35 Burst results for "John Jay"

Florida Was an Unbelievable Success Story During the Pandemic. Why?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:34 min | 6 d ago

Florida Was an Unbelievable Success Story During the Pandemic. Why?

"So Florida was an unbelievable success story. During the pandemic. By remaining open and defying federal government, pressure, Ron DeSantis, the courageous Ron DeSantis was able to keep Florida free, businesses from closing down. He was able to taper and hedge against mental health issues, depression, suicide, social isolation, alcoholism, Florida became kind of a Beacon of liberty and hope, and you see it with the real estate values around here. You see it with the new businesses that are moving here. It's almost synonymous with self government. Ron DeSantis deserves credit and Ron DeSantis has received some incredibly well earned praise for doing this. But the question is, why was he able to do it? The reason is in the structure of our government. We talk a lot about the United States Constitution here on this program. And James Madison, in the federalist papers, argued that the structure of the constitution was one of its defining elements. James Madison Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, the three authors of the federalist papers and one of the three most involved in designing our constitution, James Madison being the most involved. Why is America able to be free not because of our Bill of rights every banana republic has a Bill of rights? No, the structure of checks and balances and consent of the governed. Allows a bottom up structure, a grassroots centric way of governing.

Ron Desantis Florida James Madison James Madison Alexander Hamilt Depression America John Jay Banana Republic
You're About to Live Through the Greatest Citizen Movement of a Generation

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:18 min | 4 months ago

You're About to Live Through the Greatest Citizen Movement of a Generation

"The founders believed, and this was explicitly written in Alexander Hamilton, John Jay's, James Madison's private journals, that only God should be able to have the executive legislative and judicial authority. This is why they intentionally separated everybody. They separated it because they believed that no person on this planet should have that much authority. But they realized that the true immediate authority needs to be invested in all of you. This is one of the great dangers of these independent regulatory agencies of people that are largely untouchable that run these bureaucracies in D.C. of which you've never met them, they're unelected, unknown and have almost unaccountable power. But the trajectory of 2020, that were on, if we keep it up, if you keep on praying, fasting, showing up to events, showing up to school board meetings, running for office, if you feel so compelled, consuming news and information, knowing it's happening around you, even though it might be slightly depressing at times, is that you're about to live through the greatest, most unexpected citizen movement in a generation. Let me say that again. You're about to live through one of the greatest cities that all of a sudden they're going to look back and they're going to say when it seemed the bleak and it seems so negative and so dark and it was led by the church. I really believe that's where it all comes down to.

John Jay Alexander Hamilton James Madison D.C.
We Will Never Know What Was Said During the Constitutional Convention

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:16 min | 8 months ago

We Will Never Know What Was Said During the Constitutional Convention

"In today's time it's easy to feel disconnected to the brilliant so the clairvoyance or the wisdom of our founding fathers or the framers september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was the last day of a heated constitutional convention that lasted almost the entire summer and went from may twenty fifth to september seventeenth. Hundred eighty seven. It was held in private and and secret. George washington presided over the chair as the chair of the constitutional convention. Now we have some notes from the constitutional convention but most of the back and forth debate and the commentary. We will never know exactly what was set alexander hamilton john. Jay james madison. They were going at it. You see the articles in confederation at articles of confederation which were written after the successful revolution or separation from the british. Were posing problems there. Shays rebellion inability to commerce between states to mint currency. It became more and more clear that some form of a federal government was necessary. The question is what kind of government do we want to form

Alexander Hamilton John Jay James Madison George Washington Shays
September 17, 1787: The History Behind This Significant Day

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:57 min | 8 months ago

September 17, 1787: The History Behind This Significant Day

"Today is a day that every single child in school should take pause and be leads through and told the great american story of how we got here. Today is a beautiful day. There's a lot wrong with our country right now and i wanna take a pause to remember what happened on this day in seventeen. Eighty seven september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was one of the most significant days in human history. It was definitely one of the most significant days in political history. Almost never before had this idea of self government been tried. The romans tried it in some capacity and failed and eventually became an empire. The greek strident and city states. But never before. Did a people attempt to embark on a form of government. We're the people were the sovereign. The idea of self government independent judiciary the ideas of freedom and equality in the rule of law that are the ultimate principles to build that society. In today's time it's easy to feel disconnected to the brilliant so the clairvoyance or the wisdom of our founding fathers or the framers september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was the last day of a heated constitutional convention that lasted almost the entire summer and went from may twenty fifth to september seventeenth. Hundred eighty seven. It was held in private and and secret. George washington presided over the chair as the chair of the constitutional convention. Now we have some notes from the constitutional convention but most of the back and forth debate and the commentary. We will never know exactly what was set alexander hamilton john. Jay james madison. They were going at it. You see the articles in confederation at articles of confederation which were written after the successful revolution or separation from the british. Were posing problems there. Shays rebellion inability to commerce between states to mint currency. It became more and more clear that some form of a federal government was necessary. The question is what kind of government do we want to form now. A sloppy way to talk about the american stories say we had two founders one in seventeen seventy six and one in seventeen eighty seven that is not true there is an a divine connection between the truths of the declaration of independence and the laws of the constitution of the united states

Alexander Hamilton John Jay James Madison George Washington Shays United States
"john jay" Discussed on Johnjay & Rich On Demand

Johnjay & Rich On Demand

04:45 min | 9 months ago

"john jay" Discussed on Johnjay & Rich On Demand

"Join you know i'm not gonna sit with you. Maybe we're all sitting together. Who knows maybe we are anyway. We'll with us but you gotta win all right all right. So how do we gotta win. Okay well this is the movie edition of reverse the verse. Eight as songs from the movie. It could be the theme from the movie. You should know these backwards and forwards but do a little bit different today. Is everybody's gonna get one chance where to go around the room. But if somebody doesn't get their clue you can buzz in in steel points for them. We start with you. John jay reverse the verse.

John jay
Israel's Health Experts Warn ‘Long Months’ Ahead in Battling Delta Variant

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:03 min | 10 months ago

Israel's Health Experts Warn ‘Long Months’ Ahead in Battling Delta Variant

"There on hewitt. Thank you for joining the hugh hewitt show. I'm joined by. Dr michael oren former israeli ambassador to the united states. He is now in israel. Hello doc orrin good morning. Good afternoon the morning hue to it. I've got two questions for you. The first half to do with the return of cova de israel. The delta variant is surging. California's got los angeles. That go back to mass mandate half of america is an got to vaccines or fully vaccinated with one john. Jay shot and therefore it's ravaging the unvaccinated india's got three million dead. What's the situation in. India and in israel and inter we have the highest level of action seems last march about fourteen hundred people per day. But the number of people actually hospitalized ventilate is very very low I think there's a fear among the health. Experts at this can get out of control very very fast. We don't clamp down now. We'll lose that control People very nervous You know we're finally getting back on our feet getting through recuperate from the losses of two thousand twenty one and twenty twenty and and here we are getting slapped down again and You know speaking berkeley out of my work as international airport open. Well you know it's interesting to me that i. I wrote a piece for the washington post this week. We don't know what the absolute variant will be very up to omega but it is entirely possible that one of them have aids the vaccines unless we shut it down now. It could go very bad on us. We're just sort of assuming the worst is behind us. That's a human sort of natural bias towards best case scenario but there is no best case scenario. There's only what's gonna happen. Michael do the israelis that we get it. But i think the defense. Here's because among young people. The young people paying the price for elderly people and that This is a new reality. Amer just going to have to live with it. And i hear that from young israeli after the youngest rarely And not just young people

Dr Michael Oren Doc Orrin Israel Hugh Hewitt Cova United States Hewitt India JAY Los Angeles California John Berkeley The Washington Post Michael Amer
"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

05:25 min | 11 months ago

"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"The small body of national troops which has been judged necessary in time of peace is effectively kept up badly paid infected with local prejudices and supported by irregular and disproportionate contributions to the treasury. The impossibility of maintaining order and dispensing justice among the sovereign subjects produced the experiment of dividing the empire into nine or ten circles or districts of giving them an interior organization and of charging them with the military execution of the laws against delinquent or condemnations members. This experiment has only served to demonstrate more fully the radical vice of the constitution each circle is the miniature picture of the deformities of this political monster. They either failed to execute their commissions or they do it with all the devastation and carnage of civil war. Sometimes whole circles are defaulters and then they increase the mischief which they were instituted to remedy we may form some judgment of this scheme of military coercion from a sample given by through on us. In done of of free and imperial city of the circle of swabia the abbaye descent. Qua- enjoyed certain immunities which had been reserved to him in the exercise of days on some public occasions. Outrages were committed on him by the people of the city. The consequence was that the city was put under the ban of the empire. And the duke of bavaria. Though director of another circle obtained an appointment to enforce it. He soon appeared before the city with a core of ten thousand troops and finding it a fit occasion as he had secretly intended from the beginning to revive an antiquated claim on the pretext that his ancestors had suffered the place to be dismembered from his territory. He took possession of it in his own name disarmed and punished inhabitants and ria next the city to his domains. It may be asked. Perhaps what has so long kept disjointed machine from falling entirely to pieces. the answer is obvious. The weakness of most of the members who are unwilling to expose themselves to the mercy of foreign powers the weakness of most of the principal members compared with the formidable powers all around them the vast weight and influence which the emperor derives from his separate and hereditary dominions and the interest he feels and preserving a system with which his family pride is connected and which constitutes him the first prince in europe. These causes support a feeble and precarious union whilst the repellent quality incident to the nature of sovereignty and which time can actually strengthens prevents any reform. Whatever founded on a proper consolidation. Nor is it to be imagined. If this obstacle could be surmounted that the neighbouring powers would suffer a revolution to take plays which would give to the empire the force and preeminence to which it is entitled foreign nations have long considered themselves as interested in the changes made by events in this constitution and have on. Various occasions betrayed their policy of perpetuating. It's anarchy and weakness if more direct examples are wanting poland as a government over local sovereigns might not improperly be taken notice of nor could any proof more striking be given of the calamities flowing from such institutions.

swabia treasury bavaria europe poland
"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

03:29 min | 11 months ago

"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Of the city's fell under the tyranny of macedonian garrisons others under that of usurpers springing out of their own confusions shame and oppression bear long awakened their love of liberty. A few cities reunited. Their example was followed by others as opportunities were found of cutting off their tyrants. The league soon embraced almost the whole peloponnesus. Mastodon don sides progress but was hindered by internal dissensions from stopping it. All greece caught the enthusiasm and seemed ready to unite in one confederacy when the jealousy and envy in sparta and athens of the rising glory of the acadians through a fatal damp on the enterprise. The dread of the macedonian power induced the league to court the alliance of the kings of egypt and syria who as successors of alexander were rivals of the king of massa don. This policy was defeated. By cleo menes king of sparta who was led by his ambition to make an unprovoked attack on his neighbors the akins and who as an enemy to massa. Dan had interested enough with the egyptian and syrian princes to affect a breach of their engagements with the league. The acadians were now reduced to the dilemma of submitting. To cleo menes or of supplicating the aid mastodon its former oppressor. The latter expedient was adopted the contests of the greeks always afforded a opportunity to that powerful neighbor of intermingling in their affairs. A macedonian army quickly appeared cleo minis was vanquished. The acadians soon experienced as often happens that a victorious sent powerful ally is but another name for a master all that they're most abject compliances could obtain from him was toleration of the exercise of their laws. Philip who was now on the throne of macedonian soon provoked by his tyrannies fresh combinations among the greeks the kenyans though weakened by internal dissensions and by the revolt of messina. One of its members being joined by the italians and athenians erected the standard of opposition finding themselves though thus supported unequal to the undertaking. They once more had recourse to the dangerous expedient of producing the sucker of foreign arms the romans to whom the invitation was made eagerly embraced head. Philip was.

