35 Burst results for "John Lee"

"john lee" Discussed on Gary.club

Gary.club

04:33 min | Last month

"john lee" Discussed on Gary.club

"At least i'll have this whole little guide. If you will of faq so next time someone came to me and said hey you know what. I'm really busy. I really wanna help you. But what's your question. My question is how do you find deals. Okay i've got it in this report. Let me send it to you. So i started. Sending this report outs could start saving my time. Don't work called smart heart so you bought called but you do smalley so then. One day i get this phone call from the sky. Call steve foley and he says to me said oh. John came across one of your reports. I was wondering if you could be a speaker. One of my events like steve. I'm not speak as he's not. Just come along and bring the reponse dot reading. And so i did. I stop speaking. You know what happens. I turn up as six people that sat in the front one person to start in the buzz. Even one guy said the join kiss. It was really really bad still. I don't know what to do. Said just take my report. And i'll start reading so three months goes by like another phone call. Hello john speaking. This guy's names just won't ryan said. Hey i hope. Just book steve's mom. Would you mind speaking admirers of your show. They don't wasn't so great so yeah outcome so drive down. Take me three and a half hours to drive down there. And when i arrived the cop box full. I'm like must be a wedding on a harrison thing circle into reception as my name. Is john leeann the guest speaker tonight. Could you tell where it is through this a wall. Where the wedding is even white literally thought touting. I said it just as. Am you didn't tell me all these people..

steve foley smalley steve Hello john John john leeann ryan harrison
"john lee" Discussed on Gary.club

Gary.club

04:54 min | Last month

"john lee" Discussed on Gary.club

"Podcast family. I'm so so so excited to introduce you to john lee. he's one of my absolute new favourite. humans. I met him on the twenty seventh of december in a new app called clubhouse and today we came together for a recording of a podcast episode. Where we're really going to dive into talking about. How his parents spent all their time working and he wanted to have his own free time. He wanted to have his own path and not be like his parents how he went to college and then went from zero to becoming an entrepreneur. How he made his first million dollars at twenty seven years old and then one of his most masterful tricks that took him to where he is today. He wrote a report to save time and this report that he wrote is going to absolutely blow your mind. I'm just so so happy to introduce you to john. Lee thank you so much for having the show. I really appreciate it and what you're doing the value that you are into the communities out there especially in clubhouses amazing so thank you for that. Thank you so much. John what made you want to become an entrepreneur while i started working. I'm amongst chinese takeaways dishwasher. And i never really saw my parents so not until the age of really late. Eleven years old ten years old around the getting onto school and so many weekends with my friends and paul tease this. Puff you know what i want freedom. I don't wanna be working in the job. When i'm older so i mean it's always been there in my boss still got a job. I still worked in coal per creative world. But that's kind of what pushed me to want to much. Because i wanted to have my own time. Money runs the world because money buys the one thing that we can't buy and that's time because when you have money you have time to do what you want. Whatever you choose if it's more work great that's what you choose but when you have the money you have the.

john lee Lee john John paul
"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

04:27 min | 2 months ago

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

"Features that you're podcasters rave about this app. I think it's the experience being able to call to action right next to the content that they're delivering So and that's different for every podcast every podcast at different goals so the show but to be able to vet your listeners. <hes> consume content engage further. But then take a call to action whether that be setting up a newsletter or buying merchandise becoming a patron know. We can point here patriot on page. So they're very close to take that action after listening to the content. I think going forward a bigger feature is going to be just believe to build community That's been on my mind a couple of weeks. Now i think people will For your content. But they'll stay for the community if there is one Listeners and access to the show if their accommodation can be started at the of the episode producing. I think that's a really important. Sticky factor for keeping listeners engaged and ultimately becoming supporters show. Yes i believe in that one hundred percent and i really think that that's the unique thing about even having your own personal app for your podcast. How can people actually get involved with you and hookup with you to get one of your apps so they can find us. At our website custom mobile dot app they can meet through all the features and testimonials there and then when they click to sign up. It'll take us. It'll take my patriot on page. Actually so we. I use patriarch as our customer relationship management tool so all excommunication will go through patriot patron. I'm sure that's pretty familiar with the most podcasters Yeah it's pretty straightforward and usually we can get an app published within two weeks depending on requirements. Coming in the app stores will take five days to review and approve so within a week. Usually i can get attract at prepared and we can finalize details and have the have that submitted to the answers. One call out though So we we'll publish to the apple store and google play for no extra costs. There's no there are no cost outside the monthly subscription. But if you wanted your polish to the app store on constant would need to create their own organization apple developer account and it's got to be an organization account. That was a bit more strict about that so that there is a caveat there and apple charge an annual fee for that Account of ninety nine dollars a year. Google play is really straightforward We can publish into our accounts for free but you can also make your own accounts twenty five dollars a one time setup fee and then we can probably see happen to your account with no painting outside of japan. Is there a benefit to publish these apps under your own. Google play console. I think branding purposes so if it's under your own account then that's all these users with see if defender our account they will see squad ink inc <hes> as the developer and they can click through there and all the other after we've published but that's the only difference there is okay. Well john i do. Thank you for joining us today. I really am excited about what you're doing and i thank for being on the detmer chest with us. Thank you so much for having me up. I appreciate the opportunity. Thank you for listening into the podcast episode today. If you enjoyed it please share with a friend. Also please follow us on any of your podcast players or if you'd like to get a little more personal with us and really identify what we truly are about and get involved with what we are doing. Make sure you go over to the google. Play store and download our new app. We can't wait to get involved with you and that's gonna finish up. This episode of the dead america podcast. Make sure you come back next week and follow along for another great interview. I met waters out.

app stores apple google squad ink inc app store japan john america
"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

04:27 min | 2 months ago

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

"Features that you're podcasters rave about this app. I think it's the experience being able to call to action right next to the content that they're delivering So and that's different for every podcast every podcast at different goals so the show but to be able to vet your listeners. <hes> consume content engage further. But then take a call to action whether that be setting up a newsletter or buying merchandise becoming a patron know. We can point here patriot on page. So they're very close to take that action after listening to the content. I think going forward a bigger feature is going to be just believe to build community That's been on my mind a couple of weeks. Now i think people will For your content. But they'll stay for the community if there is one Listeners and access to the show if their accommodation can be started at the of the episode producing. I think that's a really important. Sticky factor for keeping listeners engaged and ultimately becoming supporters show. Yes i believe in that one hundred percent and i really think that that's the unique thing about even having your own personal app for your podcast. How can people actually get involved with you and hookup with you to get one of your apps so they can find us. At our website custom mobile dot app they can meet through all the features and testimonials there and then when they click to sign up. It'll take us. It'll take my patriot on page. Actually so we. I use patriarch as our customer relationship management tool so all excommunication will go through patriot patron. I'm sure that's pretty familiar with the most podcasters Yeah it's pretty straightforward and usually we can get an app published within two weeks depending on requirements. Coming in the app stores will take five days to review and approve so within a week. Usually i can get attract at prepared and we can finalize details and have the have that submitted to the answers. One call out though So we we'll publish to the apple store and google play for no extra costs. There's no there are no cost outside the monthly subscription. But if you wanted your polish to the app store on constant would need to create their own organization apple developer account and it's got to be an organization account. That was a bit more strict about that so that there is a caveat there and apple charge an annual fee for that Account of ninety nine dollars a year. Google play is really straightforward We can publish into our accounts for free but you can also make your own accounts twenty five dollars a one time setup fee and then we can probably see happen to your account with no painting outside of japan. Is there a benefit to publish these apps under your own. Google play console. I think branding purposes so if it's under your own account then that's all these users with see if defender our account they will see squad ink inc <hes> as the developer and they can click through there and all the other after we've published but that's the only difference there is okay. Well john i do. Thank you for joining us today. I really am excited about what you're doing and i thank for being on the detmer chest with us. Thank you so much for having me up. I appreciate the opportunity. Thank you for listening into the podcast episode today. If you enjoyed it please share with a friend. Also please follow us on any of your podcast players or if you'd like to get a little more personal with us and really identify what we truly are about and get involved with what we are doing. Make sure you go over to the google. Play store and download our new app. We can't wait to get involved with you and that's gonna finish up. This episode of the dead america podcast. Make sure you come back next week and follow along for another great interview. I met waters out.

app stores apple google squad ink inc app store japan john america
"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

04:26 min | 2 months ago

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

"You can the network two thousand month and then we can support that use case. Okay so let's get into some of the features that the app really include I see on the six dollar tear. It says you get the live chat. Now says livestream radio. What does that mean john. Hey if you have a lifetime radio row that you have to just like a radio station based play and your life jim radio. Url will start to play. That's very interesting now. Along with the real time chat. It says Video calls What what is that. It's just the normal video calls you can do through what's up or or any other with cama you can do Feel through the okay. And that's with your entire audience to chat or is that a singular one on one type. It's one on one. okay so now. This is multi-language it fits around the world for every podcast or correct. Yeah we even customize language to fit any language or region. Okay now it says you can offer exclusive insecure content. Is that like a private. Rss feed to have private that you want to serve. Only your can do that. And that's i think that's one of the best incentives you can give your listeners to get the the they can get exclusive content in the they can't anywhere else that's the thing. That's a great incentive. We can do that. Can also put any of the screens behind the log in screen so users what happened to make An account with their email address and password and then they can access exclusive content that way. So that's another way of building an email Maybe offering exclusive benefits to your patriots. You're on a different membership platform and say members get this extra content through the app able them to get access to the up to a log in screen. Okay now it has self-service push notifications. Is that to notify people when new content comes onto the app so new episodes There's a switch that that will trigger notifications automatically but he want to push a special notification. We can draft and schedule those admin dashboard as well. It can be for anything she wants to let your users know that you have a new t. shirt on store and check it out Back in can send push notifications to your your accusers. Yeah that's very interesting right there. So what are the social features of the app it's just what you would expect. you can have a social speed Inside the app so users can post like tweets you can post pictures and texts and then other other users can comment on those posts and like them so it's bad familiar Social posting wall. You can have here okay. the one thing that really caught my is wordpress integration. How does that work. And what does it intel. So you have a wordpress website. We can take the art of your website and it'll display all the contents and in a beautiful way inside the after there's really no need to manage your content in two different places They can display the company. You're already publishing through wordpress inside the okay. So people that use like blueberry or casto's or any wordpress integrated hosting site can use that integration. Yes yeah it'll take any public ours And integrate then. Yeah so you don't have to host your content anywhere anywhere else. So what's the number one.

jim radio john patriots intel casto
"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

04:26 min | 2 months ago

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

"You can the network two thousand month and then we can support that use case. Okay so let's get into some of the features that the app really include I see on the six dollar tear. It says you get the live chat. Now says livestream radio. What does that mean john. Hey if you have a lifetime radio row that you have to just like a radio station based play and your life jim radio. Url will start to play. That's very interesting now. Along with the real time chat. It says Video calls What what is that. It's just the normal video calls you can do through what's up or or any other with cama you can do Feel through the okay. And that's with your entire audience to chat or is that a singular one on one type. It's one on one. okay so now. This is multi-language it fits around the world for every podcast or correct. Yeah we even customize language to fit any language or region. Okay now it says you can offer exclusive insecure content. Is that like a private. Rss feed to have private that you want to serve. Only your can do that. And that's i think that's one of the best incentives you can give your listeners to get the the they can get exclusive content in the they can't anywhere else that's the thing. That's a great incentive. We can do that. Can also put any of the screens behind the log in screen so users what happened to make An account with their email address and password and then they can access exclusive content that way. So that's another way of building an email Maybe offering exclusive benefits to your patriots. You're on a different membership platform and say members get this extra content through the app able them to get access to the up to a log in screen. Okay now it has self-service push notifications. Is that to notify people when new content comes onto the app so new episodes There's a switch that that will trigger notifications automatically but he want to push a special notification. We can draft and schedule those admin dashboard as well. It can be for anything she wants to let your users know that you have a new t. shirt on store and check it out Back in can send push notifications to your your accusers. Yeah that's very interesting right there. So what are the social features of the app it's just what you would expect. you can have a social speed Inside the app so users can post like tweets you can post pictures and texts and then other other users can comment on those posts and like them so it's bad familiar Social posting wall. You can have here okay. the one thing that really caught my is wordpress integration. How does that work. And what does it intel. So you have a wordpress website. We can take the art of your website and it'll display all the contents and in a beautiful way inside the after there's really no need to manage your content in two different places They can display the company. You're already publishing through wordpress inside the okay. So people that use like blueberry or casto's or any wordpress integrated hosting site can use that integration. Yes yeah it'll take any public ours And integrate then. Yeah so you don't have to host your content anywhere anywhere else. So what's the number one.

jim radio john patriots intel casto
"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

