35 Burst results for "John John John John Deere"

AP Sports SummaryBrief at 9:24 p.m. EDT

AP News Radio

01:59 min | Last month

AP Sports SummaryBrief at 9:24 p.m. EDT

"AP sports I'm Bruce Morton The Astros continue to soar Adam Spillane has details from Houston The Houston Astros have won 6 in a row after Jeremy Pena's 9th inning walk off two run Homer sent them to a four two win over the Los Angeles angels It was paying his fourth hit of the game and second home run Oh that's my first multi home run game And send that on a walk off it's unreal In that game Astros pitchers tied a 9 inning major league record by striking out 20 angels The guardians humbled the Yankees to nothing Tristan Mackenzie dazzled allowing just one hit over 7 innings enough to impress Cleveland DH franmil Reyes I love the way bitch is attitude He's very focused in every woman and today was a great performance Tyler wells was superb over 6 innings as Baltimore won at Minnesota three one It took me a little while to kind of get back into that groove and that mentality but over the course of the last two months like I've really kind of started to get back into it and I'm feeling pretty good about it Other American League winners were the royals raise Red Sox White Sox and Mariners In the national league the Padres scored all their runs in the 9th to defeat the Dodgers four two Elsewhere Brandon Woodruff went 6 stellar innings boosted by an effective changeup as the brewers blank Pittsburgh to nothing When I can you know go to it multiple times and make it look like a strike as long as possible I just think it helps me out Other NL winners included the Marlins reds mets rockies and Phillies golf JT poston led wire to wire to win the John Deere classic for his second PGA Tour title and a spot in the British open I've always wanted to play in an open championship and for it to be at saint Andrews in the 150th is pretty special and pretty hard to draw it up any better than that Tennis it took four sets but three time defending Wimbledon champ Novak Djokovic defeated a wild card entry to move into the fourth round Bruce Morton AP

Astros Bruce Morton Adam Spillane Jeremy Pena Tristan Mackenzie Franmil Reyes Tyler Wells Los Angeles Angels Red Sox White Sox Homer AP Brandon Woodruff Houston Yankees Angels Cleveland American League Baltimore Jt Poston Royals
JT Poston goes wire-to-wire in John Deere Classic

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

JT Poston goes wire-to-wire in John Deere Classic

"JT poston's second PGA victory is a wire to wire win at the John Deere classic posted close with a 269 to finish 21 under Good for a three shot win over Christian biz Aden hoat and emiliano grillo All three earned automatic births in the British open post in one a week after tying for second in Connecticut in the travelers championship The 29 year old player from Hickory North Carolina birdie the first three holes bogeyed numbers 5 and 6 and part of the next ten before a birdie on 17 Christopher got her up and Scott stallings tied for fourth at 17 under I'm Dave

Jt Poston Aden Hoat Emiliano Grillo John Deere PGA Connecticut Hickory North Carolina Scott Stallings Christopher Dave
The John Deer Classic Is Great Fun

Fore The People

00:25 sec | Last month

The John Deer Classic Is Great Fun

"Yeah, I think people like talk shit about the John Deere classic really for no reason. It used to always be before the British open before guys went over or whatever and some guys would take off go over early, but dude, that course is fun as shit. I mean, did you like playing that? I thought it was fun. I thought they'd do the big dig all the kids get to use all the John Deere equipment. Rolling hills, bent grass, perfect condition. And it's a birdie fest without a doubt, but a ton of variety, man. I had a fun time at that

John Deere Rolling Hills
"  deere" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

06:34 min | Last month

" deere" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"Visiting the cubs. I'm like, I like the reds on the money line plus one O 5. I like Graham ashcraft to earn a win at plus one 79. I like Kyle Hendricks to allow more than three and a half runs at plus one 15. Here's a situation at Wrigley Field. Temperatures in the mid to upper 80s, maybe even touching the low 90s, wind blowing out to left center at 15 plus miles an hour. And the reason why I like the reds in this game is because their picture Graham ashcraft, this season has a ground ball rate of 58% and a walk rate of 4%. Those are very important important metrics to have when the wind is blowing out it greatly. You don't want to put guys on base for free. That's the low walk rate. And you want to keep the ball on the ground. And the wind's blowing out, thus the high ground ball rate. As a matter of fact, in the triple-A in the miners before he was called up earlier this season, his ground ball rate was 71%. So this guy is an ace at keeping the ball on the ground. He also is a pitcher that has the best money line or money line win rate in baseball this season. He's number one in base money line one are money one betting on this pitcher when he earned his team when this pitcher pitches. So ashcraft has been really, really good for betters this season. His peripherals are perfect for the environment here. Meanwhile, Kyle Hendricks is the pitcher for the Chicago Cubs and just not what he once was. His ground ball rate is under 40%. That's too low in this environment, his hard hit rate is almost 40%. That's too high. He doesn't miss bats, the strikeout rate is well under 20% at 17.2. He's allowing 1.55 homers per 9 to season with the wind blowing out. I wouldn't be shocked to see him give up at least one or two long balls. So I like the reds. I like ashcraft versus Hendrix. I'll be targeting bats and Cincinnati side. More so than Chicago side, not that Chicago can't. You know, go deep and exploit the win in this environment, but I really do think the kitchen advantage much greater for the Cincinnati reds and ashcraft has been the most profitable pitcher trying to pitch to bed on so far this season of any in Major League Baseball and he hasn't pitched up here at all season. So definitely like that spot with the reds. And then the other game, again, not two really good teams, but Seattle. And the Oakland a's. Logan Gilbert is by far one of the best pictures you probably don't know about for the Seattle Mariners, has an 8 and three record 2.44 ERA this season. They are big, heavy favorites, more than $2 against Oakland. I like Gilbert to get the win at plus one 33. Him to hold the a's while he's out on the bump to under four and a half hits at plus one ten. Liaison offense, it's literally the worst and Major League Baseball. They're dead last an average on base slugging and OPS. They're a extraordinarily punchless offense and Gilbert as with his 8 three record of 2.44 ERA has been really, really good this season. Also one of the most profitable pitchers to bet on so far this year. So I love attacking the a's offense. That's one of my favorite things to do is look and see who the a's and the tigers are playing. And then on those pictures, the a's especially just a horrendous offense. So dig into Logan Gilbert and the Seattle manners tonight with Gilbert hopefully getting a win for me at plus one 33 and holding that a's offense under four and a half hits while he's out there. So a couple of games that may not be great for TV ratings, but certainly I think some spots to exploit based on what we're seeing at Wrigley Field and in Seattle tonight. Anytime you put money on a game, it's worth watching, right? Because I always tell people, you know, you gamble, it's like going to a movie, right? It's for the price of admission. It improves your viewing experience. It's really what it's about. That is a great point. You make a wise point. And it's also the emotions that come with that are fun, the highs, and the lows, you had a low, a couple nights ago. I had a tremendous low last night. I don't know if you know saw my bed beat. We went over what happened with the D backs and the Padres for you. On Tuesday night, but last night, I had a best bet of the cards Marlins under 6 and a half alternate total at plus one 60. It was three two in the 9th inning, cardinals were up three two, Ryan helsley comes in to close it out for the Cardinals. He entered the game with a 0.30 ERA in 29.2 innings pitched. And with two outs, he gave up a two run Homer to abi Garcia. To make it a four three game. So not only did I lose my best bet, but then I watched my team some of Cardinals fan lose a game they probably should have won to the Miami Marlins and failed to a complete sweep. So it was a bad bad night after Avi Garcia hit that two run shot for me at the betting window. All right, real quick. Let's move to the John Deere classic. We gave our favorite plays for that yesterday on the pod. Right now, the first round is about midway, so there's still a lot of guys that need a tee off, but you wanted to make note of JT poston who was 8 under through 14 holes. And I'll go ahead and throw a guy out there who is from my neck of the Woods, wildwood Missouri, his name was Chris naag. He qualified for the United States open and fared well there, got into the John Deere field, Chris nagle, is 6 under through 9. So we have a couple of really, really nice scores out there posting a nagel and I know posting with someone that you were interested in before this tournament started. Is there any way to get invested in him now that we've seen that we get off to a good start round one? Yeah, so again, just make note we're recording this podcast at 1220 this afternoon. So and we'll probably be posted sometime around one 32 o'clock. So keep that in mind. Right now, post in top of the leaderboard right now at 800 with a two shot lead, data golf has him as a 16.2% chance of winning the tournament. So right now you can put money down 5 to one for him to win this tournament. Also some good odds at plus one 30 for him to finish in the top 5 and I just share that just because when you and I both liked him coming in and he's off to such a phenomenal start and we talked about it yesterday on wager as well as the podcast, there's not a lot of big names playing in this tournament. A, they're taking the week off, they're getting ready for the open. Also, a lot of them are over in Portland, playing on the live tour, the 54 tour. So keep that in mind. So I think there's some value there right now we're posting off to such a great start. All right, that'll do it for the Thursday edition of it anyway to podcast. We are back on ESPN2 tonight for daily wager at 6 eastern three Pacific..