cleo menes Mastodon don sparta alliance of the kings of egypt massa don macedonian army cleo minis akins athens greece massa syria alexander Dan Philip messina
"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

04:43 min | 11 months ago

"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Had the greeks says the obey mellow venezuela's as there were courageous. They would have been admonished by experience of the necessity of a closer union and would have availed themselves of the peace which followed their success against the persian army to establish such reformation instead of this obvious policy athens and sparta inflated with the victories and the chlorine they had acquired became i rivals and then enemies and did each other infinitely more mischief than they had suffered from. Zurich sees their mutual jealousies fears. Hatreds and injuries ended in the celebrated peloponnesian war which itself ended in the ruin and slavery of the fenian who had begun it as a weak government when not at war is ever agitated by internal dissensions so these never fail to bring on fresh calamities from abroad. The fo sion's having ploughed up some consecrated ground belonging to the temple of apollo. The m fifty onic council. According to the superstition of the age imposed a fine on the sacrilegious offenders..

persian army venezuela sparta Zurich m fifty onic council temple of apollo
"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

03:25 min | 11 months ago

"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Proportion less likely to inspire an vitual sense of obligation and an active sentiment attachment the reasoning on this head has been abundantly exemplified by the experience of all federal constitutions with which we are acquainted and all others which have borne the least analogy to them. Though the ancient feudal systems are not strictly speaking confederacies yet they partook of the nature of that species of association there was a common head chieftain or sovereign whose authority extended over the whole nation and a number of subordinate vassals or few dettori's who had large portions of land allotted to them and numerous trains of inferior vessels or retainers who occupied and cultivated the land upon the tenure of fealty or obedience to the persons of whom they held it. Each principal castle was a kind of sovereign within his particular domain the consequences of this situation or a continual opposition to with authority of the sovereign and frequent wars between the great barons chief. Few dettori's themselves. The power of the head of the nation was commonly two week either to preserve public peace or to protect people against the oppressions of their immediate lords. This period of european affairs is emphatically styled by historians the times of futile anarchy when the sovereign happened to be a man of vigorous and warlike tempur and of superior abilities he would acquire personal weight and influence which answered for the time the purpose of a more regular authority but in general the power of the barons triumphed over that of the prince and in many instances his dominion was entirely thrown off and the great five swear erected into pendant principalities or states in those instances in which the monarch finally prevailed over his vassals his success was chiefly owing to the tyranny of those vassals over their dependence the barons or nobles equally the enemies of the sovereign and the oppressors of the common people or dreaded and detested by both till mutual danger and mutual interest affected a union between them fatal to the power of the aristocracy had the nobles by a conduct of clemency and justice preserved the fidelity and devotion of their retainers and followers the contest between them and the prince must almost always have ended in.

dettori
"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

03:45 min | 11 months ago

"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Adjust your volume. Take a nice deep breath in lead it out. Slowly and off waco. Well it's the beginning of july and that means it's time for our annual reading from the federalist papers written by alexander hamilton. John jay n james madison published as a series of tracks in seventeen. Eighty eight to support the ratification of the united states constitution. Let's pick up where we left off federalist paper number seventeen the insufficiency of the present confederation to preserve the union. The same subject continued written for the independent journal by alexander hamilton. To the people of the state of new york an objection of a nature different from that which has been stated and answered in my last address may perhaps be likewise urged against the principle legislation for the individual citizens of america. It may be said that it would tend to render the government of the union too powerful and to enable it to absorb those residuarity authorities which it might be judged proper to leave with the states for local purposes allowing the utmost latitude to the love of power which any reasonable man can require. I confess. I am a loss to discover what temptation the persons entrusted with the administration of the general government could ever feel to divest the states of the authorities of that description. The regulation of the mere domestic police of state appears to me to hold out slender allurement to ambition. Commerce finance negotiation and war seemed to comprehend all the objects which have charms for minds governed by that passion and all the powers necessary to those objects ought in the first instance to be lodged in the national depository the administration of private justice between the citizens of the same state the supervision of agriculture and of other concerns of a similar nature. All those things in short which are proper to be provided for by local legislation is therefore improbable that there should exist a disposition in the federal council's to your surp- the powers with which they are connected because the attempt to exercise those powers would be as troublesome as it would be nugatory and the possession of them for that reason would contribute nothing to the dignity t to the importance or to the splendor of the national government. But let it be admitted for argument's sake that mere wanted nece and lust of domination would be sufficient to beget that disposition..

alexander hamilton independent journal John jay administration of the general waco james madison america administration of private just new york federal council national government
"john jay" Discussed on She Podcasts

She Podcasts

05:12 min | 11 months ago

"john jay" Discussed on She Podcasts

"Nineteen. I am your co host announcer introduction near covering and with me as always i co host. elsie escobar. what is up how. What's up and then our producer. Who cannot be seen john jay mingo so hello..

john jay mingo elsie escobar Nineteen
Global Crime Sting Using Messaging App Sees Hundreds Arrested

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Global Crime Sting Using Messaging App Sees Hundreds Arrested

"The FBI and police agencies around the globe pull off a cyber sting it was called a non a secure messaging service built by the F. B. I. designed to snare criminal groups since October twenty nineteen the FBI and other law enforcement around the world log more than twenty million messages from a total of eleven thousand eight hundred devices with about nine thousand currently active the messages on illegal activity range from drugs to money laundering to high level corruption and plans to kill people in more than a dozen countries John Jay college of criminal justice professor Adam Scott want says the chats provided police all the evidence they need it not only are they able to look at who the people are communicating with they're able to see what was said and basically have copies of all the information on your own servers some eight hundred people have been arrested in raids that netted tons of drugs fifty five luxury cars and close to one hundred fifty million dollars in cash and cryptocurrency I'm Jim acquire

F. B. I. FBI John Jay College Of Criminal J Adam Scott JIM
Vaccine Distribution: An Equity Challenge

Short Wave

09:28 min | 1 year ago

Vaccine Distribution: An Equity Challenge

"Okay paying we are talking vaccine equity in the pandemic and just a quick note. We are focusing a just here in the united states for this episode. So let's start with some top line numbers three covid. Nineteen vaccines have been authorized for emergency. Use in the us one very recently. How many people have actually been vaccinated so far well. Since vaccine distribution started in mid december around fifty million people have gotten at least one dose of a covid nineteen vaccine that includes about twenty five million people who got into doses means they've been fully vaccinated with either the pfizer or madonna vaccines. And that's some real progress over the past few months. Still just around eight percent of the total. Us population has been fully vaccinated. So there's still a long way to go. yeah i mean. Do we have any demographics on who the people who got the vaccine are like. Do we have any data on race or ethnicity well. Last week i spent some time at a cdc conference which was online and a bunch of public officials talked about it including dr marcela nunez smith who we heard from earlier. People of color are getting vaccinated rates below their representation in the general population. We know these challenges reflect longstanding deeply rooted systemic rallies. But here's the thing. The data that she's talking about is still pretty limited. You know so far race. Nothing to see. Data have only been collected for about half of the shots given out. Wow only half the thought i mean. There's a little bit frustrating. That's that's not enough data. Yeah it's it's really not and the biden administration pointed this out themselves and they acknowledged that it's pretty abysmal. Doctor rachelle will lansky. She's head of the centers for disease control and prevention and she says the problem is coming from a couple of different directions. Individuals may choose not to report. It may not be required of or requested by providers and some providers as well as jurisdictions have restrictions on data sharing so some of these data gaps are due to the fact that we have inconsistent systems around data gathering. Which you know is something that has been in quite a bit with this pandemic. Yeah that's certainly part of it and there's reasons why people might not want to share their personal information about race ethnicity especially people of color you know. The federal government has a long history of exploiting and under serving minority communities and that extends to this day but now there are government officials saying that. It's up to them to try and convince people that it's important to give their information. Here's neurath shaw. Health official in the state of maine in public health. What gets measured gets managed and if we measure the right things then we will manage the right issues if we measure the wrong things. Then the did that we collect. That may not bear resemblance to current present. Elf challenges is actually what we will end up managing. Yeah so early. On in fact vaccine distribution the only metric that was available was the number of doses sent out in the number of doses administered which basically measured speed and so if the biden harris administration wants to achieve both and equity with axiom distribution. They're going to have to get more comprehensive data on race ethnicity to get a handle on the problem. Yeah i mean. I want to talk about what the biden administration is doing specifically to address this issue of a vaccine but first let's talk about some of the ways. The general rollout has put. Vulnerable communities added disadvantage. Because that's definitely happening. Yeah and to be honest. It's been hard for everyone including health reporters to keep up with the changes that are happening. Daily and weekly with axiom distribution. I mean every single state has its own rules about who qualifies and had a sign up. Obviously that confusion is compounded. If the information isn't coming to you in the language you speak or you don't have access to computers and email and even for people who may have read up on how to book an appointment. It's taken them hours to actually research in book one. So if you don't have time to figure that out and if you don't have access to transportation or time off work to get an appointment and was places you probably haven't been able to get vaccinated yet. Yeah i mean and that's when you know for sure that you want the vaccine. Exactly dr christian rumors. He's a physician and executive that family health centers of san diego. He points out that people also have questions that are very specific to their own circumstances and we want those answered before they feel like they can make an informed decision to actually get vaccinated. Here he is speaking to. My colleague yuki noguchi residency is not just one thing. And in many cases. They're very unique to their own situation. Like i just got treated for cancer. Or i'm on a certain medication or i've had an allergy in the past and those are questions that'll be answered most likely from talking one on one with a medical professional or some other trusted person. Which again if you're part of an underserved community is hard to access. If you don't have the time to seek out those answers it'll be much easier if the vaccines and the resources were coming directly to you right right okay. So ping what has the biden administration specifically announced or done to address vaccine equity so at that. Cdc conference. dr marcellina smith acknowledged that this is a huge issue. And it's not gonna be easily solved. Must attend the underlying social structures arborist as we look ahead to building resilience into our recovery. What we do believe now. Is that the way we get american vaccinating and the emphasis he placed reaching the hardest hit communities attached just as important as being the goals the number of people that's needed so their strategy to get to those goals basically amounts to increasing a couple of different things number one the number of vaccines available number two the number of people giving vaccines and number three. The number of places people can get vaccinated and specific to equity. They've launched a few fema supported mass vaccination sites. These are huge operations set up in stadiums and parking lots that are aiming to give at six thousand shots a day and they're putting some of these in places that score high on something called the social vulnerability right which is a cdc measurement of how vulnerable community is based on social factors like poverty for example. They've also started sending vaccines directly community health centers which serve around thirty million people over. All many whom are rural belong to minority groups or are low income and the centers can also offer outreach in different languages and support for signing up. I mean are they also leaning on non-medical sites to i mean like i know working with community leaders and partners be especially effective. Yeah well they're also talking about sending out that nation trucks to job sites and setting up clinics and local churches and high school gyms and ymca's those non-medical sites that you were talking about and these community clinics might not be serving thousands of people a day but they will make the vaccine available and convenient for people in those communities to get gosh so the vibe administration is really trying to take a both and approach. They're supporting mass vaccination sites to get a lot of people vaccinated quickly and they're also realizing that some people will take more time and more effort to reach so they're also trying to figure out ways to gather better data and target underserved areas. Okay so you know. Most of what we've been talking about today paying as the government is handling this which i would argue is the most important facet but i mean. Is there a sense of individual responsibility here. I know there are a bunch of stories out there about people line jumping or like going into communities outside their own to vaccines how we have all heard the stories and it's hard to say how much it's happening but it does make people feel like the system isn't working you know and what bioethicists have said to me is. That cheating happens for sure but it's probably not happening enough to undermine the system overall i mean. Is that all kind of a short term problem. I mean there's a huge demand right at this point and not enough supply but the hope is that you know in the coming weeks or months the situation will change as vaccine manufacturing and distribution ramp up even further right. Yeah and that's been the hope all along. I mean for weeks now. We've been hearing about a flood of vaccines that will be coming online in the near future. That will make it less. Cut throat to vaccine appointment and we're not there yet but there are some promising signs. The government has now ordered a total of six hundred million doses of pfizer in modern of vaccines to be delivered by the end of july. Which is enough to cover three hundred million people and that's more than all the adults in the us right right. Plus we've got the newly authorized. John jay vaccine which will eventually make a difference right and getting all these shots in urgent right now because we're kind of in a race between vaccinations and variants. Which means that. The more people protect right now. The fewer people will catch the virus and the fewer chances the virus will have to keep mutating in ways that might make it avai the vaccines and the treatments. We've developed so that's why it's still super super important to keep the other measures that prevent the virus from spreading double masking staying physically distant. You know we're all excited about vaccines but health. Experts are saying right now that in the middle of the vaccination campaign is not the time to let up our guard okay pingpong we appreciate you as always thank you for coming on the show things so much. Mattie appreciate you to