04:01 min | 2 months ago

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

"What got you into podcasting and helping podcasters like this john. I'm a pilot listener. so podcasting is the main. I consume content. I think it has been for fire. Five more years I'm always listening to podcasts. A couple years ago. I wanted to start my own business And the first part. I thought i was a social podcast at Find all your favorite podcast and then engaged the shows you listen to you on social media at the same time started building about a couple years ago. I hired and agency. They spent a lot of money And it took a long time to try to even build that. But in the meantime there were other social. Podcasts came and went and kind of dawned on me that this was this was i was blocking. The wrong tree was not going to work as a product. I've seen so many failures. In time i was building my own and there was nothing work as a business came to decision rockier About how to pivot my product my business into something that might be viable. And i had this idea kind of at the start of it I was thinking we have this technology. We still thrown out Podcast don't have their own act. They've got websites where things can go. And see more content engage further with the show and then maybe conversely become a customer buying merchandise or buying tickets signing up to a newspaper there. All these calls asking the podcast was mr take but very few how to act so that. That's what it is starting. I thought maybe. I can make podcast apps for podcasters where they could own that relationship with their listeners. On the phone not just on the web and Yeah that's where if again it's a very interesting. It's sparked my interest as soon as popped up on my radar and the pricing on your packages. It is well worth every cent put out. But it's remarkable. They started dollars a month for the hoppy podcast. Or and it's unique. You can actually add your network to these mobile app for as little dollars a month..

john
"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

04:01 min | 2 months ago

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

"What got you into podcasting and helping podcasters like this john. I'm a pilot listener. so podcasting is the main. I consume content. I think it has been for fire. Five more years I'm always listening to podcasts. A couple years ago. I wanted to start my own business And the first part. I thought i was a social podcast at Find all your favorite podcast and then engaged the shows you listen to you on social media at the same time started building about a couple years ago. I hired and agency. They spent a lot of money And it took a long time to try to even build that. But in the meantime there were other social. Podcasts came and went and kind of dawned on me that this was this was i was blocking. The wrong tree was not going to work as a product. I've seen so many failures. In time i was building my own and there was nothing work as a business came to decision rockier About how to pivot my product my business into something that might be viable. And i had this idea kind of at the start of it I was thinking we have this technology. We still thrown out Podcast don't have their own act. They've got websites where things can go. And see more content engage further with the show and then maybe conversely become a customer buying merchandise or buying tickets signing up to a newspaper there. All these calls asking the podcast was mr take but very few how to act so that. That's what it is starting. I thought maybe. I can make podcast apps for podcasters where they could own that relationship with their listeners. On the phone not just on the web and Yeah that's where if again it's a very interesting. It's sparked my interest as soon as popped up on my radar and the pricing on your packages. It is well worth every cent put out. But it's remarkable. They started dollars a month for the hoppy podcast. Or and it's unique. You can actually add your network to these mobile app for as little dollars a month..

john
"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

02:29 min | 2 months ago

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

"Addis defray the see a favorite ashish wrong. Hello good evening. Good morning good afternoon wherever you may be around this wild wacky and sometimes disturbing world of ours. Yes that's the intro to the mindset. Podcast a weekly attempt to.

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

02:29 min | 2 months ago

"john lee" Discussed on Dead America

"Addis defray the see a favorite ashish wrong. Hello good evening. Good morning good afternoon wherever you may be around this wild wacky and sometimes disturbing world of ours. Yes that's the intro to the mindset. Podcast a weekly attempt to.

Hong Kong's Security Chief Promoted to No 2 Job Amid Crackdown

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Hong Kong's Security Chief Promoted to No 2 Job Amid Crackdown

"Hong kong's tive carrie. Lam has reshuffled her cabinet promoting to top security officials who led the crackdown on protests against the national security law in hong kong. The changes come just one day. After hong kong's last remaining pro democracy newspaper. The apple daily published. Its final edition after being forced to shut. its doors. well joining me. Now on the line from hong kong bureau chief and as editor james chambers. Welcome to you james. How significant others changes what. It's been a an exhausting week of news even by hong kong standards and an ends on a friday with another bombshell This is a huge announcement is one. That's taking the city by surprise and it basically doubles down on on the accusation or the suspicion that hong kong is now a police state Over the last couple of years They've been you know three individuals very much at the front and center of the government's crackdown on the pro-democracy side and that has been carrie. Lam that has been. John leader skew minister and that has been chris. Dang who's been the police commissioner Those three working hand in glove and now llamas made the decision to promote John lee to the number two position in the government so he will be The chief secretary and Christine going to step into john shoes as security minister. So we have You know to ex police offices in very senior positions in hong kong government and it is just another huge sign of weather cities heading

Hong Kong James Chambers LAM National Security Law Carrie Cabinet Apple James Dang Llamas John Lee Chris John Christine
Allen Klein: A Jollytologist Shares His Wisdom on Finding Wonder

The Healing Place Podcast

02:13 min | 5 months ago

Allen Klein: A Jollytologist Shares His Wisdom on Finding Wonder

"I'm your host terry. Well brock and so super thrilled to have with me today. Alan klein and alan is an author speaker. And got this word right now. John lee tala gist. So welcome allen. Well thank you for being here I mean me being there are whatever wherever we are in cyberspace right now so thank you. Thank you for having me on your Podcast oh absolutely. I'm so happy we connected Yes it's it's going to be a soul connection. Because i am not person that walks outside and if i see the lady bug crawling i always stop and say oh. Hi little buddy and just appreciate that moment. Yeah i love ladybugs. I also when i grew up I grew up in new york city and we will go to the country. The catskills every summer. And there would be firefly's i don't know if you've seen firefly's in person but oh my god it was like little flashlights. Flying around the air and they were so amazing. And i remember as a kid i wanted to save it so i put some in a jar and they took it into my room and went to bed and watch right before you know watching them. Go around of course by by the morning. They're all dead. I got my all moma deadliest Not so great for the firefly but right. We learned as kids we. I grew up in cincinnati. And so it was. We were on the outskirts of the city. And so but we have firefly's but when my uncle who lived out in the country with his cows and we would sit out there and i was amazed because all of his woods. It was so dark out there in the country without the city lights. It would just look like a. Yeah like just a a light. Show going on with these with these firefly's but we learned when we put them in jars retook a knife and we poke holes in the top on it and then they were able to breathe and instill lived so

Alan Klein John Lee Tala Gist Brock Terry Alan Allen New York City Cincinnati
North Las Vegas Mayor Switches From Democrat to Republican

RJ Politics

01:06 min | 5 months ago

North Las Vegas Mayor Switches From Democrat to Republican

"North. Las vegas mayor. John lee has a. He switched parties in a very public. plan denounced sort of way. Did it on fox friends at like four thirty in the morning or something like that But steve actually you talked to him about it so you know what what was his rationality gave you. Yeah he he basically told me the same thing that he said on fox. He said that You know it's been a long time coming. But the the the final straw for him. The linchpin for this was the election of several people were affiliated with the democratic socialists of america to the nevada democratic party That made it feel as if he couldn't really Stay in the party. Any longer and You know he said he's pro. Life pro gun christian personally just didn't feel like he fit into the democratic party anymore and and and i'm sure there are other democrats were also pro-life and we're also progun in new orleans christian who who may feel the same way as he does Who who aren't are not down with the term

John Lee Nevada Democratic Party Las Vegas FOX Steve America Democratic Party New Orleans
How Your Story Can Drive Your Success

FunnelHacker Radio

02:35 min | 5 months ago

How Your Story Can Drive Your Success

"Wanna introduce you guys to selene gosling. Welcome hello and thank you for having me today. I've so appreciate you taking those. You guys don't know slim. A story architect author speaker for high-profile entrepreneurs one of the coolest things we're talking about here is really how the debris the soul into your business. Which is one of the fun things for me Especially as he really kind of dive into her expertise in working with entrepreneurs to help them get unstuck She helps her. Class breakthrough plateaus reprogram their minds for success. Most really share their most powerful story with world. They can become confident. Leaders with influence brands. International media coverage in thousands of raving fans. I think the part that. I'm most excited about though is slim loves adventure. She's traveling all over the world. And i think it's really again if she left the corporate america seen She lives her life on her own terms. I was just in puerto rico she. We're talking about visiting friends. John lee dumas. Who's on our podcast just recently. But i think the cool part for me. Selena is having the opportunity of stay time with you to really help. People really understand the difference between the public story and the private story. Yes dive into that anything else. You wanna say so they can get to know your local better not married to today everything that they need to know. It will come through in. Today's that's fantastic. Let's dive right into this. Yeah so if you don't mind. I think the most fascinated by is. I know that i've always kind of hidden my private story. The hardest thing for me is publishing on a regular basis. And i'm trying to do more and more that I think i've gotten better ads becoming much more vulnerable. But i think the problem. I see in a lot of the entrepreneurs that deal with is. It's that private story. It's that space between your ears. That really is preventing the for having success. They really want and most importantly really living the passion that dream they they talk a big story but they don't believe in themselves asset something you've experienced one hundred percent even as the end of the the funny but i would say the most interesting part is that it doesn't matter how successful you are so i worked with six seven eight nine figure enterpreneurs and matter because they keep telling in creating this magnificent story on the outside hiring brand experts like cr- the best copywriters in crafting something so that they can share in their work in their funnels in their websites. And then there's always this lack of coherence between what's being put on the outside and then what you just said which is a story that they're telling

Selene Gosling John Lee Dumas Selena Puerto Rico America
Los Angeles City Council Expected to Finalize "Hero Pay"

All Things Considered

01:06 min | 7 months ago

Los Angeles City Council Expected to Finalize "Hero Pay"

"The city of L. A approved a $5 an hour hazard pay increase for some retail workers. Today L a now joins a note by growing number of Southern California cities where supermarket and pharmacy workers have stayed on the job throughout the pandemic is KCRW's Matt Dillon reports. The vote to approve so called Hero pay in L. A was nearly unanimous when the measure first came before the council last month, 14 members approved and one dissented. At all of them signed off, it could have passed. Then. Instead of this repeat vote, both Times Council member John Lee was the lone dissenter, calling it a government overreach into business. L. A now joins Long Beach, Montebello and Coachella and approving temporary raises for essential workers. Ella's hero pay will last 120 days and cover employees at supermarkets and pharmacies that have more than 300 workers nationwide. Measure also includes workers that big box stores with at least 10% of their sales floors dedicated to grocery or drug retail. California Grocers Association, A trade group has challenged the ordinances in court, but a judge has so far blocked their effort to overturn Long Beach is $4 pay hike. Parent company of Ralph said it would close two of its stores in that

Times Council Matt Dillon Southern California John Lee Montebello Long Beach Coachella Ella California Grocers Association Ralph
Jared Leto on new movie 'The Little Things' and being an Oscar winner

Popcorn with Peter Travers

06:38 min | 8 months ago

Jared Leto on new movie 'The Little Things' and being an Oscar winner

"Hi everyone. I am peter travers. This is popcorn where we tell you. What's going on at the movies. And i saw terrific movie right now called the little things. This is a movie about two cops played by of all people in washington and rami. Malek in search of someone they think is a serial killer in nineteen ninety los angeles and this guy that they focused on is played by my guest today. jared leto. Who usually gives them a run for their money in terms of letting them twist in the wind deciding whether his character is guilty is he. A serial killer is he not. I've got to tell you jared that this is one of my favorite performances of yours. It's it's like a co lassic kind of movie villain that we don't know if he's guilty of what he's accused of but we know is guilty of something definite strange character but he has humor is playful. He's all those things that make you remember character. So did you feel when you first read the script. No i said what is this. I don't wanna do this. I is was actually buy those my response. I thought you know. Maybe i should explore different territory. You know. I played a kind of than the darker side of the moon. A bit and You know. I thought maybe this wasn't the right thing to do And then after talking to john lee. Hancock and i realized that there there could be an opportunity. Here's he seemed really open. I said if we're going to do this together. I'd like to to to kind of use it as an exercise in transformation to to really try to sculpt this this this wild man albert's pharma Into something quite unlike anything. I'd done before so he seemed really game And the prospect to working with denzel washington one of my heroes and then rami malek in the mix. It was just couldn't say no. And what i love about you. Working with them is that yes albert. Your character trump really tries to drive the both of them crazy and with a kind of zen deadpan. That you have yourself you know. There's i don't want to say there's a little of you albert but there's there's some of it in. Yeah sure i've been. You know you you take parts of yourself. Other people Experiences that you've had and you kinda just build this collage you know i it with. Albert's parma was head to toe from the walk to the voice. I had different color is different knows different teeth. I had some other prosthetics different way of carrying myself and it was quite exciting to put this guy to life and to really take risk and push things right up to the edge And hopefully not crossover into absurdity But yeah he is a bit An un unwittingly unknowingly zinn. He is the voice of like maybe a soothing yoga teacher or something does. There's one i don't want to spoil any platt detests. But there's one point where they both taking you to the police station in la. It's an interrogation room and the phone rings and albert says is that for me. You know quite a quite innocent with it. It's that kind of thing that he's open to sort of any moment until he's ready to spring with something that will make denzel crazy. Sic chrissy i. there's nothing more fun than you know. antagonizing the other characters in the film and for spar he knew he uses that as a tool a likes to keep people off balance off center and humor is one of the ways that he does it and it was quite fun to show on saddened to bring all kinds of different Ideas for ad libs and improv and John lee hancock was amazing. Because you know he was the writer as well but incredibly generous with the opportunity to improvise ad-lib and he really just let me go to town. Would you haven't worked with denzel rami before right. No no no. I had an an. I didn't know them Either and i mean what was kind of fun as well as that didn't do any rehearsal like for the interrogation senior talking about that was the first scene with all three of us and the first big seen it was quite intense and intimidating Exciting there was a lot of pressure and it was explosive on sad. It was it was there. Were fireworks going off. It was really exciting to get in the ring with those guys. Everyone came prepared. I think we all knew there was an opportunity there and we all took advantage of it. Well you know all you have oscars so now. Nobody can ask you to do anything. You don't wanna do right. You just hold that thing up. You can take it with you that day. You want you could certainly a casa damage with it It is a you know. Denzel washington said the other day. You know trophies the they it's like when you're a prizefighter that the belt you won the last times not going to help me this time in the ring and Is true you know you you. It's beautiful thing to be acknowledged and winning the oscar. Was you know. An unforgettable highlight of my life and share that with my family and my friends and supporters Through my life was a really special thing. It doesn't help you when you're sitting opposite denzel washington and you've got to

