas. For those holding permits. Demonstrations will be limited in Number and participants will be screened prior to entry and escorted to their permitted location. In addition to other safety related requirements in ASDA Liquid Terra ABC News, Washington will be met by an unprecedented show of force 25,000 National Guard members helping protect against the domestic threats.

U. S. Capitol Siege U. S. Navy Memorial John Marshall Park National Guard National Mall National Park Service Washington D Asda Abc News
Amy Coney Barrett & The State of SCOTUS

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:44 min | 1 year ago

Amy Coney Barrett & The State of SCOTUS

"So the topic I want to go to now is on the question timing the fact that this nomination is coming rather late in the fourth year of a president's term has made it controversial in fact, timing of just. Nominees to nominations to the supreme. Court has been controversial now for four or five years for a variety of reasons. So that's the first question. I would like each of you to tell me your position on on the question. Should the Senate be voting on a nomination to the Supreme Court right now sire you yes or no on that? I. Mean Yes. John All right cy you are yes. On the same question Irwin should the Senate be voting on a Justice of the supreme? Court now yes or no no amy honeybear bear should not be confirmed at this time. All right. Thank you I. Want to go first use for your reasons. Why are you a? Yes on the on the question of the timing of the nomination right now well, on the question of timing I think the Senate has the authority to consent the president is nominated someone. I don't see any reason why the Senate Caq Senate is doing other things it's it's considering thrown a virus relief. Of course, it can legislate until the members leave. and. So nothing nothing prevents the president from nominating someone nothing prevents Senate from acting upon that nomination and I think there three positions John. I think one position is you must vote on the nomination I. think that was Erwin's position for years ago. A second position is you can vote on the nomination, but you shouldn't that might ear ones position today and I the the middle position, which is you can vote on the nomination and you should. Thank your ticket back to you. So what I hear size saying is the Senate has every legal and constitutional right to be doing this now. They, certainly have the legal and constitutional right to do it, but they shouldn't do it. This is stunning hypocrisy by the Republicans for years ago Senator Mitch McConnell said, the American people should have a voice in the selection and the next Supreme Court justice. Therefore, this vacancies should not be filled into we have a new president. Antonin Scalia died in February two, thousand sixteen. President Obama named Mira Garland for that seat in March of two thousand sixteen. There was eight months before the election was to be held in the Republicans wouldn't hold hearings or wouldn't hold about Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on September eighteenth of twenty twenty, and already the Republicans are looking to fill that seat. There is historical precedent. On October twelfth eighteen sixty four chief justice Roger Tawny died the president Abraham Lincoln didn't try to fill the vacancy in the month before the election or nineteen fifty-six Justice Sherman Minton resigned from the court but President Eisenhower didn't try to pick the successor instead an October fifteenth. He made a recess appointment of a Democrat William Brennan. So whoever won the election would pick the successor? Alright let. Let me jump in because I I WANNA give cya chance to respond to some of what you're saying. So so I think we heard from Irwin saying that. eight months. was enough of a lead time and they were talking about the case of Merrick Garland back in two thousand sixteen. But that one month one and a half months is too short and he sites precedent of other examples where presidents had more of that timeframe. So what's your response to that? I think are ones making a slightly different point I think if. They. Can See had risen eight months ago I think are only making the same exact point, which is what's good for the goose is good for the Gander. So it's not really a question of timing. There's plenty of time as Irwin and other people now there there's GonNa be a vote in the Senate. The point is about equity I. Think the point is about precedent in Irwin has some precedents would, of course, you can go back to previous administrations in sight other presidents. John Marshall was appointed days before John Adams left the Presidency Steven Briar was nominated and appointed to the circuit court after Jimmy Carter lost. So there, there are precedents obviously for acting after the election. Let alone before I understand there's some raw feelings about what happened four years ago and I understand that people have flipped Irwin. Himself is flipped a apparently senator McConnell may have slipped as well. I think. It's unfortunate. This game of delaying nominations has gone on for quite a long. I have a colleague who waited two years before she withdrew for circuit court position because it wouldn't allow vote. That's just sort of power politics on both

Senate Caq Senate President Trump Supreme Court Irwin Senator Mitch Mcconnell President Eisenhower Merrick Garland Ruth Bader Ginsburg John All Justice Sherman Minton Antonin Scalia Senator Mcconnell Twenty Twenty Erwin William Brennan John Abraham Lincoln Barack Obama John Marshall
It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | 1 year ago

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
"john marshall" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Have gotten less protection, like the expedited removal case are going to be perfect, significant and going to form the basis for much bigger. Broader ship in the law on the ground in the coming years decades, so tell us more about the lineups of votes in the future. No, I think the battle lines are drawn pretty clearly with the court in the next 5 10 years, Where is only gonna be a handful of cases where anyone speculated about who the critical votes are, and we're in the high profile case that it's pretty clearly going to be either one of those narrow like the pieces where it's possible that if Gorsuch or I think the norm the standard in what was true this term, and it's going to be chief Covad, 19 loomed large this year at the court in many different ways, especially for the general public because they got to hear the justices asking questions as it happened. How do you think it played a role in what happened at the court? Well, I think it's certainly slowed the court down. And I think the obvious reason why the court, you know it's still handing down nurse decisions after July 4th, because of Kim argument today, I you know, I was actually going to argue the very first case that was delayed by the virus, not guarding the vault. Look into golf. We're gonna have an effect on the court's docket. Both of this turn and next term where they have a smaller number of overall cases. There are couples are smaller effects, too. Where they're used to seeing each other in person. And, like all of us, write their pride of the opportunity to converse in person to have a sort of group dynamics come from sitting around the table. The custom these cases I'm sure that it had marginal effect on how the work of the court has been done. And then, of course, there's been the coded specific cases. I already called a really important decision in April in there with confidence, electric it we saw the chief justice, captain of the boat in the California religious Services case. I have to think that we're in for more of those over the summer and in the fall, especially asked the election in November approach. Let's talk about the Supreme Court so called Shadow docket. How important was it this term? We pay attention draw these reasons a big high profile cases that the court handled what might be in a plenary way where they have briefed in an argument. And when we got these opinions handed down from major it in July this term, I think with equally important in many respects June for all of the stuff the court did not through. Those kinds of merit cases. But all the one sentence order granting a stay applications to the federal government deny an application to other parties. I think this turn as much as any recent one. We saw volume of those rulings in a way that really had an impact everything from bringing up the president to build his border wall, even though no court has ever actually get it legal for him to use. No construction fund is using it. To the Wisconsin election to the two AM ruling on July for about the federal death penalty. These air contacts where the court is often doing just work, Junior having much of an impact on the ground, but they don't get the attention because the rulings are usually critic. They usually come out of nowhere. You know, they're not short handed down with a big pumpkin circumstance. I think this turn as much of any recent term with student impact off those orders and how they really are as much an important part of the court. You in part by that matters, because if you account for those orders, as well as the decision in the argue cases, but I think it looks much more like an even better term for conservatives and even more remarkable term for the to junk. Thanks, Steve that Stephen Wladek of the University of Texas Law School coming up next Did Chief Justice John Marshall or President Thomas Jefferson win.