Biden Administration Centers For Disease Control An Dr Marcela Nunez Smith Rachelle Will Lansky Neurath Shaw Biden Harris Administration United States Dr Christian Yuki Noguchi Pfizer Dr Marcellina Smith Madonna ELF Federal Government Maine Confusion Allergy CDC San Diego
TV Dinners

Gastropod

08:38 min | 1 year ago

TV Dinners

"How has food. Tv changed over time. And how has it changed us. All not just us gastropod. That's right. you're listening to gastropod the podcast. That looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm cynthia graber. And i'm nicola twilley and this episode. We're taking a spin around the dial which sounds medieval but believe us when we say. Tv's used to not have remotes. You had to literally spin odile. Even i barely remember those wild and wonderful days. This episode is supported in part by cabot. Creamery cabot is a co-op of new england and new york dairy farmers who make award winning cheeses with pure rich milk straight from family farms their specialty cheeses include unique flavors like roasted garlic cheddar and their team of cheese graders indirect with every batch to ensure award-winning quality. Go to cabinet. She's dot com to find out where to buy cabot near you there. You'll also find pairings how to videos and delicious comfort food recipes like the best mac and cheese and more the first thing to know about the very earliest food. Tv wasn't actually on tv. It was on the radio almost as soon as a radio came into being in the nineteen twenties in the us food radio came into being. It was a really easy way for programs to be created because they were easy and cheap. They were obvious outlets for advertising for sponsorship for food products and appliances. So that's where we saw food before. Tv was even a twinkle in the eye. Kathleen collins is a librarian and professor at john jay college of criminal justice and she's the author of the book watching what we eat. The evolution of television cooking shows the stars of these very first food shows. Were hardly stars in today's cents. These radio shows were unglamorous. It was all teaching housewives. How to economize and optimize and generally do all their chores. Better one of the not remotely. Glamorous stars was a woman named and sammy who we can only imagine was supposed to be the wife of uncle sam which is kind of disturbing. She wasn't actually a person. It was a program delivered by an arm of the. Usda and the she was not just one person but several different actors around the country. Adopting regional accents similarly a figure. That's much more well known was betty crocker. She actually started on the radio and like aunt. Sammy was played by many different actresses and she was one of the first we. Could i guess call her one of the first cooking teachers in broadcasting And we have some fun you one for. You are cooking lessons. This week is on some new christmas cookies. And besides that with sending seven ethically recipes to order numbers of schools who had indicated that they want the wednesday menu ambassador. I hope you'll be sure to watch for them on. Sammy's show was called housekeepers. Chat and betty crocker's was the slightly more enticing cooking school of the air. That sounds as though it was all about meringues and souffles and all things fluffy which it decidedly was not and then the very first television station came into being in the nineteen twenties though at the time the technology was still super experimental and people did not have. Tv's in their homes yet. Even as late as nineteen fifty only nine percent of american homes had a tv set. Foot made the jump to tv before. Tv even made the jump to people's living rooms so more megan was thirst. Tv shafran her snapple titled Tv show was called suggestions for dishes to be prepared and cooked in fifteen minutes and that demonstrated single ring. Cookery back in hundred thirty six. This is julie smith. She's a food writer. And podcast and the author of a new book called taste and the tv chef and she's british so i will translate for her single ring. Cookery means the kind of thing you can make on just one burner in your bed. Sit which is british for a studio apartment. Thanks for the cross pen translation of my uses as well as my bizarre accident. True also interesting. Megan was doing this. Fifteen minute meal about eighty years. Before jamie oliver's tv show and book of the same title. We have a picture of her filming her show dressed in. What looks like a raincoat on our website. Glamour personified where was i but by the nineteen forties food. Tv show started showing up for real in the us to the shows were cheap to produce and they were sponsored by kitchen and food companies and they were pretty boring. It was a very practical probably rather dry and yet a lot of the airtime was filled with these programs in different markets around the country. These shows obviously targeted at women most. Tv's at the time. Were actually in public places rather than homes especially bars where there weren't a lot of housewives. There was a show actually the first national televised. Tv show was james beard and it started in the mid nineteen forties and despite everything i just said about how most of the tv shows and the radio shows were led by home. Economists james beard was not a home economist. He was a gourmet and he was really all about the food and so it was a little strange to have this show on. Tv in a bar being watched by men james beard was kind of a one off for a long time but still here we go right off the bat you can see a gender divide in food tv women were the ones who were proper and teaching viewers had cook the man a ormond. Just appreciate food for food. Food was a chore for women and a pleasure for men until the only lucas came along. So diani lucas. Like james beard was a bit of an anachronism. She was a cordon bleu trained chef. Who was born in. Britain came from a very artistically oriented family. Do you only had a restaurant and cooking school in new york and she treated the kitchen as her art studio. it was her serious creative outlet. Her recipes were complex and mostly french. And they took a lot of time to make she was also kind of a taskmaster her british accent and her scraped back hair and she did not cut corners. But kathleen says the. Tony did occasionally have a little sparkle in her eye. Like when she told viewers to use as much rama's they liked or needed in their cribs. Suzanne that show was on the evening and prime time and it ran from nineteen forty seven until nineteen fifty-six but she was kind of ahead of her time. I would not be surprised if many of your listeners have never heard of the oni lucas. She just came along at the wrong time for the public. Viewing audience at diani did have a big influence on one particularly important person. Julia child the french chef. I'm doolittle she was a california girl. She was not a spy for the cia before being cooking show guru as many people think she was a research assistant at the oh s the precursor to the cia but she was really one of these happy accidents. She married paul child who had a foreign service assignment. in france. They moved to france and she fell in love with food. And she got herself trained. You know at the core blows school which was really challenging as a woman and she just became. You know a master in nineteen sixty one. Julia published a book with two other. Women called mastering the art of french. Cooking it is eight home and that seven hundred fifty. Two page book provided the kick. That landed julia in front of millions of viewers happen was. Julia was doing the rounds promoting her book and she'd been invited onto a book show hosted by a local professor on w. g. b. h. Which is the boston public. Tv station and she decided she didn't want to just talk with the professor. She wanted to cook. She wanted to teach him how to make a proper french omelette. The professor wasn't a particularly skilled cook in this live tv cooking class but people wrote into the show after it aired. They called julia a hoot and the producer thought. Julia was incredibly well-spoken so gbh gave her her own show. It would eventually become the french chef. The show was a huge hit. It was on national. Tv for three decades and it not only made julia household name but it also kind of launched the modern era of food

Cynthia Graber Nicola Twilley Odile Creamery Cabot James Beard Kathleen Collins Betty Crocker Sammy Shafran John Jay College Of Criminal J Cabot Julie Smith New England New York Cabinet Usda Diani Lucas Jamie Oliver
"john jay" Discussed on Antonio B Jackson Presents Sweetluck's "Bar Fights"

Antonio B Jackson Presents Sweetluck's "Bar Fights"

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"john jay" Discussed on Antonio B Jackson Presents Sweetluck's "Bar Fights"

"Years for for joining here is all shape. Johnny twelve dollars a month per line at bill digital hundred offenders as the houses getting you go back your long south carolina. June twenty country. I'm chas each with a whole sign. Around the hillary picture framing how much really john jay. And now you're getting flam four art timeshare free trade helping thousands of.

