35 Burst results for "John Hopkins"

The Latest: Vatican defends pope's Iraq trip, stadium mass

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

The Latest: Vatican defends pope's Iraq trip, stadium mass

"So where are we now with the corona virus pandemic covert nineteen infections hospitalizations and deaths are down dramatically since the dark days of January the number of deaths of though it is still dangerously high and has even risen slightly over the past several days there are three approved vaccines now more than fifty million adults have gotten at least one dose of vaccine so far that's about twenty percent of the adult population but it's so tough in so many places to schedule an appointment the White House says it knows that and it's working with states on trying to make it easier covert nineteen is now killed almost five hundred fifteen thousand people in this country more than two and a half million around the world according to Johns Hopkins University I'm Rita folate

White House Johns Hopkins University Rita Folate
Pfizer's vaccine trial data holds up in the real world

Bloomberg Daybreak

05:03 min | 6 d ago

Pfizer's vaccine trial data holds up in the real world

"More again on the pandemic and the promising news about vaccines that Seems to continue to pile up of late. We're joined now by Dr Amos, a doll jah, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and a professor of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. It's always good to get your insights doctor and I want to get your take on this latest study out of Israel that seems to verify the clinical data we got on the Fizer vaccine that it seems to be Just about a super effective in the real world as it is in lab settings. What do you make of this pure reviewed study? This is great news because we always know that it's one thing when you're in a clinical trial, and you've got a lot of protocols and certain people who volunteer for those clinical trials, and then you move from that setting to the real world where things can be a little bit more messy. Are there a lot of variables that might not have been accounted for in the clinical trial, and that's what we really understand how effective the vaccine is moving from F ethical efficacy Studies to Real world Effective ists. I think this is good news, and it really cemented the fact that these vaccines are the passport and the way we get our lives back and put this pandemic to rest doesn't make you think that vaccines could get us to herd immunity that it'll be vaccines alone. That could get us to that step that we all want to see. Do you think that vaccines will eventually get us to herd immunity? But it won't be vaccines alone because already one third of the population in the U. S likely has some level of immunity from prior infection. Herd immunity, although it's a major milestone to reach. It's not the only thing I think to me the biggest The biggest milestone would be vaccinating are vulnerable populations completely so that this virus can never cause serious illness, hospitalization or death again that it could never threaten hospital capacity. I think we were will get there first. And then eventually herd immunity will will come. So I think the key is really taming this virus, making an unable to cause serious disease. And that's why our vaccine allocation process is geared towards those who are most likely to have severe disease. And I think we'll get there first. Before we hit hurted me. Did he speak about vulnerable populations? Doctor? I wonder if you're also thinking about the racial disparity that we continue to see in the vaccine distribution effort we saw Further evidence of that on the Bloomberg vaccine tracker just yesterday. What's it going to take to sort of bridge the gap between black populations receiving the vaccine and white populations? It's going to be very, very challenging. And I think that The more people that get back stated. The more people in those communities that are vaccine hesitant or afraid to get back there because they're on trusting of the of the vaccine or public health authorities. The more they see people get vaccinated and nothing untoward happened. I think the better it is. But I do think we need specific outreach to those programs to those individuals specific programs that really trying address their concerns almost on individual basis, because if that group does not get back stated they still represent they represent some of the people that are most risk for. Of your disease. They're disproportionately the ones who've died from this. We have to do better in order to put this pandemic to an end. And I think it's going to be challenging. And I think we're gonna need the innovative solutions. We're going to the community leaders to really Show people the data and be very transparent about how effective these vaccines have been in go through all of the safety data and hopefully persuade them to get vaccinated at much higher rates than they have been. Our last minute here. What's your level of concern about some of the latest variants we're seeing reports on with there's a New York Times report just this morning about a variant in New York City that seems to be spreading pretty rapidly and could blunt the effectiveness of vaccines. Yeah, it's hard to know exactly how to take all the news of the variance. We know that this virus has been making variants as soon as it jumped into humans and most very instead from made headlines have never made The New York Times Because they didn't change the way the virus behave. But there are some that appeared to have made the virus more contagious. Some that have Changed the way the virus interacts with the immune system and those air more concerning, But I do think when you look at our vaccine data against these areas, including ones that are more Troublesome like the one that they call the South African variant of the resilient variant. The vaccine's still do remarkably well on what matters. Preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death. So I do think that the goal when it comes to these variants is to stay ahead of them by accelerating vaccination programs to the fastest possibles rate. Some of these various don't pose a problem, but I think we need to do better attracting them and understanding them. But not everyone that you see is going to rise to prominence and I think we're getting better now at tracking them. Sequencing, and so you're going to hear more about various, but not all of them are going to be of the same important that it's gonna take some time. Specifically all of that.

Dr Amos Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School U. Israel The New York Times New York City
James West on invention and inclusion in science

Short Wave

09:04 min | Last week

James West on invention and inclusion in science

"James west was born in nineteen thirty one and grew up in prince edward county virginia in before we dove into his research and work as a mentor. I wanted to know more about little kid. Jim and his relationship to science the desire to know how things work and why they were was my biggest motivator and i Completely forgot about this on purpose. But i took my grandfather's pocket watch support hundred and five pieces zenit. But i couldn't get it back together which resulted in rather severe punishment but it didn't tear my desire to know and understand how things work and so i was told that i could only take things apart that weren't working and that was the wrong thing. Say to me. Because if i could break it i did so i could get it. Why caesar now you're you're breaking stuff you're like look it doesn't work so right. Okay i mean were you. Were your parents. Supportive of your interest in in engineering and science absolutely not i was going to be the doctrine brother the data stove. I swear versa. They didn't care which would went. Only that it went in one of those two directions and When i told my father that i was changing my major from biology to physics He introduced me to two black men who have. Phd's and chemistry that were working in the post office score poem order on the railroad because the best job they could get was teaching at high school. And that didn't pay enough to support their families and he thought that i was well on the way to becoming one of them because You could be a preach at teacher lawyer doctor. But that was about it and terms of professions or black people and prince edward county virginia but in the face of all that jim stuck with it he graduated from temple university with a degree in physics and then went on to work at bell. Labs for more than forty years and his big invention with gearhart. The foil electric microphone didn't come from trying to solve one specific problem. I didn't. I don't think sat down and looks invent a better microphone. That was not the motivation at all. The motivation was why does nature behave in the way that it does. And and if i can understand that then how can i apply my knowledge to improving or to make things work better or lasts longer in this case. Oh to increase lifetime right okay. So so mu- because my understanding of this gym and you can. You can grade me. And i'm i'm worried about my grade but so basically this is really basic but microphone convert sound into an electrical signal right and it needs power to do that and you. Youtube found a material that you could basically be kind of permanently so you know basically permanently charge so instead of like necessarily needing an extra battery in there you know. You've you've got it without that. And that material that you found was essentially teflon foil urinate less. Okay okay. well now. That i've got my a plus in science. Let's let's talk. Let's talk more about bringing people new stem the thing. It's the thing that you're passionate about thinking that i'm passionate about so you know in your experience what works or if you feel like it's more importantly what doesn't when you're trying to bring people into snap well i think honesty is is The the very important role. It's not all roses so we get some thorns to nature. Doesn't always behaving the way that you you'd think it should. And and i think honesty's important because you want to succeed and and if you know that nature is not always going to work the way you'd think it works this gives you the fortitude to continue to your investigation will continue looking for a solution to a particular problem. In other words. There are two sides stored the glory side. And then there's the the grunge side but even more important science and technology got us to where we are and it's the only thing that's going get us further or out of whatever difficulty that we have a global warming all these problems. We need more diverse teen stem. diversity has been shown to be have an advantage. I used to worry about brainstorming sessions. Where all the white guys over here. And i was over ear but guess what solution west somewhere in between. And this is what. I learned that. Even though i taken same courses you know the same disciplines. I think differently as the black man than white males to yeah but this diversification is what makes this country great and what is very disturbing is that were not taking full advantage of our natural resources in human beings that can work and be productive in the field and this is the reason that i continue to push to make it available in. Jim's been pushing for a long time you can trace his efforts back to nineteen seventy at bell labs. Winning helped form the association of black laboratory employees all the way to jim's work today with his graduate students at johns hopkins university and nonprofit called the end genuity project. They offer math and science programs to students in baltimore public schools. Jim told me a story about joining their board of directors. Back in two thousand fourteen. When when i was asked if i would be interested in joining booed i wanted to know what the program's really all about and what i found. Was that the majority of students in the program mayhem and that. This did not represent the demographics of the city of ballroom. So i said looking. Put me on the board. But i'm going to make some changes. I am a change agent here because this does not represent city baltimore and not enough black people and women in the scrotum but today the program is eighty percent underrepresented naarden winning big shift. Not only that are the last time i looked two years ago. We graduated one hundred students all of them. Fellowships and scholarships seven were admitted to johns hopkins. And by the way these changes were made without ever touching the requirements for the permanent. Okay so what does this say to you. The says that they're talented people out there that we're not taking advantage if we can make that kind of change in the city of baltimore within a finite number of years with this is certainly an indication to me that there are underrepresented minority and women who are in love with science and really really look for opportunities to get in and and genuity project made that offer and they they took us up on it and i'm so glad they did. Okay so jim. I hope you don't mind me sharing this. You just tell me if you don't want it in the episode but by the time this interview comes out you will of turned ninety congrats birthday. Well thank you. So what's your advice for young scientists for young inventors who may be see themselves in you. What advice would you give them. Well there's so many things that i can think of. But i but more importantly is to follow your star you know. I'm pretty sure that whoever made me said make a scientist and a not fulfill that responsibility us. Oh i think that the happy people those people that are doing what they love to do. And if it science gray but in many cases you don't know whether it science not because you haven't had the exposure right that would tell you whether the something you think you would be interested in doing so Museums of books on and on and on learn. Learn as much as you can as early as you can. And the only major major advices learn all the math that you possibly can because it