Graham ashcraft Cincinnati reds Kyle Hendricks ashcraft Logan Gilbert Wrigley Field Baseball Gilbert Seattle Oakland Chicago cardinals cubs Chicago Cubs
"  deere" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

02:58 min | Last month

" deere" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"I'll start with Adam hadwin at plus one 20 to be the top Canadian when all is said and done is the favorite in the field. I don't love the price of betting someone like Adam hadwin, it's uncomfortable, but him as a favorite, but at plus one 20 to be the top Canadian when he is by far the best Canadian in the field and the favorite in the tournament. I think that's a pretty good value. I got to go back down to your classic Johnson DJs in the field. Anita, you got a better, okay? This guy has done nothing but dominate at this event and this course top 40 plus one 30 for a guy who has made the cut here's 13 straight years in a row, okay? He's won this event. He's finished inside the top ten about 7 or 8 times in that time. I don't care what forms DJ is in. This is a horse for the course as much as there is any horse for any course in all of the golfing world. So I was shocked to see that price, even though he's not in great form, DJ has done nothing but make cuts here and play well if the John Deere classic. And then I do have a Nick hardy play as well. He'll be in my daily fantasy lineup and I like Nick hardy at 50 to one to be the first round leader. I think he can win the tournament, as you mentioned, he played golf in Illinois, had some sponsors exemptions, I believe, while in college to play in this event, very familiar with the course, hardy is playing tremendous golf right now as you pointed out and really good form and at 50 to one to lead after the first round. He has fired sub 70 rounds, including one round of 64, and each of his last four first rounds that he's participated. So he's been really good lately all around, but especially on Thursday. So I like Nick hardy 50 to one to be a first round leader as a nice little big money dart throw there. So that's a look at the John Deere classic, again, the live tour is something that is going on this week and first time. We'll see them in America at Portland. So interesting to see how those two tours compete head to head this week both events taking place here on United States soil. That'll do it for the Wednesday edition of the daily wager podcast. We got our normal time and time slot. Channel slot on ESPN2 6 eastern today for daily wager. Well, of course, go deep into those games. We discussed in big league baseball, the PGA Tour and a lot of NFL as well because you can never talk enough NFL. I'll have another list coming out a wide receiver list of my top 5 wide receiver season long plays and we'll kind of do a deep dive into some big names for the Washington commanders and preview their season. So if you want to catch that, see that 6 eastern ESPN2 is how you can do so. But they'll do it for the Wednesday additional the daily wage podcast. We appreciate you dropping by. Make sure to do us a favor and rate review and subscribe if you have not already done so. She's a need a mark. I'm Tyler full, and we'll see you back here tomorrow. I'm a daily wager podcast..

Adam hadwin Nick hardy John Deere Anita golf Johnson hardy Illinois United States ESPN NFL Portland PGA baseball Washington Tyler
Grayson Murray on His PGA Status and Goals

Fore The People

01:32 min | Last month

Grayson Murray on His PGA Status and Goals

"What are you playing and basically right now? Like, are you are you going full? Are you kind of like half and half corn fairy PGA Tour you back PGA Tour starts or like what's your goal to lead to this season? I'm exempt to the finals this year, so like the cornfield finals. So I don't need to play out there. I got, I'm gonna play in the next four in a row. I don't think PJ tour. I got John Deere, barbasol, barracuda, and then the 3M that I'm gonna get into. So basically just go out there and try to make as much points as I can, many points as I can to get in that side of that one 25. Yeah. Right now I'm like 200. I've only played. I think 6 events. So, you know, I mean, I'd have to have some good finishes, which can happen. But I'm not really stressed and like people were like, oh, you know, you're gonna, you know, this is one thing too. People don't know what the fuck they're talking about on Twitter, so they're always like, oh, you're losing your card, man, can't wait to see you back in Q school. I'm like, y'all have no clue. Hey, as a past champion on the PJ tour, I get into like 6 events, no matter what every year, like for the rest of my life, like why is so and so always in these events, well, he's born on the tour three or four times like past champions like you have at your own category. So I'm never gonna be like on the streets like you don't have a card, but I mean, I don't want to be this guy that's like trying to keep his car every year or bounce around and the corn flare of the PJ. Like, I mean, I'm a legit golfer. I want to be like a top player. So I mean, I have these goals. Like, I'm trying to get my card back and I know I'm good enough. Like, I know I can be top 15 in the world. I know I can win out there again. I'm on the right

PGA John Deere Twitter
Jay Monahan Only Cares About the PGA Top Players

Fore The People

01:50 min | Last month

Jay Monahan Only Cares About the PGA Top Players

"If you are running this country, like this is true like liberalism at its finest, I feel like with Jay running this tour right now. I mean, how he does not care about anyone on this tour except for the top guys. And showing right now more than ever. I mean, the fact that he added these events to basically to the top 50 guys in the FedExCup for next year to play in all these guaranteed money events. It's going to be harder for guys the average guide to keep their car now. I mean, whoever is on that pack and who is an average player. I mean, let's take aurora. I mean, there's some fantasy. I mean, the guy has never had to now he's earned the right to be where he's at on the course. But he's never had to grind for his PGA Tour cards. So take a guy who is an average guy who might be on the board, and why aren't they like raising their hand and saying, what are you doing for us? Because as I can see right now, they're doing nothing. They're making it harder. And I mean, yes, we don't sell tickets Greece and Murray doesn't sell tickets like Rory McIlroy does, but at the end of the day, you have to look out for your whole tour. You can't just look out for your top guys. I mean, it's just like in the real world. You have to look out for the small business people. I mean, that's just who runs the country who runs the two door is going to be these small guys as well. I mean, yes, we are replaceable, but at the end of the day, we've earned our right to be on tour. We did everything we could to get there. And we're doing everything in our power to stay there, but you guys are making it way tough for for us. I mean, two perfect examples is the barbasol and the barracuda this year. They added 50 spots for European guys. It's easier to get in the John Deere this year than it is the

JAY Aurora Rory Mcilroy Murray Greece John Deere
New 'disinformation' board paused amid free speech questions

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 months ago

New 'disinformation' board paused amid free speech questions

"The the the the department department department department of of of of homeland homeland homeland homeland security security security security posit posit posit posit it's it's it's it's new new new new and and and and controversial controversial controversial controversial disinformation disinformation disinformation disinformation governance governance governance governance board board board board the the the the disinformation disinformation disinformation disinformation governance governance governance governance board board board board has has has has been been been been roundly roundly roundly roundly criticized criticized criticized criticized from from from from its its its its inception inception inception inception sparking sparking sparking sparking concerns concerns concerns concerns about about about about free free free free speech speech speech speech and and and and the the the the spread spread spread spread of of of of well well well well disinformation disinformation disinformation disinformation about about about about the the the the board's board's board's board's mission mission mission mission White White White White House House House House press press press press secretary secretary secretary secretary Corinne Corinne Corinne Corinne jumpy jumpy jumpy jumpy air air air air it it it it was was was was never never never never about about about about censorship censorship censorship censorship policy policy policy policy policing policing policing policing speech speech speech speech or or or or removing removing removing removing content content content content from from from from anywhere anywhere anywhere anywhere John John John John Deere Deere Deere Deere adding adding adding adding homeland homeland homeland homeland security's security's security's security's effort effort effort effort to to to to offset offset offset offset and and and and stop stop stop stop this this this this information information information information has has has has been been been been ongoing ongoing ongoing ongoing and and and and will will will will continue continue continue continue the the the the department's department's department's department's work work work work across across across across several several several several administrations administrations administrations administrations to to to to address address address address this this this this information information information information that that that that threatens threatens threatens threatens the the the the security security security security of of of of our our our our country country country country is is is is critical critical critical critical and and and and that that that that will will will will indeed indeed indeed indeed continue continue continue continue board board board board director director director director needed needed needed needed check check check check which which which which resigned resigned resigned resigned later later later later telling telling telling telling the the the the AP AP AP AP she she she she has has has has been been been been the the the the target target target target of of of of online online online online death death death death threats threats threats threats as as as as well well well well as as as as sexist sexist sexist sexist and and and and anti anti anti anti semitic semitic semitic semitic attacks attacks attacks attacks Republicans Republicans Republicans Republicans have have have have been been been been hammering hammering hammering hammering at at at at the the the the board board board board since since since since its its its its inception inception inception inception calling calling calling calling it it it it Orwellian Orwellian Orwellian Orwellian and and and and a a a a political political political political tool tool tool tool Tim Tim Tim Tim acquire acquire acquire acquire Washington Washington Washington Washington

Department Department Departme White White White White House Corinne Corinne Corinne Corinn John John John John Deere Deere Deere Deere Homeland Homeland Homeland Hom Ap Ap Security Security Security Sec Tim Tim Tim Tim Washington
"  deere" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

Rocketship.fm

02:01 min | 5 months ago

" deere" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

"To compiler for their support. Hey rocket ship listeners, I'm Angela Andrews. And I'm Brent semedo. We're the hosts of a show we think you'll enjoy. It's called compiler. Each episode, we talk to folks in tech. At Red Hat, where we work. And we talk to the people there connect it to. Also, anyone else who can help us learn about the world around us. Together, we tackle questions. Big and small. Ants sometimes strange. Here's our producer, Kim Wong, helping us dig into the question, how do we handle failure? I was curious about whether or not failure had anything to do with a lack of knowledge or skill or passion. But what I ended up learning from this next person that we have on the show was a little bit more insight into how important it is to fail. Hello, my name is Erica hampden. I am a Professor of astrophysics at the university of Arizona, and I spend most of my time building telescopes, which I have decided is the best job that somebody can possibly have. This is a new one for us. I don't think it's really an astrophysicist on the show. No, we have not. And you know, I wanted to ask, if either of you had ever heard of doctor hamden. No, I have not. Okay. A few years ago, doctor hampden gave this amazing TED Talk called what it takes to launch a telescope. The video has been watched online millions of times. If you speak with her, you'll learn that she's no stranger to failure. It's a telescope that goes on a high altitude balloon, not on the ground or in space. And I've been working on it since 2008, so it's getting to be almost 15 years now. Get ready for this ride. Search for compiler wherever you get your favorite podcasts..