Johnny south carolina hillary john jay
"john jay" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"john jay" Discussed on KCRW

"Ridsdel if you listen real close over the next couple of months as President elect Biden gets set to take office and afterward in particular You're going to start hearing one word shown up in a lot of stories about this economy. Esso Austerity is it's an old word. We get it from Greek austerity is the word. Jessica Red is professor of linguistics at U C. L A and started out read a meeting. Bitter, harsh rough, and that came to me and over the centuries effectively severe self discipline. Simplicity, Just an absence of fun stuff. The reason you're hearing about it on this program, though, there's a particular point at which the metaphor was extended to talk about budgets. Exactly. John Maynard Keynes in an article 1937. Hey, says the boom not the slump is the right time for austerity at the Treasury, and thus a shorthand was born austerity. Now when we think about it in the policy sense, we think of it as reducing the budget deficit. That's the goal. That's Laura Marling. She's an economist at the International Trade Union Confederation, where she studies the impact of austerity policies. Budget deficit in the year just ended by the way and remember deficits are what we overspend in a single year was $3.1 Trillion, mostly because of Corona virus will leave spending. You want to cut the deficit, get some austerity policies in place. You got to do some things. The combination usually else spending cuts and maybe tax increases but usually means government spending less with the goal. Bringing down the government debt. That second voice was J. W. Mason is a macro economist who teaches at John Jay College at the City University of New York. When you think of the word austerity in a budgetary sense, in times like these, um What do you think of Well, I think of the last decade Kai and that third voice was headed Boucher, She's president and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, and The Three of them together are going to help us understand why that word keeps coming up. And why it matters. What we saw after the great recession was the longest recovery in US recorded history, And yet the recovery was very slow for most people, So we also see this increase in income inequality, and I think it's it's pretty widely understood that that was In part because our federal stimulus was much too small and was taken away too soon. I do. There's new February 17th 2000 and nine president Obama had been in office less than a month the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act that I will sign today. Is the most sweeping economic recovery package in our history. Initially, right after the crisis, there was this big stimulus Laura Merlin again from the International Trade Union Confederation. And you know, all the banks were bailed out, and some companies were bailed out. And then about two years later around, 2010. There was this push to now all of a sudden worry about the deficit and cut spending. Yes, those bailouts were eventually paid back with interest. But remember what was going on. Right then the Obama administration was trying to get the affordable care act through Congress and midterm elections were just around the corner. He gets into the idea that you know the deficit is something that we should worry about. Supposedly, do you know when Republican support 2010 midterm elections come and go. Democrats lists six seats in the Senate 63 seats in the House. The Republicans who ran on the idea that government was too big and spending was too high. So a couple of months later at the 2011 state of the union, everyday family sacrificed to live within their means. They deserve a government that does the same. Congressman Paul Ryan, not yet speaker of the House. But then the chairman of the House Budget Committee gave the Republican response. Endless borrowing is not a strategy. Spending cuts have to come first, and they did cuts to spending on education, the Defense Department community action programs and state and local governments still recovering from the recession. And that it's widely understood now really deepen the recession and made the recovery much lower than it otherwise would have been. So when you see austerity, I think of How much lower family incomes were prior to the pandemic than they needed to be. But look, if I'm a citizen of this economy, trying to get by and difficult times and I'm gonna have is much money coming in, as I used to, and I have to tighten my belt, why should the federal government not have to do the same thing? If it doesn't it The way that the federal government works is not the same way that a family budget works the federal government to can borrow and right now, interest rates are at historic lows, and they have been for quite some time. And that means that the cost of paying back any borrowing way to do today will be much lower because of these low interest rates, and we can put that money to good use, getting people back to work. JW Mason from John Jay College has a real good analogy here. Economic downturns are situation when it's a little bit like having to turn into a skid. You know if your car is getting your first instinct is to pull the wheel the other way, and then you just lose traction and fly off the road. But you have to do is turn in the direction you're skidding to get back control. And then you can you can then get round direction. You want to go? So if the economy loses 22 million jobs in a couple of months like it did this spring, our instincts say if taxes, air falling If the economy is slowing, we should tighten our belts. We should do more with less. We should. We should figure out how to cut back to the essentials, but that when you're the government do you have to be willing to actually do something that seems a little crazy? Just like turning into a skid, which is When your tax revenue is falling, you need to pick up the spending, which is what Fed chair Jay Powell has been saying this whole time. This is the time to use the great fiscal power of the United States, too. Do what we can to support the economy and try to get through this with as little damage to the longer run, productive capacity, the economy as possible. Why does austerity keep coming up? I mean it, Z Cyclical, practically It's an interesting question. I think that it is cyclical, politically more than anything else. There's a lot of politicians who talk about austerity when the other party is in power, and they see a situation where tax revenues are falling, and where there's a sort of economic crisis is an opportunity to push that agenda that they supported anyway. Yes, Congress in the White House did spend more than $2 trillion to keep this economy functioning when they passed. The cares act back in March. Since then, though, not a dime due entirely to Senate Republicans. Hence seven minutes on the radio today about austerity. And as if to make the point of this story. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has been firm that what is needed now isn't the 1.8 to $2 Trillion that House Democrats in the White House have agreed to It's something closer to $500 billion. Thanks again. The JW Mason at John Jay College had the Boucher at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and Lower Emmerling.

John Jay College federal government Senate International Trade Union Conf President US Washington Center for Equitabl J. W. Mason Boucher White House president and CEO John Maynard Keynes Laura Marling Jessica Red Treasury House Budget Committee Biden
'The Writing On The Wall' Finds Poetry Behind Bars, Projects It Onto Buildings

All Things Considered

04:26 min | 1 year ago

'The Writing On The Wall' Finds Poetry Behind Bars, Projects It Onto Buildings

"The wall takes the words of incarcerated people beyond prison and jail walls. The project began small but gained new visibility through projections of the writer's words on the sides of buildings in the U. S and Mexico. John Kayla's reports that it is a collaboration between a conceptual artist, a college professor and those whose words they want to share. Devon Simmons served 15 years in New York prisons lens hanging off the tree limbs. Skeletons of these two range in strange fruits with strong braided brownstone. Intrigued by envy, he reads from a poem by Carl Burn hard that is part of the writing on the Wall Project. Simmons graduated from the prison to college Pipeline program, which included a seminar with artist Hank Willis Thomas, one of the co founders of the writing on the Wall. Speaking via Skype, Thomas says working with his incarcerated students sparked the idea of sharing their creative output with those on the outside is a eureka moment. Look at all the wisdom look at all the heart that is imprisoned in our society. There was a huge hypocrisy or irony that I thought we could and should be focusing on There was so much poetry and there just so much beauty drawings, thoughts so much reflection of humanity. That's Bozz Dries ing, the other co founder of the writing on the wall. She also founded the Incarceration Nations Network, a coalition of prison reformers, and she teaches English at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Technically, I was teaching English classes. But really, I was teaching criminal justice through the lens of humanities. And that to me is what the writing on the wall is. The idea for the project came winds rising. There show Thomas some of the writing she's been given by incarcerated people. Two enlisted architects to design mobile installation move that resembled a prison cell with the words of the incarcerated on the walls, floor and ceiling. The idea was to take the booth two cities around the U. S and Canada. But after it's New York debut, the tour was cancelled by the pandemic in prison by covert Bye, Mr Roland Davis. We were taken over by a virus, more cities in any terrorist attack. As the days and weeks turn into months, Americans locked themselves into their homes and fear of what was to come. We? We had to lock inside our cages because it was the safest place for us to be. With the tour cancelled. The organizer's got the idea of projecting those words on public buildings, often ones that are part of the criminal justice system. They enlisted a company called Chemistry Creative to come up with a projection system. The last installation was at Brooklyn Public Library Standing outside chemistry. Creative producer Sidney McDonald describes the first projection. Nobody was out on the streets. There was still very strict fans on everything being closed, and nobody actually really sawed in really life besides the people who were there, but the projections on but since then the writing on the wall has been Seen in Detroit, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Washington, DC Columbus, Ohio, in Mexico City again or just Hank Willis Thomas. There is nothing that Eisen artists or anyone could really do or say that was more extraordinary. Them things that these artists were doing as you say. I talk about those artists, and some of them had not thought about themselves artists, but it was clear that they were. One of those artists is divine Simmons, who is now working as a paid curator and tour guide for the project. If you take the time to actually read some of the material is in the installation. You recognize that people

Wall Project Hank Willis Thomas Devon Simmons New York John Jay College Of Criminal J John Kayla Chemistry Creative Incarceration Nations Network Brooklyn Public Library Mexico Professor Writer Carl Burn Canada Co Founder Mr Roland Davis U. S Eisen Mexico City Sidney Mcdonald
Trump caps judiciary remake with choice of Barrett for court

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Trump caps judiciary remake with choice of Barrett for court

"Amy Coney Barrett's replacement of Ruth better Ginsburg would represent the most dramatic ideological change on the Supreme Court in nearly thirty years it would also cement conservative dominance of the court for years to come Gloria Browne Marshall professor of constitutional law at John Jay college says based on Barrett's record and what she has stated one thing is certain she was going to use the inroads made by Ruth Bader Ginsburg two on duty and roads made for women New York law school constitutional law professor Donna Edwards Vince says one of the open questions about Barrett is the extent to which she intends to follow story decisis which is the established prior decisions of the court economy Barrett's position specifically on roe versus Wade is unclear certainly as an appellate judge she dissented in number of cases that upheld abortion restrictions I'm Julie Walker

Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Professor John Jay College Ruth Bader Ginsburg Donna Edwards Vince ROE Julie Walker Gloria Browne Marshall New York Wade
Trump caps judiciary remake with choice of Barrett for court

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Trump caps judiciary remake with choice of Barrett for court

"Amy Coney Barrett's replacement of Ruth better Ginsburg would represent the most dramatic ideological change on the Supreme Court in nearly thirty years it would also cement conservative dominance of the court for years to come Gloria Browne Marshall professor of constitutional law at John Jay college says based on Barrett's record and what she has stated one thing is certain she was going to use the inroads made by Ruth Bader Ginsburg two on duty and roads made for women New York law school constitutional law professor Donna Edwards Vince says one of the open questions about Barrett is the extent to which she intends to follow story decisis which is the established prior decisions of the court economy Barrett's position specifically on roe versus Wade is unclear certainly as an appellate judge she dissented in number of cases that upheld abortion restrictions I'm Julie Walker

Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Professor John Jay College Ruth Bader Ginsburg Donna Edwards Vince ROE Julie Walker Gloria Browne Marshall New York Wade
"john jay" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"john jay" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And try to do something just because you want to know there's gotta live life somehow, and those were the way that they chose to do that And we forget these things and we don't realize. Benjamin Rush. Charles Carroll. I mean, Roger Sherman. These were people that were strongly against slavery and they started abolition movements. They started Bible societies. They acknowledge that this is a stain on this country. But yet it was a cultural stronghold. I mean, they had they had to deal with logically had to do it early on early inventions. Benjamin Franklin just made me think Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Rush actually started the first. Anti slavery society and 17 70 for the first chief justice of the United States. John Jay was the president of an anti slavery society in New York. William Livingstone, one of my favorite who happen to be a governor of New Jersey, wanted to be part of that anti slavery society and on and on and on to John Marshall, Richard Bassett. James Monroe. I mean, like we're just scratching the surface. This was a common belief among the framers and the founders. The 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence. The 55 were at the Constitutional convention. There was some 200 of them in the vast majority held this sentiment. Do you think that's tall today? I think it should be, But I think that that's why it's so hurtful and so emotional for so many of us that watch the The movement. Whichever movement it is to wipe out our history in America. Gas That's so dangerous guys. I mean, if you what do they say, if you wipe out your history and you forget your history, and you don't learn from your history than you're in, you're in threat of repeating it again. Look, I don't want to repeat my history I don't want I don't want to go back. I want to be a better version of Christ version for me, then looking in the mirror yesterday and stand like man. I suck. I suck a little bit less today. It's like a little bit less. They were the only way to do. That is if I look at yesterday, and I look at how I handled this circumstance and this situation. How did I respond? Oh, shoot. I reacted here. I should have responded better. What did I react in and how should I have responded? I mean, we don't want I don't want to raise our history. I want to learn from our history. But I don't want to live in the past, but also with us being the most patriotic country or what I used to think was the most patriotic country compared To other countries. I definitely want to talk about that. You know that we're the mess, patriotic country, I would argue. We have the most reasons to be the most picture. We had a country because the amount of good that we've done goes so far beyond our borders to every nation in the world. But I I wanted Toto kind of harp on this thing about what you said about the president, United States. Recognizing the history of the country, right and saying, Hey, this is a place of equal justice and an equal opportunity. That's who America is, and he calls out forces that are being divisive. You know, we we are seeing right now that the destruction of monuments the rewriting of American history. Sort of the denigration of the country in the name of a perfectly legitimate narrative, right the notion of racial injustice that is getting sort of cast by the wayside. We're not really having an important conversation about racial injustice. What we're doing is we got forces the running cover under that and destroying monuments and pushing a cancel culture eroding the First Amendment. That's unfortunate. And the president yes, United States Yesterday at Mount Rushmore, Call that out. You know, so if it really was about ethnic injustice, I don't like saying racial injustice because we're all part of the human race..