Supreme Court Covad president golf federal government Gorsuch Wisconsin Thomas Jefferson John Marshall University of Texas Law School Kim California religious Services Steve Stephen Wladek
"john marshall" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

10:37 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"That the case is about small pox vaccinations and I here's the decision from justice John Marshall Harlan delivered he said the Massachusetts law did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment the court held that quote in every well ordered society charged with the duty of conserving the safety of its members the rights of the individual in respect of his liberty may at times under the pressure of great dangers be subjected to such restraint to be enforced by reasonable regulations as the safety of the general public may demand and that real liberty for all could not exist under the operation of a principle which recognizes the right of each individual person to use his own whether in respect of his person or his property regardless of the injury that may be done to others Furthermore the court held that mandatory vaccinations are not arbitrary or oppressive so long as they do not go so far beyond what was reasonably required for the safety of the public and quote so that's certainly an interesting wrinkle for things and the more I thought about what Alan Dershowitz said the more it jibe with my belief that I am a libertarian I deserve the right to life liberty the pursuit of happiness as long as I don't infringe on anyone else's rights of life liberty the pursuit of happiness and this is why I personally will be wearing a mask because I take my responsibility as a citizen very seriously and when I go out for instance I went to the dentist today now everyone of my dentist's office literally the whole place was wrapped in bubble wrap I mean it was the it was they took my temperature and they went through all the precautions but you know what I went to the dentist so let's say in two weeks I come down with something well in two weeks I want to know that if I went anywhere I mitigated as much as I could my risk for other people to give them a disease which if I walked by the nice old lady that I always see when I go to the grocery store I always hear produce what if I just walked by and said hello because we always say hello when we see each other because we see each other at the grocery store and I say hello in she says hello and I accidentally give her an illness that kills her it's not gonna be that big a deal for me but it's going to kill her I personally feel like that's kind of a big deal I look at it the same way I am or I am a responsible gun owner I know the potential badness that can happen as a as a gun owner but I try to do everything in my power to mitigate any of those things from happening I can absolutely say you know what it's my right to walk around you both have been there all day long but that would be stupid and irresponsible I think that we're missing the balance right now between freedom which is of course incredibly important and the responsibilities that are inherent with freedom and the responsibilities sometimes are things that were not really super excited about you don't have a video today of a guy in Costco and Costco is instituted a must wear a mask rule that you have to wear a mask if you are in Costco and this guy didn't want to play by his rules so he starts his camera phone in here comes Tyson from Costco and he's wearing a mask and he says Sir I'm so sorry it's our policy is nice as can be but the guys like you know what I woke up this morning I live in a free country like yes a free country where private business called cosco can set whatever rules they want for you to come in the door I don't take this one step further that guy had to pay a membership fee to get into Costco so it's not like he is free to walk in and shop at Costco he has signed up for a contract with cosco where he pays X. amount of dollars every year for the privilege of shopping in that store so we already knows that that exchange has some kind of responsibilities what frustrates me about all these people who say well I'm real workman's gonna do that where is your sense of responsibility to your fellow man and if you have no sense of responsibility for your fellow man why should I have any sense of responsibility for you why should I make sure that I don't shoot you accidentally with my gun okay why should we if we don't all act like good citizens we have anarchy I don't entire society falls apart when you pull up to a four way stop and there's no cop around and yet every person in every car stopped at the stop sign and the wait their turn to go there's no one making you do that why do you do that because it's the right thing to do in a civil society and sometimes the right thing to do in a civil society is something that we don't really want to do and there's now more and more evidence coming out that even homemade masks as long as you double up that fabric have some impact in stopping the spread of this virus and no one is claiming that any mask all hundred percent stops the spread of this virus so stop acting like if it's not perfect then it doesn't need to be done at all that's a very child like way of looking at things well if I can't have a hundred percent just not gonna do it that's not how it works just like herd immunity which I am a big fan of which by the way Stockholm Sweden maybe about twenty percent of people in stock may be infected right now so they're moving very quickly towards her community we're not moving there very quickly we're not going to move their very quickly because we're all but we've all been isolated so we need to be exposed to tiny amounts of this virus and guess what mask will help you be exposed to a viral load your body can handle there's so many good reasons but it all comes down to where it is your right to be free infringe on my right to be free and healthy and that's what Alan Dershowitz is talking about yes Dave yeah there's a distinction to be made the guy in cosco who's saying I'm I don't have freedom anymore of people who potentially would refuse to have vaccinations because of their liberty their confusing liberty with license exactly what licenses first before you kill a definition of licenses freedom that allows or is used with irresponsibility so if you're exercising what you consider your freedom irresponsibly that's not really X. exercising freedom that's exercising license and we don't have freedom of license now you can't just do stuff if it's going to affect other people adversely because you want to do it you can do anything you want that's not freedom no it's not you said many times freedom goes with responsibility they go hand in hand you can't have one without the other this is why free societies are so difficult because over time a sense of civic responsibility becomes eroded as we become of fat and lazy and I don't mean I I see fat and lazy kind of well no I mean fat lazy hello a hundred years ago we couldn't afford to not get along with our neighbors because if a tornado came we may need our neighbor to help us rebuild our house neighbors relied on neighbors to get things done now we rely on the government instead of our neighbors we've injected a third party who doesn't give a rat's **** about us but we have given tax dollars may have sunsets a responsibility or they want to get reelected there were bad things happen they want a Russian fixings it is a road at the civic responsibility that net of of connections that we all had even when I was a kid I mean I grew up in in the seventies in a small town and everybody knew everybody else's even if they didn't get along on a regular basis if someone was in need everyone banded together to help them that's just how it was I we've undermined that to a point where now we have people who are saying it is a violation of my freedom if you ask me to wear a mask I mean just being asked to wear a mask they're saying that okay great if you have a symptomatic coronavirus and you're giving it to me right now how free of my to avoid coronavirus we don't know everything about this virus that's why you guys every day on the blog I'm trying to give you the most current the most updated information I spend half my day reading emails from people sending me studies from February do you know what garbage is is is a study from February do you have any idea how much it's changed since February in terms of what we know and what we don't know and we still are learning stuff every day don't allow yourself to become complacent about what you think you know just because you like what you think you know because that's going to end up creating a problem and frankly it's going to prevent me from being able to go to a baseball game ever again and that's going to piss me off if wearing a mask let's baseball happen sooner I'm wearing a mask I'm sleeping and I'm doing a show it right now as far as you people don't have a mask on except I don't know yet I did can you hold it till after the news making out one liner go head your right to swing your arms ends where my nose begins exactly what yes it's D. B. more muffled if you're wearing a mask I'm just saying yeah there you go what do you have for me food prices rising to the highest they have been since nineteen seventy four and we're gonna look at what the governor and health officials talking about covert nineteen in children two o'clock right here K. we newsradio eight fifty A. M. and nine four one FM several Broncos country tonight we're talk to Broncos pass rusher Derek plus with a full three hundred sixty degree view from his head coach at North Dakota state men's what makes Tuska special we're gonna find out tonight about this country tonight here with his radio American financing has plenty of time to take your phone call and shove money back in your pocket it doesn't happen exactly like that but let me walk you through the process you call three zero three six nine five seven thousand you talk to one of their salary based mortgage consultants about whether or not they can save you money on your mortgage you answer a few questions and at the end of the ten minutes they say holy cow we can save you big because right now interest rates are at all time lows at least in the last fifty years so then you get to save money and it feels like they're shoving money back in your pocket some people are saving five hundred or even a thousand dollars a month now do the.