Angela Andrews Brent semedo Kim Wong Erica hampden TED Talk university of Arizona hampden
"  deere" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

Rocketship.fm

02:13 min | 5 months ago

" deere" Discussed on Rocketship.fm

"Company that is 200 years old. Not exactly a startup. Well, either way, we can't wait to dig in and close out this mini series on digital transformations for Michael sokka and Christian E deoti, unlike belsito and this is rocket ship FM. Thank you so much for listening to rocket ship dot FM. It is your support that keeps the show going. If you can take a second and leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts, it helps out the show so much. We're also part of the network and if you'd like to listen to more great shows from the podglomerate, go do the hot glamorous dot com to see the full show listings. Rocket ship FM is produced in partnership with product collective, a community for product people, go to product collective dot com and get access to our weekly newsletter, live video interviews, slack community product job board, and a whole lot more. Again, just go to product collective dot com. This episode is brought to you by compiler, compiler is an original podcast from Red Hat, discussing tech topics, big, small, and strange comes to you from the makers of command line heroes in this hosted by Angela Andrews and Brent Seminole. Technology can be big, bold, bizarre, and complicated, but compiler unravels industry topics and trends through interviews with people who know it best. I checked out a recent episode of theirs all about tech hubs and they go through kind of the origin of how these tech hubs have traditionally come to be. And the most interesting part, they actually covered a new version of tech hubs that is completely decentralized. And not necessarily tied to a single city, which is what we're most likely going to see into the future. It also brought me back to my Vegas days with the rise and fall of Tony shays attempt to put Vegas on the map. Anyway, it's a great episode. Definitely check it out. You can listen to compiler on your favorite podcast player. We'll also include a link in the show notes. Now if you stay tuned at the end of this episode, we actually have a preview of compiler for you to check out. So make sure you do that. Again, our continued thanks.

"  deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

05:09 min | 7 months ago

" deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"On autonomy from a dear perspective. A drop in the bucket relative to where we can go from fully fully autonomy a farm. But to do that, the technical hurdles are significant, right? They're more significant than what you saw in the soybean stubble field yesterday, for example. If you think about the technical problem associated with standing crop and operating a machine through standing crop, it sort of conjures up in your mind this need for different sensor modalities, different ways to sense things within the environment. And those are all really hard technical problems that we're in the midst of solving as we speak. And that's what comes next. It's continuing to take the pace of change of technology that's as fast now as it's ever been and deploying it to use in agriculture to solve some of those really hard problems. And that's super exciting because it's happening at a breakneck pace right now. The farm ten years from now is going to look very different from the farm today. I have seen so many industries that don't have the level of precision that you're providing. Or that still overly rely on human labor and human error. Like, have you guys ever considered patenting some of this stuff like, you know, people can brag about their self-driving Tesla all they want. That tractor yesterday was ten times smarter than anything that I've seen. Is there like an idea of like bringing this to other industries or something? I don't know. I see so much opportunity. Yeah, it's an interesting idea. If Tesla wanted to talk autonomy, we'd be happy to share what we do with them. I think the ability to take the technology and deploy it more broadly as an interesting, it's an interesting idea. My view on that is the problem set that we have in front of us right now is big enough that that's what we're focused on. But I think the time comes, eventually, as we gain broader scale deployment of the technology, we solve more of the problems for us to investigate exactly what you're talking about. How do you deploy it in adjacent spaces? I've never seen so much complexity be addressed in such a simple manner. How many people do you have in R and D? Yeah, so the answer is a lot. And more all the time. And if people are interested in working in this area, you know, they should feel free to let me know. We love to talk to them. We have somewhere in the neighborhood of 5000 folks that work in an R and D capacity in some way, shape or form. It doesn't count the many tentacles of development that we do outside of the company as well. So a significant presence. And it's not just the technology that you see on the tech stack side of things. The stereo cameras that you got to experience yesterday. It's all the technology that goes into the basic equipment. Fundamentally, if the tractor doesn't do what the tractor needs to do, then it's all the technology in the world, it doesn't make any difference. Here's the thing. I had never heard the term stereo camera before. Yesterday. There you go. Yeah. It is the primary sensor modality that we're using for perception reasons because it gives us not only the image information, but it gives us depth. So we can measure the distance away from objects just with the cameras. Anything else you'd like to add? This is the beginning of a long road of continue to change agriculture and it's exciting. As a farm kid, this is exciting stuff to think about how we can take this technology and continue to make farming more productive, more sustainable and a better quality of life for the people who get up every day to feed us. Who came up with the idea of the swipe on the app, by the way. You like it, don't you? I like that a lot. I like, it's like this dashboard. And it turns into this like command center. And it's just so quick and simple, so practical, and then you just get it to work. Probably my last question is, you don't only deal with the complexities of farming, per se. You deal with infrastructure. There is no signal here. The fact that you were able to figure out how to get that tractor to work, even without signal for me was fascinating. Does that affect how many hurdles that you have to jump to figure that out? So the tractor has to be in cell connection with a network. It doesn't have to be a great connection. We send a heartbeat signal. So we have to know what's happening with the tractor at all times. And to your point, that's one of the challenges that we face in real environments is that connectivity challenge. Real connectivity is a big deal. And it's increasingly highly putting communities that don't have great connectivity to disadvantage, not just to use autonomy and agriculture, but for all the other things that connectivity brings. I really appreciate this. This has been great. You don't do this often, and I really appreciate this. In my opinion, and this is just the personal thought. I do consider John Deere to be as much a tech company if not a more advanced tech company than any of the others that I've worked with before. And this has been fascinating. Thank you for the experience. And I really do hope we do it again. We will, for sure. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you for.

Tesla John Deere
"  deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

06:16 min | 7 months ago

" deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"Sustainability of growing more with less getting the most out of every acre with as few inputs as we can. And so all of this precision that's been built up for 20 years has been focused on doing exactly that, reducing overlap. Not having skips in the field, making sure we're putting the right product in the right place at the right time. And this is just that next step in driving that sense of precision to make sure we're doing each job as well as we can. I actually think it's the next big change in the mechanization of agriculture. If you think about how mechanized agriculture happened, the labor required to operate the machine and the machine were both required to do the job. I had to have the labor and the person to operate and you had to have the machine. Autonomy represents an opportunity to decouple those two things. You no longer need the person for the machine to operate. And that represents a huge step full function change and the ability for growers to produce and feed a growing world population. And it opens up all sorts of interesting possibilities for ways to better manage the work ways to better manage the farm ways to better manage the outcome to your point, the job quality that consistency is associated with that because the machines doing the work and it's doing it the same. An hour one is it is on our 24. That's a huge unlock for growers. I'm really interested on your projections. Obviously, you're making this very easy. It's again, you don't need to buy a new vehicle. You've made the system where people can literally just adapt it. And you're still giving the farmer the liberty to be the farmer if they want. What do you see about adoption? How much do you see within a 100%? Do you think that it's going to be like a quick impact people are going to just react to it or you think it's going to take some time? What's your vision on this? You know what? I think it really is up to us to make it as you're pointed out easy for the farmer to adopt. I think we're on a path to do that. But every farm is unique. Every farm has got different challenges and different pieces of technology that they can adopt on their farm. Not all farms are even using auto track. Well, probably 75 to 80% of the acres farmed out there are using that technology, there's still a number of farmers who aren't using it yet. So I think our opportunity is to continue to show the value that autonomy can bring to continue to bring more and more jobs that can be done, autonomously, and we'll see farmers adopt these sorts of technologies based on what they need on their farm is labor their biggest issue, then I think those farmers will probably adopt these technologies. But some farms have enough labor. And so maybe they'll look to other technologies that are more about precise placement of seed or precise placement of crop nutrition or crop protection products versus this technology. But over time, I think it's only inevitable that autonomy will play a huge part in how agriculture gets at work. It's work done just simply because of the macroeconomic trends of available labor and the need to grow even more food to feed the world. And so it will take some time for farmers to drive confidence in it, and that's our job is to help them understand that this can do as good or a better job than they can do. And that it's easy to adopt into any farming system. That also add that I think the market's ready. I think adoption will be relatively quick compared to how it's been in the past because we've been in the market for two decades with tractors that are hands free as an example. And so growers operators are accustomed to the technology and they actually ask us, why do I have to be in here anymore, right? Right. And so I think there's this expectation almost in the market that this is going to happen. And it's going to happen in agriculture. And that when it does, people are ready for it. They expect it to happen. And I think that sort of pent up demand in the marketplace bodes well for adoption. And I think what's unique about farming is we didn't go from zero tech to full tech overnight. It is literally been 20 years of a process of doing this. And so there are a number of farms who are waiting and asking for that next opportunity to make their farm even better. How's your experience been in other countries? Because you told me a lot about your travels and where you've been and how adoption has been there as well. Yeah, yeah. This isn't just about U.S. agriculture. This is about global agriculture. And there is an opportunity to continue to bring technology to every production system around the world, whether it's a sugarcane farm in Brazil, a wheat farm in Russia or Western Europe or the broad acres of Canada. We are thinking about how can we bring these technologies to each of the production systems that our customers operate in? Because they're all unique. They all bring different challenges. But we start with the same tech stack that Jamie's organization creates. And then we think about how do we have to tweak it to make it work into a different system. And I think that's the power that John Deere's been able to create for farmers is we can bring a common set of tools because of our deep understanding of how they operate in their system. We can tweak them to make them work in their unique surroundings, whether that's their country, whether that's their political areas, or whether it's the different crops that they all farm in. And I think it's a really astute observation. It's not just about bigger, faster, stronger, any longer, right? It's also because of the state of technology in the world today. It's about smarter as well. How do you make the equipment smarter? How do you make the equipment intelligent to pass on its information to the next piece of equipment in the production system? And that idea of smarter equipment, that plays across the world. It's not just a U.S. agriculture opportunity. It's a global agriculture opportunity. I'm curious as to the vision. What's next? What are you guys working on that at least you could talk about that excites you the most of whatever is coming up? Yeah, for me it's this notion of the system that Jamie just talked about. That within farming, when I'm planting the information I have at planting can help me spray my crop better. The information I can glean while I'm spraying my crop in.