Prince Edward County James West Virginia JIM Gearhart Temple University Association Of Black Laborator Baltimore Youtube Bell Labs Johns Hopkins University Genuity Johns Hopkins
US tops 500,000 virus deaths, matching the toll of 3 wars

John McGinness

00:43 sec | Last week

US tops 500,000 virus deaths, matching the toll of 3 wars

"Chuck's Iverson since a year ago, more than half a million Americans more than in some major wars combined or dead from Corona virus that marker reached in the past hours. So, says Johns Hopkins University. This is an unfathomable milestone In the last year alone, America's death toll from Covert 19 is a half million. We can't unsee what we have seen The death that Sandra Lindsey has seen is director of critical care nursing at Long Island Jewish Medical Center haunts her patients that I've helped my team, too. No post smart and care on Occasionally I'll see those spaces. They're seared in her mind and on the hearts of their families. This is all happened so fast. It took less than 100 days for the US to double its covert 19 death

Iverson Sandra Lindsey Long Island Jewish Medical Cen Chuck Johns Hopkins University United States
Vaccines Sharply Cut Coronavirus Hospitalization

Ben Shapiro

00:26 sec | Last week

Vaccines Sharply Cut Coronavirus Hospitalization

"The U. S has just passed 500,000 coronavirus deaths. That's according to John Hopkins University. The grim milestone comes to UK studies released today. So some good news covered 19 vaccination programs. They're contributing to a sharp drop in hospitalizations. Preliminary results from a study in Scotland found the visor vaccine reduce hospital admissions by up to 85% 4 weeks after the first does while the AstraZeneca shot cut emissions by up to

John Hopkins University UK Scotland Astrazeneca
US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:22 min | Last week

US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

"I'm anthony davis the. Us stood on sunday. The brink of a once unthinkable tally. Five hundred thousand people lost to the corona virus a year into the pandemic the running total of lives lost was about four hundred ninety eight thousand roughly the population of kansas city missouri and just shy the size of atlanta the figure compiled by johns hopkins university surpasses the number of people who died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen of chronic lower respiratory diseases stroke outsiders flu and new monja combined. It's nothing like we've ever been through in the last one hundred and two years since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic the nation's top infectious disease expert. Antony found. She said the. Us virus death toll reached four hundred thousand on january nineteenth in the waning hours of president. Donald trump's office who's handling of the crisis was judged by public health experts to be a singular failure. The first known deaths from the virus in the us happened in early february. Twenty twenty both of them in santa clara county california. Meanwhile the ambitious claim of the incoming president a hundred million vaccination shots in one hundred days is close to being realized one month into his presidency. Joe biden is on a glide path to attain that goal and pitching well beyond it to the far more ambitious and

Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Anthony Davis FLU Johns Hopkins University Kansas City United States Missouri Atlanta Infectious Disease Antony Donald Trump Santa Clara County California Joe Biden
 US coronavirus death toll approaches milestone of 500,000

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last week

US coronavirus death toll approaches milestone of 500,000

"The U. S. stands at the brink of a once unthinkable tally five hundred thousand people lost to the corona virus the half a million deaths it's just it's it's terrible Dr Anthony Fauci president Biden's chief medical advisor on NBC's meet the press the toll so far is roughly the size of the population of Kansas city Missouri we're just shy of Atlantis almost unbelievable but it's true it's this is a devastating pandemic the numbers compiled by Johns Hopkins University have been trending downward but found she tells meet the press nobody should be thinking we're out of the woods we're not because the baseline of daily infections is still very very high it's not that three hundred to four hundred thousand that we had some time ago but we want to get that baseline really really really low before we start thinking that we're out of the woods and Thomas Washington

Dr Anthony Fauci President Bid U. NBC Kansas City Johns Hopkins University Missouri Thomas Washington
Georgia passes 800,000 confirmed coronavirus cases, cases are trending down

Clark Howard

00:34 sec | Last week

Georgia passes 800,000 confirmed coronavirus cases, cases are trending down

"Georgia reached another milestone now topping 800,000 cases. And George is now at 8959 and the number of Georgians who have died is now more than 14,500 cases are trending down in our state and That seems to be the case across the country. In fact, data from Johns Hopkins University shows the U. S. Is seeing a 29% decline in new cases compared to this time last week. That's the steepest one week declined the U. S has seen during this pandemic. WSB Health reporter Sabrina Cubits says It's unclear exactly how much of the decline may be due to the winter weather that was across much of the country, forcing testing sites too close. A

U. Georgia Johns Hopkins University Wsb Health George Sabrina Cubits
UN says 130 countries have not received a single COVID-19 vaccine dose

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:44 min | Last week

UN says 130 countries have not received a single COVID-19 vaccine dose

"Secretary general antonio guitarist has sharply criticized the widely uneven and unfair distribution of covid vaccines saying ten countries have administered seventy five percent of all vaccinations and demanding a global effort to get all people in every country vaccinated as soon as possible. The un chief told a high level meeting the un security council on wednesday. The one hundred thirty countries had not yet received a single dose of vaccine at this critical moment. Vaccine equity is the biggest moral test before the global community. He said he called on the world's major economic powers in the group of twenty to establish an emergency taskforce to establish a plan and coordinate its implementation and financing. He said the task force should have the capacity to mobilise. The pharmaceutical companies in key industry and logistics actors guitarist said friday's meeting of the group of seven major industrialized nations. The united states. Germany japan britain france canada and italy can create the momentum to mobilize the necessary financial resources. Thirteen ministers addressed the virtual council meeting organized by britain on improving access to covid vaccinations including in conflict areas. The corona virus has infected more than one hundred and nine million people and killed at least two point four million according to the johns hopkins university tracker as manufacturers struggle to ramp up production of vaccines many countries. Complain of being left out and even rich nations are facing shortages and domestic complaints.

Secretary General Antonio Guit Un Security Council UN Britain Germany Italy Japan France United States Canada Johns Hopkins University
What to know about COVID-19 variants' potential spread, impact on vaccines

Morning Edition

04:15 min | 2 weeks ago

What to know about COVID-19 variants' potential spread, impact on vaccines

"And I'm No well, King. Good morning. Ah, virus that spreads a lot has many chances to mutate and covert 19 is doing both in this country. Researchers in the U. S now say they have found at least seven new variants here now. Other countries, the U. K South Africa and Brazil. They've all reported variants to with some big questions like Are they more dangerous? Still outstanding. MPR's health correspondent Rob Stein has been following This one. Hi, Rob. Good morning. Well, what have you learned about the U. S variance? So the first of these various was spotted by researchers in Louisiana. But it turns out the same kind of mutation looks like it also emerged completely independently at least seven times in this country. No, That's it awful large because it suggests the virus is doing something called convergent evolution. That's when an organism evolved in a way that gives them some kind of superior power. Here's what Jeremy Camille of Louisiana State University says about what the virus is doing. He spotted the mutation. It's infected millions of humans around the world now and it's probably just, you know, getting Into a more intimate relationship with our species. The question is, What is that more intimate relationship mean? Exactly Does it make it spread more easily from one person to another doesn't make it more contagious. Do do. Researchers know the answers to that? Yeah, well, no one knows yet it looks like it's spreading quickly in the places where it's been spotted, but it's not at all clear. That's because of the mutation. No viruses mutate all the time. Sometimes there are big problems, but a lot of times not so much, and there are other mutants that had been previously spotted in this country. Like you know, one that took over in Southern California Scientists are still trying to figure out whether it's more contagious or, you know, just got lucky. Now this newly identified mutation occurred on a key protein that sticks out from the surface of the virus called the spike Protein. It's how the virus infects cells. That's also the target of drugs and vaccines. So any change could be really important. I talked about this with Andrew Peco Shit. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. We should keep an eye on it. I myself have already passed this on to the people in my laboratory, and we're looking to see if we can find viruses with this mutation because if we can, we're going to bring it into the laboratory and try to study it to see what's actually happening here. Now, you know to be clear. Pecos means he passed on the details about the new various Those colleagues Yes, so they can determine you know whether they're more contagious or not Now, no one thinks there's any reason to panic. You know, far from it, actually. And we already know that there are those other various circulating in this country that we know we should be worried about. And what about the non US variants, some of which were identified before ours. How are they evolve? It Yes. So you know, more than 1100 cases of the one first flag in the UK have been confirmed. At least 40 states and British scientists just released more data than makes them even more worried than ever that, in addition to spreading faster, it may also make people sicker. You know, and the first one spotted in South Africa has not been detected in at least eight states and the one originally seen in Brazil is in at least two states. But the reality is they're probably already way more common than that. The U. S just isn't sequencing the genetic code of the virus enough to really know how widespread they are. And the spot any new variants fast. I talked about this with saucy of pop sq at George Mason University. We're flying blind right now, when it comes to mutations, and how prevalent they might be on the community already, so we really need to ramp it up. The CDC says. It's trying to wrap it up. But the country still has a ways to go. And what about the vaccines that we currently have? Will they help against the new variants? Yes. So the vaccines maybe someone that's effective against some of these various, but so far they seem to work pretty well. But the most important thing is to keep these viruses from spreading as much as we can to prevent any more dangerous ones from occurring. You know, the virus is still spreading like crazy in this country, which makes the U. S essentially a giant Petri dish that could easily produce even

