18 Burst results for "John J College Of"

Teddy Roosevelt's great-grandson says remove the statue

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

02:51 min | 2 months ago

Teddy Roosevelt's great-grandson says remove the statue

"Last month, New York's Museum of Natural History announced that it's removing a statue of President Theodore Roosevelt that many find objectionable. It's a decision that has the full support of Mark Roosevelt, president of ST John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico and the great grandson of Theodore Roosevelt. The subject Gatien of other races. By those of us of European origin. Is our nation's original sin. That sin began soon after our arrival on this continent and his bait tragic part of our history to this day. If we wish to live in harmony and equality. With people of other races. We should not maintain paternalistic statues, the depict Native Americans and African Americans in subordinate roles. A statue of my great grandfather. Eared our Roosevelt. In front of New York's Museum of Natural History does so that it is being taken down. Some argue that we should not erase our past and it's such statues, Khun B. Invitations to examine and civilly discuss complex issues. That is disingenuous. That is what books and classrooms therefore not monuments. Monuments are designed toe honor people and to keep those honorees and what they stood for alive in our collective memory. We're all of us in this country. Bound together by the tragedy of racial subject, Gatien and continuing violence and multiple other affronts to black Americans and other people of color. Those of us with power and influence who say we wish to do better are diminished. Fire stalled failed. And woefully insufficient attempts to actually do so. Those with power and influence who will not even acknowledge these wrongs. Are an embarrassment to the nation. If we wish to allow for historical nuance, and I do To continue to recognize Washington and Jefferson and Theodore Roosevelt for their very really accomplishment. While also allowing that they like so many of us were complicity in our nation's original and ongoing sin. We must start by admitting that we've failed to acknowledge the depth of that sin. And immediately remove all memorials and statues honoring those who fought a civil war or otherwise worked to perpetuate that scent. And then we should get on with the desperately needed work of up roading, systemic racism wherever it is found.

Theodore Roosevelt Mark Roosevelt Museum Of Natural History New York Gatien President Trump Santa Fe New Mexico Khun B. St John's College Washington Jefferson
"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the culture rachel this is not a problem with individual police officers is not a problem with individual college students in any of our samples this is the way the world is being reflected on the canvas of everyone's mind so one of the key ways that you can reduce the automatic association between black and criminal 'between black childhood and be older than they are is changed mature realities changed the chronic situations of which we encounter though if we stop requiring the black boys have to behave like men at home and boys at school will stop seeing them as older than they are we stop representing them as criminal on television in will stop seeing them as more dangerous than they are allowed black children to have that fundamentally uniquely human experience of being sugar that's philip at either got his president of the center for policing equity at john j college of criminal justice in new york city we reach him via skype for a cigar thanks so much for speaking with us from rougeot upi bowl for saturday vets all things considered from npr news i'm michelle martin you can follow us on twitter at npr eighty c or follow me at npr mich e l we hope you'll tune in tomorrow when we'll be talking about the south by southwest music festival which just kicked off in austin texas we'll have a conversation with a festivals keynote speaker at the mayor of london said khan and will get a preview of some of the new musicians will be performing this year thank you for.

president michelle martin twitter texas london khan john j college of new york npr austin
"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tiba golf he is president of the center for policing equity and he teaches that subject at john j college of criminal justice in new york he is a social psychologists whose work focuses on racial bias and he's gotten a lot of attention for his two thousand fourteen study that found that black boys are often perceived as older than they actually are and less innocent than their white counterparts which leads to a greater assumption of guilt and greater instances of police violence against them he's with us now via skype professor thanks so much for speaking with us as roundly would you talk a bit more about your research study from two thousand fourteen how did you go about studying this question yes we are actually building on the research of 100 grams on and others would found similar sets of things but when they had described the behaviour of black as opposed to white adolescence and it turns out that when you describe behavior that's asia appropriate but it's it's bad behaviour you start adding years to your estimation of how old the black actor was while we him was we added pictures so they now we're looking at faces of an actual ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen year old and we saw they added a number of years to them we rashly really surprise it first has the number of your was way more than we would expected flooring five years to the face of a thirteen or fourteen year old child that takes someone who's early in adolescence and makes them a legal adopt an end you found that this is particularly pronounced with black handsome and like what about what tino kits yeah it was particularly for now among black boys we actually only looked at ways because you start adding generated becomes complicated but there some researchers at georgetown who justice actually replicated this doing the same thing with black girls around the same age not the same case were latinos or latinas that same cash for american folks and there's not a occult representation that allows us to look at that on prenatal folks it does seem to be particular to black folks so study focused on police interactions with black.