Western Europe U.S. Brazil Jamie John Deere Russia Canada
"  deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

04:55 min | 7 months ago

" deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"This autonomous tractor will detect things on its own. But tell me more about that. What's safety features were added? Well, safety was definitely our number one priority as we developed this system. Obviously, we want to productive tool that's easy to use, but it has to be safe and so safety was number one as we thought about this machine. And what's different about us compared to automotive is that we don't have to make the decision as to whether to go left or go right or stay straight on a road if an obstacle comes because we're in the middle of a cornfield in Minnesota, we can just stop. And so the system is really focused on just stopping if it sees any anomalies, anything out front that it didn't expect, or even anything with the tool that maybe doesn't look like it's supposed to look or something breaks on the tool. It can sense that, hey, that's not how it's supposed to look. And I'll stop and alert the farmer that hey, something's wrong, you might want to come look at it. But we also know that we can't constantly alert the farmer if a dog or a fox comes out and the tractor has to stop. And there's also shadows. We're outside and the sun and other things. And so there's a lot of reasons why the tractor might stop because it sees an anomaly that we don't want to alert the farmer for. So we're using some third party support. That will take a look at what the tractor is seeing. And within 30 seconds, it's looking at the image that the tractor saw that made it stop. And it's giving the tractor the command to go ahead and start again. If it was a shadow or a bird or something else, that caused it to stop. But our ability to just stop and check to make sure everything is safe is really a differentiator to bring autonomy to agriculture compared to other industries. Right. No, for me, that was probably one of the most I was like, no, I was in a car accident. I fell asleep on the wheel. Oh man. So it was really bad. And I, you know, I've noticed how vehicles today will, you know, they'll have their radar systems. They'll be able to steer a little for you. They'll be able to detect the car in front of you. This is that looks like baby software. Compared to this. Well, and for 20 years, we've had a number of alerts in the system, right? Because we've been self-driving in the field with an operator in the seat for a long time. And so we've had to deal with that because on long stretches, you could go a mile in one direction in a straight line. We did want to make sure that no one fell asleep, right? That when they got to the edge of the field, that they turned around. And so we've created alerts around the boundaries and things to say, okay, it's time to make sure you're ready to stop distractor and turn it around. And then in addition to the perception safety, how many something people don't often think about is when you take the operator out of the cab of the tractor, the reliance that you had on that operator detecting mechanical failures, things that could go wrong with the tractor is now gone, right? And so we've had to think about that in the context of safety, so things like redundant braking systems. We not only break with what we call the service breaks on the tractor, but we can break the machine and stop it with the transmission as well as an example. So those are the things that you have to think about when you take the human out of the loop, so to speak and you're relying on the tractor to be able to not only make the decisions about whether to move or stop. But then be able to execute on those actions. And technically, for what I saw in jute in July, the pretty much the tractor was already self-driving. You just added systems to it, but you were already doing that for a while. For me, what I saw in Iowa, mostly was like, okay, yeah. You know, I go through the fields and I see everything so well lined. So I'm like, I don't drive that straight. The addition is to make sure we're historically, we have driven through the field, operator in the seat hands free, even now turning on the ends with something we call auto track turn automation, which does the whole field without the farmer ever touching the steering wheel. But that's just the point a to point B element of autonomy that farming has had for a long time. It's really this notion of job quality and the ability of the perception systems to identify anomalies going on with the job to say, hey, we're not doing it like we should have. These are complex systems. And while it doesn't happen often, things break. And we needed to make sure we had that system built in to make sure we were doing a good job because no one's going to buy autonomy if it does a worse job than a manned system. It has to do as good or better in order for farmers to want to put it into their farm, because this is a system and the next job is impacted by the job that went before it. So if you mess up or have an issue, it probably means some serious rework or it impacts your ability to grow a healthy abundant crop next year. This perfection is really at the foundation of sustainability of growing more with less getting the most out of every acre with as few inputs as we can. And so all of this precision that's been built up for 20 years.

Minnesota Iowa foundation of sustainability o
"  deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

06:15 min | 7 months ago

" deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"It's a seasonal effort, agriculture is seasonal. And so when you need labor, you really need labor, but you don't need it all year long. And so attracting the constant source of labor is difficult when it's a seasonal seasonal type of effort. And just the intensity that is around the labor intensity that's still within agriculture makes it difficult to attract enough labor into doing the jobs that need to be done. So often those jobs don't get done. Plus the precision, like my dad, I grew up a farmer. And he had told me the importance of, for example, a seed to be planted at a specific height for like that alone, how important that is, the separation. I can't imagine human beings being able to do that precisely for over and over and over on a cornfield this large. And let's talk about the tractor particularly, or more of the system, I guess, because anybody that owns at 8 R could just adapt the system to their tractor. It's like, you don't need to buy a new tractor for this, correct? Yeah, the system is intended to be a retrofit solution that it can go on a tractor that you already own. And attractor is a Swiss Army knife. It doesn't number of jobs on the farm, not all of them will be ready for autonomy right off the bat. So the tractor definitely needs to be able to do all the jobs on the farm. And over time, more and more of those will get done autonomously. Okay, what particular crafts are already supported, for example? We're starting with the job of preparing the field after harvest is our first step. But you can imagine that all of these jobs need to be done in a timely fashion. At the same time as other jobs. And so whether it's spraying or planting or someday even harvest, other will likely be autonomous solutions for farmers to manage their farms from wherever they are. So give me a typical day for farmer. Wake up in the morning, make your coffee and tractors out there. What's their day going to look like, for example? Well, I think they'll definitely be monitoring it. We've got cameras and video feeds to be able to see what's been done. They'll be working to understand how much time until that field is done. Because they're going to need to either add fuel to it or move the tractor from field a to field B but while that tractor is running and preparing the field for next year's planting season, they'll likely be doing something else that's critical at that time, like getting in their combine. And combining the field next door, or moving grain, you know, as green comes out of the field, it's not dry enough typically to just go right into the bin. So they've got to dry it to get it ready to be stored. Or they have to move it to get ready to sell it to the market. And so there are just a number of things. Always happening at once that the farmer will take his attention from what used to be maybe tilling that field to something that's more important for their eyes to be on at that time. There's also a quality of life play here too, right? They may be doing something not farm related with the time that they're saving while their tractors doing whatever it needs to do in the field. And that's a huge benefit to a farmer who might work today in harvest 16, 18 hours a day. Doing nothing but far more, right? That's a significant improvement to the quality of life. We were on a farm last week where a farmer was using this technology. And he said, hey, I get to go to my son's football game tonight, right? Think about the fall in the Midwest, Friday night lights and football is a big deal. And a lot of times farmers miss those opportunities because they have to get the crops out of the field. Tell me more about the technology because another thing that fascinated me is the control of the tractor with your phone. And the immediate reaction of the tractor. Swipe. And just an immediate reaction of the alerts and just boom. Press a stop button, and there was no delay. In an area where signal is not really amazing, it was just an immediate reaction. Like tell me more about how this works. Sure. So there's stereo cameras around the vehicle, stereo cameras are the primary perception mechanism, the sensor modality that we use. And we're constantly surveilling 360° around the tractor and the implement, which is important. So different than automotive, perhaps we've got to worry about not just the tractor, but also whatever is behind the tractor and the job that it's doing. So that's unique and different and it makes it a little more complicated, perhaps than what the automotive industry faces today. And then to your point, we use John Deere operations center. It is the common front end the digital tool that our growers are accustomed to using. It's where their data is stored. It's where they manage their farm. And so that is the front end for this application, right? They have the ability within John Deere operation center to do exactly what you saw yesterday. Start that mission plan for whatever the tractor needs to do in that field. And swipe and initiate motion. And so in that swiping action, the tractor is surveilling the 360° around the tractor making sure that it's safe to start motion and initiate motion it warns people in the local environment that it's that it's going to start. And then it's off and running. And from that point on the customer, the grower can really manage that through the application on their mobile device. And so in the morning you will pretty much just turn on your app, go to the tractor, make sure that everything's set. You feel it. And then you will I was noticing that there is no need for hardware in the field to tell the tractor what the limits are. You will do everything digitally on your phone. Yeah, because in preparation for the season or maybe even ten years ago, the farmer drew the boundaries of their field to manage all of their guidance lines and other things that have been around for two decades. So we've got a digital twin basically of that field that tells us where the edges of the field are, and the GPS on the tractor tells us where the tractor is. And we make sure that the tractors always inside of that field. Obviously, safety is a concern. We have this is not a Toyota Camry. You know, I was thinking about that yesterday. What am I more concerned about? An automated tractor or a tired farmer, driving the tractor, where in the case of the non automated tractor with a driver that's been there for 16 hours, there is nothing stopping that thing in case something pops up..

Swiss Army football John Deere Midwest Camry Toyota
"  deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