Rob Stein U. Jeremy Camille MPR Andrew Peco Brazil Louisiana State University South Africa Louisiana ROB Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School King Southern California Pecos George Mason University UK United States CDC
The US is averaging fewer than 100,000 new Covid-19 cases per day

AP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 2 weeks ago

The US is averaging fewer than 100,000 new Covid-19 cases per day

"Talent from Johns Hopkins University continues to present a grim picture. Number of newly confirmed cases in the U. S. Has Abd but remains around 100,000 per day, and the number of people dying from infections each day has swelled. The total had reached more than 481,000 as of Saturday morning, more than 5000 in the past 24 hours.

Johns Hopkins University U.
California coronavirus-related death toll highest in US

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 weeks ago

California coronavirus-related death toll highest in US

"California has now surpassed New York with the most coronavirus deaths in the U. S. That tally from Johns Hopkins University shows California's death toll at just short of 45,500. That's nearly 200 more the New York's death toll. Large portion of deaths in California have come in the last couple of months as the state deals with vaccine shortages and overcrowded

California New York Johns Hopkins University
California's virus death toll surpasses New York

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

California's virus death toll surpasses New York

"California's past New York is the state with the most deaths from the coronavirus adding to a tally by Johns Hopkins University California's death toll from the corona virus has reached forty five thousand four hundred ninety six that's slightly more than hard hit New York state federal officials were touting their systems with mass vaccination sites but the states grappling with vaccine shortages Los Angeles is temporarily closing five mass vaccination sites including Dodger Stadium for lack of supply here's Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti vaccine supply is on even it's unpredictable coronavirus rates in California have been improving and the daily number of cases over eight thousand is down for fifty three thousand in December I'm Jennifer king

California New York Johns Hopkins University Eric Garcetti Los Angeles Dodger Stadium Jennifer King
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
The Latest: Spain: AstraZeneca shots to essential workers

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

The Latest: Spain: AstraZeneca shots to essential workers

"Where are we now in the battle against the corona virus the coronavirus has now killed more than two million three hundred thousand people around the world more than four hundred sixty eight thousand of them right here in the US that's according to Johns Hopkins University vaccines have been slow rolling out as you know but so far about ten percent of Americans have gotten at least one cove it nineteen shot the percentage of gotten both shots meaning their ads fully protected as they can be by the vaccine is about three percent that's according to an AP analysis awaiting FDA approval now Johnson and Johnson's one shot cove it nineteen vaccine I'm Rita folate

Johns Hopkins University United States AP Johnson FDA Rita Folate
Sea-level rise could threaten coastal nuclear waste facilities

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Sea-level rise could threaten coastal nuclear waste facilities

"Nuclear power is a source of low carbon electricity but producing. It creates dangerous radioactive. Waste that needs to be stored safely and permanently. Recent research suggests that as sees rise some nuclear waste. Storage facilities are at risk of flooding or storm damage. We really focused in to say okay. Well how many plants might actually be subject to these risks that sara georgeanne of the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. Her team looked at thirteen facilities along the us coast. They found that if seeds rise about six feet which is possible by the end of the century. More than half of the waste storage sites would be directly along the water's edge or even surrounded by water so she says it's critical to anticipate these long-term vulnerabilities and take action. There are certainly ways. Those risks can be managed now for example after five years. Spent fuel can be moved to dry casks. This is a safer. Long-term storage method than the cooling pools. Where a lot of spent fuel is currently stored so jordan. Says it's critical for policymakers to understand the risks at nuclear facilities and create regulations and policies to ensure greater

Sara Georgeanne School Of Advanced Internation Johns Hopkins University United States Jordan
Tampa mayor frustrated by maskless fans after Super Bowl

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

Tampa mayor frustrated by maskless fans after Super Bowl

"I'm Julie Walker could those Super Bowl celebrations become super spreaders of the corona virus sounded Superbowl fans in Tampa many of the mass taking to the streets mayor Jane castor says there's a level of frustration when you see them because of how hard they're working to curb the virus even distributing two hundred thousand masks ahead of the game this comes as the U. S. is making progress in the fight against the virus the country's reporting fewer than a hundred thousand daily cases for the first time since the start of November according to Johns Hopkins University meanwhile this weekend mark one year since the first death was reported in the U. S. more than four hundred and sixty three thousand have died since I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Jane Castor Super Bowl Tampa U. Johns Hopkins University
South Africa Halts Planned Rollout of AstraZeneca Vaccine

WSJ What's News

01:34 min | 3 weeks ago

South Africa Halts Planned Rollout of AstraZeneca Vaccine

"Astrazeneca's plans to roll out. Its cove nineteen vaccine in south. Africa have been put on a temporary hold. The country made the decision after a small. Clinical trial found a dozen to protect people against mild and moderate illness from a new fast spreading strain first detected in the country. The journals gabrielle. Steinhaeuser has more from johannesburg. What they're going to do is they're gonna kind of smaller rollout two hundred thousand people and then follow them and get the evidence that we're missing right now which is finding out this the vaccine limit or prevent severe illness and they're going to measure it by looking at how many people at the hospital off one hundred thousand a spokesman for astrazeneca said the company believes its vaccine could protect against severe disease. It says it's working to target new variants and hopes to have a new vaccine ready by the fall. Vaccines by johnson. And johnson and nova vacs have yet to be authorized but we're also less effective against the new strain in recent trials in the us a new cove in nineteen variant first detected in the uk is spreading rapidly with the number of new cases doubling every week and a half according to a new study it also found that the variant may become the dominant strain in many us states by march new coronavirus cases in the us fell below one hundred thousand for the first time this year according to johns hopkins data

Astrazeneca Steinhaeuser Severe Disease Johannesburg Gabrielle Nova Vacs Africa Johnson United States UK Johns Hopkins
"john hopkins" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