president new york georgetown Tiba john j college of skype professor asia ten eleven twelve thirteen fou fourteen year five years 100 grams
"john j college of" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The mind of the culture mexico this is not a problem with individual police officers is not a problem of individual college students in any of our samples this is the way the world is being reflected on the chambliss of everyone's mind so one of the key ways that you can reduce the automatic association between black and criminal 'between black childhood and be older than they are is changed the mature we allen's change the chronic situations in which we encounter though if we stop requiring the black boys have to behave like men at home and boys at school will stop seeing them as older than they are we stop representing them as criminal on television then will stop seeing them as more dangerous than they are will allow black children to have that fundamentally uniquely human experience of being schaefer that's philip fatif a got his president of the center for policing equity at john j college of criminal justice in new york city we reach him via skype heuristic our thanks so much for speaking with us thanks for having me oh four saturday that is all things considered from npr news i'm michelle martin you can follow us on twitter at npr etc or follow me at npr m i see h e l we hope you'll june in tomorrow when we'll be talking about the south by southwest using festival which just kicked off an austin texas we'll have a conversation with the festival's keynote speaker the mayor of london said he khan and we'll get a preview of some of the new musicians will be performing this year thank you for listening we hope you have a great night.

mexico chambliss president skype michelle martin twitter texas london allen philip fatif john j college of new york npr austin khan
"john j college of" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Transmission observed no pfaender and engage them physical confrontation armed physical confrontation ensued command about was shot multiple times johnson says the suspect is in custody the weapon recovered it's still unclear if commander bauer was on duty or offduty and who fired the weapons ryan burrow abc news chicago the man who set off pressure cooker bombs in new york city as well as new jersey in two thousand sixteen will serve the rest of his life in prison ahmad khan rahimie a naturalized us citizen from afghanistan was giving multiple life sentences in a manhattan federal courtroom today rahimi was wounded himself during a shootout with police and captured shortly after the blast that wounded thirty in september of two thousand sixteen one expert thinks investigators could have plenty to work with as they try to find out who sent that letter with white powder to donald trump jr the letter mailed from boston turned out to contain cornstarch forensic science professor doctor lawrence koblenz ski with the john j college of criminal justice spoke with wbz's carl stephen the envelope shell has writing on it presumably there's a stamp uh and the envelope may or may not have been moistened uh with saliva to seal it um if they're so live on either the stamp of the envelope there's dna uh and that is a major factor in breaking the case you can hear more about what steps forensic scientists are taking to find out who male that letter check out our website wbz 1030 dot com the new york times may not be around in paper form within a decade or so and that is the opinion of the paper ceo cbs news business reporter jason brooks with detailed chris journalism is eulogy may not be far off in the making newark time ceo mark thompson told cnbc that he thinks his company's products may have another ten years of life hit like it to survive for as long as it can but says that the economics will determine when it no longer makes sense to keep the printing presses running the times.