06:10 min | 7 months ago

" deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"Thanks, Dan. My name is Jamie hyneman. I'm the chief technology officer for John Deere. My responsibility is really to build up the tech stack that all the products that the Anna just mentioned, that technology gets deployed on to put to useful, useful purpose for the customers that we serve. I'm going to start with a little story. I was in Iowa in July. You show us the place, drove a tractor, drove a combine, had this great experience. And then we have dinner. And you guys saw me go all crazy about what we did there. But you didn't tell me anything about what I just saw. It's really hard not to. How hard was that? You kept this under wraps, like come on. Well, there's so much technology for us to share. It was actually easy to make sure that we wowed you with all of the technology that's already out in the market that farmers are using every day on fields all over the world. So we didn't need to let this cat out of the bag because we had so many other great technologies to share that all have built up to this point in time where we have the opportunity to drive autonomously in the field across many, many acres of farmland. Now give me a little backstory because our top of mind is if we hear about artificial intelligence, we think Tesla, we think Qualcomm. We don't think of John Deere. And that's probably one of the biggest misconceptions. But I obviously would like to know more about the backstory of what I just saw with this automated tractor. This is the culmination of how many years of work. I would say 20 years, which is probably part of the reason why we keep it such a good secret. Technology and agriculture, I may as you well understand now is one of the best kept secrets. It's highly technical industry, technology driven farmers are early adopters of technology generally. So this autonomous tractor really has been in the works for I would argue 20 years since we started to put satellite navigation on tractors in 2002 time frame, and they started driving themselves through the field with an operator in the operator station. Now why automation and farming? I guess that would be like the biggest question is before that trip I did not see John Deere's a tech company. And now for me, I honestly have a hard time seeing you as a farming company just. But why automation informing? Yeah, there's several reasons why automation has become so important in farming. And it really comes back to the purpose of every day, getting up to feed the world and clothe the world. And today, in farming, timing is really critical. If you miss your planting window by a day, you can sacrifice a percent of your yield every day that you missed that planting window. If you miss spraying a weed, it can grow four to 7 inches in a day. And not be able to be terminated and can impact the yield in your crop. So timing is really, really important. Then there's a ton of uncertainty. We're here in Minnesota today where it's going to rain most of the day. So not a lot of farming can get done today, but there's crop out there standing in the field waiting to be harvested or a field waiting to be prepared for next spring. And if the snow comes, they'll miss that opportunity. So the uncertainty of weather adds a whole nother set of variables to that timing issue. And then finally, people are moving from rural areas where food is grown to urban areas. And so the available labor to grow the food that we all eat is decreasing as well. So farmers need that automation to ensure that they can get the job done in a timely fashion and do it super precisely, literally at inch by inch to make sure that they can get the most out of the land each and every year. And I think that's an important distinction to autonomy as people generally understand it. We're interested in autonomy and agriculture, not just driving the tractor from point a to point B but it has to do a useful job in the process, right? And tillage or planting or whatever the case might happen to be. It's not just the act of moving the machine and its occupants from point a to point B, but it has to do the job that the farmer expects it to do. And it has to do that in a way that generates a lot of confidence that it's being done in the proper way. So the farmer has confidence in the actual work that's being done, because if it doesn't do the job well, their business suffers as a consequence. I think that that's probably what struck me the most. In economies of scale, in a country as big as this one, and I was showing my son yesterday how if you don't have a combine. It's impossible for humans to be able to harvest all this land in the amount of time that a combine can do it. I know that it's always this concern about labor. And it's probably one of the questions that I do have here. We have to worry about giving jobs and everything. Yes, we do. But can humans actually do it? Give me an example of a combine. What time does it take for the harvest of a mile, for example? Yeah, so X 9 combine is an example of our largest combat. I think you had the opportunity to see that this summer when you were in island in July. That machine will harvest 40 acres of farm ground in good corn production per hour. So if you think about that to your point, it's just not humanly possible for us to have enough labor to harvest 40 acres of corn in an hour. And that's not just taking the ears of corn off the stock. It's shelling all the corn off of the ears, processing the corn, making sure that it's clean, clean grain, right? So that it's useful for the next step in the agricultural production. And then I noticed that there's even a camera that will tell the farmer how the corn is coming out. Exactly. Right there. Yep. And change the settings of the combine to make sure it's not putting too much pressure and cracking the kernels, but also not too little pressure to let material other than grain like cobs and leaves into the grain tank. Because the farmers paid for a clean, damage free sample. And so for them, it's really important. And so those cameras aren't just their to help the farmer see. They're making the decisions that a farmer used to make on how to set that finely tuned machine to run as optimally as it can. And last week in Nebraska, we were able to demonstrate delivering 93 semi.

John Deere Jamie hyneman Qualcomm Tesla Iowa Dan Minnesota Nebraska
"  deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

01:57 min | 7 months ago

" deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"And so if I swipe this, it's gonna be ten seconds. We're gonna take off. So let me know if you're ready. Let's do it. Okay. So what you're hearing then is our startup slash warning sequence. So if there happened to be any bystanders in the area, it's a signal that hey, this tractor is about to do work. And then we're off and running. Okay then. So we're going to finish the pass we're on. In a second here, it'll be in that old metal signal. We are going to raise the tillage tool behind us. We're going to make the turn. As you can see, we're going to turn to the left here and then this is CES 2022 and I'm currently at the John Deere booth and for those of you wondering why John Deere is at CES. Let me just put this to you in perspective. I'm not sitting on a Tesla. No, but the tractor that I'm sitting on is fully autonomous. And there are so many questions as to why. Why is automation important informing? And why has John Deere taken such a giant leap that many companies are still struggling to figure out? We had a full interview with their leadership team and trust me, we delve into all these questions. I'm hanging everywhere with pocket now and this is our interview. Jamie Indiana. Thank you for doing this. We had this very interesting podcast with Josh, who wanted to be here. And for him, it was like, what were you doing in Iowa? That was the whole topic like why? Because we've been doing tech. I've been doing tech for ten years. And the last thing I would have ever expected is to see deer as a tech company. But let's just start with your formal introductions, your positions, and.

John Deere Jamie Indiana Tesla Josh Iowa
Deere workers approve 3rd contract offer, will end strike

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 9 months ago

Deere workers approve 3rd contract offer, will end strike

"Striking workers approve a new contract with John Deere some ten thousand John Deere workers members of the United auto workers union approved a new six year contract that includes a ten percent raise and eighty five hundred dollar ratification bonuses the deal also calls for five percent raises in years three and five and three percent bonuses in years to four and six and preserves a pension option for new employees makes workers eligible for health insurance sooner and no premium health insurance coverage the vote ends a strike to begin October fourteenth dear has predicted it could see record annual profits as high as five point nine billion dollars when it releases its earnings report later this month unions in general are more inclined at this time to ask for more because of the ongoing worker shortages and long hours workers have been putting in during the pandemic I'm timid wire

John Deere United Auto Workers Union
More than 10,000 John Deere workers go on strike at 14 U.S. plants

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 10 months ago

More than 10,000 John Deere workers go on strike at 14 U.S. plants

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting deer and company workers go on strike after rejecting a contract offer more than ten thousand workers at fourteen Deere and company plants in five states what on strike Thursday in the first major walk out of the company in more than thirty years members of the United auto workers rejected an offer from deer earlier in the week of five percent raises for some workers and six percent raises for others rejected offer would have paid top scale their production workers just over thirty dollars per hour rising to thirty one dollars eighty four cents after five years the agricultural machinery giant known for its green tractors enjoyed a pandemic Boone gear is expected to report record profits of between five point seven billion dollars and five point nine billion dollars this year hi

Mike Rossi Deere United Auto Workers
I Bought It. Why Can't I Fix It?

Slate's If Then

01:53 min | 1 year ago

I Bought It. Why Can't I Fix It?

"Several years ago journalists and kepler was on his very first work trip. He was an intern. Us news and world report. At the time he was excited. We did carry okay the first day and i got a little bit drunk. Nothing crazy but i fell asleep with my laptop in my bed watching comedy or something like on netflix. When jason woke up the laptop had moved down to the end of the bed without him realizing it and what happened next. Has that painful almost slow motion quality that anyone who is broken anything expensive knows all too well kicked it off the edge of the bed and the lcd broke on on me laptops. So the screen wasn't broken but if you opened it was just us all kinds of crazy colors and tickets be apple store and they wanted seven hundred dollars exit money that jason. An intern did not have so. We figured why not try to fix this thing myself he went on ebay and found a replacement. Lcd screen for fifty bucks. A fraction of the price that apple had quoted him and then he found some instructions online. It actually took me like ten hours to do like couldn't get the screen off. And i remember at one point. It was like four in the morning. And i grabbed in exacto knife which is not something you want to take the wires but i was just so frustrated and i just couldn't get the screen off to put the new one end eventually jason fixed screen and he used that computer for six years but the experience opened his eyes to a really important story in the tech world. One that he's been covering ever since it made me think like. Why does it cost so much to do this. It costs so much to get a device repaired by the manufacturer. And it's so hard to do it yourself because manufacturers from apple to samsung to microsoft. John deere make it that way.

Jason Kepler Netflix Apple Ebay United States Samsung John Deere Microsoft
"  deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

02:43 min | 1 year ago

" deere" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"Here's what was that like. Oh do well. A lot of it was kind of boring. Because you all you had to do. Autopilot follow the map and then it would automatically route itself automatically turn itself. you'd automatically connected to the other tractor. You could do those crazy. it'd be. Yeah we did a little bit. There's no manual. like no. of course the automation was the crazier part town. And then for me. It was like awesome to meet like their current. Cto and be in the vp. Like it's interesting the vp. For example of of their tech industry is the designer of the tractor. Pretty much the the show the of their technology department and is just dude to like to sit down with the person that actually designed tractor seats a lot of form that a lot of the operation. A lot of the technologies to you know. I was starstruck in a lot of this. But it's interesting once you get to meet these people after you've tried it and then there's like why did they explain it to you like this. Has the purpose of this. The cooler is there because the dude some of these farmers are in the truck for like four hours. Fourteen hours fourteen hour days and this and this is all stuff that the average i'll use consumer yes doesn't realize about dude i'm like oh my god you know. I can't tell these companies to pan. Whatever it is that they do but it is just really interesting to see how certain like you would have never assumed that. Agriculture was so modern. Who would have ever told you that. Agriculture was so modern at the that other industries were just so behind do they do they ever talk about. Let's say perception of farming today ever kind of soothing. All the time okay and it has a lot to do with like it's interesting. The first tractors that they built john deere like one hundred years ago infrastructure that they design actually designed it with horse rains. I think i've seen that one right. So the reason why they did that is because they had a problem with farmers wanting to use their horses so they tried to make the tractor as similar to a horse's possible and so it's the same thing like they don't remove like if you want the tractor to be fully manual and operated on your own you can but it's not because they need for it to be it's just because even the perception of farmers lot of these men are in their sixty seventy s. They don't wanna stop farming and so they want to continue feeling link the tractors something they control so its that perception then..

john deere
What Did Boo Weekley Buy With His Million Dollar Win Wires?

Fore The People

01:57 min | 1 year ago

What Did Boo Weekley Buy With His Million Dollar Win Wires?

"All right, boo. This is a personal question. All right. I've wondered this, so I never got a winner's wire, all right? So like the next Wednesday, right? You get your wire and you get you get $1.3 million or whatever. From whatever you want, the week before. Yeah, we had wires, but I never got a winners wire. What did you buy with a one point whatever, $1.2 million of a winner's wire after you won one of those terms? Was it a bulldozer? I mean, if I'm thinking about you, I'm like, oh, he probably bought like an excavator or a bulldozer or like a gun. Like 15 guns. What did he buy? A big ass piece of property. What did you buy after a big ass winner's wire on the Wednesday? Because you get them on the Wednesday after tournament week. What did you buy after the Wednesday after tournament week? I'd say that Friday after the first tournament. 'cause I missed the cut in New Orleans. I went when I drove back home because it's only three Irish from my house in New Orleans. I stopped off at the John Deere store. And I bought me a 40 20. Yeah. John Deere tracker. With a front end loader. I got that on the first one, and then the second one about me a Corvette. Oh. About me, 2009, then I take that back. I didn't buy a Corvette that went out to me and Brant won. Players, something, though, some kind of little old gathering down there in South Florida. I bought a Corvette so that had been 2010. I bought that Corvette was the only other. That's the only two things I really bought. Like just a spur of the moment by, but I bought me some money and with all the other money.