08:37 min | Last month

"john hopkins" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"And around the world. So question for you i am. You know for better or worse in the private sector and we have certainly embraced the philosophy and the tenants of early mobility in daily awakening and or maintaining wakefulness throughout the day. And so are patients are kept awake to the greatest extent that we're able to do so we obviously physical therapy and occupational therapy but i think we still struggle and terms of that early mobility really maximizing a patient's physical capabilities and even maximizing their cognitive capabilities. Where do we go from here if we don't have right now. The extra resources from the physical medicine side in a speech therapy does a lot of the cognitive work. But it's a small team and they don't do a lot of cognitive therapy from that department. This is something we can do as critical care specialists on our own may be teaching the nurses to do things that are even a little bit beyond their scope or even the physicians to do things a little beyond their scope to kind of bridge the gap until we get to the place where we have the added resources that we need yet. There's absolutely many different models for doing this. So for example some of my colleagues in japan have physician lead will -bility programs. Not nurse led up led but physician led obviously other people from the team are are part of that is well. It's not physicians alone. But physicians play a very big role in the actual mobilization of patients. There's another study for instance that was conducted in the united states. In germany that was in surgical issues that was predominantly nurse based mobility so the two groups the intervention group in the control group both got the same amount of physical therapy but the difference was the intervention group got added nurse face mobility and very improved outcomes so nurses can be highly engaged in doing this and often. It's a bit of a partnership so sometimes our nurses are junior. Nurses may say we didn't learn this in nursing. School are more senior. Nurses may say oh. Yeah this is kind of old hat. But i've fallen out a practice. So we have a partnership of our physical therapists with our nurses to make sure that there's safe mobilization safe for the patient safe for the nurse and we try to recognize that are ot and pt and speech. Resources are relatively scarce resources. Let's use them. On the most complex haitians the most challenging patients and then there are other patients that through nurses and physicians. We may be able to do a lot of this and if we start this early if we don't automatically deeply sedate patients and give them bedrest then it's much easier to mobilize a patient that walked into the hospital a day or two ago if they haven't had that prolonged bedrest in their muscles haven't melted away and they haven't gotten very weak then it becomes much much easier for a nurse to mobilize that kind of asian the challenge that we face at large tertiary centers is often. We have patients that are sent to us from other hospitals where they may have had two or three or four weeks of bedrest and then we're really behind the eight ball because they've had a tremendous amount of muscle loss and we're not going to be able to simply have the patient sit in stand because they've lost so much of the muscle so starting early makes it much better for patients and much easier for all the clinicians and ball. Okay dr needham. We're gonna take thirty seconds and we'll be right back. Hi i'm robert ross. Host of cars that matter you might be wondering what makes a car matter and i have a feeling you already know the answer. Some cars have changed history. Some you can hear a mile away. Some have lines that make your heart skip a beat if a car ever made you twice then i think you know the ones that matter join me as i speak with designers collectors and market experts about the passionate drivers and the passions. We drive cars that matter wherever you get your podcasts. Okay we're back with dr dale needham and dr steven table. So let me ask you a bit about our kovic situation. And obviously we're going to be dealing with covert patients in the hospital probably throughout the rest of twenty one so this is now potentially just a new way of life in your hospitals. Both stephen dale. You're still dealing with flu. Patients that end up getting monja and taking things to another level right so with covid dr. Anita you've noticed some long term both physical and cognitive impairments that you've already seen rear their ugly head in the fight against covid. What have you noticed in. What unique care are you trying to administer. In your icu. For such patients. You know before. Kobe bid with the society of critical care medicine about a decade ago. We got a multidisciplinary group of stakeholders together and created the term post intensive care syndrome or x he. Ics we created that not as a scientific term created that because we needed to raise awareness and educate patients families doctors nurses throughout the hospital and through clinics that many patients survive in ice you day with physical cognitive and or mental health problems. We are seeing these same kinds of things in a critically. Ill patients that have had cove as well. These can be long lasting impairments in one or all three of these areas and it is a very very big challenge. And what's happened. Is that many people that aren't familiar with long term outcomes after intensive care are thinking that these are magically new problems. These are kovic specific problems but many of these are problems that were also round before covid existed in. These are the kinds of problems that created our johns hopkins critical. Care physical medicine rehab program to start. Having patients awake and moving early but to address the huge influx of the difference during the covid pandemic is that in the history of critical care. We've never had this many seriously. Ill patients so what might once have been very rare complication. now that we have so many more patients were seeing that kind of complication in a greater number of patients despite it being perhaps the same percentage of patients so the absolute number has increased and to rise to this challenge. I'm so proud to be a colleague of dr anne parker and dr emily brigham to pulmonary and critical care doctors at johns hopkins. Who have started the johns hopkins pact clinic clinic specifically dedicated to the care of patients who have head covert patients. That were critical. Eeo or not critically on that done specifically in partnership with our colleagues from physical medicine rehabilitation. So they have created a clinic specifically for covid survivors to head that multidisciplinary team together to help improve. These patients recovering. Is there anything that they're doing specifically that's different than they would. Otherwise be doing for a post critical care syndrome individual specific to covid or is it just more of intensive therapy because we have so many people. Now were suffering from this for the most part. Many of the things that are happening would be the same things that are happening before. Cove it but we need to keep watching for. Are there any things that are particularly unique or different so there is an eye out for these things. And what's so great about this kind of clinic where patients come together and so many of them can be seen by the same people is that they can easily begin to see if there are trends. Are there problems with heart function and if there is then there's one or two specific heart specialists that will see. These patients is their problem with balance or with having low blood pressure. When you stand up in a fast heart rate something called hotspot. If there's something like that there's somebody else said. That patient can see so. I think we're still at a pretty early stage. Many of the reports that we see with post covert Outcomes are the same kinds of things that we know about so for instance we published a report of four cogan looking at fatigue symptoms in survivors of critical illness. Patients that have been in an intensive care unit and we found a year later that roughly two thirds of patients report clinically significant symptoms of fatigue a year later so when. We're seeing copen survivors. Also talk about fatigue in the weeks and months after. That's not saying to me that there's something unique to kobe but through these specialized clinics. We can pay very careful attention to see if there are new things or trends and then begin to think about interventions that may be needed..

robert ross stephen dale japan germany two three Anita thirty seconds two groups Kobe twice a year later both twenty one dale needham united states Cove dr. two thirds emily brigham
"john hopkins" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on WJR 760

"333,000 John Hopkins University of Medicine reports There are more than 19.1 million confirmed cases across the country. Some household supply manufacturers are betting not everyone will return to the office Once the pandemic ends. The companies that produce food and consumer products are betting that working from home in some form is here to stay. The Wall Street Journal says Connie Agra and craft Time's air upgrading to make more at home Lunch foods. General Mills has added a special manufacturing mind just for cinnamon toast Crunch cereal and Kimberly Clark is converting a plan to make toilet paper for homes. ConAgra's betting that people have formed new habits because the pandemic has lasted so long. It's also increasing production of Marie Callender's healthy choice and others. GeneCo's Sola Fox News. Golf's great white shark has contracted coronavirus for We're world number one ranked golfer Greg Norman is battling covert 19 on social media. Norman shared that he admitted himself to a hospital emergency room on Christmas Day Friday and returned home Saturday. 65 years old Norman experienced fever, headaches and muscle aches. He wrote that he was released from the hospital and is under medication in his guesthouse away from the main house, Norman said, Until I get two consecutive negative tests, I will continue to isolate with my dog. Apollo keeping me company. Norman thanked all those who have expressed concern, love and support, he wrote. Let's put 2020 in our rear view mirrors and looked 2021 beyond where we can get back to life. And whatever the new normal will be. Jarod Max Fox News. There's another case of a monolith, making the news this time in San Francisco and of the fresh baked variety. A nearly 7 ft monolith made of gingerbread mysteriously appeared on the hilltop on Christmas Day. The three sided tower, which was held together by icing and decorated with some gumdrops was discovered at Corona Heights Park. The cookie Crumbled The next day. I'm rich.

Greg Norman Sola Fox News John Hopkins University of Med Jarod Max Fox ConAgra Corona Heights Park Marie Callender Connie Agra General Mills Kimberly Clark Golf headaches San Francisco gingerbread The Wall Street Journal
"john hopkins" Discussed on 5 Things

5 Things

03:05 min | 3 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on 5 Things

"Service providers may be reducing limitations on usage that day so people can connect and see each other through a computer screen. I know some of us are really sick of that. But you know seeing my mom on the computer on the computer screaming my dad. It's gonna make me so happy on thanksgiving If you have other people in these households that you're trying to connect with who are teachers and know how to use these tools so well now you play games or to Put together some thanksgiving haiku. Where every household gives you one line. I mean there are lots of fun things that we can do in stay connected this year. It won't be the same as in years past. I don't think anyone will deny that. But we'll be something we remember for years and years to come so do your best to make a memory. That is special to you and yours fabulous. Well our final question. What are you both doing for thanksgiving. So i'm not a major thanksgiving person. In general i tend to avoid people for the most part and i ended up sitting at a dive bar watching people all day. Usually what i ended up doing so that's probably not going to happen. This thanksgiving i do sometimes gathered with friends. Friends that i that i kind of part of my my extended household. What what. I would consider my extended household i. I'm not sure exactly what i'm gonna do a. It's i have a feeling it'll be lots of covid related stuff on the news. Because i do a lot of media related to that but nothing major from me but it's not a big deal for me on thanksgiving so i don't necessarily feel the loss of other people do and my family will be gathering just our household focusing on our kids. They're planning the menu. So yes my husband. And i are getting takeout. So we're not eating just the macaroni and cheese and popcorn that my kids have been begging for. So they'll have. That memory will have a different memory and then we'll be connecting our. I'm one of five children so we'll be connecting twenty-seven people via webcams to to relax and enjoy each other to say grace have a toast to what we are most thankful for this year. Amazing thank you so much for joining me. Where can people follow you on social media and keep up with more of your work for me. You can find me on twitter. it's just at amos a. a. e. s. h. I also have a website tracking zebra dot com. Where i'm not updated it for a while with some blog posts and things that people may be interested in and i am also on twitter at carrie. Ann altaf you can find me. They're great thanks again. Both of you. Thank you happy thanksgiving. Thanks for having me You can get more expert insights in the episode notes. I've included hyper links to usa today. Stories and advice from the cdc. You've.