mark thompson newark jason brooks reporter john j college of professor donald trump manhattan afghanistan commander cnbc johnson ceo new york times carl stephen wbz boston rahimi us
"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Snapchat the app is very popular with young people and it turns out it has become popular with child predators as well joining us now is adam scott want who's an assistant professor of public policy john j college of criminal justice in new york adam thanks for joining us thank you for having me and how much predatory behaviour you seeing right now on snapchat especially versus other sites are apps snapchat has become a haven for child predators to be able to both exchanged child pornography with each other and to be able to induce children to send us pictures of them to the predator and we're also seeing differ kulti in law enforcement being able to investigate due to these safeguard snapchat has in deleting both snap some stories after a certain amount of time because they they disappear of right away within a few seconds in some cases in some cases you know it depends snapchat supports different methods of communication a snap stories and chats some disappear as soon as they're open in red other stay around for a day or so um some could stay as long as thirty days but if law enforcement doesn't know that this is going on and they don't get to snapchat on time with a legal process to request or to preserve the evidence they lose it forever so what can investigators do about that it's really difficult unless an investigator is able to either get to snapchat within 24 hours of the snap being exchanged or unless they're able to pre identify who the predator is and set up an operation with snapchat where their monitoring that offender um you know it's it's extremely hard to do we have children all over the country that are being approached by people they think our children their own age but really they are predators they are adults who are significantly older than them and have fake profiles to try to lure the children to send them a photos that could either be nude or of them doing other things is there anything parents can do to protect their children from suffolk this parents are absolutely the first and most important defence in protecting their children from online predators um parents.

assistant professor child pornography law enforcement investigator suffolk adam scott john j college of new york thirty days 24 hours
"john j college of" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on Here & Now

"A stringent view of our future policy with regard to immigration and stephen miller goes much much further than that and really defines one poll of uh of extreme reluctance to have more immigration legal or illegal and so those voices when you hear sarah sanders say that uh there's been a lot of negotiation going on in the white house she's talking about the back and forth among people who work in the white house more than a back and forth between the white house and capitol hill will run in a in a commentary you write and we'll posted it here now dot org you point out that we americans are pretty conflicted to paul show at least three three and four agreed that dhaka the population should have legal status to stay but also a majority of americans don't think daca was worth shutting the government down over any even though they believe that there should be a path for dhaka recipients just briefly we are as conflicted the country is conflicted about immigration the country is built on immigration most of us are dead send it from immigrants in one sense or another but when people look forward at the immigrants who are coming today in those will come tomorrow sometimes they ask whether those people will be enough like themselves to have the same privileges as americans that they enjoy that's where we are energy right we have different lincoln called our bonds of affection ronel thing and the are senior washington editor and correspondent thank you thank you robyn while you're getting your news about the shutdown at from npr if you're under thirty there's a good chance you're also getting your news about the shutdown from snapchat the app is very popular with young people and it turns out it has become popular with child predators as well joining us now is adam scott want who's an assistant professor of public policy at john j college of criminal justice in new york adam thanks for joining us thank you for having me and how much predatory behaviour you seeing right now on snapchat especially versus other sites are apps snapchat has become a haven for child predators to be able to both exchanged child pornography with each other and to be.

paul new york john j college of adam scott npr robyn washington daca dhaka stephen miller capitol hill child pornography assistant professor editor lincoln white house sarah sanders
"john j college of" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The problem that we envisioned perhaps a few years ago of thousands and thousands of a foreign fighters departing the conflict zone once the war started to subside that's what we anticipated happening and it's not happening in those numbers so most of this new sounds pretty good isis has no safe haven it's fighters are on the run and they aren't escaping abroad in large numbers but remember this the forerunner of isis was al qaeda in iraq the us and its allies dismantled that group a decade ago it thin reemerged is isis stronger than ever as conditions proved more favorable this included the chaotic arab uprisings of 2011 and the us military withdrawal from iraq that same year this lesson is not lost on isis it is far easier to kill a terrorist than to slain ideology and that has always vexed they folks who or prosecuted in the campaign gehlsen marc lamont as with the council on foreign relations the us has a good record when it comes to winning battles in the middle east what's hard she says is the aftermath and as long as the ground is still right for insurgency it's very hard to keep a war ended and the truth is no one really wants to pay for the rebuilding nationbuilding is a fourteen letter word that has become a fourletter word the islamic state stresses that it's waging a long war and the hard core leadership sees the recent setbacks as something that can be reversed greg my ry npr news washington for years prisoners at the guantanamo bay naval base have had a creative outlet art three dozen pieces of that artwork are now on display at john j college of criminal justice in new york but the pentagon is not on board with the exhibit andras david vaughn the reports the show has prompted the defense department to clamp down on inmate art the dispute over the guantanamo artwork really comes down to one question who owns it for commander and lee analyst the prison camps spokeswoman the.