John Marshall Harlan Massachusetts
"john marshall" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"But the dead by the John Marshall it's not the jingles be all you can be for the U. S. army and be a pepper for Dr pepper written by Jake Holmes he also wrote dazed and confused led Zeppelin a copy of the forty five is worth up to five hundred dollars you could add another five hundred dollars for the pictures find a value for any record that money music dot com others might be John and now back to my day job as we take your calls for you here John are there any Glenn Miller a collector's items baby original copy of but why don't know in the mood string of pearls tuck sido junction or Chattanooga Choo Choo no overall the big band era and not to collect builder are exceptions is a Benny Goodman seventy eight called written the Scotch it's worth a thousand dollars because Billie holiday's singing on the record so even a Benny Goodman is given the credit the reason collectors want us because of Billie Holiday the big band era overall not to collectible another band music two years ago yeah Daniel in the Elkton Maryland now hi Daniel hello yes Sir go right ahead yeah I don't know I got a question for your guest please yeah is sergeant grocery gore was blues where where would he would in may from goes though bundle by noon where is god rom where is he from yeah it will be backed up why do you need to back in the country there I I have no idea I'm not sure we know what we're more in the Hindu collectibility then yeah anything else here his first album though was very collectible yeah his first album was was quite collectible but that's about all the we've got here for you I'm a I'm sorry to to tell you.

John Marshall U. S. army Dr pepper Jake Holmes Zeppelin John Glenn Miller Benny Goodman Daniel Maryland gore Billie Elkton
"john marshall" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WTOP

"Anymore tickets on sale now using is in our nature dot org eleven forty eight traffic and weather on the aids and when it breaks leaving national harbor headed north on I. two ninety five towards district north of MalcolmX Avenue the work zone found before the student parkway drivers report it blocks two right lanes northbound on I. two ninety five before the Suitland parkway with two right lanes blocked for the work zone no other problems being reported if you're traveling on DEC two ninety five headed towards eastern Avenue the inner loop of the beltway in Montgomery County at River Road still the work along the right side on that right exit ramp no problem so far one two seventy the speaker but on three fifty five just south of one oh nine the crashing down pole under police direction at little Bennett drive no problems being reported on I. ninety five of the Baltimore Washington parkway between the two beltways if you're on one ninety eight this is westbound and Rockbridge road stay to the left in order to get by the work zone set up there north on route one in laurel and whiskey bottom road the left lane gets you by there also the ICC eastbound closed between Georgia Avenue lay hill road for that works on no problems in Virginia on the beltway between Alexandria Annandale and McLean things are looking pretty good on sixty six in both directions between front royal and Roslyn where you are above speed northbound and southbound I. ninety five and a three ninety five I mean a good ride both ways between Fredericksburg and the fourteenth street bridge in the main lanes express lanes of three ninety five remain closed between Duke street and fourteenth street bridge for that weekend maintenance also be mindful in Vienna Buell road both ways between John Marshall drive in city history we have some pedestrian traffic at the noble central farmers market so please use caution if you are traveling in that area sit back relax and Ryan Fairfax connector express route six ninety eight nonstop from Vienna metro to the Pentagon schedule info offense connected dot com rocks all worth WTOP traffic and now your storm team four forty four counts with Breanna Berman solo hi there looking like a sunny day today and temperatures have been warming it's still chilly outside you'll need a jacket as we're looking at lunch time hour in the forties but low fifties today.

Montgomery County ICC Virginia Alexandria Annandale McLean Fredericksburg fourteenth street bridge Roslyn street bridge John Marshall Ryan Fairfax Vienna Pentagon Breanna Berman
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 1 year ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
"john marshall" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"If. music. seven. number one hit music station. I don't know too much. tell ya. you know so precious when you. from those that can drive you. I just to let you know your. I'm so happy that you are a. just to make you. just to let you know you. you'll. so I went to John Marshall high school this morning because they are one of the top ten finalists competing for the kids of and rallies where they play softball games these guys are here the Jonas brothers dot com slash pep rally voting with..

John Marshall high school
"john marshall" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