carrie twitter cdc usa Ann altaf twitter.
"john hopkins" Discussed on 5 Things

5 Things

07:31 min | 3 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on 5 Things

"We delete vaccine candidates by pfizer and madeira both required to doses so that's around six hundred million doses and not everybody's going to have access at the same time it's gonna come out on a rolling basis based on priority groups so healthcare workers high risk individuals may be in the best case scenarios december january. They'll start vaccinate them but for the general public. We're looking well into twenty twenty one. So we will still see some level of restrictions and they move to the level of guidance versus mandates as more and more people get vaccinated but really about seventy to eighty percent of the population needs to be vaccinated across the herd immunity threshold. The first goal of the vaccine though is not herd immunity it's to protect vulnerable populations so our hospitals don't go go under that they don't go into crisis and because of that they're still going to be spread of the virus because those individuals aren't going to be in the first priority group to to be vaccinated it's going to be healthcare workers high risk individuals. So we'll still need to be very vigilant. This is going to be a virus. That's not going to be a radical but it's going to be with us and it's going to become less of a public health emergency but we still need to be to be vigilant for several month period. At least and and i think that's the important point to remember. Is that that. This is now going to establish itself in the human population and we are very enthusiastic about the levels of protection that this vaccine to initial vaccines have provided over ninety percent. Which is really really astonishing based on what we thought would happen. But i do think that there's still a lot of work to go before these vaccines can can realize their full potential of the public health. Emergency that we're in. It's a very interesting moment in terms of when we when we think about the whole time line thus far with emergence of this new virus and how it is establishing itself in human population and i totally agree. It's it's not going away. We're going to have to learn how to live with. This and vaccine is going to be one of our critical tools but until we're able to really get the vaccine to all the people who need it. It's going to take some time. But i think the thing we have to remember is that even though science is a process and we needed to be that process so that we can rigorously. Check the data. We can make sure what we're doing is safe. We can make sure that it has the human benefit that we need to have and we can continue to push forward in sao during the week where most of us are grappling with. These thinks giving plans and recognizing that you know what it. It really is important for us to see grandma next year and not have her succumb to to corona virus. And so we're being flexible in these plans. And then we get this glimmer of hope right that we have these now to vaccines that are marching very consistently very strongly towards manufacturing that we could even potentially see vaccine available for our healthcare workers by the end of this calendar. Year is an amazing feat. And it's just we have to remember that this is. This is a slow inconsistent march. Working as fast as we can but we are not going to be Short cutting any of the safety or any of the science that we need to in order to make sure that the vaccine is is right for human population so yes it means. We are going to still be wearing masks. It means we are still going to need to social distance. These are just milestones on this on this longer process. Absolutely an a mesh. This might be a question more for you. But if we see a spike in cases ten days out from thanksgiving what could that mean for our health infrastructure. I'm thinking that you know if more people are getting tested for covid that could lead to a shortage of tests. And that means that it's gonna take longer to get those test results in and that means that it's gonna take our contact tracers longer to start their investigations. Because they don't have the test results back and that's time that people won't be quarantining given the the numbers of cases that we're seeing if the rate of spread continues and is accelerated by thanksgiving. What could that do to our health infrastructure. Well i think it's going to be inevitable that we see some spike in cases after thanksgiving. If you just wind back a month. When the canadian thanksgiving occurred canada saw spy can in many people are still going to gather. And we know that there's gonna be some level. Even with the cdc guidance some level of of cases that occur because of thanksgiving and there are many parts of the country were hospitals are getting near capacity or really concerned about capacity. So i do think that this added burden is going to be something that pushes hospitals closer to the edge. And that's something we've been trying to avoid. You have to remember the flattening. The curve is primarily about. Having cases occur at a pace it's manageable by the healthcare system. So that not everybody is getting sick at once and thanksgiving is an opportunity where you may have a lot of people get sick at once. And there's going to be an increased demand on tests and we know since the beginning of this pandemic. the testing has been in abysmal failure in this country. That the turnaround time even the best days for outpatient testing maybe three or four days and that makes it really worthless because the contact tracers can't do anything with the four day old test because it's not going to be very impactful when they start trying to tell people to isolate so so. I do think that this is going to be a major challenge for our healthcare system for the public health infrastructure that we kind of lack in this country and we already are seeing runs on. Testing prior to thanksgiving is people use tests as a as a way to try and decrease the risk. It's on ironclad but some people are are doing it. And that's already putting pressure on tests. So i just think that this is probably going to accelerate some of the problems that we've had from the very beginning of this pandemic and it's important to remember if we would have had a better testing solution if we would have had access to test. In the way that countries like taiwan south korea. Have we would never have been in this situation and wouldn't be thinking about these types of dilemmas so that being said there are so many alternatives to gathering in person for thanksgiving meal. You could do a distanced food. Drop off you could plan virtual cookie decorating party. You could order take out. You could have a virtual watch party and watch a holiday movie with family. I as soon as we get off this call. I'm going to be putting some thanksgiving greeting cards in the mail and sending them to my family professor. Altaf what would you say to someone who is hesitant to shake things up because they feel that they really need to be physically with family. This week so i think we all should remember that in years to come. We will be thinking back on this thanksgiving right. We will all have stories about how we celebrated the holidays during a pandemic. And i think the thing that you have to allow yourself to do is to shake things up right. You have to give yourself permission to shake things up. You have to give yourself permission to let your kids run the show on the thanksgiving and get yourself some takeout right. You have to give yourself permission to to reach an have that our long call with an elderly a loved one. Who is not leaving home for thanksgiving this year right. So it's the moments that you want to find where you truly have connection right because that's what we're missing. Usually we get we get connection kind of even on a daily basis waving to someone at the store those types of things. All of that has really reduced and rightfully so. It's helping to keep people safe. So in order to kind of refill. That and reenergize ourselves to have really meaningful connections on thanksgiving. I think is going to be really important so jump into it. I know that there are a lot of webcam..

cdc Altaf professor taiwan canada south korea
"john hopkins" Discussed on 5 Things

5 Things

06:47 min | 3 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on 5 Things

"I'm joined by professor carrie. Ann all talk and dr a mesh dulger. They both teach at the bloomberg school of public health at johns hopkins university. We spoke this week about small things. People can do to minimize corona virus during the holidays. Here's that conversation dr dodger. I'll start with you. What would you say to someone who has already bought a plane ticket and is planning to travel for. This week's holiday was the first thing i would do is think about what your risk tolerance is and you have to realize any kind of interaction with people especially for going from one part of the country to another is going to have significant cova nineteen risk of of you either acquiring it or spreading it. And that's why the cdc has issued guidance recommending. People not travel the one thing that you could do if you are not going to go or be based on the cdc guidance is to try and call your airline agency and see if they have any refund policies available or if you can change your ticket or postponed the ticket and maybe not go on what. The situation is in the country if you are going to go. There's a whole list of things that you need to kind of keep in mind and it's remember it's not so much the plane where your risk is it's actually getting to your gathering and i think probably go into that in more detail what you need to do but again i would probably be trying to see if the ticket is refundable. Yeah professor top. Do you have anything to add. You know. I think the cdc was very clear this week with with this devastating statistic that there were one million new cases over seven days and so we are in this period right now where cases are accelerating very quickly so the name of the game with this holiday season is just going to be flexibility. I know it can feel very devastating to have to change plans. I think if we enter this holiday season by just saying things are going to be fluid. And we're going to have to make a plan. Abc and probably in order to make sure that we have our celebrations. And the safest way possible if someone isn't traveling far. But they're still interacting with people outside their household that's still high risk. According to the cdc right yes gathering even in your household with family. That may be more local to where you are. So we're not talking about distance traveling but just gathering locally can still put you at high risk for krona virus infection and this is because we're seeing a lot of transmission and a lot of community is right. Now i agree. We know that small gatherings where people let their guards down especially when it's people that they know very well that are from the same town as them. That's that's a place where we're seeing transmission occur. And when you're thinking about a thanksgiving gathering it's going to be a time when people are not going to social distance when it's going to be hard to keep different households separate so so. This is a high risk activity and you can expect. Just based on the community prevalence of this infection around the that. When you have people from other households gathering you're also gathering with that virus to what small steps can people take. That will make their thanksgiving safer. I'm thinking of a scenario where everyone brings their own food. A scenario where. You're going to try to increase the ventilation in the house. Whether that's opening a window or turning on the fan above the stove everyone using disposable plates and silverware what are some small concrete things that people can do. So i think the first concrete thing that you can do to really reduce the risk is to see if you could hold your event outside now. I know a lot of places in this country are getting colder right now. The temperatures are dropping even in maryland. Here seems a little bit colder than what i would be comfortable with studying outside for an entire meal so perhaps instead of an entire meal it's desert gathering outside or if you're if you're able to access a fire pit or something like that where you could invite your family again a small number of households to gather outside with masks on around a fire pit to say hello that that's one way you could still have a gathering and yet really reduce that risk as we've seen in a number of studies when people gathered together and sit down and share a meal in a place where there's not great bent ventilation. That is a high risk environment. We've seen this and in studies in restaurants and so if you arguing invite people into your home and again this is not what the cdc recommends but if you decide to do that definitely open your windows. Make sure your guests. No it may be chillier in your home. Make sure that individuals have enough space from each other while they're eating so you really have to think about your layout of your table and where you're going to put people but the idea here would be you know that seems like quite a bit of additional effort whereas instead of going to all of that you could just say let's gather outside. Let's go for a walk. Let's do something where we can definitely get some six feet of space between our households. We can wear masks and we can enjoy each other. I agree all of those recommendations would decrease the risk. I think you can also couple that to Trying to have more than one household coming. Try to kind of pod them so that they stay six feet away from other households. And if you're having this endorsed maybe you. You change your seating that way You can you can bring your own food. That's one way to do it. Or you can just have it kind of serve restaurant style wherever you where. The food is kind of Put on the table when people are not at the table. So you avoid the congregation of people around the When it occurs. I don't necessarily think you have to bring paper plates. Disposable disposable silverware we see surface transmission as being much less likely than people. Interacting with each other and transmitting it. You can also for people who aren't going to wear masks or they may not they may be reticent to wear masks for whatever reason You can have them wear face shields which which may also have an impact in decreasing the risk. Especially because you can you can drink with. You can put give people straws that they can drink under their face shield you can even eat under a facial. I've tried to eat a piece of pizza under facial wants so. There are other things you can do to try and reduce the harm. The virus causes. You just have to be creative and really just think about the virus being at the table with you and not allowing it to have access to your friends and family but those are so many great suggestions we've had good news about vaccines filing for fda emergency use authorization but tell us why. Vaccines are a silver bullet solution. So you have to remember the to make a vaccine. It's going to be very long and arduous process and it's not going to be available in a in a couple of months for the whole entire country or the whole entire world..