al qaeda us iraq marc lamont greg washington new york pentagon commander analyst npr guantanamo bay naval base john j college of david vaughn guantanamo
"john j college of" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is far easier to kill a terrorist than sustain ideology and that has always facts they folks who are prosecuting the campaign gales himachal lamont with the council on foreign relations the us has a good record when it comes to winning battles in the middle east what's hard she says is the aftermath and as long as the ground is still right for insurgency it's very hard to keep a war ended and the truth is no one really wants to pay for the rebuilding nationbuilding is a fourteen letter word that has become a fourletter word the islamic state stresses that it's waging a long war and the hard core leadership sees the recent setbacks as something that can be reversed greg my ry npr news washington for years president prisoners at the guantanamo bay naval base have had a creative outlet art three dozen pieces of that artwork are now on display at john j college of criminal justice in new york but the pentagon is not on board with the exhibit interest david on the reports the show so has prompted the defense department to clamp down on in made art the dispute over the guantanamo artwork really comes down to one question who owns it for commander and lee analyst the prison camps spokeswoman the answer is simple items produced by detainees during their detention here do remain the property of the department of defense we don't consider government on that that's alka per don she's the human rights expert on the legal team representing amar all baluchi his uncle is khalid sheikh mohammed the alleged mastermind of nine eleven attacks i'll baluchi is accused of acting as a courrier for osama bin laden and faces a possible death sentence senate investigation found he'd been brutally interrogated in a secret cia prison before arriving in guantanamo put on says a work by all baluchi being shown in new york a vortex of color dots titled vertical in guantanamo captures that ordeal evidence of his torture and the effects of his torture the continuing effective is torture fourteen years after he was kidnapped i'll baluchis cia interrogation was dramatized in the movie zero dark thirty ty you saw now when he lied to me i heard you i'll baluchi and thirteen others who also underwent ci interogations are called highvalue detainees.

president guantanamo cia senate osama bin laden khalid sheikh mohammed amar human rights alka john j college of guantanamo bay naval base us npr baluchi analyst commander david pentagon new york washington greg fourteen years
"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The ways terrorist group linked and destroy art she discovered that other lawyers also had collections of art from guantanamo attorney alka prodan is represented several detainees over the years every single one at are a bit by john j college of criminal justice his mission is there in its name to study crime and justice it's galleries show works by us prison inmates and foreign dicle dissidents another show up right now celebrating nine eleven first responders there are eight artist in the guantanamo show four have been released a few years ago the men started turning out still lives sculptures and pastoral scenes but most of all images of the see the cells at guantanamo or just yards away from the caribbean but thompson says the sees usually hidden eric tarps covering all the fences they can smell it they can hear it they can't see it then three years ago a hurricane approached cuba and the tarps came down so for four days it could see the ocean for some detainees from landlocked afghanistan it was the first time the men built model boats painted seascapes and oil and pastel and rendered to depictions of the titanic one of them in gravel insane and gathered from the exercise yard the film titanic is one of the few available to detainees from the camp library of the nearly three dozen pieces in the exhibit just one is an abstract work from a distance it looks like brightly coloured candied buttons swirling down in a way into avoid upon closer examination there's an inscription vertigo in guantanamo page laino is one of the shows curator it looks fine on the surface but there's a lot of lake very tortured pencil marks than it's i mean it as a black hole it's a fun colored buckle the artist is a morale baluchi the only socalled highvalue detainee in the show he distributed money that the alqaeda conspirators used to carry out the nine eleven attacks a military commission is set to triumph on charges that carry the death penalty attorney out a production represents l baluchi and loan the.