United States president Benjamin Rush Benjamin Franklin America Roger Sherman William Livingstone Charles Carroll James Monroe John Jay Bible Declaration of Independence New Jersey Mount Rushmore John Marshall New York Richard Bassett
"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"It has rarely been attempted to be employed, but against the weaker members. And in most instances attempts to coerce the refractory and disobedient. have been the signals of bloody wars in which one half of the confederacy as displayed its banners against the other half. The result of these observations to an intelligent mind must be clearly this. That if it be possible at any rate to construct a federal government, capable of regulating the common concerns and preserving the general tranquility. It must be founded as to the objects committed to its care. Upon the reverse of the principle contended for by the opponents of the proposed constitution. It must carry. It's agency to the persons of the citizens. It must stand in need of no intermediate legislations. But must itself be empowered to employ the arm of the ordinary magistrate. To execute its owner resolutions. The Majesty of the National Authority must be manifested through the medium of the courts.

National Authority
"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"john jay" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"It's more natural. Death is what we now seem to be on the point of experiencing. If the federal system be not speedily renovated in a more substantial form. It is not probable considering the genius of this country. That the complying states would often be inclined to support the authority of the Union. By engaging in a war against the non-complying states. They would always be more ready to pursue the milder course of putting themselves upon an equal footing with the delinquent members by an imitation of their example. And the guilt of aw would thus become the security of all. Our. Past experience has exhibited the operation of the spirit in its fall light. They're good in fact, being inseparable difficulty in ascertaining when force could with propriety be employed. In the article of pecuniary contribution, which would be the most usual source of delinquency, it would often be impossible to decide whether it had preceded from disinclination or inability. The pretense of the latter would always be at hand. And the case must be very flagrant in which it's fallacy could be detected with sufficient certainty to justify the harsh expedient of compulsion. It is easy to see that this problem alone. As soon as it should, occur would open a wide field for the size of factious views of partiality. And of oppression. In the majority that happened to prevail in the National Council. It seems to require no pains to prove that the states ought not to prefer her a national constitution which could only be kept in motion by the instrumentality of a large army continually on foot. To execute the ordinary requisitions or decrees of the government. And yet this is the plane alternative involved by those who wished to deny the power of extending its operations to individuals. Such a scheme if practicable at off. Would instantly degenerate into a military despotism. will be found in every light impracticable. The resources of the Union would not be equal to the maintenance of an army considerable enough to confine the larger states within the limits of their duty. Norwood the means ever be furnished of forming such an army in the first instance. Whoever considers the populace, nece and strength several of these states singly at the present juncture. And looks forward to what they will become. Even at the distance of half a century. Willett wants dismiss S Idaho and visionary. Any scheme which aims at regulating their movements by laws to operate upon them in their collective capacities. and to be executed by a coercion applicable to them in the same capacities. A project this kind is little less romantic than the monster taming spirit, which is attributed to the fabulous heroes and demigods of antiquity. Even in those confederacies which have been. Of members smaller than many of our counties. The principle of legislation for sovereign states supported by military coercion. Has Never.

Union Willett National Council Idaho
Big tech companies back away from selling facial recognition to police

All Things Considered

02:07 min | 2 years ago

Big tech companies back away from selling facial recognition to police

"Amazon for years has offered a service called recognition to police departments here's how it works officers can take a smartphone photo or use a grainy picture from a security camera and try to match against a massive database of mugshots stored in the cloud Adam Scott won is a professor at John Jay college of criminal justice your average police officer instead of having to try to figure out who committed the crime could pass one of these videos to a facial recognition system which will help me in the right direction he says there are many types of crimes where facial recognition technology can help kidnapping missing children Shuman exploitation bank robberies home burglaries but there are big problems with facial recognition M. I. T. researcher joy Buolamwini has documented them all of these systems work better on lighter skin faces than darker skin faces they all overall work better on a male identified faces than female identified faces in other words people of color and women are more likely to be misidentified by this technology that's why cities from San Francisco to north Hampton Massachusetts have banned governments from using it Amazon has fought back loudly saying researchers are over blowing the flaws of its system Fulham when he says even if the face scanning tool becomes flawless she fears it can be used for mass surveillance that events like large protests what kind of society do we want to lead then and we do not want to live in a society where going outside exercising your first amendment rights because you're speaking up for what's right land you in trouble for nothing else than that you're faced with Amazon never mentions George Floyd or the protest his death sparked in announcing the one year freeze instead Amazon says the pauses to give Congress time to quote put in place stronger regulations to govern the ethical use of facial recognition technology some companies have gone even further Microsoft says it will not begin selling face scanning software to police until there's a national law in IBM this we condemn technology that can be used for racial profiling and mass surveillance it's

Amazon Adam Scott Professor John Jay College Officer San Francisco Hampton Massachusetts George Floyd Congress Microsoft IBM Kidnapping Shuman Researcher Joy Buolamwini
"john jay" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"john jay" Discussed on AP News

"Enforcement John Jay college says those cops and a duty to intervene you're better off to be ostracized and going to pretend the former NYPD cop says there's an entrenched police culture that needs to change in one of those things is listening to the office is not getting involved in certain things and not talking back Minneapolis city officials are now trying to strengthen duty to intervene by making it enforceable in court I'm Julie Walker New York City elicits curfew a day early and the day before it's set to reopen with phase one following its corona virus shut down mayor bill de Blasio says after a largely peaceful Saturday night the APM curfew no longer seems necessary honestly I hope his last time we'll ever need a curfew in New York City more than two thousand people were arrested since the start of the mayor is looking ahead focused on healing re opening rebuilding this is a moment that every New Yorker should celebrate as our achievement together your achievement because you did the hard work to fight back the corona virus so we could get to phase one phase one re opening for the city includes manufacturing construction wholesalers and retailers with curbside pick up Julie Walker New York large protests against racism and police brutality in support of the black lives matter movement have taken place throughout Europe and further afield com three most US offices by two to three weeks before his death have resonated around the globe in London thousands of people congregated around the U. S. embassy for the second day running in rhyme processes how to peacefully get noisy rally holding placards that read black lives matter and it's a white problem one protester standing outside the US embassy in Hong Kong noted that George writes that the facts everywhere the global issue people around the world will be looking at the U. S. and thinking to themselves that obviously black lives don't seem to matter that much the demos in Bremen London and Hong Kong came a day off to largely peaceful anti racism protests took place in cities from Australia to Europe to the U. S. in response to the may twenty fifth death of black American George Floyd I'm Karen Thomas thank you for listening to the AP radio network did you know that you can purchase prints of a piece for tiger fee for your personal or small business use every day a piece to top the first capture incredible images from all around the world they're.

bill de Blasio New York City Europe Hong Kong Bremen London Australia George Floyd Karen Thomas John Jay NYPD Minneapolis Julie Walker US London
"john jay" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"john jay" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"News for dissipated in the protests should get a test for coronavirus would act as if you were exposed and I would tell people who I'm interacting with a soon I am positive for the virus because you could be infecting other people the call is similar to what officials in cities like Seattle San Francisco and Atlanta have made following massive demonstrations Joseph Giacalone a former New York police sergeant who now teaches at the John Jay criminal orange college of criminal justice says this is a lesson for every policeman if you see something that is wrong you need to step in in situations where this is something like this was transpiring you needed somebody needs to step up there and you better off to be ostracized and going to burst meanwhile public outrage over the death of George Floyd is spilling over into small town America rallies have surfaced in places such as Norfolk Nebraska and Sioux city Iowa authorities say a northern California sheriff's deputy was killed and two law enforcement officers wounded when they were ambushed by suspects who is a member of the U. S. military Santa Cruz County sheriff's Jim Hardin start said sergeant Damon guts Willer was shot and killed near Santa Cruz tropical storm Cristobal is bringing heavy downpours to parts of the U. S. Gulf coast as it continues advancing toward the region roads were flooded inside coastal Louisiana and Mississippi on Sunday strong winds had a smoky fire that threatened about a hundred world homes and prompted evacuations in northern California the fast growing blaze burned about two square miles of dry brush near the town of winters one of the stories a townhall dot com really thank the pain relief that's natural pain relief that works and pain relief that attacks the source of the pain that I've come from the doctor's clinic this morning twenty eight staples out of mine the and I am not taking pain killers why because I don't need to I'm taking really factor yes the trouble does but it doesn't have any negative side effects and I am doing just fine thank you very much that's the experience of tens of thousands of Americans we'll take you really factor right now see the incredible video endorsements that really factors are common in order your three week quickstart a pack for just nineteen ninety five that's less than a dollar a day that's truly remarkable to be liberated from your pain.

Mississippi U. S. Gulf Santa Cruz sergeant Damon Jim Hardin Santa Cruz County U. S. Iowa John Jay New York Seattle California coronavirus Louisiana Cristobal Sioux Nebraska America George Floyd
"john jay" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"john jay" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Jeremy house easel protests over the death of George Florida continue to New York City with thousands of demonstrators most of them wearing masks walking through Manhattan without a looming curfew New York governor Andrew Cuomo says anyone who's participated in the protests should get a test for coronavirus would act as if you were exposed and I would tell people who I'm interacting with a soon I am positive for the virus because you could be infecting other people the call is similar to what officials in cities like Seattle San Francisco and Atlanta have made following massive demonstrations Joseph Giacalone a former New York police sergeant who now teaches at the John Jay criminal orange college of criminal justice says this is a lesson for every policeman if you see something that is wrong you need to step it insinuations where this is something like this is transpiring you need the somebody needs to step up there and be better off to be ostracized and going to burst meanwhile public outrage over the death of George Floyd is spilling over into small town America rallies have surfaced in places such as Norfolk Nebraska and Sioux city Iowa authorities say a northern California sheriff's deputy was killed and two law enforcement officers wounded when they were ambushed by suspects who is a member of the U. S. military Santa Cruz County sheriff's Jim Hardin sars said sergeant Damon guts Willer was shot and killed near Santa Cruz tropical storm Cristobal is bringing heavy downpours to parts of the U. S. Gulf coast as it continues advancing toward the region roads were flooded inside coastal Louisiana and Mississippi on Sunday strong winds had a smoky fire that threatened about a hundred world homes and prompted evacuations in northern California.