cdc professor carrie dr dodger johns hopkins university Ann bloomberg school cova professor maryland Abc fda
"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:41 min | 4 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"By guest today's David Linden a professor of the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His lap because what forbidding use the cellular. Memory storage recovery of function after brain injury at a few other topics. He's the author of full bestselling books on the biology of behavior for the general audience. His most recent book is unique the science of human individuality. Doklam David. Thank you for having me on. Sure. Yeah. So the topic of conversation is your most recent book that just came out. And it's simple. Human individuality. Then I think about humans David. I see eight point three billion people around the world we see do sorta micro segmented ourselves into. An ideal buckets by skin color by language by country be have looted leaders of great democracies reminding us VR in in different buckets. At all the time. So what do you mean by human individuality? Well, what I really mean is all the traits physical. behaviorally emotional cognitive that you can describe about a person them away that I began to think about this. This is about five years ago when I found myself single midlife and I did as people do these days and. I went to an online dating website and I was reading the profiles trying to find woman who I might want to have a conversation with. And worked out very well I met a woman who became my wife She's wonderful. Happy ending. But You know the Nerdy side of me was reading the list of traits that people have their used to describe themselves and wondering how they come about. So you know someone might say, well, I'm five foot eleven and I'm bisexual and I have a Boston accents and I like a bitter beer, but I don't like white chocolate and. I tend to be a risk taker, and so I started thinking well Gosh. How do these traits that make her an individual? Come about. So that's how it all got started. Okay, okay and so So so we'll get into the book in detail, and so you know then I think about sort of human individuality. Yeah..

David Linden Doklam David Johns Hopkins University Schoo professor Department of Neuroscience Boston
"john hopkins" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

05:59 min | 4 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"The number's out of John Hopkins University today, if we if we weren't aware of how huge this thing is already the pandemic these numbers or just in critical it's been confirmed by the experts of John John Hopkins, Johns Hopkins that monitor this thing. That there are now 40 million plus cases of Corona virus throughout the world. You know, the U. S has a good chunk of those. Let's go to NBC's Alex Stone, Our friend and Los Angeles who was a regular on the Mark Mason program. Looking at these numbers a little more carefully today and Alex. It's hard to know how we're going to turn things around. And even though there are new strategies and being talked about, it's not going to go down anytime soon. Is it? Well? No. Doesn't look that way. Paul and the number of covert 19 cases in the US over right million 41 states today, seeing hospitalizations rise quarter of hospitals in the US say their icy use air busier now. Then they were during the summer peak. And there's this belief in the medical community that this could be the beginning of the second wave. You know, from the beginning they've been saying, Look, once we get flew into this going into November December that the numbers it's likely going to become seasonal. Until we can get a vaccine and the numbers are probably going to go up. So could be a rough fall and winter moving in that way. El Paso, Texas. Today, doctors say there it's out of control in Chicago. They're seeing over 500 new cases every day. That's a 50% increase in two weeks, the mayor today saying action needs to be taken to make no mistake. This is the second surge that Dr Fauci And doctor already have been mourning about since March. We're now, innit? Yeah, and in New York. They're focusing now on micro clusters to slow cove it in individual neighborhoods where they're seeing surgeons put the viral increase of the fall. Together with his port in cold cold would fatigue. And that's a bad combination. Cuomo there, you know, He's got a point that we're all tired of this. And so you know, you kind of think. Well, my neighbor, they've been doing pretty well. They haven't been doing a whole lot and you know you don't wear a mask and you have a couple of beers with him, and you know, you get a little bit closer as you're talking to them, and that's how the spreading is going on. You've got 40 million cases worldwide. Only two states right Our showing declines. Vermont and Hawaii. All the others are stable or rising. And then we've got this question about Thanksgiving. What do we do? I know her family. It is an interesting situation. Right now. We're probably tonight. Likely they don't live in Portland led tonight. They're going to get the word. Some family members of ours that they're not coming to our Thanksgiving because we've got to really figure out we're going to do and we talked to Dr Colleen crafted Emory University. And she says gatherings even for Thanksgiving really need to be outdoors, and they really need to be limited. She says. You know if you can avoid them altogether great if you can. If it's something that you can't imagine not doing, then you need to prepare for at least two weeks in advance for everybody in that gathering to essentially quarantine, you know, and that's what we're telling our family members. My parents, my wife's parents were saying, Look, if you guys want to come to our house, they lived 300 miles away if you want to come We need you to essentially except for maybe going to grocery store going to work. You need to quarantine and we want you to get cove it tested before you come and this is going to be an argument. The others just aren't invited this year, So it's you know something? A lot of families we're gonna have to deal with. How are your parents taking that message? Are they are positive in their response is well, you know, interesting is that my folks last night said you know what? Because we we kind of tried to soften it a bit and say we would like the parents, Tio essentially quarantined, isolate and we would urge you to get a test and we also invited my sister who seriously never goes out. But we said she had to get a test We have. We will get tested. My wife and I will. And my parents said We're going to get tested. They said no prominent now is my wife's father and stepmother than that This is going to be a fight. He has a very different view on Cove it and you know whether it's really or not, and whether you need to wear a mask or not. That one's going to be interesting. Even though in Santa Rosa, there is a testing site, probably one block. And it's free and open to the public that he could walk into. They swab your mouth. They don't even go all the way up the nose. You put it in, and you're done. So we're going to try to convince him. Look, John, just, you know, Go one, block down the street to the fairgrounds and walking and let them swab your mouth and then you're good to come to Thanksgiving. It's so tough and a cz, you know, like I have four grandsons. They'll live within minutes of our house. We're together constantly or used to be for Sunday dinner minimum, but usually several times during the week and various combinations. And now the sun's air saying, Hey, we're trying to protect you, Mom and dad and we don't want to come and we don't want to come to Thanksgiving and I'm saying things like well. What if we set up tables in the garage and open the big door and open the side? Vicky looks at me like I You know, that's your thing, you know, like my my folks are in their late seventies. My wife's here a little bit younger than that. But you know that they're They're at an age where, whether it be us. That's why we're going to get tested before they come down or potentially. I mean, look, you know I'm in my forties now and they give it to us and we could have a problem or we could spread it. So I mean, it goes all over that that there's just that question Whether you believe in it or not, or trust the science or not, You know why spread it? If you don't have to be interesting today, we're hearing a lot from The president. He held a call with the GOP today kind of bashing into found she and then a few minutes ago. He made somewhat similar comments on the tarmac in Phoenix as he's in Arizona doing campaigning today. And.

John John Hopkins John Hopkins University Alex Stone US NBC Johns Hopkins Los Angeles El Paso U. S Chicago New York Dr Fauci Cuomo Phoenix Texas president Vicky GOP Emory University
"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:16 min | 5 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yeah. Yeah. They see a lot of problems today right? and Algorithms Biases It's It's Morris biases a story candidate learns and makes a allocation seizures. If are themselves, you know the outcome Ovadia bias, the decision making process than the algorithm who learned the wrong Know location rules. Yeah, yeah. So so if you if he'll forward for five years. You Look at Canada Australia and the United States you look at Blood Plaza and kidney and possibly other things. do you think we will be in terms of policy stats It appears different from country to country I. Don't know what e you jamboree is doing and. Know what developing countries you know policies are in this area what's to General View? Eat. Some you know it's always difficult to make predictions my sense is that like in the context of Blau the donation that more and more blood banks are using? Certain. Types of incentives than they're framing them. In. Now, way that you know that they are not perceived as you know payments but what being away that reinforces their donors. Motivational. So your reward, your donors instead of you pay your donors, it makes a big difference in the way in which rewards or incentives are are presented. So in in in the context of organ donation, my sense is that society's. Not just the US Bah also other societies are moving towards recognizing that giving giving an organ particularly keeping his that can begin by leaving a you know a individuals east costly in in that it is. That he's a fact again, this consensus that no one should be made financially worse-off soul though there there is this repugnance factor in in. The. Idea of paying Akini, donors or organ donors a there is a sort of consensus that to. Compensating donors for their costs. direct and indirect is ethically appropriate. So what I think is going to happen is we'll really season indication that this is happening to the the range offering more suitable expenses will be no is expanding and in gaining recognition of the costs that Donald phase, we'll see I, think more willingness to offer reimbursement for the rankles in. An, indirect costs..