alka prodan caribbean thompson cuba vertigo black hole attorney john j college of guantanamo afghanistan three years four days
"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And every one of his given the same 24 hours we all have the same twenty four hours it's what you do those twenty four hours will determine the success in what you do and alonzo mourning thank you thank you so much for having me and finally tonight a look at works of art from an unlikely source the guantanamo bay detention camp a new exhibit in new york hosts art made by current and former detainees special correspondent arrun wrath has the story the art work at the john j college of criminal justice in manhattan reflects what is studied eu galleries take on themes related to crime in the mall human rights and dissent art that reflects justice and injustice the entrance is lined with work depicting nine eleven first responders upstairs in another exhibit a piece of art from a man who is on trial for his alleged role in supporting the attack vertigo by a more all baluchi is not about nine eleven by it reflects his tour at the hands of the cia which was documented in a senate report it's just a swirl at winds and dots and he drew it to show his lawyers what happens when he experiences vertigo when he can no longer see which is the result of a traumatic brain injury suffered during interrogation interim is an art professor john j and she studied the strange intersex aladi an art but arc from gitmo detainees was a surprise one of their lawyers four detainees uh approached me and said i want my clients are to be exhibited and i said what do you mean those are made at guantanamo what hit me at first this how normal they shouldn't their drawings be so much more angry and it took me a long time to realize that uh uh a that these artists want to show beauty there's arc from twelve gitmo detainees in the.

manhattan human rights cia professor alonzo guantanamo bay john j college of senate vertigo john j gitmo twenty four hours 24 hours
"john j college of" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The ways terrorist groups linked and destroy art she discovered that other lawyers also had collections of art from guantanamo attorney alka prodan is represented several detainees over the years every single one of had our our that was ready to defy john j college of criminal justice his mission is there in its name to study crime and justice it's galleries show works by us prison inmates and foreign political dissidents another show up right now celebrates nine eleven first responders there are eight artist in the guantanamo show four have been released a few years ago the men started turning out still lives sculptures and pastoral scenes but most of all images of the see the cells at guantanamo or just yards away from the caribbean but thompson says the sees usually hidden air tarps covering all the fences they can smell it they can hear it they can't see it then three years ago a hurricane approached cuba and the tarps came down so for four days they could see the ocean for some detainees from landlocked afghanistan it was the first time the men built model boats painted seascapes and oil and pastel and rendered to depictions of the titanic one of them in gravel and sand gathered from the exercise yard the film titanic is one of the few available to detainees from the camp library of the nearly three dozen pieces in the exhibit just one is an abstract work from a distance it looks like brightly coloured candied buttons swirling down in a way into avoid upon closer examination there's an inscription vertigo in guantanamo page laino is one of the shows curator says it looks fine on the surface but there's a lot of late very tortured pencil marks than it's i mean it is the black hole at the fun coloured black hole the artist is a morale baluchi the only socalled highvalue detainee in the show he distributed money that the alqaeda conspirators used to carry out the nine eleven attacks a military commission is set to try him on charges that carry the death penalty attorney alka prodan represents l baluchi and loan the.

alka prodan caribbean thompson cuba vertigo black hole attorney john j college of guantanamo afghanistan three years four days
"john j college of" Discussed on WINS 1010

WINS 1010

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on WINS 1010

"Falco our next report at 451 on ten ten wins news time four or forty two manhattan district attorney sivan's is defending his decision not to prosecute movie producer harvey weinstein over allegations of sexual harassment and assault too little hard to hear but he made this comment to reporters today micromax pence made his comments during a conference at the john j college of criminal justice and in response to a report that he accepted campaign donations from one of weinstein's lawyers a few years ago van said he had no regrets about having to raise money in order to campaign for office he said nothing that anyone ever contributed had the slightest impact on his decision in making weinstein has denied the allegations in 2015 he was the subject of an nypd sting tape a tape of which was obtained by and posted by the new yorker yesterday the da's office says that tape itself was not enough to bring a case the hollywood reporter today says weinstein has added criminal defense attorney blair burke to his legal team meanwhile model and actress carrie della wien join a list of weinstein accusers today posting about several alleged incidents two instagram lindsay low hand posted and then deleted comments about feeling quote very bad for weinstein and he she says he never harmed her low hand also called on weinstein's now estranged wife georgina chapman to take a stand him be there for her husband and chapman announced last night that she was divorcing weinstein wins news time four fortyfour it's.