07:59 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Once again by the John Marshall forces of course of course of course in nineteen eighty six evangelist Jim Brown says the theme song from a TV show Mr chains like satanic messages which was of course of course of course and so was Mr ran a horse don't know about any satanic message but I soundtrack could sell for two hundred fifty dollars find the value for any records that money music of course of course and this will talk to his voice is hoarse you never heard of a talking horse yeah this thread will will be talking to to Mister John Marshall mighty John not a forthcoming boneheaded show is always fun to talk to and you can learn about the value of those old vital records you've got stored away one eight six six five oh Jimbo one eight six six Bible five four six two six services Ted who calls in from Jamestown New York on the Bohannon show good evening Ted HM hi I should've called in earlier but got kind of busy I would lead now thank you just wondering your double jeopardy hello she said that she yeah a charge is made and as you say it probably wouldn't pass what yes No Way Out for new evidence came to light can they still make the same charge will if a charge is made first well and and and someone is put on trial jeopardy attach is and I don't believe that as long as it's the same charge like Joe blow committed murder in the state of Tennessee just to make something up here if that person is tried and the not convicted that is to say quitted jeopardy has attached to it I don't believe there's enough new evidence out there that could re open that case a jeopardy has attached now than let's say that somebody committed murder the state of Tennessee but it violated a federal law against murder there are some now with the John Kennedy was murdered the only cried committed was a Texas state law against the shooting somebody that anybody but but in that case let's say there was new evidence and it it did violate a federal law then you could bring charges under the federal law which would not be considered double jeopardy okay I was just checking because if the impeachment doesn't pass which as you say it probably what yeah well I already I don't want to repeat myself it would it wouldn't be tried as I see it or what day one of the Z. that's died of the double jeopardy applies in the case of impeachment which is not a court room activity and the only punishment of course under impeachment is removal from office so I don't believe the dubber double jeopardy would apply it in any way shape or form to the impeachment process which is technically not a judicial process yeah that's one question I don't because I don't know yeah my just wondered we ought to search directly Kerry out well yeah it is certainly a worthwhile question which unfortunately we may be in a position to to determine one of these days but no jeopardy and again I I'm I'm not an attorney but but the jeopardy replies to a specific criminal charge and technically speaking impeachment is not a criminal charge impeachment is a specific charge of they can be brought to bear under the rules of the constitution but it is not in the court room even though it does wind up with the trial before the U. S. Senate and so I'm pretty sure the jeopardy does not attach at all so you could for example you could bring up but let's say a charge that president of trump dipped his granola and coffee whatever okay I just of that I would make something up there and and he was acquitted of that I suppose there's nothing that would keep another house or the same aus from from voting that same charge another time no matter what the the set of the outcome of the Senate trial double jeopardy is a courtroom process in a replies to to court procedures that does not apply to the process of impeachment which is a very a special form if you will of well rendering of justice I suppose for want of a better term okay saw one of the note Jim thank you very much you're quite welcome one eight six six five oh Jimbo one eight six six five oh five four six two six our number and we'll see what happens I am given odds myself on the beach but I felt that before Robert the molars testimony before Congress recently that the odds of an impeachment resolution passing the house was about eighty percent the the the the love pressure would be brought to bear the the that's the policy might be forced to go down a path you would just as soon ignore I filled after Muller's testimony that the likelihood of such a resolution passing dropped to about forty percent just by virtue of the fact that he did not come through with what Democrats were looking for which is to say really solid backing for the notion of the impeachment about of course the conviction in the Senate of stays just where it was before a mother testified zero percent before you testified at zero percent after he testified it's just a it's just not going to happen but again keep in mind so the gals let's assume that job the Democrats so this is not a probably a likely scenario but but it could happen let's assume that the Democrats in the twenty twenty election cycle keep the house and they take the Senate and there are a lot of Republican seats to be defended in twenty twenty so that could happen but that president trump is reelected so you would still have trouble in office but you would now have under my make believe scenario you would have a house and the Senate both of the hands of Democrats it wouldn't surprise me at all to see an impeachment wrote resolution pass and a Senate depending on how democratic it became voting to convict that could happen and again it could happen on the same grounds let's say that and earlier impeachment resolution by the failed on there's no double jeopardy in the impeachment process for what it's worth one eight six six five oh Jimbo one eight six six five oh five four six two six and we'll be back in just a moment at farmers insurance we know the sound of a perfect hot air balloon landing and a less.

Jim Brown John Marshall zero percent two hundred fifty dollars eighty percent forty percent
"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"And the custom when Marshall Becomes chief justice. Is that during these discussions. The justices may only have wine. If it's raining I assume that this was to cheer themselves. On Marshall's custom was to always ask one of his colleagues often associate justice story. You Know Brothers Story. We look out the window and tell us what the weather is. Story might say well. The Sun is going down and a clear sky marshal would say our jurisdiction is so vast by the law chances. It must be raining somewhere. The wine was served to the Marshall Court. This may explain the number of unanimous decision. I'm serious I'm serious about that. Because because there was this was a man who I mean except versus Jefferson. He really really liked almost everybody. Almost everybody liked him Justice story the first time he heard him as a lawyer. I love his laugh and I realize I've written a number of biographies. This is the first person who's a laugh was described. Wow did out in this whole like It's not that they lacked a sense of humor. But but this is the this is the first person I ever read the description of laugh and stories. I love his laugh. So that shows you you know what kind of a guy? He was one-on-one and that's how he ran his court. I mean he al- also. There was the power of his mind. There was the power of his legal reasoning. But but the first thing the sort of the first story of this personality is this this warmth this geniality this ability to get along with people and You know the expression herding cats. Well you know that that can be what what the Supreme Court is like or any any small group politics and Marshall had that ability. He had that gift and That that geniality that good fellowship was was a key part of it. Well Richard. You have an open invitation to join us at John Marshall. One time home in Washington. Dc The decor Bacon House. I've eighteenth and F- okay so you can enjoy some wine as Marshall perhaps enjoyed it With us in some other martial files okay. Great they'll take you up on that great. The book is John Marshall. The man who made the Supreme Court Richard Brooker joined us for a a wonderful interview. We encourage you to buy it All bookstores nationwide or on Amazon On the Internet Richard. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Garrett. Thanks for having me all right. This program has been brought to you by the James Wilson Institute on Natural Rights in the American founding. If you'd like to learn more about the James Wilson Institute please visit James Wilson Institute Dot Org. Thanks for listening..

John Marshall Marshall Court James Wilson Institute on Natu Supreme Court Richard Brooker F James Wilson Institute Dot Org James Wilson Institute Garrett Bacon House Jefferson Washington Amazon
"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