United States Blood Plaza Morris Blau Canada Australia Donald
"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:25 min | 5 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"For Act of altruism from the active donate say a kidney or or even bosmo blooded nobody should be made worse-off in. So there are no ethical objections to remorse people for their costs. The ethical objections? Arise for Bateman stats are sort of beyond go beyond beyond beyond that. Or are perceived to be prophets Yes I think the key concern is that the again the author of a monetary particularly monetary reward particularly when that word is considerable in size. Concern is that that's a promise or offer might induce people to make decisions that are not that they would. Late grant that are not really in their best interest or that they would get him to make those decisions without really considering all. Potential downsides or cost so that the promise over award would make them focus on on the money too much. Didn't did thereby. Regard in potential harm's or harmful consequences with the that is sort of the the concerning addition to a broader ethical concerns that is just a immoral is just the against sort of human dignity or the paying for body Parts Co. modifies the human body in some people believe that that is just wrong per se that there is an absolute sort of moral value that he's violated when we attach a dollar value is on on a on a body parts. Yeah. Yeah. So interesting result here. So. The said approximately three quarters of favor payments. You say it was pointed who are in favor of payments to plasma donors place importance on guaranteeing robust domestic supply now. I think you I don't have any of me if there wasn't a the of the quarter who objected this idea maybe half of them say that David David prefer a policy change. If the domestic supply can beget indeed to be hundred percent. and so so so this concern about. exports being not reliable and I think this is probably a more serious concern now that gold nineteen. it seems to push the quarter who say that not in favor it doesn't know that that's a great great Boynton in question. So you're right covid nineteen has sort of exposed the fragility of. A global supply supply chains and in fact, in in our paper, which preceded the covid nineteen one of the concerns that the Canadian respondents seemed to have was this of guaranteeing a. Sufficient domestic supply you know without relying excessively on on imports and indeed yes. So we mentioned earlier that about seventy something percent of the respondents were in favour of compensating donors sobe the remaining thirty, twenty, five, thirty percent being against. Those who are against the. We started the reasons for their for their opposition send them objected the. based. On a applause mob from donors is unsafe. twenty years. have been in the US with black paid plasma donors that have been new incidents of contaminated plasma were large extent. This is because with. Of course but also because. Of the logic advances in in in in the in the way in which. DONATED PLASMA GETS US. Screened get screened in the plasma gets tested into essentially clean. Others process through which. Infectious agents that might be in in in the plasma gets essentially killed and Seoul and that process is it's extreme the reliable in the an safe for. So it is sort of concern of of several of those Canadian respondents were against a blood Madonna's but. That serve sort of misplace is based on a on a misconception, an Braxton of those. Were opposed to paint plus McDonald's they are just opposed as a matter. because of moral concern is wrong according to them Pay donors regardless of. Any effects that compensation might have on the supply of plasma but about half..

body Parts Co. Bateman Seoul US David David Boynton McDonald
"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:32 min | 5 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Across the board. And, you found out almost the same in. Australia. In Australia sort of a middle age of Canada bear, it is illegal in Australia for the play outdoors And Australia. I think is also importing plus that's absolutely right. Yes. Australia in Australia league at the bay plasma donors. will strengthen relies on imported plasma from the US. Sephora. For their plasma therapies a plasma to produce therapies. And we find that Canadians are also K with the. Australian. Plasma donors being nabbing again no way than solve a moral we call it moral Nimby is not in my backyard morality We don't find any evidence of that in the case of of. Famous okay and so. So if I, if I understand his numbers got mighty Oh. Three quarters of the population regardless of their location policy excetera. Feed it's okay to donors for Donors and quarter approximately Don't believe. It's a it's the right thing to do. Now like discuss before I, guess we haven't really. Dug. into. The different types of compensation. So one thing I was thinking about this you know, how do they feel about? Pushing the cost. To the donor. So as you said at the plasma donation takes longer. So somebody taking time of war transportation and so on that is not really really painful plasma but really compensating. The donor for the cost that incurring in the process. I don't know if there was any any sense. Information. Specifically from our candidate. From Canada Study the there there. There is a you know a sort of anecdotes evidence dead. People are more comfortable or you know that there are far fewer concerns for compensation that takes the form of reimbursement of of costs also in the in the ethics bioethics. Community. Jr Actions, to paying. For Body parts you know blood plasma or even organs for transplantation. objections. Are Stronger you know the concern that avalaible poor populations might be unduly pressured into donating because of the promise of monetary reward or that they would be exploited the again by if we allowed a pavements for for body parts. With concerns tend to be. Less strong or or absent together and station is a reimbursement for costs like given by your ethics community there's a widespread consensus I would say that nobody should be made financially worse-off..

Australia Canada Jr Actions Sephora US Canada Study
"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:17 min | 5 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So perhaps perhaps that is less of a concern today than perhaps you know maybe ten years ago, but I was also wondering I know that you can. You didn't do this in this paper. Crowding out effect if there is some sort of a market based mechanism, like if he can titrate the incentive mechanism you it has. Sufficient amount of blood data. Some incentive that as you know, adult fabric supply that has hired incentives I don't know if any any experiment like that was done or whether it is just looking at incentive or knowing center. So devastating by you could have you could have different Types of offence. Of offer by incentives to different types of of individuals depending on their motivation writes, the effects could be could be different but that's exactly why This is one big reason why we develop that beauty research agenda that that we did in particular we work with the American Red Cross in in northern Ohio they very janitors shared a bunch of data analyzed in studying the effect of of rewards of of different kinds of from mogs to share food to a pins, coupons, jockettes in and so on. In one sort of regularity that we found was that all these incentives, these awards. Had A positive effect on on blood on blood donations. So we also did a randomized controlled trial where we use the purely comical wards. 'cause you know one could argue that you should looking at the effect studying the effect of a shirt. T shirt has the Red Cross logo than the positive effect could be due to A. Social of image of social signaling. That by by wearing the Red Cross t shirts indicates into society that I'm a certain type of person I'm a good person I give blood. And Soul so that positive effect could be due to the that instead of the Monitor your dollar value of the t shirts. So.

American Red Cross Red Cross Ohio t
"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:47 min | 5 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"john hopkins" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

06:01 min | 5 months ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Have a choice when flying Thanks for flying with us. If you like to join us, 6157379986615737 and I was reading an article from the BBC of all places. Corona virus. Health experts join global anti lock down movement. And they're saying the approaches having a devastating impact on physical and mental health as well as society, and they're calling for protection to be focused on the vulnerable while healthy people. Their lives. Exactly what we've been saying from the get go. So Clay Clark is here. He is the author of Fear. Unmask the truth behind the Corona virus shutdowns. And I'm sure he agrees with that whole Hardly Clay. How are you? Build a thrill. Thank you for allowing me on your show, sir. It is my pleasure. So you heard that? I mean, we now have a bunch of health experts all around the world. I mean, Oh aRer. I think they over 6000 of these, saying the shutdowns or worth worse than the disease. Well, this will make you bad or very happy. So we'll feel happens here might be an emotional tornado. One of my good friends on Dr Richard Bartlett. He was a former top, a medical adviser for Governor Perry of Texas for seven consecutive years. And Ah, he was on Newsmax this week and do another interviews on Glenn Beck. Er, get a good friend of mine, Dr Richard Bartlett. He's treated over 1000 covert 19 patients with zero depth. Using just a view. Death denied O R. Some people called Palme Court because tonight pull McCord and a Z Pak And maybe, you know, we've been trying to get him on. We want to talk to move because that's amazing. I want to get him off. You know, It's amazing. It's like I'm trying to, you know, somewhat connected to the media, and I'm calling you no good. Great shows like yours and friend shows I know to try to get him on the air, and it's amazing how How anybody in the media could not like that information that they could want to delete that information. I mean, think about how nefarious that is. He's talking about a treatment and the media wants to get rid of it. But when you think about it for a second And you think about that Bill Gates is one of the top donors to the will of the World Health Organization. One of the top donors to the CDC. One of the top donors to the John Have John Hopkins University, one of the top donors toe Oxford, You start to realize Well, I mean, it's really Bill Gates controlled a lot of what we hear in a lot of what people perceive as fact. So it worked for great shows like your show here. I don't know where people would turn to Well, and we had the Jane Fonda today, saying that Colbert was God's gift to the left. And so we have over 200,000 people. United States who died from this thing And she thinks it's a great thing because they're using it as a political weapon. Which is exactly what they're doing. So talk to me about the mask thing. I don't know where you come down on this. I would You know the man? Well, I mean, it seems to me especially knowing what we know. Now from the CDC on money about it. Arrows Eros allies is And that's something the mask is not going to stop. We have probably been looking at this from the wrong in every way. Yeah. You know what I tell you? What? It's the pointer listeners. I know. A lot of your listeners are busy, so folks don't run into a door into a car or something. But maybe you could mentally write this down. Write it down. It's time to free America dot com. Time to free America dot com and I've actually met with Ah, governor about this and Dr Bartlett's Met with governors about this, But when you're on the OSHA website, it clearly states When you wear a mask, it brings you if you wear a mask, I guess as an employer only for this way an employer. I can't require you to do anything that reduces your oxygen level two below 19.5% oxygen of what the ocean website states. And so, Dr Bartlet, Doctor me handle these doctors, friends of mine. They've done studies on it. And it shows when you wear a mask for more than 30 seconds, it decreases your oxygen levels two below 19.5%. So, basically, you're making healthy people sick. And to struggle with oxygen deprivation to protect them from a virus. That has a 0% fatality rate when treated with beauty. Or Dr Scott Atlas, the newest advisor of the newest member of the Corona Virus Task force. He actually mentioned at his White House briefing that the Corona virus now less dangerous than the common flu. And yet we're telling healthy people to wear masks to protect them from a virus that is less dangerous than the common flu of the average person. This is totally a political attempt to destroy this economy. And to allow the left to just destroy many American cities to point to a bad economy and to steal an election. It is nefarious. So what do you think about the president getting this Because I mean, people will gather of some GOP pundits out there saying all this is this is disaster is going to sing the whole thing. He bounce back from this thing in two or three days. It seems to me That's a good thing for him and a good thing for America to see them. Well, Bill I hate to. I hate to bring the room down a little bit here, but I'll tell you, President Trump. He's a great guy. He's working hard, but he also you know he drinks Coca Cola, He has been known to eat hamburgers. And we'll just say he's a hardworking guy, but I don't think he is like America's leader ofthe personal fitness. Okay. I mean, you know, not a time to work out. I mean, I mean, I'm not judging the guy. I'm just saying he's not like a fitness model. If a guy's seventies who's not exactly a fitness model, we'll just leave it at that. If he beat the thing in three days and everybody that I know and almost everybody, I'm sure your listeners knows it's hard to find somebody that we know. That actually was a healthy person that I'd of covert 19. Now Here's what's even crazier and more nefarious rim death. Severe is the drug that is recommended. You take him Det severe disappear if you get covert 19. I'm not sure if you're aware of it, But if you go to time to free America dot com Avital sided George Soros in conjunction with Gilead are.