Albert Peter Travers Rami Malek Malek Jared Leto Rami Denzel Washington John Lee Jared Hancock Los Angeles John Lee Hancock Parma Washington Denzel Rami Zinn Platt Chrissy UN
Los Angeles City Council Approves ‘Hero' Pay for Grocery Workers

Tim Conway Jr.

00:37 sec | 8 months ago

Los Angeles City Council Approves ‘Hero' Pay for Grocery Workers

"Hour news in the City Council's moved forward on requiring grocery stores to step up pay for employees during the pandemic, the council's following a move made by the county and Long Beach to require large grocery stores to tack on $5 an hour hero pig she store workers do not have the luxury of working from home, Councilman Mitchell Farrell says. The workers deal with a lot of people who shuffle through the stores with Councilman John Lee says the requirement could hit mid level grocers. That's where I'm really worried about the unintended concept. Quinces. Councilman Markey's hero stops and says the measure is really designed for the big chains, their CEOs and the people in the C suite. They getting hazard pay, except they're not. Exposing

Mitchell Farrell City Council Long Beach John Lee Councilman Markey
'The Little Things' stars Jared Leto, Rami Malek, Denzek Washington is a stirring crime thriller

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

'The Little Things' stars Jared Leto, Rami Malek, Denzek Washington is a stirring crime thriller

"Denzel Washington Rami Malek and Jared Leto collide in the little things a mystery premiering today on HBO. Max, a jaded detective tracks a serial killer in the San Fernando Valley. It must really like my car. Do I was the trunk space. Denzel Washington gives a complex performance as a cop willing to bend the rules. Unlike his idealistic deputy, Ramsey Malik during a cat and mouse game with Jared Leto's creepy suspect, writer director John Lee Hancock has been trying to get a script made since 1993 feeling like a nineties thriller like the Silence of the Lambs. It's a shame it wasn't made back Then, as we've since seen the same concept done much better in seven Zodiac and prisoners. Still, I'm a mark for this John Rush trying to solve the case, even if we've seen it

Rami Malek Denzel Washington Jared Leto Ramsey Malik San Fernando Valley John Lee Hancock HBO MAX The Silence Of The Lambs John Rush
The Little Things Movie Review

Little Gold Men

01:45 min | 8 months ago

The Little Things Movie Review

"Okay one less title. That's out this week. This went on in theaters and on. Hbo max i believe It's the little things which is a detective thriller. It is both set in the early nineties and feels a little bit like a time. Capsule from early nineties It starts in washington with rami. Malik and jared leto. Three best actor oscar winners. That's kind of a rare sight There it. I enjoyed the throwback quality of it while also thinking it was yet another of the stone cold boomers. We're talking about this week Richard i think you might have enjoyed it. Listen i did even. I didn't like it at all. I really wanted it to be something specific that of that was written in the early nineties. Steven spielberg directed. Imagine so strange are and then. I think clint eastwood was looking at it and deigned veto and finally john lee hancock wrote it decided to make himself twenty seven years later. I wanted it to be kind of one of those nineties. Post silence of the lambs. Serial killer studio thrillers. You know a little grimy kind of silly but like engaging good detective work kind of stuff and it has those trappings but at the center is kind of a weird void at the center. I think it's kind of trying to be about something bigger and fails at that. And so everything else kind of doesn't get its proper do denzel washington's always good rummy. Malik is fine. Jared leto. People people's tolerance level of him certainly varies. And he's really doing a thing you know and i found it engaging for like the first scene and then i was like okay i get it. I don't even more so for me. It was just like it had all these interesting component parts. But the whole didn't really didn't do it for me.

Jared Leto John Lee Hancock Malik Rami HBO Oscar Steven Spielberg Clint Eastwood Washington Richard Denzel Washington
What Is Worcestershire Sauce?

BrainStuff

04:17 min | 8 months ago

What Is Worcestershire Sauce?

"It's that brown sauce with a nine unpronounceable name. It looks on paper. Like war hester shire. It's a tiny tasty edition to red meats soups and pretty much. Anything that needs brazing. And according to the company that originally created it lea and perrins. it can be pronounced. Worcester shire worcestershire or worcester. Sheer worcestershire sauce is used to make good things even better because it packs a lot of savory nece sometimes called you mommy the word emami by the way was coined in the first decade of the nineteen hundreds as a way of marketing. The then newly isolated flavor compound monosodium glutamate or msg but back to the sauce. We spoke by email was shameless. Mullen a chef at the institute of colin area -cation he said in recent years there's been a newfound interest in amami or the fifth taste after salty sweet bitter and sour described as deliciousness. The amami brings out the natural flavourings and food makes steak taste more sticky mushrooms. More shrew me worcestershire sauce is made up of a lot of flavorful ingredients including anchovies. That's right it's not generally vegan plus red onion molasses garlic tamarind and malt and or cider vinegar mullen said the vinegar and tamarind bring a punchy city to the sauce and the molasses and onion balance out the sweetness but the true magic happens during the lengthy fermentation process which takes eighteen to twenty four months. This last and most critical step was something of a happy accident. When supposedly in the early eighteen hundreds to chemists based in worcester england john lee and william parents were charged with duplicating a recipe that one british nobleman or another had enjoyed in bengal. Their first effort was an utter failure. However and chemists left it to languish in jars their seller a few years later they rediscovered the batch and were thrilled to realize that fermentation had turned it into the perfect savory sauce. They started selling it in eighteen thirty seven. It came to the us in eighteen thirty nine and is sold in over seventy five countries today when that original leeann parents product was shipped overseas. It's glass bottles often broke as a result of rough waters. So the company began rapping the individual bottles and paper. The tradition continues today more a way to distinguish the brand rather than a need to keep the product whole the company lost the copyright to the name in eighteen. Seventy six a while. Leeann parents recipe remains a closely guarded. Secret competitors have sprung. Up to make similar versions. The bbc counted at least thirty others and worcester alone. You can even making it yourself at home. Mullen said while the aging and fermenting process might be a bit much to undertake at home. You can make a very tasty approximation of worcestershire sauce. By simmering soy sauce mustard powder malt vinegar tamarind paste garlic anchovy paste tomato paste ginger molasses and spices. Those spices he said can include coriander seed mustard seed and the clove as well as orange peel and black pepper. He explained the simply. Mix all the ingredients and similar to sauce consistency. Then strain in store liquid. There are lots of recipes online including several for those of us who have been playing around with home for medication and of course the beloved sauce isn't relegated to stakes and such either. It can be added to pretty much anything that needs inning bitter bloody mary fondue cheese sauce eggs popcorn potato salad dressing or a grilled cheese sandwich. Leeann parents even recommends a splash of it in place of your normal dashes of salt and pepper. The continuing enthusiasm over mommy flavor is carrying over into the share market and this recent uptick is expected to continue projected through twenty twenty five. At least mullen explained amami hounds have been on the hunt for heritage condiments likely and perrins original recipe and there's an ever increasing trend toward finding new applications for the sauce or marinade. Cocktails worcestershire sauce is having a moment.

Hester Shire Perrins Worcester Institute Of Colin Mullen LEA John Lee Leeann Bengal William England BBC United States Amami
Los Angeles Councilmembers Move To Arm Park Rangers

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

Los Angeles Councilmembers Move To Arm Park Rangers

"To L. A City Council members are renewing a push to change the L. A. Municipal po'd and arm. The city's 30 Park Rangers, Jo Buu Scardino and John Lee SE rangers are first responders who often react to law enforcement issues. Blue sky, you know, introduced a motion yesterday that would begin the process toe arm them. These are park rangers, all were asking is to allow them to defend and protect themselves and the patrons of our parts. Park Rangers are sworn peace officers and received basic police training. After their higher they could make arrests but aren't allowed to carry a firearms right now. The union representing Park Rangers backs the proposal to allow them to carry guns. The union says there have been nearly 40 homicides, hundreds of rapes and thousands of other crimes committed the L. A parks over the past four years, underscoring what it says are the dangers that Rangers face.

Jo Buu Scardino John Lee Se Rangers Park Rangers City Council Union Representing Park Ranger Rangers
Amber Hurdle Cuts to the Chase With Her Velvet Machete Brand Strategy

Dose of Leadership

04:30 min | 9 months ago

Amber Hurdle Cuts to the Chase With Her Velvet Machete Brand Strategy

"Hurdle friend on those of leadership. Welcome to the show. I'm so excited to be here. You know we know each other almost eight years. Did you knew that. I was looking at the calendar. Almost eight years. I was thinking about that. Yeah because it was like right after. I left gaylord hotels. It's crazy and i was like in watching. Your journey has just been amazing. It's been so fun to watch and just remember back in the day back in two thousand thirteen right when we that kind of we met through a Kind of. I guess it was a facebook. Entrepreneurial group that john lee dumas mastermind e type thing in there. Was me you anthony tran. There's about eight of us that kind of clicked together right and we kind of started sharon and in the paul. Good for me anna. And we're still good. We're still connected all those people they all come to nashville. They see me. Yeah austin netflix. Austin yeah yeah. He's still going and Oh gosh i could go on go on yellen selwyn. Yeah killing it and arizona. Yeah i remember. I met with him. Gathering owen and somebody else in phoenix. Oh the guy He did aaron. Pierre use aaron pierce curson in owen and owen had just moved to phoenix. He'd moved from new york and he moved to phoenix and was in phoenix. Mo- behind in new york s right and then we all had lunch and met paul. I was had lunch with paul somewhere. I tried to hook up with you a national lane and it didn't work. You were going something. I was nashville. And you and your husband were going somewhere. Gosh dang that's just so fun to see that here we are. And i've never had on the show i've been wanting to. I've been a big fan. Because you're i think of all the people that were there. You were the closest to what i was doing in terms of thought beliefs on leadership and entrepreneurship. And i love your story so we're reminiscent of all these people were talking and it was like. What are these people talking about. What did they see it. Like for the four pull out for the audience. Like i can't even of all the times. I've called you or you like i remember standing in the middle of academy sports like in the adidas section. Because i'm told you re run dmc that way like you calling me and like running an idea by me and and so you should. The audience were sitting here talking about this person. This person and we're having our little memory lane trip but the best part of that is that we have a crew of people that are similar in our values who've been on a similar journey for a similar amount of time. yes we'd all be at different levels and where we've gotten in that amount of time but we can lean on each other in that strong people environment almost like a. You know your own board if you will as entrepreneurship can only especially how we do it. And that's really important. Like it's really important that i can call you. I know you have a mortgage and children and like grown-up responsibilities. At i can call you and you can share perspective with me as a business owner with the same responsibilities and help me in context make wise decisions. That is a great point to do what you say. Maybe a lot of people that listen to show or no listen to show never really talked about that but the importance i've talked about with guests on the show the importance of finding an inner circle or your tribe or your mentors if you will in the people that we've talking about here and the people listen haven't really seen it but i have leaned on all of you guys over the last eight years for exactly what you said right like ham doing this. I'm struggling with this. What do you think and never really thought about that too. You said that. Like how many times i have reached out to all eight of you during the during these eight eight years i think it's it's invaluable right in its requirement for leadership in for entrepreneurship. Insurers like you've got you can't do it by yourself now you've got to have. We don't have another office to pop into a departmental meeting like you would in a corporate office where you bounce ideas like. We don't have a white board room. Like i haven't and you know said you have to figure out how to recreate that team or that perspective The way that you'd hand how