10:14 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Of a an account of the story and so two but to make this visit to the reader to me. I decided to for each one of these cases to go back however far that would be to catch the story at the beginning of it. And sometimes this not going back to colonial times The obvious examples Dartmouth Woodward and this is a case decided in eighteen nineteen. It's a fight over the governance of the college but The story begins Before the revolution when Dartmouth I gets its charter from George. The third and and the case will be decided based on the language of that charter and the structure that it set up at Marshall's decision that this this was a contract and therefore Something that the constitution prevents the states from impairing under Article One section ten. But but so I take it back to the very beginning and then carry the story up and similarly with you know with all the other cases the Cherokee cases where we have to start with what were the relations of the of the Cherokees With the United States Up to the point they get in legal trouble Gibbons Viagra and the steamboat case or or why did we have steamboats in the United States? Who invented them? When and how How did this monopoly? That's being challenged in the case got established in the first place and You know it it makes the story more queer. A lot of fun Sometimes they're real characters involved in these cases Some of the some of the back story is pretty jaw-dropping Fletcher versus pack cited by the Court and eighteen ten. This is This is a another contract case. Really the first important one and that begins begins the crooked land deal in the state of Georgia in seventeen ninety five. The state of Georgia is broke They sell thirty five million acres of land for a penny and a half an acre for land companies which were formed for the purpose of taking advantage of this sale and it turned out that every single member of the Georgia legislature that approved. This was bribed. The going rate for their vote was a thousand dollars and one guy took only six hundred dollars and he said well. I wasn't greedy. That's why they helped on my extra four hundred dollars. I mean it's it's it's it's entertaining you know and then you should be entertaining should I hope it does entertain the reader. But but these are also you know these. Are It also shows how porno these cases are because people? Don't go to court over nothing. You know. People would rather not do that most of them they go to court either because they really want something or they're really afraid of something you know. They're afraid of being cheated there or they're afraid of going to jail cases Aaron burr his treason trial. He would have been an act that you know if he'd lost that was the penalty for treason so he was fearful of his life and You know on the other hand people people want money Jefferson thought burner was a trader. He wanted him punished So so they're they're they're powerful motives On either side and I wanted to be able to capture not only the entertainment but the drama every one of these cases. Well we envisioned this conversation jumping around the book a little bit and I hope we get to talk about Some of those cases and the figures and the drama as well. But as this is the James Wilson Institute podcast and we have a nice robust constituency of lawyers judges and clerks judges among among them. We thought we would first focus on the most general question of how Marshall approached his role as a judge he approached it. I think I'll use the word conservative late. You know. Not Trying to invoke either side in in either current political debates or the political debates of his time. I mean this literally in the sense that as a judge you deal with cases. That's all you deal with. It was interesting to me before Marshall even get on the court in the decade or so that the Supreme Court existed before he got the job of chief justice there were several instances where the president or Congress s Supreme Court to do other things. You know asked for advice on Some PD question or asked to supervise tension. Requests of revolutionary war veterans. There were several instances. And then all those instances the court said now you know. We're not going to be Jack of all trades. Our job here is to be the Supreme Court for cases that arise before the federal judiciary. That's what we do. That's all we do at that informs marshalls behavior. He you know. He sits there with his colleagues five of them. At first and later they become sixth court increases from six to seven justices and they wait to see what lands and their laps. Now you know. They're not. They're not blindfolded here. They they are aware of what's happening in the legal universe. And they're certainly aware of the politics that that swirls around them but they he added they are there to decide cases now the the innovation that he's often credited with and this is in his. You know his first monumental case Marlboro versus Madison at eighteen now. Three this is the first time that the court strikes down. A portion of a law passed by Congress And this is Yeah this is rightly considered a landmark decision. I wonder if it isn't a little over emphasized because Marshall wasn't making the doctrine of judicial review out of whole cloth in eighteen. O three right. This is already a concept that people understood. It was already out there Alexander Hamilton had written about it and the last of the federalist papers where he covers the judiciary at the end of the series Marshall himself had spoken about it at the Virginia ratifying convention in the summer of seventeen eighty eight. He was one of the delegates to that convention which was going to approve or disapprove the key the new constitution for the state of Virginia. And he he was pro-constitution then he gives a speech one of the speeches. He gives us on the judiciary and in the course of that speech. He does expert on the principle of judicial review and There was even before Marshall even gets on the court the there was a case in the seventeen ninety s involving the constitutionality of a tax on carriages Now it turned out of the court decided to this tax was okay but they were certainly in a position. Since the question came up to go on the other way so the que- the constitutionality of a law had appeared. Ask a question before the court before Marshall even gets on the court so yes margarite is is. It is an important decision. It is First Time it's done and then it's very rarely done there after I mean the the most famous time it's done as dreads Scotney. Seven this is this is decades after Marshall is has died and a A A judge pointed to me after my book came out. There were a couple of cases with the Marshall Court decided in the eighteen twenties having to do with WHO owned It was either the shoreline or the islands and Mobile Bay. Was it still the federal government or was state of Alabama? This is after. It's become a state and the court There had been a law passed by Congress implying that the federal government could still dispose of these lamps and then the court set now. He can't do that. It's now state Alabama's now state therefore it has control over these lands so the point is there was another. There was another instance of the court. overruling a portion of a law passed by Congress much less famous or notorious and dread Scott but But my only point is. This wasn't happening a lot but It was a principal that was that was already understood and and Marbury famous. Because it's the first time it's actually made real. Yeah I see it as as twofold one. You Misunderstood more being twofold. Fold one as you articulate the misunderstanding that the case established judicial review merely articulated. How it was always They're in the constitution under our constitutional scheme but the second is this strange misunderstanding. That judicial review means judicial supremacy. And how when the court decides Case it is binding as a constitutional amendment is passed through the power and logic of the supremacy of the Supreme Court within our judicial system. If you can talk a little bit about why what why there exists that confusion well Certainly other branches Have have challenged that notion that you just articulated marshals on lifetime. Andrew Jackson.

Court Marshall Supreme Court Marshall Court Congress s Supreme Court Congress United States George Dartmouth Woodward Alabama Georgia Aaron burr Viagra Virginia Madison Fletcher Alexander Hamilton James Wilson Institute Jefferson
"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