Cristobal U. S. Gulf Santa Cruz sergeant Damon Jim Hardin Santa Cruz County U. S. Iowa John Jay Seattle California Mississippi Louisiana George Florida Sioux Nebraska America George Floyd Joseph Giacalone
Duty to intervene: Floyd cops spoke up but didn't step in

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Duty to intervene: Floyd cops spoke up but didn't step in

"Minneapolis is one of several cities that requires police officers to intervene to stop other cops from using unreasonable force but that didn't save George Floyd when he was pleading for his life lawyers for the officers charged in Floyd's death say their client spoke up one saying you shouldn't be doing this well the other asking Derek show then soon video with his new employee's neck if they should roll Floyd on his side show them replies no just a Jacquelyn who teaches law enforcement John Jay college says those cops and a duty to intervene you're better off to be ostracized and go to prison former NYPD cop says there's an entrenched police culture that needs to change in one of those things is listening to the office is not getting involved in certain things and not talking back Minneapolis city officials are now trying to strengthen duty to intervene by making it enforceable in court I'm Julie Walker

Minneapolis George Floyd Jacquelyn Julie Walker Derek John Jay Nypd
Booker says 'moral moment' must be met with change

Meet The Press

08:59 min | 2 years ago

Booker says 'moral moment' must be met with change

"Donald Trump is the first president of my lifetime who does not try to unite the American people does not even pretend to try instead he tries to divide us general Mattis is letter was a stunning and powerful I respected Germanos that he has every right to express his opinion that's his opinion and these comments from former White House chief of staff John Kelly I think we should look at people that are running for office and put them to the children they are what is their character like what is there what are their ethics are they willing if they are elected to represent all their constituents not just the base and joining me now is democratic senator Cory Booker of New Jersey senator Booker welcome back to meet the press you call this moral moment for this country but these protests are also trying to spur more than just awareness they're trying to spur a policy change will be more confident in that we're meeting a moral moment or that will actually lead to changes in our policy will be the same in fact when I look at everything from the suffrage movement to the labor movement in this country it's always been the people in the streets often young people who have demanded and forced a change in consciousness that made policy changes possible working all week with Kamel Harris and allies in the house to get real policies proposed and will be releasing a bill tomorrow for things that should have been done in this country a long time ago banning certain police practices creating deeper accountability and so I'm just grateful to see this kind of nonviolent protest outpouring the streets because they are leading their putting the pressure they're creating a possibility that our policies can reflect the spirit of this country that we can be in the law a more beloved nation you know you're you have a unique set of experiences you've been a mare you're a federal office holder in the Senate where should most of this change be enacted on the local level or or on your on the federal level I'm it's got to be enacted on every level we are a society where we are culpable we have created a nation distinct from any other on the planet earth we incarcerate the plurality of human beings incarcerate one out of every three women on the planet earth they are incarcerated or here in America we've taken so much of our treasure between the time I was in law school two time I once mayor we were building a new prison or jail every ten days and explicitly and implicitly we all have made a decision that we're going to treat mental illness with prison jail and police addiction with prison jail improve police poverty with prison jail and police and overwhelmingly African Americans with prison jail and police we now in America have more African American men under criminal supervision then call the sleeves of men that were slaves in eighteen fifty this is astonishing this is unacceptable we need to be more Regis in our compassion for one another more more ambitious in our imagination that we can create a society that's not so over policed or where police we don't tolerate certain tactics that have had a generation in fear you said at the beginning of this that eighty plus percent of Americans think this country's out of control well for black people in this country we thought this country's out of control in the way police is our communities and individuals for a very long time in this awakening is so important to create real substantive change not just lip service from politicians tell us something tell me how you're thinking is change being a mare at one point you thought you didn't want the federal government that you thought some of the oversight over the New York police department at the time and in different ways you even braced it since what did you learn over time about this issue well it shows the insidiousness of institutional racism well we are a majority black city in New York we had a majority black city council black mare black police chief and we knew we inherited a a police department with decades of challenges and so we went to work when I got into office to reform our police department but we didn't have the data we didn't have the transparency and it took the federal government and their accountability in their systems and data analysis to show that we were not moving as fast as we should and so we took on a very ambitious plans that extend from everything from changing our missile court system with drug courts and veterans courts and youth courts to pulling in experts from John Jay college just say you don't have to arrest people to create safer neighborhoods that there are other ways to go and I partnered with the ACLU before I left to set a national standard a collection of data collection practices so I learned the hard way that this is not a system that is always explicitly done by over racism this is a system that's real bait that we all have to take responsibility for and get practice it is bad to like a you're gonna see in the bill we're gonna release but just give greater transparency and greater accountability for those working with police I want to ask you about de funding the police last night in Washington DC on sixteenth street right next to the black lives matter letters the phrase deep on the police was painted down there and that is there's a lot of passion around that issue and when you hear that and the phrase may mean different things to different people but when you hear that what's your reaction I understand clearly the sentiment and the substance behind the slogan and so well thought slogan I will use are your people just dismiss it and don't get deeper into the substance as I said earlier it is not a mark of a beloved community to prey upon the most vulnerable and your society we are using police and fire a guy ran police departments I would have exhausted police officer saying why are we using police to deal with the fragility or vulnerability of our society there's so much money going into our police departments there is a more expensive way to deal with it I remember being surprised in Seattle with a housing group called Plymouth housing where they showed me a data analysis where they look at what was more expensive for society gifts providing supportive housing for Americans with mental illness that were homeless or leaving them on the streets and they found out they were of the same Seattle millions of dollars bite giving people supportive housing because homeless people left on the streets with mental illnesses end up in hospital emergency rooms and jails and and so this is the outrageous but I think people on the streets are feeling and that I share is that we are over policed as a society that we are investing in police which is not solving problems but making them worse when we should be in a more compassionate country in a more loving country I know love is at the core of our ideals but it needs to be made manifest in our policies we would actually spend less money we would elevate human dignity and human potential and we would set a standard on the planet earth for how we treat those who are vulnerable as opposed to what we're seeing right now center when you're running for president you were quite critical of of former vice president Joe Biden and you question whether you question whether his past whether he had the credibility given his record on some of these issues to to be a reformer on this where are you now well I'm fully you have to put my faith in a Joe Biden to be the person who could preside over this transformative change and I'm gonna tell you right now the heroes for me as I look at great presidents past the time of LBJ for example are extraordinary capable leader like Joe Biden but the real heroes in that generation were the people who were sick and tired of being sick and tired and and if there are protesters listening to the show I just pray and I want to say to them with all sincerity stay on the streets near nonviolent protest state demanding change and I think that Joe Biden's election can do that and look Donald Trump can't center himself in this this this is such a bigger moment than him this is not a referendum on one person in one office this is a referendum on who we are as Americans and who are going to be to each other this is a moral moment will we become a more loving and compassionate society not with our rhetoric but with our laws in a rule is and how can I treat the most vulnerable and so this is that moment that I think Joe Biden can be the president for but the responsibility is not on any individual it's on

Donald Trump President Trump Mattis
Police unions and Supreme Court shield Minneapolis cops

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:45 min | 2 years ago

Police unions and Supreme Court shield Minneapolis cops

"I'm Anthony Davis? Long before the death of George Floyd last week, efforts to overhaul the way policing is done in Minneapolis repeatedly fizzled in the face of a powerful eight hundred member union that championed military style police tactics. The unions Labor contract with the city is a formidable roadblock to citizens seeking disciplinary action after aggressive encounters with police led by Lieutenant Bob Crawl the unions vocal and haunt charging president for five years. Offices rarely face sanctions. Analysis of Complaints Against Minneapolis police officers from the past eight years, shows that nine out of every ten accusations of misconduct were resolved without punishment or intervention aimed at changing in offices behavior. The Minneapolis Union contract is not unusual. Dozens of other contracts across the United States contain provisions that stymie efforts to hold cops accountable for violence and other alleged abuses, compounding the challenge citizen, seeking justice, a US legal doctrine called qualified immunity, an investigation last month found that the contempt created and reinforced in a series of US Supreme Court rulings increasingly shields from civil liability offices who are accused of using excessive force. You have immune police officers who are beyond punishment because of their union contract as well as constitutional law said Gloria Browne Marshall a professor at John. Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. That combination leads to an arrogance of a police officer who can kill a man in broad daylight while being taped and believe he can get away with it. The Union contract and the qualified immunity doctrine play a role in bouldering. Some police officers to commit abuses. Legal scholars say, but they don't always provide a shielding cases that trigger criminal charges or unleash national media scrutiny in A. A letter to union members on Monday Federation President Crawl wrote that he was working with the unions Labor attorneys to get the offices accused of killing George Floyd reinstated. They were terminated without due process crawl wrote among the contract provisions that impede efforts to discipline. Abusive cops is one forbids the department from including allegations of misconduct in an officer's personal file unless the accusations result in discipline. Crawl has himself been the subject of ten misconduct complaint since two thousand thirteen. The records don't

Bob Crawl George Floyd Minneapolis Minneapolis Union Officer President Trump United States Jay College Of Criminal Justic Anthony Davis Us Supreme Court Gloria Browne Marshall New York Professor
What Happened on Horton Road?

True Crime Brewery

13:47 min | 2 years ago

What Happened on Horton Road?