Phoenix Owen John Lee Dumas Anthony Tran Yellen Selwyn Aaron Pierce Curson Nashville Gaylord Paul New York Netflix Sharon Pierre Anna Aaron Austin MO Arizona Facebook
7 Laws of Podcasting

Marketing School

05:06 min | 11 months ago

7 Laws of Podcasting

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm the orbital and today we are going to be talking about the seven laws of podcasting. So Neil that I've been podcasting for about been four years now a little over four years for marketing longer if you think about your growth everywhere yeah. Longer will leveling off for for seven years on that one. So it's been a long time. So seven years. For seven laws. Right. But I guess I'll kick it off I. so before I could get off meal and I did it no this podcast was going to go and we've realized that we caught onto a trend that is still taking off right now and podcasting is just going to get bigger and bigger last year the number was about seven hundred, thousand podcast in the world has probably got a lot bigger since. Then, and there's a lot of advertising dollars going into podcasting Joe, Rogan's podcast. They did a deal as spotify for over one hundred, million dollars. So it's just going to continue to be good times. It's a nice medium for people and you know the first law will say about podcasting is you know you've got to be consistent and share story around that my leveling up podcast for the first year only nine dollars. A day off of their first year after second year only thirty downloads a day, and then from there, it started compound, and then that led to that podcast is still there and now we have the mark podcast but we've been very consistent with it on the same lesson that goes over to if you're doing youtube if you're doing blogging if you're doing any type of content at all, it just it just consistency. Number two, you need half quantity the more quantity you have the more episodes you have the more listens yoga time it really does stacking compound. So don't just think that you're GONNA do well, even if you're consistent and you're pretty senior episodes every quarter or even weekly, you're not gonNA do as well as if you just did a daily with people like us John Lee Dumas, there's quite a few players who just Do daily a is more work, but you get the listens in the Dallas away quicker if you just quit way more quantity number three. So if you look at the Joe Rogan's of the world when he does video podcast, it actually gets chopped up into a lot of different pieces. So we've often talked about Omni channel and hasn't changed air if you do a video podcast like we're doing right now and you. Can make a bunch of different pieces. One sixty minute long form interview can become six mini pieces and you can put it onto youtube. You can put onto podcast whilst now you have thirteen pieces right there and then you can make little micro content for social. There's just a lot that you can do chopping things up and you can use a service like repurpose house dot io, the adding Babbit two, hundred, fifty. Dollars a month find on a five, hundred, dollar a month plan. Eventually, you can have your own team, do it for you, but that's a good way to get started with repurposing number four. You GotTa do Keyword Research. It doesn't matter what you end up talking about. If you don't have the right keywords with the title of your podcast and your descriptions, you won't get as many listens in Dallas. So Do Keyword Research. Number five seems like a dust and but still a lot of people fail in this. I, remember back in the day I was using Blue Yeti microphone and the problem with that one was I plugged it into my USB port. What you should be doing is you should be using a mixer so both nearly have a mixer read one called focus right and you can use focus right and then we both have higher pr forty microphones and so these are high quality microphones route four, hundred dollars from the Mike and the mixer. I believes anywhere from one hundred, one, hundred, fifty dollars or so you don't need a start with anything crazy but. If, you're going to be using a blue Yeti, which one hundred dollars still make sure you have a mixer because you sound a lot better and a very important thing is the quality of your sound 'cause when Neil I used to record next each other when we first started this ambiguous when we had to turn off the air conditioner, it would get really hot but also more importantly, it was really echoey and done a terrible because we're right next to each other and people said, oh you guys sound like you're recording from the bathroom Blah Blah Blah and we started getting bad rating from it it just it's not a good user experience. Number six aspirations. If you don't ask for ratings, you won't climb the charts and you won't get as many new listeners and downloads. So at the end of each podcast, there's nothing wrong with asking for ratings. Yeah and on top of that, if you're GONNA ask for the ratings, we haven't done the best job of this incentivizing people to put a rating. You'll probably get a lot more exotic just neil haven't done a good job about it number. Seven, you gotTa know your numbers. You can use look at the apple podcasts analytics look at spotify analytics as we look at where retention is and you can see retention will tell you what episode you should be doing more of. So for example, what we do episodes Seo retention might be ninety, five percent but if we start talking about how we like to plant tomatoes than our retention might be forty percent or so so it might not do as. Well, the other thing too is when we use chargeable chart able, that's how you spell it. They will show you your thirty day performance or your seven day performance for new content that you have coming out. So now I've been looking at them like, oh, well, people really latch on what we talk about certain things and they just they totally get disinterested when we talk about other things such as I don't know whether I'm just making things up. So, use chargeable has a lot of different features. It's probably the most complete podcast analytics tool out there were not affiliated and we just use the free version, but she's been really good for us.

Joe Rogan Youtube Neil Spotify Dallas Eric Su John Lee Dumas Omni Mike Apple
Jeff Brown from "Read to Lead" & How to Intentionally DREAM Your Success

Dose of Leadership

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Jeff Brown from "Read to Lead" & How to Intentionally DREAM Your Success

"Jeff Man I'm so excited that you here welcome the DOSA leadership. Well I'm excited to be here when I looked at the lineup. You've had on your show to be included in that lineup is up a real privilege. So thank you. Let me start off by personally thanking Yose talking with Chris Brogan. Couple of ago he had me on his livestream on his show And we were talking about in in you and I have been connected since we both started our podcast pretty much. I started mine in. January of two, thousand thirteen and I think you were spring or summer of twenty thirteen I can't remember. July, Young. And I think we connected even way back. Then I think someone I think John Lee. Dumas. Connected US somehow somewhere But Anyway I wanted to thank you personally because you've been kind of a private mentor to me from an interview style. And I get complimented on my interview style and I attribute a lot to listening to you and learning from you privately. So I wanted to. Your your style in the way that you do it is something that I try to emulate and look up to. So I wanted to personally thank you before i. Went further on that. Well thank you for buttering me up. I'll say lots of Nice things. I know. I think it's it's I can't believe that we haven't done this sooner. Because we've been connected. So Long I love to that we know as looking at your. facebook feed the other day. and. You always post your pictures of your dachshunds and I got two dachshunds and you got three. But you got one about the same time that I did eleven years ago. The same month, a June July I think of eleven years ago you got that dabble when they have what his name, what's his name Frank Frank. And Anyway I've got. Eleven year old long hair red haired Dachshund, and loved Oxen's in fact the kids are printing the wife's pressure in mead. Get another one a new puppy. And I'm like Oh, you know, and then I'm secretly looking behind the scenes online. I just love this dog just. Anyway. So this isn't a dachshund readers podcast, but we could probably turn it into that but anyway I just. I've watched your journey it's been parallel to mine. We've talked a lot of the same folks. The podcast journeys been amazing for me as I know it has been for you. Looking back at this I've had my ups and downs, and in fact, I was telling you in the prerecording here that sometimes. I was kind of in a low funky at the beginning of the summer and I took sabbatical for about four weeks and they just started getting back into it and. What about you is it happened you along these these last seven and a half years seven years for you. You know thankfully no, I mean there have been. A moments where I've taken a month off and you know done releases of of older episodes, I I do have a a streak. I'm quite proud of at the moment. Just because it's a big deal for me, but about two and a half one more than two and a half years without missing a Tuesday. which I could not say about the first several years I, miss one year there but got a long street going at the moment. I. I I. Know You agree with this the important thing about podcasting in center going around a particular topic as a lot of people do can can sometimes be limiting. But. It's possible to choose a and be really specific in your choice of IDEA. But at the but at the same time, have different things that fit within that. For example, I think of intentionally consistent rereading and it's a very specific thing and and. That sort of the mantra that my podcast is built around value of intentional assistant reading. But that umbrella. serves many topics very well leadership, personal growth mindset entrepreneurship I mean the list goes on and on. and so I never run out of topics to talk about that fit within that sort of over arching umbrella and I. I never run out of books being really strange and so others always something new and interesting another shiny thing around the corner that I can I can latch onto dive into an read so. I haven't had that issue. I have been more recently as I as I'm sure you have. Tailored some of my questions to what's happening in the world or. many of the people I talked to make their living or at least partially through public speaking or you know in person workshops and things of that nature and so. I'm often asking, well, what are you doing? in light of your and and everything else. In because virtually everyone I've talked to everyone I interview has been an impact in some way myself included and so. Those kinds of of changes or or metamorphosis to the processes kind of happen naturally as along

United States Chris Brogan Jeff Man Facebook Frank Frank Dumas John Lee Yose
Man Sentenced to Life in Prison for Killing Nia Wilson at Oakland BART Station

Mark Thompson

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Man Sentenced to Life in Prison for Killing Nia Wilson at Oakland BART Station

"At an Oakland Bart station has been sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. John Lee Cowl was convicted in March for the death of Neil Wilson back in 2018. Jurors also convicted cowl of premeditated attempted murder for stabbing Wilson sister who was injured but survived the attack. California added a record 558,000 jobs

John Lee Cowl Neil Wilson Oakland California
"john lee" Discussed on Scott Ross Leadership

Scott Ross Leadership

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"john lee" Discussed on Scott Ross Leadership

"To follow you <Speech_Music_Male> We'll post your information <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> in the show notes <Speech_Music_Male> everybody, but thank you so <Speech_Music_Male> much. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Man <Speech_Male> What a pack <Speech_Music_Male> twenty-five <Speech_Music_Male> minutes there <Speech_Male> I know that you got <Speech_Male> a lot out of it and <Speech_Music_Male> just some things that really stood <Speech_Music_Male> out to me were. <Speech_Male> His <Speech_Male> qualities of <Speech_Male> a great entrepreneur, <Speech_Male> just that idea <Speech_Male> focus <Speech_Music_Male> and obviously <Speech_Music_Male> being <Speech_Male> passionate <Speech_Male> about what you do. <Speech_Music_Male> His <Speech_Music_Male> his answers on <Speech_Male> mentor ship <Speech_Male> were huge <Speech_Male> the ability <Speech_Music_Male> to <Speech_Male> find someone who's only <Speech_Male> a little bit <Speech_Male> ahead of you. I mean this is one <Speech_Male> of the biggest mistakes I think. <Speech_Music_Male> People make is that <Speech_Music_Male> they convinced <Speech_Male> themselves. They can't <Speech_Male> be successful because <Speech_Male> they don't have the <Speech_Male> ultimate mentor <Speech_Male> in their mind, they <Speech_Male> don't have. <Speech_Male> John <Speech_Male> Maxwell they <Speech_Male> don't have a Jeff <Speech_Male> Bezos. Have <Speech_Male> somebody like <Speech_Male> an Elon Musk <Speech_Male> to to mentor <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> them, so they're like well <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm out <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> John Lee <Speech_Male> two things. If you heard that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> interview number one, <Speech_Music_Male> he picked someone who <Speech_Male> is only a year ahead <Speech_Male> of the picking <Speech_Male> somebody who's wear. He <Speech_Male> wants to be <Speech_Music_Male> the second <Speech_Music_Male> thing he does. He paid the person <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I mean. He <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> was willing to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> invest <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to shorten <Speech_Music_Male> his learning <Speech_Music_Male> curve. And that's <Speech_Male> really what it's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about. You know I've said this <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> many. Many many times <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that your <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> mentor could come through <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a book. Your mentor <Speech_Male> could come through a podcast <Speech_Music_Male> like this I mean. <Speech_Music_Male> I could technically <Speech_Male> be your mentor. <Speech_Music_Male> If you're listening to enough <Speech_Music_Male> Scott raw shows, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I mean somebody like John. Lee <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with entrepreneurs on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fire. That can <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be your mentor because <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you're finding <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people who are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> where you want <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to be. They don't need to <Speech_Music_Male> be somebody. The necessarily <Speech_Music_Male> meet with <Speech_Music_Male> you face <Speech_Music_Male> to face, but <Speech_Music_Male> I thought that was <Speech_Music_Male> absolutely critical <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his talk about <Speech_Male> being. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You know being <Speech_Male> willing to be teachable <Speech_Music_Male> when he was in the military <Speech_Music_Male> and I. think that's the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lesson that can be applied <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to absolutely <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

John Lee Elon Musk Jeff Bezos Scott
"john lee" Discussed on Scott Ross Leadership