11:00 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"Hello my name is Garrett's networker. Welcome to the James Wilson podcast. Today we're joined by Richard Brooke. Eiser Richard is the author of many biographies of the American founders. Most recently he has written a biography of the great chief justice. John Marshall the man who made the Supreme Court from Basic Books Richard. It's a pleasure to be speaking with you. I'm joined by one of our interns for the James Wilson Institute Josh Hero and were just overjoyed to be able to speak with you before we dive into our questions. We noted that in your acknowledgment section. You mentioned one of the close friends of our founder and director. Happy arcus as one of the influences that you're writing a book Michael Woman and so before we get into the book itself. We were hoping you can tell us a little more about how our DEA friend Michael was a helped you writing the book well. He was very helpful. He steered me towards The best the Marshall Scholarship I never even watched to law school so I was coming to this from the outside and that that's an obvious disadvantage. I think it's an advantage because it means that I am looking at everything crash and I have to make sure that I understand it myself. Which helps me in explaining it to most of my readers who are also going to becoming to it as non-lawyers on Kamla professors about But that means I need some helpful Indians to Just guide me through the Marshall. Scholarship and Michael Uelmen was was certainly very helpful. steered me towards The best box Marsha books out there which is one of the reasons I decided to do. He seemed to be relatively under done considering his importance. And there are excellent books on him. But it's not like someone who's been president for instance or war Benjamin Franklin or Alexander Hamilton. Even before the musical there there was just a lot more about all these guys and relatively little for the great chief justice so So that will seem like free field and Michael UELMEN was one of the Expert Helpers who gave me a map of that before I punched him excellent. I think your your book is very clearly written to an audience. That is familiar with Marshall. But you don't really take for granted the reader's knowledge. Would you be able to tell us a little bit about the narrative framing process that you employ in the book and why you specifically made decisions to focus on Marshall and his relationships and what is it exactly about his personal connections that served as a backdrop for discussing Marshall's understanding of law and politics overall? Well I thought to personal relationships which were most important to his public career were first his early contact and his almost boundless admiration for George Washington. And that's second his lifelong animosity with his second cousin. Once removed Thomas Jefferson which was returned in spades by Jefferson. Marshall volunteered at the age of nineteen for the Virginia militia. In seventeen seventy five this as soon as the news of of Lexington and concord it spread throughout the colony and then the following year. He joined the continental army and he was in free. Battles Washington demanded it Brandy Wine Germantown in the fall. Seventeen seventy seven monmouth courthouse. In the summer. Seventy eight and between Germantown and MONMOUTH. He was at the Winter Encampment Valley forge where Washington was also in command show. He saw the commander in chief and victory. He saw them defeat and he saw him in this very trying winter and his conclusions from these firsthand. Experiences was that Washington was the man who had guided us through the revolution. He was the man who saw through. Who who made it a success and he never forgot that it was imprinted upon him when Washington at the end of the war returns this commission. Congress in December. Seventeen eighty three Captain Marshall Rights as old school. Fellow James Monroe and he called Washington the greatest man on earth and that was an opinion he would never change and he would follow. Washington's lead throughout the rest of his life When when it becomes a question whether we need a new constitution in seventeen eighty seven? Eighty Eight He is one of the lesser followers of Washington pushing for the ratification of the new constitution. decade later WASHINGTON summons him to Mount Vernon to basically ordered him to run for Congress when our first two party system has already developed federalists of of Washington and Adams Hamilton versus the first Republican Party of Jefferson amount and again Marshall follows Washington. He is a federalist and he agrees After some persuading To RUN FOR CONGRESS. And He is the congressman who tells Congress a year later that Washington has died and he calls him first in war first in peace. I in the hearts of this country and this is an attitude that he would keep for the rest of his life. The only book ever rights as a five volume biography of Washington the policy preferences that he has as chief justice are those of the federalist. Party He believes In a federal government in which in crucial respects the federal government has supremacy over the state governments He believes in the Commercial Revolution The Hamilton Vision A lot of a lot of that. The hammel Tony and vision is sustained by Supreme Court decisions that Marshall Issues so this is the lifelong fact of his encounter with George Washington. Now the the other important man is his cousin. Thomas Jefferson and the animosity. The animosity begins in the Washington Administration when when Jefferson is Washington's secretary of State It it exists. Swin Jefferson is struggling with Hamilton over Hamilton's financial program. Jefferson is very skeptical of it He he is skeptical of it. On the merits he also thinks unconstitutional. They have such thing as a bank of the United States Hamilton argues brilliantly. That this is an implied power under the constitution and the reasoning that Marshall Himself Will Echo in eighteen nineteen when he decides McCall versus Maryland which relates to the second bank the United States. But what really turned him against his cousin is Jeffersons attitude to the French Revolution Like the other members of Jefferson's party Jefferson believes this isn't on alloyed. Good thing he never turned against the French Revolution. Even through the reign of terror. The only point at which he finally abandoned says faith and that is what Napoleon takes over but for that first decade of the French revolution from seventeen eighty nine To to the end of the century Jefferson Madison his Bernie. They are all in for the French revolution and they seem to Marshall to be as patriotic towards France as they are towards the United States. If not more so and this is Tha Marshall Unacceptable He believes that the Jefferson is lacking in proper patriotism. Any also feels he's been disloyal secretary of state president want because although he terry's out Washington's neutrality policy officially he's also trying to undermine on the side and These are unforgivable offensive to Marshall. Both because he's a patriot and kneels during the revolution and he is such an admire of Washington so after the seventeen ninety four him. Thomas Jefferson is permanently in his in his black letcher. There is no possibility that Jefferson can ever come back for him. So those were the you know. Those are the personal relationships that I Ramified through Marshall's life now the other the other structural decision I made I mean writing a biography is. There's something very easy about it because they all have a similar shape. I mean there's a person who's born and then he does stuff and he dies right the structure you don't you don't get away from it. But the the one modification for this particular book is that in Marshall's most important career which is chief justice. This is the last More than a third of his life thirty four years from eighteen eighteen thirty five where he is chief justice that careers memorable largely because of a number of landmark decisions that he hands out and that his court agrees with so these cases are very important and each one of them. I realized is a short story They only come to the Supreme Court at the end of their course. That's when they've you know who the parties have been fighting about. Whatever it is they go to court. It comes through the lower courts finally at arrives at the Supreme Court and the Marshall Court decides what it decides bad and the justices are interested in that they are interested in the arguments that are presented to them. Now of course there's also politics swirling around a Lotta these cases. They're also aware of that but they come in at the climax.

John Marshall Washington Thomas Jefferson Supreme Court Alexander Hamilton George Washington Marshall Scholarship Marshall Court United States James Wilson Eiser Richard Richard Brooke Jefferson Madison Washington Administration James Wilson Institute Garrett Congress
"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"For a horseman. Well, can't wish you anymore success in lock than I than I already have. I'll reiterate I think it's one of the really pleasant and happy results in particularly in the northeast the have colonial comeback because I think people had completely written off. And just because it didn't seem that the the gaming side of it had any hope at at a certain at a certain point. And then all of a sudden it did. And it's kind of amazing the way the way you were ready to strike, John. And that's a testimony to you and your tan Virginia racing commission as well. Yeah. I mean, everybody just a strong group with a passion for the industry that helps bring this back to life without idle for far too long. It's only appropriate for Jill burn didn't carry that torch beginning with the ceremonial burn the Turks force, but only. Only. He'll be here all week. He'll be here. Believable John Marshall revolutionary racing. And or is that name was that was just a working name is that name dissipate? Now believe it or not that is the name. Okay. It is that'll be maintained as the as the corporate entity. Oh, I'm sorry. You're talking about revolutionary or is that was that Jackson is very famous name in Virginia thought you're talking about the John Marsh? Oh, ask me is your name, really John Marshall. Well, of course, it is strangely enough in Virginia. My name's John Marshall. And I never have a problem. Getting a reservation in town. That's the name revolutionary racing. Our parent company Pacific, peninsula Pacific entertainment. Okay. So that's our parent company and colonial downs group is the subsidiary. I head up with Jill support to revive live racing at colonial down since two thousand nineteen. It's market down and included. If you've never been you're gonna wanna go. Everybody loves it. One thing we didn't say about the five o'clock start. It it might be three degrees cooler at five o'clock that. This anywhere. Anyway, around the country, and you know. Maybe you predict some some warm weather. So that was certainly one of the factors that went into it. And but great. Yeah. It's a win. Great ship in time to. Absolutely each traffic and other. So a lot of a lot of work went into that. With the horsemen to help make that decision. Trying to be everything is about being horsemen friendly industry-friendly and putting on a great product for people to wager on Joe McKay who's up in the in the Baltimore area. Joe is wondering if it's going to be a tournament you're gonna tie at all with h c b CDC humidity NTR a now and have had discussions about hosting NHCD tournament. There's well so Michelle raven craft talk get with her Keith and the group and tiara and will certainly want to put some things together to tie in with that. It's a fantastic Tien excited for you both and for everybody that is going to get a chance, and I mean, the jobs and everything that it does for the the region and for Orsmond up and down the eastern seaboard, colonial down C N L, you'll you'll see I don't know how many horses are out there running that still have CNN on in their PP's. Seattle of that. Yeah. That's absolutely. Yeah. They do. Yeah. That would be a while. But I remember this property it is seven six and seven year old seventy that that probably at the two year old horses. The horsemen jockeys have participated there in the past. It's a very very big list of of support..