"Well come to true crime brewery. I'm Jill and on Dick Kellyanne. Tennis was just two days shy of her fourteenth birthday when she disappeared in her own neighborhood in nineteen eighty nine in the days. That followed children's stopped playing hang outside terrified. Neighbors began a harassment campaign of the Gallup family. A family whose two sons had become suspects. The Gallup poll appeared like any other well-maintained suburban home on the outside but what police found inside was shocking. This story shows us how we don't know our neighbors as well as we think we do. And how secrets inside of a family can fester and proliferate infecting others. Join us at the quiet and today for what happened on Horton road a troubling and Morbid case of two families one suburban neighborhood and one unforgettable unforgettable crime so I picked a beer actually from UTICA to New York Beer. This is from that brewing company in UTICA IT SARANAC black forest black beer it's German shephard spear charts means black in German so a black beer dark brown nice thick coffee colored ahead a nice aroma roasted ransom light. hops taste just like you think would from the nose Selena thin and gotta be honest a little nondescript the script so it's not that great a beer but it's okay nicely drinkable okay. Does the trick does does the trick and never tried it. So why. Don't we opened up and give it a try Yasushi. Thank all right Dick. Follow me down to the quiet with head on down. Why don't you go ahead and start our story okay? Yeah this doesn't seem to be too much going on around her. I think it's post Thanksgiving. Let Down Sheriff. Though on we go thirteen year old Kelly. Antennas lived on Long Island in the town of Valley Stream. She lived with appearance Victoria and Richard and her younger brother Richie in a middle class suburban neighborhood on Horton road. There is just nineteen houses houses and Horton road. Some were Cape Cod style. Homes some larger homes of red brick wall with neatly manicured lawns. Horton road is a neighborhood of families with children building for the most part mixture professionals small business owners blue-collar workers there are certainly wasn't allowed to do in valley stream. There was an ice rink and a pizza parlor. Kelly was a good skater and the ice rink was one of her favorite places to hang out before March. Third Nineteen Eighty Nine Horton road. Residence shared a sense of community. They had a block party on Labor Day. The fourth of July in Halloween each year. It was a good way to let the kids. Kids have fun while keeping an eye on them. At the same time everyone knew one another at least peripherally and parents felt safe letting the kids walk to and from each other's houses to play but March third nineteen eighty nine marked the end of tranquility and peace. On Horton road. Life would never be the same for the people who lived there for as long as they lived. They would remember the day when Kelly. Antennas didn't come home and the lives of two families would be destroyed. Kelly did go to school that day. Her father picked her up after school and dropped her at her home as he did most days and on the ride home. Kelly asked asked for permission to go to the ice rink with friends butter. Dad Said No. She needed to babysit her eight-year-old brother Richie until her mom got home from work now the tennis house was full and you could even say as a little bit on the crowded side had belonged to Kelly's grandparents now they were elderly and they continued. I live in the House with the family now. In this particular day the grandfather was in the hospital dying after a long battle with cancer. So this couple had purchased the the house in the late sixties. Mira certainly well known to all the neighbors he a lot of the neighbors there had been there a long time for generations. Kelly's at least Richard was a big guy in his late thirties. He ran a business repairing cars victorious auto repairs named after his wife made a decent living for him and Victoria worked to of course she worked at a local physician's office. Heli helped a lot at home with her grandmother. Her little brother entered dog ugh brutus. She rarely had friends to the house but she did have a lot of friends and she saw them in their homes and also at the ice rink. According to Kelly's friends she rarely complained about her crowded house or the extra responsibilities that she had there she really loved her family and just saw it as her responsibility to pin chin. A Nice Kid. Yes very nice kid. From all accounts Kelly had four really close girlfriends and these girls had nicknames nicknames for each other Kelly's nickname was sky because if her big blue eyes she's tall five foot. Eight and her hair was Brown with Auburn highlights and she was known for her wide smile. And here pretty much always happy disposition. Now maybe it's because of her family responsibilities but Kelly was more organized Organiz than most girls her age. She had a calendar in her room and she could be counted on to be where she was supposed to be. At any given time she hadn't yet had any boyfriends. She didn't drink and didn't do drugs. Kelly had a girlfriend the same ages. Her on Horton road share in stone. L. Sharing live just five doors down down so Kelly walked over there quite often to visit. The gulab family was one of the quieter families. On Horton road. They were a bit older than most and not super a friendly. The Father John was in his fifties very serious and hard worker. He operated a gas station in a neighboring town and he also did car repairs this his wife Elizabeth Gulab in her late forties and on the heavier side was more friendly than her husband. Elizabeth had friends in the neighborhood and she attended ended. The Roman Catholic church where her three children had had their confirmations. She worked full time at a local transportation company in the office. But what Elizabeth really enjoyed with shopping at garage sales and flea markets. That was her passion. She would call herself a collector if you'd asked her but everyone would soon find out that she was a hoarder before order became a noun. Yeah wasn't really a well known thing then true now the go ahead three the kids. When was Adele the oldest? She is a graduate of college. Twenty one year old Robert and fourteen year old John Jay Robert and John J I still lifted home Adele lived in Manhattan and worked for an accountant for an accounting firm. Kelly's very best friend was Roberta Gross. They had known each other since they were preschoolers they attended. Would Mir middle school went to the movies ice skated and they were just beginning to talk about boys. Neither of them had dated yet Kellyanne. Roberta routinely talked on the phone after school. Roberta had an after school job where she was able to use the phone. So March third was a Friday and Kelly's birthday was that Sunday the plan was for Kelly's closest girlfriends. Four of them to take Kelly out to to dinner Friday night. Invite over first sleepover at Roberta's and surprise her with a slumber party. Kelly's mother had already agreed to this with Roberta. OUGHTA after her father dropped her at home. Kelly called her friend Jennifer but there was no answer then. She called her dad at work and asked to go to the ice skating rink again. He again told her no. It was still another hour until her mom would be home and then she could go. Kelly called another friend after that and complained about having to babysit her brother. She said she was thinking of just leaving for the ice rink anyway. The phone rang at the tennis house. Shortly after that. And Richie answered. The caller said that his name was John and he asked to speak to Kelly so Kelly took the call spoke for less than a minute then twenty minutes. It's later at three ten PM. Kelly told her little brother Richie that she was going to her friend. Nicole's house just down the street and she'd be right back. Richie wasn't I used to being left alone at all. So after just five minutes of Kelly being gone he decided to go find her at three fifteen. He walked down the block to Nicole's house but Nicole said that Kelly hadn't been there six year old hairy Finney who Kelly had baby sat for in the past was out playing in front of Sharon Sharon stone. Els House which was between Nicole's house and the goal of House here. He told Richie that he had seen Kelly and she'd gone into John. Jay's house the goal of house both of the young boys went over to the goal ABS. Front door rang the doorbell several times but nobody answered there so Ritchie. I went back home and he was back home at three forty five by himself. No big sister at this point. It's kind of like. She just vanished. The she wasn't where she told her brother she is going to be right and nobody seen her except for one little kid has said she went into the goal of house. Yes but they couldn't couldn't get anyone answered the door now. It was really strange. It's very strange. So Richie got back home. And he called his mom and his dad to tell NICB. Kelly left him alone victorious she would be home within the hour. Ritchie mentioned the Gallup's House to his dad. Dad Tom go find your sister so he told Richie to beat on the door and call for Kelly until someone opened the door. Kelly barely knew the Globes. She had no reason to be in their house and she needed to get home. I'm I'm sure the parents are kind of pissed off at her now. She's not watching a little brother. She bailed on him yeah. Initially they're angry right. They think. Why would she do that? There's no reason right. But before he went over which he took it upon himself to call the goal of how several times he found the number in the phone book. Remember those phone books. Yeah you're yeah. Those were cool but there is no answer so he walked back to the House and he pounded on the goal of store yelling for Kelly and he did this for several roll minutes but now he heard loud rock music blasting inside the house not to give up so easily though Ritchie went to the sidewalk and started yelling Out For Kelly yelling her name and then he got a little bit clever he started yelling. That brutus is loose her dog because he thought well if she knows her dogs loose. She'll she'll come out right away. She loves that dog but still nobody came to the door. There was no response at all. Just a house with the door shut and loud music playing so Ritchie went back to the house and Roberta. Her friend called again for Kelly. She called two more times in the next hour. So and Roberta's getting more and more concerned about where Kelly could be. How Victoria got home? A little after five and Richard was a few minutes after her and they were upset. Like you said because this wasn't something to Kellyanne ever done leaving brother alone like this now added us. She was very reliable so the parents called her friends. But no one has seen Kelly really. So I they're at they're angry but then a very quickly became word. Victoria walked down the block knocking on doors of their neighbors and friends know Anouar Newark. Kelly gone finally Sharon stone. All told Victoria that she had seen Kelly. and to the Gallup's house after three PM this supporter. What Richard told his mother and a father but a strange the goal of did have a fourteen year old son? John Jay the Kellyanne John. Jay were in France. I mean they don't hang out together didn't do anything together. moodiest proximate in age. Yeah so I think most parents would remember a time when their child disappeared. Like that. And you just panic. You don't know what to do and unfortunately in this case it turned out to be your worst nightmare. The worst thing you could imagine there were five calls else from the tennis house to the Gallup's house between four fifty three PM and five thirty pm that day just before six. PM Richard Tennis. It's called the house again and finally he was able to speak with Elizabeth Gulab. Elizabeth said that Kelly had not been at the House and it actually took a moment to remember member who Kelly was because these two families weren't that friendly Richard S to speak to John. Jay who was the fourteen year old son of the goal ups and Elizabeth did hand over the phone to John. Jay Gallup John J told Kelly Stat that he hadn't seen Kelly for several days in fact but Richard thought he sounded nervous. He seemed really anxious to get off the phone too so he didn't know if that was just because he was nervous talking to an adult or if he new something he was hiding. It seems that I know it hasn't been a longtime Achilles been gone right but she never did anything like this. I'm thinking and people are starting to get a little fearful about what's going on here. Yeah but I don't think John Jay was getting fearful no. He was kind of a teenager with an attitude. We'll get to more of that. I think John Jay you saying I haven't seen her but we have two people who said that Kelly went into his house right.

Kelly Stat Richie Jay Gallup John J Tennis Victoria Roberta Gross Richard John Jay Ritchie Elizabeth Gulab Els House Kellyanne Harassment Sharon Sharon Stone Selena Dick Kellyanne Dick Utica
U.S. prosecutors open criminal probe of opioid makers, distributors

CNBC's Fast Money

03:47 min | 2 years ago

U.S. prosecutors open criminal probe of opioid makers, distributors

"We are following a developing story in the OPIOID makers the Wall Street Journal Reporting Federal Prosecutors have opened up a criminal probe into a number of these companies. Let's get right now to make trump back at CNBC HQ with more details. Make Hey Brian well. These companies are already facing thousands of lawsuits over their role nuclear crisis. And this may be a case of another negative headline rattling stocks. Now we already knew that these drug makers and distributors had received subpoenas from US attorneys concerning the controlled Substances Act Johnson and Johnson. Kevin Mallon Cotton Amnio on the drug company side and Amir Source Bergen mckesson of the distributors now. The Journal reported today that federal prosecutors have opened a criminal investigation into drug companies examining whether they violated that act which the Journal points out is normally used to go after drug dealers. I spoke with Bernstein analyst. Ronnie Gal who said he was surprised that the stocks were moving so sharply lower on this. He said investigations investigations are one thing but criminal prosecutions would be another and right now. The report is that the probe is in its early stages but he also pointed out that these stocks had recovered quite a bit over the last month on some potential expected relief in these lawsuits particularly Teva. Some of the companies have reached a tentative settlement framework with some state attorneys general over the OPIOID the degation but not all states are on board. And it's not a done deal. Meanwhile oxycontin maker Purdue Pharma continues to make its way through bankruptcy trying to get more CDs on board with its settlement proposal which is contingent engine unsettling DOJ probes as well and a New York case against multiple companies is scheduled to go to trial early next year unless a settlement is reached. They're the headline today. Just another reminder reminder guys at this saga is far from over for these companies brand make tro make thank you very much or you guys. Just talk more about this. I mean these are big names. The stocks got hit today but this is an issue. We're talking about a criminal probe. We're not talking about a civil case. We're talking about criminal charges here. So the headline risks of significant name like mckesson for example. And it's done this a number number of times within the last six months one thirty one fifty five back to one thirty back to one fifty five. It's probably headed back down to the thirty five W. trade these stocks right now. You don't autumn because that's not the environment we find ourselves in people will say mckesson nine times. It's cheap it is cheap but the headline risk is too severe. So it's down seven percents today my senses senses this further room to the downside but one thirty five level. I think you close your eyes and you buy it again. Well if you think about John Jaso they are clearly both. The most diversified in the one is the biggest balance-sheet and in fact rallied On a couple of small state settlements in terms of civil charges. So I if you think about the headlines that are going to continue to fly in the face of of frankly on Johnson Johnson a handful of fronts. I don't think you have to go in there and run. You don't have to run in there tomorrow and buy it but I do think you have a dynamic here with a company that is at least I made it very clear. There are places where they think you know. It's worth settling and places where they're going to dig in very hard and ultimately we've seen this balance sheet is actually a rallying cry for the stock during difficult times time so I actually think this very well insulated around here is best as I can understand it very unclear. Federal Criminal Environment. Yeah I mean you got teva which is down fifty four percents year Amnio which is probably too small dimension. I mean make mention it so I will again. But it's down eighty three percent. Let's not forget about you. Remember insys therapeutics. Anybody Remember Insurance Nancy. They filed for bankruptcy in June. The stock basically went to zero because they had criminal charges around opioids now. They were more of a sort of a biotech nick base in Arizona. The point I'm trying to make here and I do wonder you don't know where these are going to go. This is the national crisis. We're talking about criminal charges. Any reason to own any of them in that circumstance. I guess if I had to own one I would go to John Jay with seventy and they can afford it right. The balance sheet is as Tim. Tim is talking about is the best shape of any of them. But I don't think you need to. I don't know why you need to I don't know why you need to chase him. Go