sivan harvey weinstein harassment new yorker reporter blair burke carrie della georgina chapman manhattan district attorney producer assault john j college of hollywood attorney
"john j college of" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"This hour from townhall com i'm heat petered the big question is why in the aftermath of the mass murder of some fifty eight people during a country music concert ahmaz vegas by a gunman firing from a 30second floor of a hotel mesquite police spokesman officer quinn everett says the murderer was not on police rate darfur any incident what you need for us is a the gunman the shooter and the person with them that we them as keep police department have not had any contacts with these people in the past we haven't had any traffic stops three out of any law enforcement contacts no arrest or nothing as andrea andrew akioshi and laurel icici said people were trying to rob run but the exits were in the same direction where the shots were coming from your part of the racing and you're you're going to die then again hunger a die hard this new to get out here as quickly as possible and then of course all the people around your thinking thinking the same thing in this since the mass hysteria point white house press secretary sarah sanders was choked up while talking about those who died trying to protect others in las vegas there are examples will serve as an eternal reminder that the american spirit cannot and will not ever be broken in the days ahead we will grieve as a nation we will honor the memory of those lost as a nation and we will come together united as one nation under god indivisible the government's been identified a 64yearold steven paddock the brother of paddock said he's completely dumbfounded by the shooting a security authorities says watch out for copycats in the wake of the las vegas attack james makreda teaches security management of john j college of criminal justice says the shootings will make people more cautious of big events we must be too because an event like to trigger the.

murder laurel icici sarah sanders paddock las vegas mesquite officer quinn everett law enforcement andrea andrew akioshi press secretary james makreda john j college of criminal jus 30second
"john j college of" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Eighty three eighty three look why do you think and teeth a m black lives matter exist it is b because we have allowed this type of behaviour to continue to take centre stage in america espn they're basically not doing the right thing when they look at jemil's smith and treat her as a minority doesn't she realized that they're doing the very opposite that they pretend that they're actually doing to help her because if you feel that you have to protect her because she's a black woman and you're basically same black women are not smart enough not strong enough to stand up and take the consequences of their words and their actions brands what do you think that makes sense i mean think about that for a moment that has to make sense but of course it doesn't make sense because this is the way the left plays it and unfortunately those that are left us those that are democrats those that fall into this also narrative think that they're doing something of honor something that's dignified and the truth of the matter is there not they're doing the exact opposite and they have to be protected makes no sense why do you think antesa exists friends in fact i n t for is on record of saying that it's a privilege to teach future dead cops mike isaacson who's a professor john j college of criminal justice who is also an antique the leader is on record of saying that he tweeted that.

jemil smith professor america mike isaacson john j college of
"john j college of" Discussed on 100:1 The Crack Legacy

100:1 The Crack Legacy

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on 100:1 The Crack Legacy

"I'm christopher johnson and this is one hundred two one the crack legacy based on what i understand it was intended to be a drug smuggling operation it went down right here at 37th and eighth at patrick doors months confrontation with the in why pd delors jones round remembers the story it was about half past midnight under a red awning streaked in health kitchen grime the used to read the distinguished welcome both cocktail lounge the officers approached him about wanting to purchase and their conflicting stories marijuana of crack cocaine delors teaches law in policing at the john j college of criminal justice and she's written about doors smith he was a black man haitianamerican he had some beers with friends at will combo and according to the new york times he stepped outside to get a taxi the report said a plain clothes detective named anthony vasquez approached him and asked him about buying some drugs vasquez in a group of other undercover cops had already made a series of drug arrests in the area that night it's not hard to imagine that dorfmann heard in vasquez's question and insulting stereotype and it pissed him off he said i'm not a drug dealer and became little bit irate they will undercover so he didn't know initially that they were police officers and am some kind of a scuffle ensued the other officers get involved now who takes the first swing how long the fist fight last even what makes officer vasquez pull his gun witness in police accounts don't agree but at some point the detective has his nine millimeter in his hand then a single bullet inter's doors months chest and he was killed patrick moses doors a 26yearold fatheroftwo was dead who a month later about twenty five hundred people marched through brooklyn to city hall waving haitian flags and shouting down pollution rush they also called on mayor rudy giuliani to resign the mayor had released dortmund's paltry juvenile record a move that struck many as blaming doris mun for his own death in press reports giuliani defended his decision saying he quote would not one a picture presented of an altar boy fact dortmund had been an altar boy he graduated from the same elite catholic school as giuliani dismiss up pattern uh an africanamerican males being suspected of criminal aladi and ending up dead at the end of an involuntary police encounter what made the story really upsetting for many was the time it just three weeks earlier in why pd officers were acquitted in the death of another unarmed black man ahmadou diabe he was shot 41 times right on his doorstep jones brown says there was something familiar in the outcome of doors mazda unfortunately what what is also become the pattern is at the police officer who killed him was not even indicted for any criminal charges and you know as a lawyer i seen a what or the police approaching patrick heat still be alive this series one hundred two one was inspired by the recent deaths of unarmed black men and women killed by police even over the few months that we've been doing our stores there have been several high profile police shootings caught on video in the summer of 2016 alton sterling and philander casteel were shot to death by police within about a day of each other this is why i bring a patrick dorfmann because his killing that story could fit neatly on the same list except dorfmann wasn't killed in the last few years officer vasquez shot him in two thousand more than a decade and a half ago this isn't new in this episode i'm gonna look at the