John Marshall Virginia John Jill Jackson Joe McKay John Marsh Seattle Michelle raven CNN Baltimore Tien Keith Orsmond three degrees seven year two year
"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"About the the HP a and and the tie-in to the after care alliance, and how you structured what should be, you know, very nice income flow for for them, sir. Steve we agreed with the HP Virginia HP a to fifteen dollar per starter on contribution from real policeman for every starter and at the. End of the me flow kneel downs will match that that contribution to the TA and the intention is for those dollars to be reinvested in Africare efforts on within the Commonwealth of Jinya specifically Virginia, whether it's whether it's breeders odors, anybody that horses coming off off the track for the horsemen on that topic Jill and that is one of those other challenges beside those kinds of things that are tangential actual horses and give everybody in update on the the dates and the way in which racing will be reintroduced at colonial. And then what the intermediate plan is for you know, for the meats that will come after work I can speak on this year specifically so live racing will return on August eighth through September seventh and will raise three nights a week. Thursday fr. Day Saturday with a post time of five o'clock except for Labor Day, which are postal be one o'clock, we end -ticipant probably eighty percent of those races will be on our turf course, because we have the great, you know, luxury of utilizing that turf. Course, we have a phenomenal steak schedule being put together the return of the Virginia. Okay. And the Virginia derby will both be on August thirty first the Commonwealth. What about the older colonial Cup? Now. The Virginia Virginia oaks Virginia derby. Horse undercard stakes that will support older horses on the turf for that night as well. So we plan on having four stakes races on August thirty first, but a very solid Virginia breads sakes program. That that were up. There will be run races that have been transferred. Elsewhere while colonial nouns was was not in operation and the stable area will open around July twenty fifth. We've hired Allison DeLuca are racing secretary. Everybody very familiar with the in secretary at Tampa door. Assistant racing secretary Churchill Qinglin Allison's been in this industry for very long time has an impeccable reputation credibility among the horsemen, and is absolutely ecstatic to be a part of the team returning racing to colonial downs. We've hired attract superintendent Ken Brown out of Maryland. He's been the track superintendent Canterbury and this helped laurel out as well..

Virginia Virginia Virginia oaks Virgini secretary HP Commonwealth superintendent Churchill Qinglin Allison Allison DeLuca Africare Ken Brown TA Steve Jill Tampa door Maryland Canterbury eighty percent fifteen dollar twenty fifth
"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Dollars gets the static quota Saturday. Afternoon horse all day long. But. Mostly Springer miles, but I'll let you get going because I know you're in a rush, but thanks for getting a thin. They Francis always a treat and enjoy today. And then said we'll recap next week is wall. So have two winners from the rebel. Maybe we haven't gotten word yet from from hot springs about where they stand with the potential split that I got a feeling. I think they'll be some three year olds rounded up there might be anarchy bread in there that or to that rounds out the fields, but sit for Nando and Francis Garin in Ocala and follow them. And of course, said and work thoroughbred consultants. And the we got plenty of talk about actually I I had some interesting breeding farm discussions as well while it was there and the Pinnock season. They're hitting the end zone as well. We'll do all of that. When we're together next said and this thanks a lot. Let's stay right here. And sitting in front of me is. Yeah. The the management team of colonial downs. And. Yeah, there you go. And now now you're live in front of me. John Marshall, you're good. I think John say Hello. Hello. Thanks for having a steam. I got my pleasure. Jill burn vice president racing perations at colonial downs any experience with a microphone Joe. Hi. It says it's on it's on. No. You're no kidding. I'm just saying, you're you're you're first rodeo, exactly, exactly. And John for you, though. And the revolutionary racing team talk about you know, we we all know what transpired. But I don't know all that much about the backstory and the forming of the team and you guys getting involved Steve. The revival of live racing at colonial downs is about to unwind..

colonial downs John Marshall Francis Garin Nando Dollars Ocala vice president Steve Jill Joe three year
"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"I had no idea. Don't do that. No. He he's he's a welcome addition. You know, how about there was a little article that Jim Dunleavy wrote about about Alan Goldberg. And I thought we all had thought with a oh, my gosh, I'm going to forget his last name Duarte with him taking over the training for rich and Tooley and colts neck, but apparently Allen kind of come really kinda got a freshening. It took some time away. And now is back. But I saw Charlie Bolden was buying horses. Versi at Tooley signed a couple of tickets for colts neck. Yeah. And in fact, he was one of the people we spoke to the crawfish boil last night. Gobert is concerned. I. He's very tight with the central and. You know, like, you said more freshening because they're very very long time loyalist together, and even the why for its Zampa very. Quotes with him as two years with. Whiteboard. So I I think it was. Well, but the freshman before any back together. I also wanted to bring up with you couple of. Specific hips and a couple of results that I thought were were very interesting how about CARA Conti with a three hundred sixty five thousand dollars, seller and. It. It would seem at this point that Seth Clarkson. Is making a habit of buying individuals from the most obscure corners of the the stallions spectrum a two hundred and seventy thousand dollar Philly by majestic city. The New York bread that. Stands quest. Royal and was actually one hundred thousand dollar yearling at Saratoga last year. So it was obviously a standout a right from early on. Right. Absolutely. And the best one of the best parts about this is side of trackside farm comes into into play. And I just at city was a wasn't Evans and trackside. Production, and he was a nice horse and a city zip. And of course, with cities zip gone from the, you know, gone from the rosters not gonna make anymore. Those as Glenn Cain for us to say, the sons of cities zip getting attention. And this is a I think the first flare to notice. Yeah. And it's a really good point. You make about second arm and buying the facts horsey. He's had success with brats. Think about the notable success. Quack kidding? I found done of the. Helen billboard mcclain's me. Right. You only sixty five hundred dollars at signed..

Tooley colts Evans Helen billboard mcclain Jim Dunleavy Charlie Bolden CARA Conti Seth Clarkson Alan Goldberg Glenn Cain Gobert Philly Duarte Allen New York three hundred sixty five thous one hundred thousand dollar sixty five hundred dollars seventy thousand dollar two years
"john marshall" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