John Deere Store New Orleans Corvette John Deere Brant South Florida
Glover With a 64 at John Deere Ends 10 Years Without a Win

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Glover With a 64 at John Deere Ends 10 Years Without a Win

"Lucas Glover is earned his first PGA victory in a decade by taking the John Deere classic by two shots in Illinois Glover birdied five of his final seven holes for a seven under sixty four that wrapped up his fourth career win and first since twenty eleven at quail hollow still play twenty five six seven events a year and I still can honestly say I come back and I can do it and but never doubted that Glover finished his run with a twelve foot birdie on the par five seventeen th and then a six foot putt to save par from the bunker on eighteen Ryan Moore and Kevin knight tied for second following sixty eights for others finished three shots back I'm Dave very

Lucas Glover Glover John Deere PGA Illinois Kevin Knight Ryan Moore Dave
"  deere" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

04:20 min | 1 year ago

" deere" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"The website where you go and get a plan get organized. Let's talk about the john deere. Classic rick and leading up to the british interesting field in terms of perhaps as we've talked about some opportunities to find soft spots in the market There will be some guys as always with opportunity to get into the british field on the line. How do you approach a week like this and we always talk about the guy you've got to have when there's a field without big names. Is there a guy you have to have or do you go about building a card in a different way rick. They're certainly guys. I have to have but it is just a little jarring when you're paying essentially two thousand dollars more for every single one of these names that you normally pay for just got up to readjust then reassess Kind of change your perspective a little bit. I mean the someone like a kevin in to me. He's ninety seven hundred dollars on draftkings. There's a handful of guys more expensive than am. I find him to be pretty intriguing. He i believe he has legitimate winning upside. We have seen him do that in much more difficult fields over the course of his career. He's starting to a lot better. Which is great for him because he's been generally sour for most of his career and he came off. Miscut really missed the cut by a shot. Which i don't really care about but the four stars before that have all been top twenty so i think he's someone that Is sneaky live to win this golf tournament. Rick rick run. Good dot com. Gimme another guy or two that you believe in a field like this has legitimate a win or at least be in the mix on sunday capability. Yeah i think. I think it's a very short list but the one that i think is miss price. The most is probably kramer. Hickok seventy seven hundred and he's probably like sixty sixty one or seventy two one depending on where you're looking he is. I was impressed. Not only with the fact that he went eight holes harrison english and a playoff two weeks ago. But that's that could very easily been a draining experience. The fact that even made the cut last week in detroit on of course. That probably doesn't fit him. That well i thought was impressive. So now he goes to a place. That is a much better fit. We know trending in the right direction. We know he's kind of knocking on the door a little bit. I think he's one of the few guys further down the list. That actually has win equity rick one of the things that i do. Is i scan the cheat sheet looking for guys as i get a little bit lower a little bit lower who maybe last year at this time. From a draft kings pricing perspective would have been much higher and We talk about guys and the runs that they go on from a perception standpoint..

rick Miscut john deere Rick rick kevin Hickok kramer golf harrison detroit
Caller Reminds Us That There Is Some Hope in America

The Dan Bongino Show

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Caller Reminds Us That There Is Some Hope in America

"And scared. Love the show I wanted to report about the Good America parade over the fourth Small town. The first four. Float. Idaho First four floats who are the biggest greenest, cleanest John Deere harvesters you've ever seen in your life, followed by three or four big clean fire tracks, all decked out and flags. And then cheerleaders and then the middle school on a flatbed playing on their band. Uh, God bless America, uh, gives you some hope, doesn't it, Cindy? Yeah, it just it did. I just left with the warmest feeling like everything is going to be okay. I hope so. Cindy. Part of us. The heart of us is good. Yeah, I hope so. Well, thanks for your call. I appreciate we needed that producer Mike and Jim were like, Listen, such a dour topic. Take Cindy. Thank you, Cindy. We appreciate the call. I hope she's right, folks. You know, I do. But that was when I opened up the show with

Cindy America John Deere Idaho Mike JIM
"  deere" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

06:28 min | 1 year ago

" deere" Discussed on Recode Decode

"You know to to your point with a tractor and a planter and that tracker implant or taking the prescription that the farmer developed with the the yield data that they took from the previous harvest. And they're using that prescription to apply changes to that field in real time right as they're going through the field with the existing data from the yield map and the data in real time that they're collecting with the tractor to modify things like seating rate and modify things like fertilizer rate and all of those things in order to make sure that they're minimizing the inputs to the operation while at the same time working to maximize the output and that data then is going into the cloud in their referencing. It that track for example that the tractor in the planter took through the field is being used to inform the sprayer when the sprayer goes into the field after emergence in the crops. Come out of the ground. It's being used to inform that sprayer with the optimal path is to drive through the field in order to spray only what needs to be sprayed and no more to damage the crop. The least amount possible all in an effort to to optimize that productivity at the end of year to to make that yield map that is the scorecard a report card at the end of the year for the farmer to make that. Turn out to have a better grade. That's a lot of data who collects. It is a john deere collecting ed. Can i hired a third party sas software company to manage that data for me. How does that part work. Yeah great question. So i would say a a significant amount of that. Data's collected on the fly while the machines are are in the field and its collected the case of deer machines by dear equipment running through the field There are other companies that create the data and they can be imported into things like the deer operation center so that you have the data from whatever source that you wanted to collected. I think the important thing there is this storm. It's been more difficult to get the data off the machine because of connectivity limitations into a database that you can actually do something with it today You know the disproportionate number machines enlarge. Agriculture are connected. They're connected through terrestrial cell networks. They're streaming data bi directionally for to the cloud and back from the cloud and so that data connectivity infrastructure. That's been built out over. The last decade has really enabled two way communication and and has taken sort of the friction out of getting the data off of a mobile piece of equipment And so it's happening seamlessly for that operator. And and that's a benefit because they can act on it then and more near real time as opposed to having to wait for somebody to upload data at some point in the future. Tuesday is the farmers data. John deere's as their terms of service agreement for a combine has certainly turned to service agreement that our positions pretty simple. It's it's the farmer's data. They control it so if they want to share it through an api with somebody that is a trusted adviser from from their perspective. They have the right to do that. if they don't wanna share it they don't have to do that. It is their data to control. Is it portable. I mean when. I say there are computer problems here. I'm like ken. y tractor. Deliver an excel file like. Yeah they certainly can export the data in in form factors that are convenient for them. And they do they'll spreadsheet. Math is still routinely done on the farm they can utilize a spreadsheet to do to do some basic data analytics. If they want. I would tell you though that that what's happening. Is that the amount of data that is being collected in in curated and made available to them to draw insights from is so massive while you can still use spreadsheets to manipulate some of it. It's just not tractable in all cases and so now that's that's why we're building functionality into things like the operation center to help do data analytics and serve up insights growers. It's their data. They can choose to to look at the insights or not but we consider those insights up to them because the data an analysis part of this problem is becoming significantly larger because the data sets are so complex and large. Not to mention the fact that you've got more data coming in all the time. Different sensors are being applied. We can measure different things you know. There's unique pieces of information that are coming in and routinely building to this overall ecosystems of data that they have at their disposal. We've talked a lot about the feedback loop of data with machinery in particular. There's one really important component to this. Which is the seeds are a lot of manufacturers out in the world they want this data the gmo. They can adjust the seeds to different locations. Where do they come into the mix. The data from our perspective is is the. It's the farmer's data right. They're the ones who are controlling the access to it. So if they want to share their data with with someone that they are they have that ability to do it and the and they do today right. they'll they'll share their yield map with whoever their local seed seed salesman is right and and try to optimize the seed variety for the next planting season in the spring and so that data exists. It's not are so we're not at liberty to share it with eight companies and we don't it has to come through the grower because it's their productivity data that they're the ones that have the to share it. We don't have a lot of data. Maybe you can't share it widely but you can aggregate it. You must have a very unique view of climate change right. You must see where the food ways are. Moving or different kinds of crops are succeeding and failing. What is your view of climate change. How what is your perspective on it. Given the amount of data that you're taking it. Yeah it's a great question. The reality is for us that we're sort of hindered answering that question by the recency of the data as we have You know broadscale data acquisition from production. Agriculture is really only a five to ten year old phenomenon. Right and so the data sets are getting richer. They're getting better. We have the opportunity to see trends in that data across the data sets the it exists today. But i think it's too early. I don't think the data's mature enough yet for us to be able to draw any conclusions from a climate change perspective with respect of the data. That we have the other thing that i'll add. Is that the data. Intensity is not universal across the globe. Right so if you think of climate change and global perspective. We've got a lot of data for north america. A fair amount of data that gets taken by growers in in europe A little bit in in south america. But it's not rich enough across the global agricultural footprint for us to be able to make any sort of statements about how climate change is impacting..

south america europe north america Tuesday five today excel John deere ten year eight companies ken. y tractor last decade one two way deere
Episode 215-2: Leave the Gun, Take the McFlurry - burst 08

The Security Ledger Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Episode 215-2: Leave the Gun, Take the McFlurry - burst 08