Scott Ross Leadership

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"john lee" Discussed on Scott Ross Leadership

"Where our interview originally got interrupted, and so you're going to hear that. Just ignore that and just focus on the content because you're absolutely going to love it so without further ado. Here's John Lee Dumas. John Lee Dumas Man. Thank you for jumping on the Scott. Ross show I am fired up to have you, sir, I'm a big Fan of your show been listened to it for a long time. Just really really honored to have you. Thanks for coming on well, brother. I am fired up to be here. I love the purple theme behind. You wish you had told me I would. Would have warn my purple earrings all right. Nice well. Let's dive right in John Lee because You know one thing that I've always wanted to ask you. You have talked more entrepreneurs than any human I know, and clearly there's gotta be some takeaways from that I mean what is it that makes a great entrepreneur, or what have you derived from all those interviews three rethinks? Successful entrepreneurs are productive. They are disciplined and they're focused by productive. I don't just mean that. They produce any kind of contents. Busy they're productive, but the productive doing the wrong thing, so they're going a million miles an hour in the wrong direction, which means they're going to be a million miles in the wrong direction where successful entrepreneurs produce the right contents, which is solutions to their audiences, biggest struggles, and then they're disciplined every single morning they wake up and they have a plan of action that they are a disciple to, and then focused my favorite word focus follow one course until success. They're not doing ten different things. They're the best one laser focused area. They're not going one mile wide in one inch deep. They're going one inch wide in a mile deep, becoming best in show. Love now something that you know you talk about a lot is mentor. And you just talk about what you've found in terms of the importance of mentorship. And how do you find the mentors for your life? Key thing when it comes to finding mentors is the following phrase. Your perfect mentor. Who is currently where you want to be, and now that sounds simple and obvious, but sadly so few people actually follow that phrase follow that structure, and they're like well. If I only have like Richard, Branson be my mentor or mark. Cuban but like if you WANNA like run an airline or open a record store. Maybe those guys who'd be good mentors for you, but who is somebody who is right now where? Where you want to be in life in for me back in twenty twelve and I was looking for my mentor. I was looking for a successful business podcast host, so I found a successful business podcast hosts. I hired her. She was about one year ahead of me in guess what she was able to guide me through the process because she had currently been down the path that I was about to embark upon. I mean I see that a lot I mean people want to. They're like well. You know like you said if mark, Cuban, my mentor, well I'm hosed. You know if John Lee Dumas can't be my personal mentor and I'm just curious. Because I'm sure you could ask this a lot. I get asked all the time and I'm I always love to hear people's answer. People asked me Scott will you. Be My mentor. What do you tell people when? When people reach out to you that are just like you said. They're so far back down the path. There's a hundred other people that be better mentors for them well. I am very honest, and I say I no longer mentor anybody one on one however I do have a list of individuals who I've personally mentor in the past who are great coaches in love to make an introduction for you and you can have free fifteen minutes no. Questions asked no strings attached conversation. These individuals in you know be off to the races. If that makes sense for you so i. do feel like no matter what stage you are in your life and business. Making the ask is always a great thing to do. Because even if that person ends up not being the right fit for reasons that you know could be plentiful. There's a very strong potentialities they could guide you or make a warm introduction in the right area, so forcing favors bullets make the ask dry forward now. Something that I know you talk about a lot is finding. You're calling and obviously being passionate about what you do. You kind of stumbled upon podcasting I. Guess I mean you were on. Your on long commute all the time, so you're listening to podcasting, and you know kind of discovered that it was a thing and that changed your life I mean. What do you recommend for people who they know? They're frustrated where they are. They're in a nine to five. They feel stuck, but they don't really feel. There's this obvious blinking. Light of that's my calling. Listen, I, stumbled upon podcasting. Absolutely, I was just desperately looking for content that was looking for inspiration I was looking for motivation. I was looking for structure. I was looking for a lot of things and my advice. Specifically to your question, those individuals is listen. Life is a buffet. It is a buffet of a splendor of difference, dishes and appetizers and main courses. Desserts in you need to be trying everything because into you go all in and actually take something actually put it in your mouth in actually experience what that is. You're not gonNA know if you like it, love it hate. It's are disgusted by so you need to be looking at life as opportunities test and try things. gophersports Take Action Fortune favors the bold dive in..

John Lee Dumas Scott John Lee Ross Branson Richard
The trouble with embryos

Science Friction

06:43 min | 1 year ago

The trouble with embryos

"Welcome to science fiction. Years coming to you from the Home Studio Bunker, still. Can't seem to get the doves and waterbirds to be quite when I need them to be, but look in today's show. It's a wild story about biology ethics, politics and to millionaires on a personal mission that went horribly. Why would on the case is reported John Lee? Who joins me for this show? Hi Natasha Yeah. This starts in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one with Mario and elsevier. They would to property developers from Los Angeles and they really wanted to have a child together, but they were an older couple. Yeah, that's right also was forty and Mario was fifty seven, and they couldn't do it on their own. So in one thousand, nine, hundred one. They decided to come all the way to Australia to try this brand new thing in fertilize. Fertilize Ation Ivf I mean today creating a baby using his totally commonplace, and it's a big industry over familiar. But this was the early eighties when the technology and the science was so new that this just was we'd this idea that you could create a human embryo outside of a woman's womb, and suspend its development in time to it was blowing people's minds. The moment of conception. An event that has taken place in its natural environment, the womb since the doing of human existence. Now it comes in gloss. And with a host of problems, moral, ethical and legal. So Australia was leading the way in fact with the science of RV. If that when the real couple come here, the techniques still very much being Susta, this is experimental stuff. Yeah, and one of the people who knows just how difficult those early days were is Gab, Kovacs he's a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash University, but back then he was the clinical. Director of the IVF program at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne. was very difficult to Queen Victoria hospitals over General Hospital and everyone sort that. Is Just a phase. He wasn't going to work. It wasn't a last and we wasting. Everybody's time. When we started doing collections. We have to me. Natural Song goes on spontaneous relation, so it's not unusual to have to collect exit to I. Am for am six I am. So we had a lot of opposition. All IV of treatment started out using the so-called natural cycle method, which meant doctors had to wait for the perfect moment in a woman's natural ovulation cycle to retrieve that one egg. She created every month. If they collected at the right time, it could go on to be fertilized to make an embryo. If they time too late, they'd miss the egg and have to wait another month too early and the egg wasn't mature. Mature enough to be fertilized outside the chances here of actually getting a baby out of IV, if treatment would have been extremely low when the Rayo says rock up in Australia yet, but a talented trio at the Queen. Victoria, hospital was changing all of that, and they were about to put Australia. In the history books so I wanted to do the IV. If in a totally different way to the way they were doing it because I wanted to utilize. Methods developed in animals, scientists Alan, trounson originally trained as a bit and he was to the hospital by IVF. Pioneer cal would car would he allowed me to work with John? Laden to develop a totally different system, which was using fertility drugs to stimulate than women, so we could get more eggs and hence more embryos. Well what happened is is that actually worked? It was the system that actually work. It was a huge leap forward. They found a way to create multiple viable embryos at a time and freeze them, and every extra embryo meant another chance of creating a baby for a couple who couldn't otherwise have one is, but every stage in artificial production is still precarious. So in those early days, a significant proportion of those embers just were lost in the phrasing. Prices will only about thirteen percent five treatments ended with a live baby back then today that figure stands at about thirty percent, but even so this scientific breakthrough was life changing for Wannabe Parents Alan Trounson. An iphone they could cope with disappointment. Absolutely, you know very well essentially because. They understood. This was a very early in in terms of the research, so the chances of getting outcomes would very low if anything happened when somebody got pregnant and is is it was astonishing and so when we go to Ronald pregnancies from the methods with using John in the whole world Sunday stood up and so what what the Heck did you do? Do that. Okay, so let's meet the American couple at the heart of the story Jane. They land in Australia headed. Elsa Riaz respond to treatment will Gab Kovacs was one of the doctors at the Queen Victoria Hospital remember I said they were millionaires. That's important to this story, but back then Gab Kovacs had no idea. Just Shiva's is trashed and she spoke. In Mississippi we didn't look very well off. You ever probably struggling to spend the money to Florida squad expensive to fly back in the ninety ninety eight foods relatively much more than what they are now and with quality deal to come over here and leave over here. We felt sorry for him and most secretary always. suggestively discounted faithful porpoises Riaz who've had no idea that they were quite wealthy. He Remembers Elsa being very dramatic and difficult to deal with, but she had good reason to be all. She was very strong that a terrible history. I'll guess you've gone through Easter beforehand and they've were pretty strengthening to fly over here. They had one child who they'd lost. He was murdered. I think or an accident. Remember the D. Tough, and that's why they're really chained to have another child and off. If they're only hype, that's why to throw you. Both Mario and L.. Serena's had had children with previous partners, but they'd been a tragedy. Else's ten year old daughter had only recently died should been playing with a gun and it went off killing her that he's absolutely horrific are so that means that there was so much emotion entangled with this whole process. That's right. There was, but the process started well. Three embryos were created for the couple using else's eggs and donor sperm, so they had three chances of success. And I don't think we did about eleven o'clock midnight on a Saturday evening and she was very dramatic. Everything was sound. What's the drama? So she would her ex collected to street is beforehand a fertilize, and they would have developed and. Would have chosen the best probably wanting to Australian bureaus back, which would then be tempted to be

Australia Gab Kovacs Queen Victoria Hospital John Lee Elsa Riaz Mario Alan Trounson Natasha Yeah Elsevier Monash University Los Angeles Victoria Laden Director Jane Mississippi Serena
Chinese researchers isolated deadly bat coronaviruses in Wuhan labs

John Batchelor

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Chinese researchers isolated deadly bat coronaviruses in Wuhan labs

"The best question that will be asked in one hundred years from now is where did it begin the origins of the fires that shut down the planet and Bangor the best economy the United States had ever seen in all of the solar system where did it begin I welcome bill Gertz of the Washington times he's the national security correspondent at times he's also the author most recently of deceiving this guy inside communist China's drive for global supremacy Bella very good evening to your hard news reporter and therefore congradulations is part of your job however we spoke in late January and at that time you alone were reporting the suspicion that somewhere in a lab in Wuhan and will be specific in a moment came the virus that we're now plagued with I noted in these last days a number of very global reports financial times al Jazeera Reuters that fox news etcetera have all echoed that report with the details that somewhere in the trump administration of the national security apparatus our source or sources confirming the labs the labs I will name because they're in your careful reporting this is the will hand institute of virology to labs one the blue hens center for disease control and prevention would you tell me as a P. two lab the other a national biosafety lab oratory in Wuhan would you tell me is the P. four what do we know now about the origin of the virus in one or all of those labs good evening to you bill well it could be on the program John thanks for having me on the key elements of these laboratories is that they have been conducting extensive research for the last twelve years into bat coronaviruses and the new Wuhan virus it's now rave raging and ravaging countries across the world is about corona virus so both of these laboratories according to Chinese state media have been engaged in this research work in fact China has boasted that of their obsession with viruses since the outbreak in two thousand three of the sars virus China has decided that it's going to investigate viruses and just in the last twelve years they've uncovered two thousand new viruses and to give you a little context there for the two hundred years before that there have only been discovered about twenty five hundred viruses so they've almost doubled the number included in this two thousand are several hundred of these corona viruses and which we know now can be deadly to humans and can spread rapidly and are highly contagious so we're in the midst of dealing with this crisis and China has been totally irresponsible acting as a communist dictatorship with active in covering up deceiving deflecting criticism and basically making this disease for worse than it should have been had it been detected early and had steps been taken by the communist regime to stop it what do we know and what do we want to know about the virus in those labs how it got out of those labs and do we have a date for when we're looking there is just unofficial information and in fact you mentioned said that sources were revealing this information this week yes I reported in January the key here was that fox news had information from sources they wouldn't even say government sources and they went to Donald Trump during one of the coronavirus task force briefings and they asked him is this information accurate hoping that trump would confirm it and give legs to their story unfortunately the president basically punted and said he did not want to discuss it but the two labs in question one is the national biosafety lab it's it was built by the French and was completed in twenty fifteen and I reported in my Washington times column that the French hesitated in transferring this because they understand very well that in China there's no distinction between military and civilian facilities the same factories that make refrigerators make intercontinental ballistic missiles same with their research laboratories so there's been there is known to be a covert Chinese biological warfare program and clearly the Wuhan institute of rock virology is involved in that covert program what we don't know is the extensive work that they've done on bat coronaviruses now there have been a number of studies published by the Chinese in fact this one researcher her name is she John Lee and she's famous as the bat woman of Wuhan she works at the Wuhan institute of virology and she reported in January that it's clear that one of these bad corona viruses could escape and it could escape in China well as a reaction to that the Chinese have cracked down on publication of all reports relating to the origin of the virus another indication that there's a lot of information that they know that they're not sharing with the

Are You Willing to Redo It All?