08:23 min | 3 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on WDRC

"Back to the LARs Larson show. It is a pleasure to be with you and a special pleasure to speak with Richard Brooke is from national review, the author of many other biographies that you should read. But the one most late the most most recent one is John Marshall the man who made the supreme court. So here's John Marshall appointed to the supreme court as chief Justice by the lame duck president John Adams as he's leaving office and Thomas Jefferson is coming in. What was he real as reluctant to take on that post as he had been to take on running for congress at the behest of George Washington, his hero. Well, you know, I think he saw he saw the importance of the political moment. But the federalist party had just been shellacked. The election of eighteen hundred was a Blue Wave Jefferson and his party. They had taken the White House. They had flipped both houses of congress. The. The only branch of the federal government in which federalists still prevailed was the judiciary. Because that's who all the judges were. They'd all been appointed by Washington or Adams, so Marshall saw this as a very important job to have politically. And he's also, you know, he's been a lawyer all his adult life, and I think he's confident in his legal abilities and legal opinions. So I think he he probably took the on in the spirit of the soldier. He had been during the revolution. Here's my. Here's my new set of orders. Let me go. Do this job. Now, he did he see in the supreme court something that truly would be made into something. Great. And not as John J side is this this place with no dignity, and no wait and no consequence because these days, you know, how Americans view this the announcement of a new supreme court decision on virtually anything is is viewed as as extraordinarily consequential. And and something that is effectively lifelong meaning when they make a decision because of starry decisive. You're you're probably going to be stuck with that decision in that interpretation of the constitution for at least several decades before it will be looked at again these days. Right. Well, one change that Marshall makes mmediately in the first ten or eleven years. So the supreme court justices gave their opinions on a case one after another call Syria. Oh, the first Justice would read his opinion on the second would read his you'd go through the whole court. The Marshall court began to give opinions of the court usually read by the chief Justice sometimes read by other justices, and these were often unanimous opinions now justices were perfectly free to give either currencies or descents that could currencies when they agree with the majority opinion, but they've got a slightly different take. So they you know, they they give a concurrence or if they disagree with it. They they give a descent, and so those still happened -cational. But for the most part, you're getting unanimous opinions many in some delivered by the chief Justice himself, and this imparts a kind of a wait to the whole court. It's not just a collect. It's makes it seem like it's not just a collection of individuals. It's a unified body. Giving a collective opinion on the law. The other justices object to this particular method of doing it. They realized that it would give their opinions more weight. There was one Jefferson appointee. William Johnson who who is kind of uneasy with this for many years, and at the end of of the end of his life. Marshall flight he begins to descend more frequently. But for the bulk of his time on the court. He goes along with this. And he has an interesting correspondence with Thomas Jefferson in the early eighteen twenty s this is almost twenty years into his own time on the court, and he explains to Jefferson how this process worked. He said when I first got on the court. I thought I'd give my own opinion. But then I just got lectures from all the other judges telling me, you know, if we were sniping at each other this this makes all of us, look bad. You know, you shouldn't do this. How accurate is this description? I mean, he's telling it to Jefferson who doesn't like the court periods. So maybe he's trying to tailor it to please his correspondent. But you know, certainly he had felt pressure to go along with his brother justices, and for the most part he done it. So. And I think this is a result of of Marshall's great skill and what you might call small P politics. You know, how to manage your colleagues how how to lead your colleagues, and he does it by being genial? I mean, that's just who he is. He everybody seems to like this guy, Thomas Jefferson, and he likes everybody. He does it by being deferential. If if there's some Justice who's more expert in a particular field of law. He will let that man do the decision let that now take the lead. And then of course, when you do that you get deference in return, then the third thing assistance quality of his mind, this intelligence that he had and it just impressed. His fellow justices. That impressed the lawyers who argued before him, and you know, you put all that together. And then you add in the fact that he just stays there year after year and. It it builds up this internal mystique of the court, which which is also public mystique people begin to to see it as this impressive body that we have to pay attention to the book. I'm speaking Richard Brooke Heiser, it's author about is John Marshall demand who made the supreme court. So Marshall is on the court for thirty years. This is a four thirty four still a record for chief Justice. It is an and well with longer lifetimes, these days view, suppose, we'll ever see that record eclipsed. Well, John roberts's pretty young. There have been a couple justices who've been on the court longer than Marshall. But but no chief Justice of all the cases he held you described them as dramatic cases England included involving businessman in scoundrels, a native Americans and slaves. What was the one that stood out to you? Well, they were so many of them were were interesting one that was both interesting back story and very consequential. What's your veep tack? In eighteen ten and this was a case about a land sale by the state of Georgia, Georgia sold off thirty million acres for a penny and a half an acre. This is what's now. The states of Alabama Mississippi Georgia was very poor state was the only way they could raise money. Now, the problem is every single legislator in the Georgia legislature had been bribed to make this sale happen. The going price was a thousand dollars a vote one guy took only six hundred dollars and he explained I wasn't greedy. You know, the people of Georgia got upset about this and elected a whole new crop of representatives. And then they passed a repeal act saying, Nope, we take this sale back, and we're going to forbid it from ever coming before. Georgia court anyone in a court in this state who treats this actors having been real will be fine two thousand dollars. So they're repealing it and squelching litigation in Georgia. You can read the history of all of it in John Marshall, the man who made the supreme court is author is Richard Brooke Heiser, Mr. is have been more than generous with your time. And thank you so much for this. And for all that you do for national review as well. Thank you for the time today. Okay. Thank you for having. It is a pleasure to have you on. You're listening to the LARs Larson show. Laursen show. This is FOX on Justice. There are five justices.

John Marshall supreme court Thomas Jefferson Marshall court LARs Larson Georgia John Adams Richard Brooke Heiser national review congress federalist party Richard Brooke George Washington John roberts White House John J president Alabama Mississippi Georgia Syria
"john marshall" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"john marshall" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thanks very much. Rick. That was marvelous. Bill Buckley in terms of journalism when he valued probably most was the quality of the words and this led him to make some poor choices over the course of his editorship of national review. He gave a liberal writers like, Gary wills and Joan Diddy in their start, or at least increased prominence by publishing them in the pages of national review which annoyed our publisher at the time. Go rusher to no end occasionally had to remember to remind Bill Bill, we are a conservative magazine. But fortunately, he did not always have to choose between the quality of the words, an ideological found nece, which would have been very bad for Nash review the case. But Rick Rick is a really exemplified. What Bill wanted a national review writer to be eloquent cultured sustained and witty, and we can't be sure anymore. What Bill would think of anything that national review is is doing these days? We don't get the memo's anymore. But something I'm complete. Lately, confident in is every time, we publish something by Rick Rick is that Bill Buckley would love that. And that very much goes for his latest book our educational system. I think is increasingly failing us when it comes to history. It's shunting it aside or distorting it. But we've had a great revival of history writing in biography in this country, and Rick was really a front runner and catalyzer of that trend with his wonderful book about George Washington written about twenty years ago. So now, Richard Brooke is being joined by rich Lowry editor of the national review for the CUNY his book, John Marshall, the man who made the supreme court. So rick. I thought we dig in a little bit about Marshall, and maybe talk a little bit about your craft and take questions which people right on the no cards, can you? Tell us a little bit more about the sources of Marshall's ambition for the courts was this for the court was as a product of a. The view long-term view of what role it should have in our system, or is it some of kind of Madison, Ian and Bishen checking ambition dynamic where anyone is naturally going to want to increase the standing in power and prestige of their branch or department of government. Well, certainly there was that element in it. And Marshall comes to the court after a decade of frenzy politics, the seventeen ninety s was our our first decade of partisan politics. And because it was all brand new. It was really quite mad. I mean, we wring our hands over our politics now. But but I tell people go back to the seventeen ninety it is this just worse. It's more frenzied politicians are killing each other. Hamilton wasn't the only one today in a dual one of Marshall's colleagues on the supreme court or Republican appointee Broncos Livingston he killed a federalist and a dual he shot the man in the groin and he bled out five minutes. And this never came up in them confirmation. Did.

Rick Rick Bill Bill John Marshall Bill Buckley national review supreme court Gary wills rich Lowry CUNY Nash Richard Brooke Joan Diddy writer publisher Hamilton Broncos Livingston George Washington department of government Madison editor