christopher johnson marijuana new york times anthony vasquez officer crack cocaine john j college of
"john j college of" Discussed on 100:1 The Crack Legacy

100:1 The Crack Legacy

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on 100:1 The Crack Legacy

"I'm christopher johnson and this is one hundred two one the crack legacy based on what i understand it was intended to be a drug smuggling operation it went down right here at 37th and eighth at patrick doors months confrontation with the in why pd delors jones round remembers the story it was about half past midnight under a red awning streaked in health kitchen grime the used to read the distinguished welcome both cocktail lounge the officers approached him about wanting to purchase and their conflicting stories marijuana of crack cocaine delors teaches law in policing at the john j college of criminal justice and she's written about doors smith he was a black man haitianamerican he had some beers with friends at will combo and according to the new york times he stepped outside to get a taxi the report said a plain clothes detective named anthony vasquez approached him and asked him about buying some drugs vasquez in a group of other undercover cops had already made a series of drug arrests in the area that night it's not hard to imagine that dorfmann heard in vasquez's question and insulting stereotype and it pissed him off he said i'm not a drug dealer and became little bit irate they will undercover so he didn't know initially that they were police officers and am some kind of a scuffle ensued the other officers get involved now who takes the first swing how long the fist fight last even what makes officer vasquez pull his gun witness in police accounts don't agree.

christopher johnson marijuana new york times anthony vasquez officer crack cocaine john j college of
"john j college of" Discussed on Invisibilia

Invisibilia

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"john j college of" Discussed on Invisibilia

"If you asked african americans after the interaction with white doctor was over whether or not the doctor was friendly the thing the attend it too was not the spoken words in our researchers the nonverbal clues by far and when the signals were contradictory someone was verbally friendly but had negative body language black participants basically dismissed the verbal altogether but if you ask the white person how funny they behaved two things predict how friendly they thought they behaved one was how nonprejudiced they are and the other one was how nice how friendly they were verbally because those are the things that are accessible to us basically white people and black people were attending to completely different parts of the interaction which is why they walked away with such tragically different interpretations of what had taken place now doctorpatient interactions are important to the real consequences in terms of treatment so this finding is meaningful in the real world well that makes me tired i mean like you to explain the lat but it makes me sad our makes me sad to but not everyone found the news about implicit bias so disheartening a murder spot was if i told you this is philip goff a psychologist to john j college of criminal justice who founded the center for policing equity gough was still graduatestudent in nineteen ninety nine when he was introduced the idea of implicit bias and he says as one of the few african americans in his programme it made huge intuitive cents to him it's it's like when someone says something that you've been feeling but never had the right words were on it felt a lot like that for me it felt relief um it felt validating our it it was a a weapon against feeling like you were crazy in these situations where you measure racial prejudice and the levels were low which you live in it and it doesn't feel like the levels are low doesn't feel like racism is an alive and well in that situation and implicit bias were gave a language for that and it made garfield hopeful he says because this new theory suggested that there might be new responses on in some senses when their signs on the water fountains on and when even children don't get the benefit of their humanity it's really clear where the enemy is when they took the signs away it's harder to locate it.

african americans murder philip goff john j college of garfield