The $100 MBA Show

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Are You Willing to Redo It All?

"I WANNA start with prime example. When you decide to Redo things in Your Business Redo your project. How could pay off in the recent motion picture release of Sonic the Hedgehog a movie that cost sixty five million dollars to produce the features allaster Jim Carey and millions? More has been spent on marketing but about six months ago. They screen the film to a live audience. They want to get some feedback. They WANNA find out how well this is going to do in the box office. A couple of things happened number one. The film absolutely bombed and it wasn't because of the story or the acting. It was because of the animation. In fact somebody actually filmed clips and gus screen shots of this film. When they screened it and spread it all over social media and the twitter sphere and the blogosphere blew up there was outrage to. How Sonic the HEDGEHOG? The character was designed people. Were saying it's too lifelike. It doesn't look like the original. Sonic and what a waste of an opportunity. Remember they invested ninety five million dollars to make this movie and in the screening. They find out. People are outraged the G- out of the screening and they see the Internet is turned against them. People can't stand the way sonic looks at this point. The producers of the film had to make a choice. Ignore the critics and role with the movie as is or say. Hey we need to rethink this. We need to kind of make sure. This film is a success and take the criticism seriously in fact it cost paramount. Who produced the film thirty five million dollars to make these corrections to make these edits to the animations and Sonic? This was a huge Chris. They took to listen to the feedback. And say hey. We're going to another thirty five million dollars to get this right but it paid off. The movie just got released last week. And it's breaking all kinds of records. So why do I share the story? Well there's a pivotal time in your business or in the development of your product where you need to decide. Do I reinvest and improve the product based on feedback? Do I redo things even though it's going to cost me a whole bunch of money whole bunch of time? Well paramount did. Is they decided? Hey instead of trying to double down or dig our heels on a product that didn't get reviews. Let's take this opportunity of six months to get it right. Yes we're going to invest more money but we're probably going to lose more money if we just insist on rolling with the movie as is but more importantly when asked the director Jeff Fowler said we would be doing a injustice to the fan base of sonic the Hedgehog. If we got this wrong we have one shot to get this right and we got him do. What's right for the fans? This is somebody who's putting the customer first understanding that the customer is the person that pays the bills. They're the ones that GonNa make or break your business. She got a police them. You GotTa make sure you're delivering something that they actually want and need. I want to share a story from my own business where I had to. Redo things altogether. I actually to do a few times before we are Webinar. Software Company back in two thousand fourteen Webinar Ninja. We actually released a course called the DIY Webinar Guide. And this was a course on how to put together your own. Webinar using various tools like Google hangouts at the time and Email marketing software and video hosting software and landing page software. And how to put it all together and Frankenstein it together to run a Webinar. We thought. Hey that's what we do every day right to run a Webinar. How can we make it easy and other people? Let's create a guy to show them how to put it together. We put this guy down the world and it totally flopped. We got to sales and one of the sales was a charge back. That means somebody called the credit card company and said I want to refund. The other sale was actually from a friend in front of the show. John Lee Dumas from entrepreneur on fire. Who just basically bought it to support our work. We quickly had to make a decision on this Ossete. Not something that people want. How can we redo this so we can make sure we deliver what people want so we learned from the experience at? Hey people actually don't want to do the work. They want a tool that does afford up enter our webinar software and we started with a very small Beta version and we released it in April. Two thousand fourteen and the rest is history. Well technically it is but throughout the history we had to reiterate the software and get better and better improve upon a based on customer feedback. We still do this today. All our customer feedback is what informs our roadmap for one hundred Ingeba in two thousand twenty and beyond so listening to your customers finding out what they want and improving your product based on that iterating improving. This is essential in today's marketplace. You can't live in a vacuum even apple who's known for just kind of doing its own thing and saying. Hey you're gonNA love whatever we put out there. They listen to feedback and they changed their keyboard on the macbook pros and use the old keyboards back in two thousand and fifteen with a butterfly mechanism Because the customer said. Hey we want the old keyboard this new one. We don't love so much but the question is. Are you willing to go back to the drawing board and Redo things a lot of us? Don't make that decision we say. Hey let's just keep on selling it. Let me lower the price. Let me add some bonuses and not owning up to the fact that hey the product is not what it needs to be. I need to Redo things the promises that often we have this feeling of sunk costs or what's called the sunk cost fallacy. We put in so much into something we feel like. Hey I put it in all the stuff put all this time effort money. Let me just keep going in this direction because I put so much into that investment not understanding. Okay the investments great. But it's time to now and Redo things and don't deny the actual criticism the actual feedback. They're getting from customers

Jim Carey G Twitter Google Chris John Lee Dumas Ossete Director Apple Frankenstein Jeff Fowler
"john lee" Discussed on Reinvention Radio

Reinvention Radio

14:16 min | 1 year ago

"john lee" Discussed on Reinvention Radio

"I was able to leader of sixty men and four tanks so twenty three year old second lieutenants Austin the US army. We deployed again with sixteen men. Foremen per tank four tanks in on the tank commander. So I'm on one of the tanks and I'm in charge of all four of them and I remember so clearly when we were at Fort Riley Kansas about deploy our deployment ceremony. I know I'm hi. I'm literally like hugging and shaking hands of husbands wives. Mothers Fathers Kids you know and looking at the I'm being like you know I'm bringing your loved one a home like that was my job as the officer as the two leader of the tune and of course I meant it and of course I was naive about a lot of things never having been in war before but over the course of that thirteen months we lost four of the sixty soldiers they gave that ultimate sacrifice and you know I had to write those those letters like I had the person informing them that their loved ones never return and you know one of the most heartbreaking ones. That's you know. Obviously I think about on a daily the basis is on my platoon. Sergeant had a daughter while he was deployed. He had a picture of her but he never got to hold her. You never got to see her and she he was so tragic and so sad and it was just so overwhelming at the time you just have to kind of push through but kind of a point. I'll make from that. That is you know for me. Now it's just so simple to get in perspective in life when like a recording gets warped or a sponsored ronsard drops off or this happens that's crappy or power goes out you know while I'm interviewing Tony Robbins or whatever might happen like I can put things in perspective and be like you're not getting shot at like you're not endanger like you're not you know like literally in war right now like things could be so much worse so although this is an ideal I'm not going to be attended. I'm happy about it. I'm at least going to put things in perspective. So it's not GONNA ruin my overall perspective of this that's Yeah thanks for sure on the rest of that and how how do you define success. There's there's lots of different definitions is out there. One of my favorites is success. Means having the courage the determination the will to become the person you were meant to be. You've had a lot of success and maybe how you defined minded five ten years ago. He's very different from how you would define it now. How how would you define success when you first started down this entrepreneurial path verses this is how you define it now? If I'm going back to think about how I would define success. Ask like seven years ago when I launched entrepreneurs on fire you know it probably would have ben that I could pay my bills doing something I enjoy doing. which was entrepreneurs on fire which was interviewing people and growing a brand in the business of art cows? Not really knowing what my path to paying. Those bills was gonNA look like 'cause you still about a year out from generating any revenue with podcasting with the overall business. But that would have been what I would have probably define success as but you know looking back now having generated over sixteen million dollars in the past seven years and having operas doc fire Netting over a million dollars a year in revenue getting to keep almost all of that living in Puerto Rico paying a flat or percent tax rate. Ah Yada Yada like I now. Define success is really one work which is freedom because now my success has really given me freedom and the freedom that has given me is location freedom. I chose live in Puerto Rico and I want to live here and I live here. It gives me lifestyle freedom. You know I work really it really hard some days and I work almost not at all other days. Like I'm able to really structure my schedule in create the my boundaries that I want to create Kanai went on a ninety day world track back in August on November where we went to see. Gee I spent a four days with Tony Robbins at his resort resort in the molly which is nine other people than we did. The other like basically eighty eighty five days in Europe spending a week in AIRBNB and all these different countries in cities and it was unbelievable and gorgeous. Weeden it not work during that time. We're putting in about an hour to an hour and a half a day. You know doing emails social media all of these things. Thanks but it's around a business that we built in business. The we enjoyed so it's still our choice to continue to want to do that. And that really is what I would define success at. This point is is the freedom to do all those things. The location freedom the lifestyle freedom the financial freedom Yemen so let. Let's let's talk for a second in about want versus need and I mean it really does seem like you know you. You have everything that you want and you probably have have everything that you need first of all. Do you have everything that you want and everything that you need and if so how how do you stay fired up when when you don't want more and you don't need more well I think if you were to be technical on like maslow's hierarchy of needs. I probably have all that they need. You know I mean we have our dream home down here in Puerto Rico or able to do what we WANNA do and like all these different things. We have shelter. We have food. We have comfort we of all that but as far as like you know what I want like I still have this desire to have a big impact in this world and I really would love to be able to see that. There's earthquakes happening here in Puerto Rico are and just be able to go and swoop in like write a ten million dollars shack and just say let's just take care of the situation now or like identify another issue in Africa or in Thailand or in the United States in like go Lohan like just completely make a huge impact there and like am either financially now like no and like we'll ever there. Maybe not but you know. That's something that I I would love to achieve into. A chain of some point is just to be able to have that kind of financial Influence where I really could a make a massive impact two eight t to a cause that I really believe in and and would want to make a difference Riches Juve anything eh again. I don't WanNa hog the Mike here. No I was just going to kind of go back to the initial start with with podcasting and you were or a fan you. It was obvious that you didn't really want to Model after what someone else is doing. I noticed by the way you structured. Richard Your questions that that unlike some people your answers are the answers that came back to you would always be different right where some people get always have universal answers like yes. I believe in working out every day. so what do you think for people who WanNa on a podcast now. Do you think that there's a a format that people should be following or do you think it's still wide open as far as you could just create any new type of a format so going back to the first part what you were sharing. Is I really believe that entrepreneurs on fire was successful because I focused on this story and a lot of people would say well. Doesn't your podcast give boring because you just ask the same questions every time. But I'm like you're completely missing everything. Which is the question is tell me your biggest entrepreneurial failure and how are you ever going to get the same master to that? Anybody I mean. Everybody has an unbelievable story of their failure. This unbe hundred percent unique to that individual. And so. That's where story really comes in. I'm a big believer in story like there's a reason why history is his story like it's all about the stories that we just grew up as how we used to pass a long history as you know before you the right things down before you could store things on computers like it was by the spoken word. And that's why you hear the phrase like once upon a time like you kind of lead in because you want to hear that history like what happened back then like people really resonate with that and so kind of moving forward into the second part of your question is I think still is wide open. But you've got to do it in a way that is really creating massive solutions to real people's problems so if you're gonNA the podcast in two thousand twenty said amazing time for there's more listeners now for podcast than there ever has been like people like John was like so easy if you back two thousand twelve roommate but nobody listened to podcast back in two thousand twelve. Like I was a Weirdo listening to podcasts. It was hard. It was a techy like you couldn't you couldn't be like Alexa play. PODCAST ask like in the car dash wasn't in. This wasn't an outlet. You literally had to be a little bit of a techie person to figure out how to make it happen and there wasn't that many listeners and now the listenership ship has exploded in his everywhere companies like Pandora and spotify an iheartradio and other companies have all gone. All in on this on this medium are doing amazing using things to the worst. Now you have this much bigger potential audience but with that. I think you've got to be very specific. And very structured of. Hey I I am going to solve one person's problem at a very high level. So what was the problem that I saw back in two thousand twelve. That was pretty broad the way that was back in two thousand twelve to you could be a little more broad back and still win because the competition so much lower so much less saturated but I was solving the problem of that person like myself that was driving to work every day. It was working out multiple days per week. That loved podcast go wasn't getting enough. Didn't WanNa wait a whole week for the next episode. Come come out when they just listened to a twenty five minute episode so that every single day was right there for people. It was the right solution to your problem. So what is your podcast. Odd cast going to provide as a real solution to a real problem and just interviewing successful entrepreneurs. You're not solving a problem. That's not being solved by hundreds if not thousands of other people so you may have some level of success but they could just go to any others. What's keeping them listening to yours and all these different thanks? So that's what the folks to be in two thousand twenty and beyond it comes to podcasting. Hasn't are you going to be able to be best in show in for me. It's it's like I want to solve a real problem for real listeners. And if I can't be the best at this level that I've got to go one niche down and if I can be the best at this level that I'm going to stay here until I've got momentum to them potentially move back up to the next level for some people might be going three levels down and that's fine because you sometimes just a niche till it hurts but you've gotta find that place where you're solving a real problem at the best level all of your competitors. It's a really really good point and it. It plays a little bit into the the question around discover ability as well and me reality. He is because you've been at this now for some time you you you will smartly so you receive the benefits of Of getting into podcasting asking early and and and really been able to benefit from what I would call the ascending spiral which is as new listeners. Come into to the PODCAST. Mix they see the shows that are in the rankings. See The shows that are on the charts as A. That's an interesting show. Let me check that out. So they they start listening. They started subscribing start downloading the star rating. They start reviewing and then of course that helps those shows that are already popular stay popular. Oh and ascend in that spiral which makes it really really hard for most mere mortal starting a show to break into that unless you'd really Driving listeners listeners from other existing platforms so so to that end. How do you think new shows get discovered and we know L.? Three hundred thousand shows were launched just in twenty nine thousand nine hundred. Those numbers continue to grow. How do those shows get discovered and ultimately survive? Well you do what I just shared which I won't go into detail again but you do really be focused on not just being this broad vague show but really being a niche niche specific show. They're willing to serve a really diverse audience. And I kind of like the idea of like combining two niches like say like. You just became a Vegan. Angie Angie like well what is like something that Veasley struggle with well. What's the right way to to exercise now that you're not having any kind of meat in your life? Well well what if like yoga was a great way to exercise. If you're a Vegan well what if you create now podcasts. Combine the two niches of the Vegan Yogi like now everybody who's the Vegan or everybody likes yoga. And there's like this crossover here so now you can be like this solution to two niches serious areas problems. Which is I'm you know? I Love Yoga. But I'm Vegan or Levin going to do for exercise in you're able to solve that problem at a very compact level so now in between the lines is up. Are you saying if people are going. And then they're searching for like almost like SEO is websites right. I mean they're going through. Throwing these search terms into the box is that is that how do podcasters potentially should be thinking about it and even out new listeners are trying to find shows yeah. Keyword searching is really big for the reasons of actually searching for podcasts and then finding the shows you want and actually having a show title that is promising the solution to the problem that people have which is the looking for that content is going to digital press. Play a lot more than just having like the John Lee Dumas. Shell like okay. What does it John Lee Dumas?.