"Mcdonalds email to its franchisees. Was basically as you said it said. You're you're voiding. The warranty on the taylor hardware which are basically required to us and you may be exposing your employees to bodily harm. Of course franchisees were would be. I guess free to ignore those warnings. Except for the fact that i think the the implicit message that e mail was that this that we don't want you using these things so you shouldn't use them right. Yeah you know it mentioned so it said that but it also mentions that it also mentioned confidential information in that You know kitsch access all of the systems confidential information and this is why again. I'm going back to your rights repair issues. These are the exact same arguments that you hear time and again from whatever that whether it's medical device whether it's an automobile whether it is a Home appliance the three legs of the stool. Our intellectual property warranty void warranty and physical harm and physical safety. Those are the three just kind of reliable like malaria. Curly of the of the anti repair argument is particularly interesting on this case about the mcdonald's machine because confidential information is is another again. I'm not I'm one of the last people to stand behind Or defense you know companies like apple and samsung but at least they make some effort right like some. Some efforts actually define what confidential information is. I mean if you look at this situation. The mcdonald's ice cream machine. They mentioned confidential information. But are there implies. It's their confidential information when really it's actually the owner of the machines confidential information but they never make that clear and so it's a it's a very interesting Head scratcher in which you like. What is going on with this machine and and the ecosystem lewis makes it while we're at it. Let's dispense with the warranty argument. Magnuson moss the federal warranty acmes. It really clear that you know you you do not void the warranty by having e either servicing it yourself or having an independent service person work on it or anything like that. So the whole you know by attaching to catch device you're voiding. The warranty is clearly not supported by federal law. But you're right. What this reminds me of. Actually a lot is the situation on farms right now with john. Deere and data that dedere equipment is collecting from farms soil moisture data weather data and sell on That deer considers it's proprietary information and in fact resells at a at a hefty profit and yet many people are like well. That's the farmers data. They should have a say into whether that gets collected and resold an and it would seem to be the same really the same question. Whose data is it. It's my franchise. My customers isn't it. My data But but apparently not well especially because it's not defined to and you know mcdonalds. John deere probably unfairly. Certainly in an unbalanced way makes the claim that it's their data. But taylor at mcdonald's in some taylor. Mcdonald's make no effort to actually define that or to try and make that argument. they just. It's very interesting. That taylor is a logo. This like nineteen seventy s or nineteen eighty s era kind of crowd. And it's like. They're they literally think they're king and they can just to create a stuff that oh by the way this void your warranty and guess. What is our confidential data. Like you know what you're not saying. This is america. You can't just decrease often have it happen. What do you think what was the response of the franchisees to that message. I guess from your standpoint as a business owner obviously it was a big blow to your business but did you hear back from them on on the specifics of that hoban who would. What do they mean at saturday dr that it was my data or any kind of questioning of that or is it more like. I don't want to kill the goose that lays the golden egg. And i'm just gonna do what they tell me to do and not ask was both. I think it was both. I mean. there's this is. It's both the same time it's like. Hey part of the system It's the system is doing a lot of things that i don't agree with but at the same time. I'm going to completely Sympathetic to catch. Because again it goes back to the rebellion of franchisees in the first place. Why would they have to you know when you when you kind of have to when you look at the existence and growth of kit which is basically a vaccine you know to to a virus that was created you have to. You can't acknowledge the growth of the vaccine without acknowledging the virus and so this this was obviously a slap in the face to the mcdonalds industrial complex that produces this machine but on one hand it was clearly a necessary vaccine technology that That the franchisees still stand behind they still use on so like use analogies and metaphors and it's kind of like being i never. I never supported the war in afghanistan right. But it's like. I'm still still in america so pay taxes so it's like on one hand you don't support this war effort and you don't support you're going there but it's like you're still part of this system and i as a citizen and very powerless to impact. What goes what goes on in washington support afghanistan. I'm not to pay my taxes. Because i don't want the money you know like i mean you can. You can certainly right. That's right the. Irs franchisees are are very much in the same situation. They're like listen we. This is their afghanistan where they don't

News Trends Executives Experts Interviews Cyber Security Samsung Apple Mcdonalds Mcdonald Nineteen Seventy S Nineteen Eighty S Era Three John John Deere ONE Three Legs Magnuson Moss Taylor Lewis Malaria Deere Hoban America Afghanistan Washington IRS
The WiFi Evangelist, Kevin Battistoni of Hunter Industries

The Sprinkler Nerd Show

01:57 min | 1 year ago

The WiFi Evangelist, Kevin Battistoni of Hunter Industries

"Kevin welcome to the show. Thank you andy. So let's get started kind of typical fashion. I love for you to share. Just how you got started in the irrigation industry. While betsy i had no choice i was kind of born into it. My family got their start in the allegation industry in the chicago. Land area back in nineteen twenty eight with a company by the name of mueller missed irrigation. Great grandfather and grandmother lived in the foothills of ohio. Close to west. Virginia Could make it on the farm so Came to chicago to work for family members in. I wanna say at that point. In time it was probably the forties Just pre world war two and mueller. Mr gatien was Where might it was. Actually i call on them to this day in in their garage that i did a training with their guys two weeks ago. It was subdivided into four parts. And that's where my family actually lived by. My grandfather was an unpaid employees from age. Thirteen to sixteen and Yeah he worked there till nineteen sixty one. Michael bob came to him. In sixty one said dave where starter o'hara gatien company in my grandfather was a licensed plumber Working year round raising four kids. Happy as can be was their number one service guy had all the north shore mansions you know. They love david day. He was the guy and he says bob. You don't even own a piece of equipment. He said that's no problem. I sold the john deere corporate headquarters. We have worked for the next nine months. So i don't know if you've ever seen the footprint of property they installed it in one hundred percent spray heads while now insult like the stories. I mean even run across the old systems. They sweat every ten foot length of copper in andy. There was no such thing as replacing ahead. You brought a file and brought a torch any fig while irrigation system. Probably cost more than now when you think about

Mueller Mr Gatien Chicago Michael Bob Betsy Hara Gatien Andy Kevin Ohio John Deere Corporate Headquart Virginia Dave BOB David
The Jobs Numbers: Who's Hiring in America

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:44 min | 1 year ago

The Jobs Numbers: Who's Hiring in America

"Hundred and forty. Five thousand is the number of the day on this thursday. At of course is the number of new applications for state unemployment benefits filed last week astronomically high as i think i've been saying every single thursday for going on a year now. The bureau of labor statistics is going to hit us with the jobs report for the month of february tomorrow. Another snapshot of how this economy is doing as a whole good in parts. Not so good in others. One part of the labor market. That is doing all right. Actually manufacturing marketplace's andy euler going where the jobs are. The john deere engine in tractor museum in waterloo iowa celebrates the history of mechanized agriculture but the museums hosting an event. This weekend. That is very much about the present a job. Fair randy venzke labor relations manager at john deere's waterloo works where they make those big yellow and green tractors the jobs that were currently focusing on our your general assembly. Some well living in some machining jobs. He says the company started its hiring push back in december quickly had over a thousand applicants. And we're able to fill more than two hundred jobs since then you know. The number of applications have really dropped off fact. We've received about hundred hundred ten applications in the past two weeks. He says they're trying to hire about three hundred more people by april problem is there's only about one hundred thirty thousand people in the county in unemployment is currently under four percent across the. Us manufacturing activity is up increasing three year high in february as consumer demand rebounded after the early stages of the pandemic manufacturing's been growing not quite for a year but for the last nine months. David berson is chief economist at nationwide insurance. Because it's been growing has needed workers and they're starting to run out of workers for whom manufacturing jobs or the appropriate physician and jed cocoa chief economist. The job website indeed dot com says. There's a skills mismatch between those hiring. And those seeking employment sectors have laid people off service leisure tourism and the sectors that have done a lot of hiring endemic manufacturing warehouse. Construction do require somewhat different skills and he says those industries that initially lay people off this time last year are starting to hire people back. I may dealer for marketplace a little bit lost in the news. Firehose today was data on fourth quarter worker. Productivity widgets produced for our work to is the very simple formula down four point two percent october through december the biggest drop in forty years. Not great. no but this is a little bit misleading in terms of understanding. What's going on you aren't s. Q is at the university of pennsylvania school of social policy and practice businesses that were not as productive normally just by the nature of the activity such as restaurants and so on have started reopening. So that drags down the average productivity and today's numbers not entirely unexpected. Well that's happening. There is what we call a regression to the mean. Now why are we telling you. This is amount of zilder is at the conference board. It is a basis for future living standards if productivity rises sustainably. That means that down the line Wages are going to be increasing on a more steady stable basis and so from the history matters filed this bit of context. Productivity growth was really sluggish after the great recession wage growth back then also super sluggish as well

Bureau Of Labor Statistics Andy Euler Tractor Museum John Deere Randy Venzke Waterloo David Berson Nationwide Insurance Jed Cocoa General Assembly Iowa University Of Pennsylvania Sch United States
The Latest: Trump follows tradition, leaves note for Biden

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: Trump follows tradition, leaves note for Biden

"President Donald Trump has followed at least one presidential tradition while there was no invitation to the White House for Joe Biden after he was declared the winner of the November election the Republican president did leave a note for his successor deputy press secretary Judd Deere didn't want to say what was in the notes citing privacy for communications between presidents trump has refused to publicly concede to bite in and did not mention the Democrat by name in a pair of farewell addresses he also interrupted many traditions of the presidency including by not attending bite into inauguration showing up there Washington

President Donald Trump Judd Deere Joe Biden White House Donald Trump Washington
Rumored Trump Trip to Scottish Golf Course Ruled Out of Bounds

C-SPAN Programming

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Rumored Trump Trip to Scottish Golf Course Ruled Out of Bounds

"The new Corona virus strain that first found in Britain has caused a near lockdown in that country, and that may effect may effect President Trump's travel plants. CNN reports that Scotland's first minister Nicolas Sturgeon, was asked during a news conference about unconfirmed Scottish media speculation. That Donald Trump could be planning a trip to one of his golf courses in Scotland around the time president of Joe Biden's inauguration on January 20th. Have no idea what Donald Trump's travel plans. Are You be glad to know. I hope and expect a Z. Everybody hopes, and it's what is everybody expects everybody necessarily will hope that the travel plan immediately that he has is there to exit the White House. But beyond that, I don't. I don't know, but it's not. You know, we're not Loving people to come in to Scotland for a without an essential purpose right now, and that would apply to him just as applies to anybody. Edelson come into play golf is not what I would consider to be an essential purpose. Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon White House deputy press Secretary Judd Deere, telling CNN anonymous sources who claim to know what the president is or is not considering have no idea when President Trump has an announcement about his plans for January. 20th he will let you know.