Dr Richard Bartlett Bill Gates CDC America Clay Clark Governor Perry BBC United States John Have John Hopkins Univers George Soros Jane Fonda Glenn Beck Severe Dr Bartlet Ah World Health Organization Coca Cola Palme Court Dr Scott Atlas Det
"john hopkins" Discussed on 15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on 15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

"People at a ruthlessly committed level and not looking for much of anything back in return. I have come across or been introduced to. Some really phenomenal people in the neuro plasticity and psychological space. Now, and I say that that's pretty arbitrary. Right. Like, what does that mean? What if I were to tell you that I had access to? Some of the lead research development individuals inside of John Hopkins as pertains to neuro plasticity and psychology. Essentially advance study on how the brain works. Why it works and how to optimize it? I told you I could get that person on the phone. Impressive. Right. And this is not a what I'll call a, you know, a addict swinging contest right now, I don't know how else to call it. It's been a long day for me. This is just stating facts. Like, I have this guy. Right. Neck is not a on a lone ranger in this fight. He's then connected to and part of a tribe and a group in a a clan. If you will have individuals out of Harvard that also specialize in psychology and neuro plasticity. All of a sudden, you think of John Hopkins one of the leading research institutions in the United States, and you think of Harvard, obviously, reputation precedes itself. You have groups of individuals from these two powerhouse schools, and universities that are coming together to form a roadmap of your mind. And in this road map of the mind as I've shown this to other people and ask some people to take some what I'll call test. It ends up being a true roadmap like if I lay out a map of the United States and the head all the major highways and byways on it is that roadmap. Good or bad. What about you? But my answer for me personally as neither. It's just a map. Now. Of course, if in that map, I strategize. And I'm a newborn I try to figure out a way to take over Idaho. And I'm gonna conquer Idaho. And I'm I'm gonna strategize how to frame it in and cut off the roadways new bunch of crazy stuff that I would never do that map, then becomes bad. But if that map gets me from Columbus, Ohio down to us a south Dade Florida down around Miami. And I'm driving from Columbus down. And I'm putting my family in the car, and we're going to go take a vacation, then the map becomes very good. No different than the map of your mind. The back of your mind becomes this powerful tool to give very clear on the facts, the facts of what's going on. Where's your ego at where's your narcissism? Where's your Machiavelli Anisim? How do various factors in your thought processes intertwined and connect with one another?.

John Hopkins United States Idaho Harvard Columbus Ohio Miami Florida
"john hopkins" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Analysis of more than one thousand people without with n without psychiatric psychiatric easy for me to say disorders has shown. That nitrates chemicals used secure meat such as, beef jerky salami hot, dogs, and. Other processed meat snacks may contribute to, mania an abnormal mood state. Mania is characterized by, hyper activity euphoria and insomnia the findings are out of the. John Hopkins medicine study which was designed was not designed to determine cause and effect but with published July eighteenth and molecular psychiatry journal specifically it found that people hospitalized for an episode of mania had more than three times the odds of having. At e- having ever. Nitrate cured meats than people without a history of serious psychiatric disorder experiments. In rats by the same. Researcher showed menia like hyperactivity after just a few weeks on diets with added nitrates again the number here is eight six six nine zero nine four or five five we're. Talking about nutrition we're, talking about how we're talking about nitrates in our food and how that if you think that food can affect. Your mood you'd better listen in while a. Number of genetic and other risk factors had been linked. To the manic episodes that characterized by Polar disorder and may occur and. Other psychiatric conditions those factors have been able to. Explain the causes of these mental, illnesses in researchers are increasingly looking for environmental factors such as diet that may play a role so for any of, you people out there that are feeling like you. Might, be a little bit down or you you might not just be in the best mood remember you know eating the right foods eating whole foods in good foods I'm not having too much of anything remember on that scale for fullness therapy and not fall at all ten being so full you feel sick when. You, get to an eight nine, or, ten, on, that, Spillman, scale you're actually? Going. To end up feeling. Really tired really lazy and you're probably going to wake up with a food hangover and that's not what I want for you, guys I want you guys to live happy healthy lives so start thinking about your sleep what foods you're putting in your your Body and you know the processed foods do you really want those in your system from what this. Study is saying it's just one more study showing and giving us avenues but how much how many studies do we need it's not that I'm saying they should. Stop doing this studies but what I'm saying is there is enough proof out there now that we should be trying, to stay away from processed foods we talked last. Week, about you, know fast foods and, some of the local restaurants and. We're finding dishes that were supposed to. Be for one person that had over four thousand milligrams close to five thousand milligrams in, some cases in these foods that a lot of, us are consuming and it's about time, you wake up start thinking about what you're putting, in your, mouth and again I've I do this show every Saturday from, eleven to noon and the number here is eight. Six six nine two zero.

Researcher molecular psychiatry John Hopkins
"john hopkins" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"An electromagnetic. Field experiment from John Hopkins University a vibration isolation platform data, logger from, control dynamics and get this. A whiz bang satellite system to bring wifi yes. I said why fi into space and I know what you're thinking I can't even. Get a strong wifi on my back patio and they're putting. It into space All right you know people always like to say yes. There's an app for that because there truly is inap- for. Anything that you can imagine but I bet the person behind the coin toss. At never actually thought it might be used this way. A couple of police officers in Georgia in hot water after footage from their own body Cam was obtained by a local TV station the video shows the officers arresting a woman for speeding now that sounds normal enough but that's not all it showed during the arrest the officers used a coin toss apt to. Decide, whether they should arrest her or not the app simulates a. Coin toss the suspect actually won the toss but, the officers decided, to arrest or anyway she was charged with speeding reckless driving driving too fast for conditions but. That's. Not all, one? Of the police? Officers admits on camera that she. Didn't even have the proper equipment to determine the suspects exact, speed so you might have guessed Now the officers were placed on leave and, after the footage aired on local TV all the charges against the suspect were dropped I'm telling you the coin toss app these cops really should. Use the magic eight ball All right let's talk about. The explosion of three d. printers it's really changing the manufacturing landscape because you can buy three d. printer and download.

John Hopkins University Georgia
"john hopkins" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"john hopkins" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Louis colombo's is our guest is called eisenhower john hopkins press put it out louis tell me about ice relationship with harry truman it was cordial i can crewmen got along at first but as i political career began to blossom and his skepticism about certain aspects of truman's policies and what the administration was doing i think it became very strained particularly on truman side i don't think it was strained that much on i side but they got along very well at first and not so well as things developed so i think that's probably normal when someone's coming up and it has a bright future ahead of them as i did tell me about an and this would just be a broad broadbased question eight years is president lou how do we rate those eight years what can you say about them well his objectives were to achieve peace that is the cold war was intense and he wanted america well armed and deal with that above all if we didn't have peace he thought with atomic and then nuclear weapons we didn't have anything so he achieved peace in those eight years and along with it he sought that they had to be scrawled if we were going to win in the long run so he thought peace and prosperity i think he helped america achieve both of those we had three this little town do we had three balanced budgets during his eight years and that was one of the jackie's was keep government expenditures under control and move ahead with the programs that he thought would ultimately that ultimately we would win over the communist empire and indeed we did also frame the strategy that enabled us to win blue yes the republican policies at that time were.

Louis colombo harry truman president america jackie john hopkins lou eight years