Puerto Rico John Lee Dumas Tony Robbins US army Fort Riley Kansas commander officer Austin WanNa Europe Alexa AIRBNB Kanai Weeden maslow Yemen Richard Your Levin Pandora
"john lee" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"john lee" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"I finally got his opportunity to interview my dear friends. I WANNA welcome to the show the one and only Mr John Lee Dumas Joe. Welcome you know. I gotta be honest honest with everybody watching right now. There are few people that can match my energy. The commands my enthusiasm Matched my excitement. Dave you do all three. We are brothers from another mother absolutely and I am so excited. We're GonNa just route through this kind of stuff. I'm so excited about because I've I've had the option of watching you and your jury drawl all the years opt Mancini Roethlisberger was Louis. Hundreds of your show. I have your I I have all your books and it's it's so exciting just to see not only your journey but the I mean there's a couple stores hats kind of dive into it and so I've known John for years but the first time you and I met it was you i Russell and I don't know if you remember. We ended up meeting their so. I'm F- Akin Live. I'm really excited like I was there. As Dave Russell's guest in fact like an hour before that that Russell was on stage presenting and he was just like got to the part. He was talking about podcasts and he was like. By the way is John Lee Dumas in the audience and I raised my hand like he had me stand up and Mike everybody clap. It was like this big thing. About how like he was like showing like how I offer you podcasting Blah Blah Blah. But like. I still hadn't met him or were you in person like you know it was still from stage to audience like hundreds of feet away and so then like an hour later in the bathroom you know and I'm just like washing my hands. I look in the mirror and there's russell right behind his handler Dave just like looking around anybody else. Come into bath. And I'm like Russell Dave like like John. Roy Moore like hugging in the bathroom. Other men are walking in like three dudes hugging in a bathroom. We did a photo auto in the bathroom. Then like an hour later on stage like somehow Russell inserted that picture into one of his slides. Like look why bumped into in the bathroom. It was just like the best saying that. That's just Kinda guy you're in so I mean I senior different events instead. You're like the most approachable person world. You Care so much people and you just giving giving giving giving giving and so anyone has opted meeting John. I just thought you you don't feel shy or just go up to him because he literally just off Jonah Edelman just pours his heart out more than you do in everything you do you just you just care so much about people and it just comes across. I'm so excited. Having Google Dave I received that and just kind of like further. That story about how important it is. What what you just shared specifically? It's such a perfect kind of segue without even knowing. It is like an hour after that bathroom photo during a break up between talks. I'M GONNA corner talking to a couple of people in this guy comes up to me. He's like a John. I saw Russell call you on a big fan for a long time. Introduce myself and say hi Rik Talk Long Story Short. That person has now been my facebook ads manager for four years so you never know I love it. I thank you one of the things you don't know much about John is he also is massive massive huge affiliate ars Super excited by the way. I'm not afraid I'm not afraid of showing. Sharing numbers have been publishing monthly income reports for seventy six months. And so I'm happy to share all my numbers share them all for seventy six months. I just love doing it and I was so excited when Russell on my podcasts like six months ago. He's like all all right. Good interview gotta go like no Russell before you go. I did a quick screen share. I'm like I just generated over a million dollars in commissions just by promoting clicks on awesome. Like now as you and I talking about like one point two five and by the way that's one point two five million dollars that you click on paid me that's not like overall gross sales. That's money in my pocket from Click finals from supporting you guys over the years. And it's honestly one of my favorite checks every two weeks or exotic dot. It's been fun actually reciprocate. We're finally actually advertising on your show for an we've Bursa at. We've never done this before and it's fun just to kind of test and tweak and I I finished. My audience loves finals or with that. That's what I WANNA talk about most is. I want to talk about your audience and most importantly your Avatar so a- as one of our top village the opportunity coming out to Boise and and one of our awards was African masterminded top affiliates. And when you got up onstage you talked about your Avatar in so much detail to the point where honestly we actually have. It transcribed actually transcribe the reason I have described is it actually is going to be in the new dotcom secrets book. I love it and so you can either go ahead. And if find and describe a your Avatar or I can read what you said at the time. Whatever you WANNA do? I'm happy to do it because it is a passion. My so many people say John like what's your my podcast be like how alongside to be. What frequency should be should be an interview or topic base low? They asked me a million questions and I look at them and I'm like listen. Believe me I'm speaking from my heart. I love you as an individual. But I'm not gonNA listen to your podcast on saxophone playing or on ballet or on fitness or whatever. I'm just not gonNA listen to your podcast outcast so I get. You're asking me these questions but you're asking the wrong person never asks somebody that's not going to consume your content. Ask Your perfect listener for your podcast. And of course we're talking specifically while podcasting right now this goes for everything. Ask The perfect buyer for your products you know ask the Ask the perfect user her for your instrument whatever that is inserting that perfect ideal individual and so for me. I know that it's so critical as a podcast hosts that I know specifically to achieve who my ideal listeners who the perfect entrepreneurs on fire Avatar is yes in that person is Jimmy in about two hundred to a little bit of a rant right now and this is what Dave has on the pages next to him but essentially this my friends. Jimmy is forty years Zolt. He has a wife and two kids ages. Three and five. Jimmy drives to work by himself every single days at twenty five minute commute to work. He gets his job. He sits in a cubicle cubicle. At a job he does not enjoy for eight hours. It gets back into his car. Drives homeless a thirty five minute commute home because he gets stuck in a little bit of afternoon traffic than Jimmy he gets home he plays with his kids. Has Dinner with his family puts his kids to bed. Hangs out with his wife for a little while and then he has a little what I call. Jimmy Pity Party at the end of the night. Because he's like why do I spend ninety percent of my waking hours doing things. I don't enjoy doing driving to work sitting in a cubicle driving eating home why do I only spend ten percent.

Dave Russell John Lee Dumas Russell Dave Jimmy Mr John Lee Mancini Roethlisberger Jonah Edelman facebook Dave I Google Roy Moore Louis Mike Boise Zolt
"john lee" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

12:40 min | 2 years ago

"john lee" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's Inbox they see for podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the United States. I'm Jim Lindsey Director Rector Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations this week. Topic is US Austrailia relations you with me discussed the future of the US Australia alliance in the face of a rising China are Charles Adele in John Lee Charleen Lean John or both senior fellows at the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney in Sydney Australia Charles previously in associate professor of strategy and policy at the US Naval War College he served on US Secretary of State. John Kerry's policy planning staff from two thousand fifteen to two thousand seventeen earlier this year he co authored the Book Lessons Tragedy Statecraft in world order. John served as the principal adviser on Asia for the Australian Foreign Minister from two thousand sixteen to two thousand eighteen. He was the foreign ministers lead adviser for the two thousand seventeen foreign policy white paper the first comprehensive guide to Australia's bilious foreign policy in more than a decade currently. John is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Hudson Institution in Washington. DC Charleen John. Thanks thanks for joining me today my pleasure thanks for having me. Revenue Sanja Sean if I may I want to start with you and if you could just sort of lay out to us how the world looks from the vantage point of camera or Australia more broadly the politicians and strategic elites in Australia except that the world has changed particularly with respect to relations between the United States and China. They used to be the fairly complacent hope that United States and China could be a lot more integrated in the way they have the business relations. They used these type that in that China could be a responsible stakeholder. That hope is now gone. I think way a straighter is now is that we recognize. China is a problem but there's not yet agreement of sufficient agreement with the United States as as to what we actually do about it John. How would you describe the breakdown of the debate within Australia in terms of Australia's relations with China. I suppose the harder line of the strategic relates would want to constrain China in some areas limit China's power or at very least as limit China's capacity to make decisions that would be detrimental to Australia and its allies. There's a software group that would still want the United States and strategy to offer more carrots for China to change its course. I think a straighter is gradually hitting towards the former. The hotta wrote the harder line of action but eighty steal a very lot debate in camera and he brought Australia to moment charlie. You're an American ex Patriot in Australia Elia. What shortage strikes you the most about the debate that you're seeing among Australian so we've been living in Australia for a little over two years at this point and and I guess there would be a two things Jim strike me. Most one is when we moved to Australia in mid twenty seventeen. I had followed Austrian politics and foreign policy at St knew that the debate was quite healthy about the United States future in Asia no less what China was doing what I didn't anticipate at the time even as I noted things were heating up was that Australia would basically become a frontline state in the debate on the future of Asia and that's both because of some questions over the US staying power but really because of Chinese actions not only in the region but with an inside of Australia itself so it has been a topic that has been front and center sometimes a little bit louder sometimes a little bit softer softer but consistently and in some ways the Australians are quite far ahead of the curve and in other areas they've lagged behind so that's one a big observation the second one though is contrasting it what I see in Washington the Australians in the policy circles that John was just outlining. I think think have made a fair amount of decisions more or less uniformly see the challenge but once you get outside of camera the camera bubble they call it a when you get up to Sydney or down to Melbourne which were most business is transacted no less when you get out to Perth in Western Australia. Which is where a lot of the minerals come from the the debate is very very different and so within the business community? John has already outlined that there are some real differences of opinion because thirty percent of Australian in the outbound trade goes up north to China when the Chinese leaded in and on university campuses the other place where it's really flared there is a dependence on Chinese students coming in at the University of Sydney of which John and I are both fellows at the US study center one out of every four students is from mainland China so that has really shaped the debate in different ways. I think than you're seeing play out here in the US. I would say Jim that to add to what Charleston said. Australia is ahead of the curve on very specific issues where the Chinese have directed actions against us so foreign interference foreign infiltration institutions now institutions. Australia is ahead of the curve in fact. I think Australia probably leads the world in terms of the push back against China. We have pass fairly tough legislation against in foreign interference directed at Chinese activities sorry to interrupt John. Could I just stop you right there and ask you to just paint a picture for people as to what specific kinds of interference Australia has seen coming from China in his that interference being conducted at the government level or is it being done through third parties those a time when the perception was that Chinese interference was very sporadic and there wasn't a systematic nature to it. What you're saying in the last two years is a lot more information has come out about the Chinese united front and systematic attempts to infiltrate some talking about attempts to we know the politicians attempts to infiltrate both parties all branches of both Party's attempts to infiltrate AL universities attempts to infiltrate our Chinese diaspora communities and attempts to infiltrate our a Chinese language media overtime. We've realized that they have not just been attempts to Chinese have been fairly successful so for example last year we had a senior. Sania Labor Party senator fourth resign having received donations from a Chinese citizen in return advocating China's position on the South China Sea in current times. We've seen a Liberal Party a government member of parliament whose association we've Chinese groups have increased suspicions of motivation says this is Gladys Lou. We've looked at the Chinese language media in our country. One estimate east that ninety five percent of chinese-language press is now owned and by entities with direct links to Beijing propaganda apparatus that has been substantial success by the Chinese united front to infiltrate our the end of this these student bodies and increasingly quite a lot of evidence is being published by press and this really has changed not just the Bayton strategy but the public perception off China so in these areas foreign interference in particular Australia has responded quite robustly but in the strategic debate as to what you do about China in the longer term how how we position ourselves with respect to China in broader terms that babies just beginning several times John you mentioned the term Chinese United Added Front. Is that an actual organization or something else that united front is a vast bureaucratic apparatus belongs to the Chinese Communist Party. It is an organization which is directly answerable to the State Council in China. It is a substantial organization. It has at least forty thousand officials working for the United Front the purpose of the United Front East to increase domestic support for Chinese Communist parties but significantly one of the motivations are one up the objective is now to rached Chinese diasporas in various countries particularly Western countries and tried to co opt or intimidate those yet spurs is to support Chinese objectives in their home countries and it's that overseas mission as it were which has come to light in Australia which has become very grill fifth straight wins and that was the reason why legislation was passed last year specifically targeting Chinese activities so you're seeing situations and in Australia where Australian citizens of Chinese descent are facing intimidation from ages the Chinese government and is sort of cow them into not making any criticisms of China were Beijing's policy correct correct. There are two ways the Chinese have been caught effective. The first why Oy as you mentioned is intimidation and coercion so they'll be intimidation or coercion of Australian nationals of Chinese origin the intimidation and coercion could come the form form of US threats to it'd be S- interests which they may have in China or sometimes even threats to families of those family members who are still in China. The second effective way way they've managed to have presence is that they have engineered a situation where a lot of the Chinese. ESPN groups in Australia the organizations are led by individuals with sympathies to the Chinese Communist Party so even though the vast majority of Chinese Australians on not sympathetic necessarily to Chinese Communist Partie de Voices all the community organizations in Australia tend to voice very pro China views charlier astute student of international national relations and you know that affinities countries have for one another because of culture and of political governing style are powerful but they're not the be we all end all material interests matter a lot and you mentioned when he was speaking in a moment ago about sort of where economic activity is directed for four Australians. They're a great deal of business. Being conducted between Australia and China cooking walk us through the extent of Australia's Australia's economic relationship with China absolutely Jim in broad stroke the way that this normally gets publicly framed in the debate in Australia but this is actually true true. I think on a much larger scale throughout Asia particularly Southeast Asia is that there are two partners of choice. You'll hear this all the time. There's a security partner of choice. That's the United States. Australia has a treaty alliance with the United States that dates back to nineteen fifty one we share values we share interests but there's an economic partner of choice and that happens to be. China and the narrative will also run that in Australia. They like to talk a lot about the fact that there have been twenty nine on interrupted years of economic growth. It's has become one of the most prosperous advanced countries in the world and a lot of the discourse will be that the only reason and that Australia was able to weather the downturn after after the global financial crisis was because of their trade with China and again. I I talked about the second ago. It is a big trading relationship chip. It's between thirty one and thirty three percent of outgoing trade goes up north to China and that's in a whole bunch of different areas although they're generally it's different different products and services than for instance what America traits with China so it's mostly things that are dug out of the ground. be it still beat aluminum. Be at iron ore were were cold or things like wheat or wine or products such as education now. That's the broad frame of the debate. Although there are some errors actually in how that's framed because of course Jim when we talk about economic relations between countries were talking about more than just commercial relations and so one of the products that our center has turned out is when you dig in a little bit further and beyond just looking at commercial trade when we begin to talk about investment into Australia when when we begin to talk about employment numbers when we begin to talk about taxable revenues that contribute to Australian. GDP It's actually the United States that contributes. It's the most natural when we're talking about inbound..