President Trump Nicolas Sturgeon Donald Trump Scotland CNN Joe Biden Britain Golf Scottish First Minister Nicola Edelson White House Judd Deere
Farming Simulator is getting its own e-sports league

Esports Minute

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Farming Simulator is getting its own e-sports league

"Simulator lead keeps on rambling with three new sponsors for its third season. I'm a dreams and this is the Esports minute presented by E Sports Network. Yeah. You heard me right? It's the Farming Simulator league and it's exactly what it sounds like now entering its third season than Farming Simulator league is an actual a sport they compete at events like farmcon and agritechnica with a total price pulled over $250,000 for the third season of The League the FSM as it's known to fans of digital Farm speed running has welcomed three new sponsors and they aren't just some run-of-the-mill Brad's the developer. The game Giants software has welcomed on Intel Core Teva agriscience and not know until I imagine doesn't need an explanation. I think most gamers are probably familiar with the company Court Ava agriscience is an Agriculture and see company on the atrato is a provider of servers for Gamers Club. The best part is these are the overall event sponsors the actual teams all have their own sponsors as well including a bunch of leading agriculture and farming Brands John Deere Lindner and chrome return this year alongside defending Champions Trio board Wheel Systems. That's the name of the team. The team is called trelleborg Wheel Systems. They also welcomed on new Ross. I can't it's got some money. I'm trying not to laugh. This is legitimate. He's sport new rosters represented by voltra Manitou and Rudolph hormon. We'll all make their debuts in season three besides just being a funny part of these Sports industry. I think the FSL really highlights a key lesson four Brands, even if you don't think your brand or company fits neatly into the Esports and gaming worlds. There is always a way to build me a connection with the gaming audience. You just need to know where to look for partners. If more simulator base League start taking off. This could be a way to bring in a wide variety of brands in air travel Trucking down more if they want to connect with the Esports and gaming world.

Farming Simulator League Esports Developer Trelleborg Wheel Systems Ross John Deere Lindner Ava Agriscience E Sports Network Giants Wheel Systems Gamers Club FSL Intel Rudolph Hormon Digital Farm Teva Brad FSM
"  deere" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

04:20 min | 2 years ago

" deere" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Face this is the tech companies those lines of law we are in a hybrid ecosystem where bits pixels are intermingling with the atoms. Right arm the company transitioning into a data company and not as the evolution. We are on so I'm curious and I'm not asking this from a I want the inside Scuba John Deere necessarily but from your role being in a farming industry and looking at technology trends of twenty thirty. What are some of the biggest challenges challenges you have in your role helping to get? There was a great question. And you got me thinking this and while the it's not as much as a challenge it's more about this guy. I have a favorite thing that I keep thinking. Good is the enemy of great Because you're already in a good place are you going to really push yourself to achieve greatness because that comes with with a with a level of risk right and also we are very. We're in a good position from a as a hardline company and we are making a transformation so so that is again uncomfortable so the new world that we're in is disrupt or be disrupted a try and so get comfortable comfortable being uncomfortable right so that all and not as that's a cultural thing that we have to kind of embrace company going forward but what I would like to say is do Duhr is not a stranger. Transformation eighteen thirty seven. We innovated as a company. This was the beginning of John. Deere with south scarring block that was the original innovation right fast. Forward a short eighty one years and we decided to go check out this internal combustion vestige and engine fat that was happening in one thousand nine hundred nine and decided to make start making machines because you know our legacies doing animal move. You know pulled implements. Let's get that and go make these tractor things right so we did that. Big Bet. Big Risk Transform The AG industry transformed Dior. And we've never been the same fast forward. Another short eighty-one years we acquired the NAF COM satellite positioning the company in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine and that is the underpinnings for everything that we're doing today. It's the precision that we needed to drive that auto auto truck yield mapping to do the variable rate application. All data required that salvage level accuracy. That was satellite corrected right eight and now we know waiting on years. Eighteen years later twenty seventeen the acquisition of Blue River and now we're on boarding artificial intelligence onto our equipment. That's why say the future is limitless. Transformation is an odd. Yeah no that is considering what companies last like even a great company. You're seeing like fortune. Five hundred's will be gone ten to twenty years you've seen that I ain't giants giants. Topples can get comfortable sitting on your laurels. No no no no. I think that is a perfect finish. Oh sonal if anyone wants to learn more about John Deere and exciting things here at C. S.. How else could they learn about John? Deere AH wealth. If you're at sea yes police come by booth come talk to us and we will be more than happy to talk to you about all the attack actually actually show you all the tech. I mean what I talked about. Today was just a small sliver of all that we are offering so I encourage everybody to come visit our booth. That's the fastest and easiest way to get to us. And once you do that or alternatively connect to with me be a Lincoln and let's start the conversation and I can point to wherever you want so I'm giving that invitation then is it so that we there's John Deere Dot Com assuming and then we're on John Deere Journal Dot Com. Ah Either of those Hopkins. Thank you too so excellent. Will Tony. I want to say thank you very much and I want to say your name because slaughtered my last name. So I'm I'm trying not to slaughter yours so thank you sonal Raza Begum Obscene. John Deere for joining us here innovation calling. Thanks for having me. It was a last week you.

John Deere John Deere Dot Com Deere John sonal Raza Begum Obscene NAF COM giants Duhr Blue River Dior Hopkins Lincoln
"  deere" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:14 min | 2 years ago

" deere" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Think this is like the TV easily easily roll off a few with Deere get back in the playoff spot we care girls it would reduce the last call the other day did the numbers and basically said you know one of the numbers the later of putting out this year are the same as last year but there were a couple of differences and you know one of the big lots of schools allow and we could talk about bad breakdowns defensively and I certainly think that's part of it but I think also too as I've said before my show Vasilis getting some really good yes but great and I think just that little bit of a dip in his play we have seen the goals against start to creep up but I think you somebody did it gets the press on Tuesday night was one of his better games he has more opportunities like that in front of them that I think the waiting again have a really good opportunity to strike off six seven eight wins in a row and then I'll send you look at the Tampa Bay Lightning and there it's second or third place in the Atlantic division but I get to you have to keep alive a lot of people looked at last year and they said well you know what they're not really facing a ton of adversity and maybe that hurt the padding in the playoffs well now they are facing some diversity you know they're not a playoff spot twenty five games in but they're a lot of people out there who were for finding fault either gave in and really upset where they are which I would say why would you want a P. twenty five games it basics of adversity is it a bad thing for this lightning team and as long as they right the ship and head of the playoffs really pretty good about themselves and if that means their fifth place or six place second place it's not gonna really matter you know where they are as long as they're playing well in I think some of this adversity that they're facing now is going to be a good thing for them for sure but as I said before Michael ran from the Star Tribune is gonna be up next talking about this while TV obviously will get a chance to see them a lot gave it gave out your if you're out but they were one of only three teams to sweep Tampa Bay last year and their style has always been I think it's tough to play against because they typically don't have a ton of star players on their team is not in doubt gave and they've always had to play really good defense at typically what that means is they've had really good off our goaltenders they've kind of been challenged a bit offensively because of the style they've had to play it by the witcher Spurgeon and make a quick you both out tonight for that those are two of the big pieces offense when I feel like some other older players are there go to players offensively and I think that could be really risky it's today's NHL it is accuracy how would you take a look at where he is right now Eric Staal is just coming off a forty goal season a couple years ago read with your star players are you know thirty three thirty four thirty five I think it makes it harder for you to be competitive offensively gave it gave out because the young man's game right now B. E. D. to have guys who can get up and down you could skate and who are dynamic not to take anything away from those two players because they put.

Deere
"  deere" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:40 min | 3 years ago

" deere" Discussed on WTVN

"A Deere search John Deere Gator for more. mainly clear overnight tonight the low down to sixty three degrees that's our last comfortable overnight after that it starts to get a little sticky Tuesday's high end to eighty nine degrees it's going to be warm and humid but lots of sunshine and our overnight lows for the next few nights will be in the seventies I maybe see six first morning chief meteorologist Marshall might be cut your severe weather station news radio six ten WTVN. central Ohio's news traffic and weather station news radio six ten W. yes. broadcasting from the underground. from the files of the hidden. somewhere under the broken steel of a nondescript building we once again made contact with a leader. the end. mark Levin here are number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three a one month you know I've got piles of stuff I want to discuss with you. but I do have to say we are prepared now the. when the president begins his rally begin speaking we're gonna be breaking in from time to time because they're just so great. the hilarious and substantive. by the way one of the other things I noticed was happening on Sunday. Friday. is this discussion among some of the media. the.

John Deere chief meteorologist mark Levin Marshall president Ohio WTVN. eighty nine degrees sixty three degrees one month six ten W
"  deere" Discussed on Z104

Z104

01:34 min | 3 years ago

" deere" Discussed on Z104

"Deere wasn't the only thing you were swiping over the holidays. A thousand dollars to help pay those bills. Just listen to the key word when you hear it texted back nationwide to seven to eight eight wine for your chance to win a grand. Message and data rates may apply to quarter million dollar handout on z one. Oh, four the radio dot com app has all the hits too. Imagine dragons, Selena Gomez downloaded to listen to us anytime anywhere where when it comes to taking care of your family and keeping up with work, you've got it covered. But if you don't have health insurance who's covering you, Medicaid covers doctor and hospital visits prescription drugs, preventive care and more all at a low cost or at no cost to you. And thanks to a recent change more Virginians at more income levels. Now qualify if your family of four makes less than thirty four thousand six hundred dollars a year, or if you're an adult without kids making less than sixteen thousand seven hundred dollars a year visit cover VA dot org or call eight five five to four to eight to eight to to find out if your eligible for Medicaid and to get rolled even if you've applied before and been turned down the rules have changed such again because to take care of others. You have to take care of yourself too. That's. Cover VA dot org or eight five five to four to eight to eight to brought to you by the Commonwealth of Virginia..

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