Johnson Johnson Ronnie Gal TIM Amir Source Bergen Mckesson Wall Street Journal Cnbc Hq Mckesson United States Kevin Mallon Cotton Amnio Purdue Pharma John Jay John Jaso Bernstein Arizona DOJ Analyst New York The Journal
Exxon, New York prosecutors face off in climate change fraud trial

Morning Edition

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Exxon, New York prosecutors face off in climate change fraud trial

"I'm David Brancaccio in New York and Exxon Mobil trials at the start of New York today has to do with climate change but maybe not in the way that you might think the state of New York argues Exxon defrauded its investors misleading them about the value of the stock by telling them one thing and perhaps doing another from the market places than ability desk Scott Tong has this preview the accusation is Exxon Mobil use two sets of books on climate change and its risk the plaintiff the Attorney General of New York argues that the company told investors that it's all a future with lots of carbon regulations and cost to the company David Shapiro at the John Jay college of criminal justice says that sent a certain message to Exxon stockholders they would say Hey Exxon is accounting for what we anticipate is going to be a dramatic change in how governments approach climate risk in other words Exxon was clear eyed about taxes and regulations on fossil fuel use but in private the plaintiff says the company's actions were altogether different the internal reports effectively is safe well we don't anticipate much in the way of additional costs based on a climate risk regulation the problem with that as the argument goes is Exxon Mobil made oil and gas decisions that were too risky and hid it from investors but Exxon Mobil calls that a baseless theory and then it used to different cost assumptions because they're apples and oranges it makes sense to marched ocal CEO of Adam's funds which holds Exxon stock one you've got actual hard cost you can actually consider the second is a bunch of assumptions you have to make on demand many years down the road I'm not sure that's fraud he says analysts who follow Exxon aren't even talking about this case and if the company were to lose the amount would be negligible but litigation analyst Brandon Barnes of Bloomberg intelligence the state attorneys general and others bringing energy and climate lawsuits see today's case much differently I think it's part of a much broader effort to figure out a way to address climate change when there's a perception that the federal government is moving fast enough the Exxon Mobil trial could provide drama in the form of emails a pretrial investigation found that rex teller sin who was CEO for the period in this case used to email addresses at work one under his name one under an alias the company says the second email was created for quote secure communications I'm Scott Tong for

David Brancaccio New York Exxon Mobil Exxon Scott Tong David Shapiro John Jay College CEO Adam Fraud Brandon Barnes Federal Government Attorney Analyst Bloomberg
"john jay" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

12:25 min | 3 years ago

"john jay" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Flight seventeen minutes tower flight seventeen minutes. Power over police, instructions check and see if you have male passenger occupying twenty four passenger, occupying twenty four wanted by police over checking Melissa Joe we got a man in twenty four. I'll tell them municipal tower. We have a man in seat, twenty four. The name is traveling under his John Jay Jones, John Jay Jones. Maybe that's his right name. But the police want they normally Boston. Black. Maybe you've met Boston black before, on your local movie screen, in case, some of you haven't, I think you'll soon be fast friends of his, and now meet Boston Blackie. Outside. The law is no strange territory to Blackie. But never does he stray for personal reward, although the police, and notably inspector. Faraday find no solace in his motives, and only wilder in his ability to remain out of their reach me gesture Mars as Boston Blackie, enemy to those who make him an enemy friend, those who have no frame..

Boston Blackie Boston John Jay Jones Faraday Melissa Joe seventeen minutes
"john jay" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

07:00 min | 3 years ago

"john jay" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Delighted to be joined now by Joe Tessa talk. I was promised poker McFarland. What is what's going on? What do you mean? You were probably the voice of Monday night football. That would be Joe Tessa talk. I'm gonna sit this Joe I will not stand for this slander sorry to disappoint Jake. I always go with the more handsome. With the first round knockout. It's a standing eight count. Golick junior is down. Testified blood over a shirt after that one did that make the top ten Golic and wingo moments of the year head to be out there. Right. And it didn't make the top ten top five, and he did not make it. Well. Kept me out of crowd five fingers say to the face right there. I still reeling right now, I've got unity imprinted on my forehead. You thought you're going to be a conscientious objector and just sit this out. He came WVU style over the robes pulled you out of the stairs up into the ring. And then bloodied. You he told us. He said when he covers boxing in these events, his his dry cleaner will sometimes look at him. Because when he hands them the close, he's got blood splatter from the ring on him. So I took to call him. Joe the hitman tour, and he took me out there. Let's also just note though, like one hundred percent sure that's just calling the box. He could be sneaky like. Yeah. We've never know show Tessa toward is Dexter tracing down the trinity killer somewhere. Golic and wingo. ESPN radio ESPN news Jason Fitz. Mike Golic junior. We're hanging out. Bobby carpenter making us, look good. The entire time. We were expecting Texans wide receiver. John Jay Hopkins. He's just got pulled into a meeting. He has this thing called a playoff game this weekend. So we're gonna look to reschedule that so perhaps later in the show today, depending on his meeting schedule. We'll keep you updated on that. Instead, let's talk about some intriguing college football matchups going on. Because let's be honest the match yesterday. Like, I found myself watching Michigan state yesterday. And then I watched like an hour later two hours later three hours later, I'm still watching Michigan state. I've done I've done that times this year. I'm like, I keep thinking this is the game where where where Michigan state's gonna show me something and it never happens. Like, I don't know what I'm doing anymore. Morton Antonio would have found a way to winning with to win a game six nothing like that would have been unbelievable. Oregon who will we I still think of Oregon as offensive innovators this explosive offense all over the field? You have Herbert come back the sentence. He was going to be the number one quarterback Fagin, and they're like barely mustering a touchdown in the six seven gaming what what is going on here is this an ESPN classic from nineteen fifty six if you win a bowl game in two thousand eighteen now two thousand and nine thousand nine six nothing. I won't be allowed to claim the national. Here's the craziness, and then you have Missouri and Oklahoma state taking on each other. The irony is Oklahoma state of big twelve school wins the game on a fourth in one stop not the fact that they're scored like seventy two seventy one and a two point conversion into win. They stop a team on a fourth. And what I didn't know that was possible. I did not know that was possible that they could actually get a tackle wraps up. Bring him to the ground in the backfield and prevent a first down. It's a big time push. And so you're right. The bowl game lead up, quite frankly, exposes all of us for being football degenerates. Now, we're starting to get into mainstream football again today, we had that for the playoff games over the weekends the games. And the teams everyone knew now we get back to some big time names matchup and to me the most interesting bowl game of the season's going down today with UCF LSU. Let's you're right in that. Because I haven't been very intrigued because number one I love at aura. I mean, the more coach sound you can get in your life, the better because the man is phenomenal regard in whatever he talks about just one more piece of the Mizzou, Oklahoma state game and people talk about Mike Gundy, and you want to say that his mullet isn't a recruiting violation that doesn't give disproportionate advantage. My wife are watching this and the hotel last night. She's like, I really want Masuda way. Like, wait, the the mullet coaches on the other side, I'm all like, she's all this is all in an Okie state is that the mullet is on the other side line. That's all that. It's actually he looks. Amazing. It's gotten better with age. I think it's unbelievable the way Mike Gundy who went from being a man who's forty do. Now. A man who's fifty and somehow has a better head of hair, very jealous. You're just glossing over the fact that you had your wife up here for for New Year's Eve to have just a wonderful romantic beginning of the new year set the set the stage, and instead you made or watch college football game in the hotel room. Well, we went out to dinner we had to wake it's four thirty wakeup call this morning for this. But this is that's the woman that I married someone who was comfortable sitting there watching college football with me in a game that really not too many people care about with the guy wears a turtleneck and a mullet looks like it's from nineteen eighty eight on the sideline. It's fantastic. Well, today's actual games are going to be fantastic. You mentioned the one that I'm the most excited for just because I think. LSU UCF comes down to is not just coach. Oh, it's the opportunity for the SEC to make a statement. Now ESPN college football analyst, Brian greasy yesterday was on the Paul finebaum show said that LSU wants to put a stop to this UCF national championship. Chalk talk. Check it out. There's no question that the LSU is sick and tired of hearing about UCF talking about championships. And you know, abhors Ron wouldn't say that to me directly. But you could feel the vibe. From the defenders grant del same kind of thing. They don't only want to win this game. They wanna make a statement doing it. And I think that that's an important last sentence. They don't only only want to win this game. They wanna make a statement doing it. And that's why you know for all the because I I think UCF has done is spectacular and had their fan base. Just accepted. What UCF is doing as being spectacular without also claiming a fake national championship and trying to just drive it down nursing. I mean, if it hell of a statement. I mean, at this point, I think for a lot of college football people, you're looking at it and saying, okay, somebody's gotta end this. Memphis almost did it twice in Memphis can almost beat this team. Then especially without their starting quarterback and fairness, but that McKenzie Milton, I think that's a big piece. But when you have this guy, coach, O, eill, polite. Here's when he's addressing the media talking about players talking to his players. I don't know how you can't be cheering for this guy. Johnny. Great young, man. Louisiana. Oh, man. We wanted to get bigger. We have to fix the line of scrimmage..

football UCF Joe Tessa Mike Golic LSU Michigan Oklahoma Mike Gundy ESPN Joe I Golick Bobby carpenter Oregon John Jay Hopkins boxing Memphis Joe Jake wingo