Australia China United States Charleen John Jim Lindsey Chinese Communist Party Asia Australia Elia Council on Foreign Relations South China Sea United States Studies Centre John Kerry Sydney University of Sydney Western Australia US Naval War College Washington
"john lee" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

07:11 min | 2 years ago

"john lee" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Who's ready to rock today? Fire nation jail D here with an audio masterclass with John Lee in that is not John Lee Dumas myself. But this is John Lee, a brother from a number mother in this guy is on fire, and we're gonna give an audio masterclass on how to use social media to turn your passion into profits. John lee. He's an international speaker and bestselling author who has created multiple seven-figure businesses over the last ten years one of which is soon to be listed on the stock exchange. He's found or of wealth dragons, which is one of the world's largest e learning platforms for business entrepreneurs in you can visit wealth dragons, online dot com to take your business to the next level. So fire nation. Today's audio masterclasses how to use social media to turn your passion into profits. What we talking about how we can gain more followers. Turn our passionate into a profit how to create a recurring income from what you love how we can raise millions of dollars through social media and so much more. So don't go anywhere because we'll be diving in with John Lee when we get back from thinking, our sponsor, growing your e commerce business, creating amazing customer experiences to learn how Cleo can help you build high value customer relationships and make more money for your business. Visit Clave yo dot com slash fire. That's K L A V I y dot com slash fire. John say what's up to fire nation? And sure something interesting about yourself that most people don't know how you doing hope y'all doing all some and taking action. So something about me that no one knows is I'm a huge mall. Superheroes. Geek, do you? Go to like, all the movies, all of the difference marvel shows that are out there. Now when model films come out here that come out midnight. So I'm one of those guys that tonal by self. My wife's in bed is like you just go and. Myself pretending. I'm for somebody to come down to me. I love it. I love it. You like, so I know the taken I'm sorry. Taking a box of popcorn on the two. That just never gets eaten. I love that. So fire nation. We all have our passions are scape. Ism things that we like to do when we're not doing the business type of thing. But as I mentioned during the intro this audio masterclass about how to use social media in turn your passions into profit. So it was pretty exciting is John decided to just scrap everything that he was ever doing. He could literally figure out how to turn his passion for marvel into profits through social media. He could totally do it in a heartbeat. There's a niche out there, there's a huge audience passionate raving. So we're going to show people right now today during this autumn ash glass, how to do just that. So John, you're the expert as I mentioned before we already gave you a killer introduction. So people know all the things you have going on right now. So let's just dive right in to how we fire nation can use social media to create pass him income and actually grow Asst. Strong online brands. Yeah. I think one of the biggest things that for those everyone listening right now, you know, you're all entrepreneurs you'll have some ideas Nisha thing, you're really passionate about. But the thing is John most people passionate about something. But it's not what the making money from so often one of the most important things right now, especially in this era. Social media is just immediately is on fire right now. I mean, everybody's in the mobile phones mobile phones. The I mean look in the morning is the last thing we look at when I go to bed. It's not all wife husband, any all. Really is that I guess the, you know, the dog call doom like people say this one of the biggest opportunities in line thing before it was real estate like five ten twenty years ago is real estate than it was the dot com. Boom, you know, ten twenty before that. And then now is this whole so anyone with a passion. Now can get paid to do. They lifted do is insane insane. So that is absolutely insane. How can we fire nation create passive income and grow that strong brand online? How can we make those steps? Like where do we start the three steps to this? First one is I call this formula, the the F S formula. So v means do go to create a low value. So it doesn't matter. What you do if you love drawing little value in drawing if you do photography critic of valuable for Tokyo. But right now people use the internet because they want to look something. I mean, you know. Fifty two percent of all the search volley right now on the internet is based on how to content to Seoul the program to an invite a solution. So I think the thing that people can do is number one. They go to create a lot of valley. So think about what you wanna do all the problems are in your industry, and then Chris Aleutian to it, but created video based phone because video now converse, a lot more than a lot of the traditional ways of of consumption on the internet, if I've just had a meeting Google, I was invited to the doodle headquarters and this aided by twenty twenty you know, all internet, like eighty two percent of internet traffic will be video based. So I would highly suggest people just shoot a video open camera at was go to small phone now and just record books. And then just talking about stuff token about the problems in in your industry and talk about the solution. That's kind of how stole two when I started in in real estate. I made my first million they twenty seven and leisurely all did videos out there on why people could sell the properties. And so I would buy properties below the market value in that would sell them a high price. Okay. John let me jump in here for second. Because I think there's a key point that I wanna make sure fire nation is absorbing right now. And that's fine. Asian you right now in your niche in your passion, your curiosity need to do this either find the problems the obstacles and the challenges and then on social media on video whatever it is. You're going to choose to do you flip it on? And you just present the solution to those problems to those struggles to those challenges in by the way, I'm a big believer in John you may disagree. And I'd love if you digs. We can have a conversation about it. But I am a big believer. That fake. It's to you make it is horrible advice because people see right through that. It's it's a world that we live in you need to be transparent and honest fire nation. So my quote that I want you to live by is document until you make it flip on that camera. Go to social meat and say, hey, listen, I'm starting off right now. And I want you to come on this journey with the I'm just a guy or a gal who's going to create solutions for the problems as I see that you have them, and I'm going to get better every single time. I do this. And I want you along for the journey with me document. That's why you start today right now fire nation when you're not good because none of our good because we haven't started yet. And you just documented

John John Lee Fire nation John Lee Dumas Seoul Google Cleo Chris Aleutian Tokyo five ten twenty years eighty two percent Fifty two percent ten years
"john lee" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"john lee" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"There won't be very many podcasts where I can say that our next guest is the number one podcast revolt. Very true. Yes. There's Tim Ferriss. There is John Lee Dumas, and then there's everybody else. I would say Gary vein or Chuck, maybe in that top ten conversation, you have, you'd say, Tony Robbins is up there you'd say that Dave Ramsey but really I mean you have John Lee Dumas is he stands with the craft the crop in. So this guy on his website, he reports on eofire.com entrepreneurs on fire dot com. Reports every month, his gross income and is gross profits, so sick, it's gross. It is so this. So this month here reported gross income of one hundred sixty five thousand dollars. A profit of one hundred thirty four thousand two hundred and eighty five dollars. Clay stares. This guy started his podcast after getting out of the military. He decided to enroll in college at Roger Williams university of law in Bristol, Rhode Island. He dropped out after a semester. They took a job working in corporate finance and Boston for John Hancock. Then he went to New York City to work for a technology startup before leaving to move to San Diego. And while living in Maine in twenty eleven doing commercial real estate, he started listening to podcasts driving and he thought to himself. I should start a podcast, you know, maybe I could do one that's that's every day because most people don't have one every day and I'm going to interview celebrities and so for six now going on seven consecutive years, he's reached out to the biggest of the biggest celebrities faced countless rejection from people. Just ghost him. They say, no, they turn him down, but yet he continued to record with an audience of five subscribers. Or a day, seven subscribers. Couple more fourteen. There they go. Wow, twenty eight every day every day. Now think about this today. He's making a profit of a hundred and thirty four thousand dollars a month. And recently he achieved his goal of moving deport Areco. So he now broadcasts the entrepreneur on fire podcast out of his home in Puerto Rico. So I wanna get your take on that Klay stairs. I wanna get Steve Koreans taking that Klay stairs. You're a the millionaire schoolteacher you're a guy that was once a schoolteacher probably watching life of entrepreneurial success, sort of looking at it from the outside going. Okay, that's something so somebody else does. So definitely. And how old were you when you finally jumped into the entrepeneurship game? Forty, seven years old. So what encouragement would you have for the listeners out there that would say, gosh, I could never do it. You do clay or I could never do it with John Lee Dumas does. Can you? Can you encourage listeners out there. Yeah. Well, it comes to a point where you're you're, you're gonna make a decision. Are you just going to keep doing what you're doing and not feeling that fulfilled filling not being in the place where you are tapping into what you know is inside of you, or are you gonna make the leap? I remember clay talking with you early on and you bring up this concept of you gotta jump. You gotta make the jump so many times. I just found myself wanting to get someplace. But my big thing personally, my big thing was I was unwilling to submit to anybody in follow anyone. And that's what helped me back. Can I can I throw a crazy thought out crazy. Do you guys remember the Indiana Jones scene with the invisible bridge? Oh, yes. Use I use that makes me think about because you need to coach leap. Yeah, there to scared to take leaf. You've gotta coach he through the sand on the invisible bridge, and then you saw and you took the lead. Yeah, you'd take this. Steve curry for anybody out through the bills discouraged and says, you know, I see you today driving a labor Guinea ICU today, going out there and having massive success at total and in concepts. I see you really closing mortgages, but you don't understand. I mean, I I've never done that before. I could never do what you do it. Courage listeners out there because everybody is where you're at right now in life. A lot of people aren't, you know, in a place of financial freedom when they can go out and buy the things they need and have the time freedom to do what they want..

John Lee Dumas John Hancock Tim Ferriss Tony Robbins Dave Ramsey Steve curry Clay Gary vein Boston Rhode Island Steve Koreans Bristol Puerto Rico Roger Williams university of l New York City Guinea ICU Indiana Klay Chuck