20 Burst results for "John Hello"

"john hello" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:42 min | 10 months ago

"john hello" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Of him in 15 30 am enjoying the conversation tonight? We're identifying critters were doing their work in identifying these critters as we invade their forests. Here's a guy who likes to invade the forced himself as I understand it. Over the years, John Hello? Hey, you know, you know you were talking about chickens said Keys to raising chickens in the mountains is the builder, chicken mansion and convention. Yeah, That's what I got. I got a chicken mansion. And it's like 10 by 10 and you don't want to get into it. You know, it's got big, huge doors on both ends like a barn, Huh? And then I have screen windows on both sides. But during the wintertime like and those I have these panels that come down that strap down so when it's winter time Keeps the chicken is nice and warm because it closed up closes up the windows. And then the other thing I have in their control. Don't exactly he controlled from my heat lamp, right? And then I also have that this is the best part of it. And this is what you gotta have is an automatic door closer. So what I did is they took a light sensor. And I do that through some relation sometime delay. So when the sun goes down the timer's time out for about 30 minutes and we start the laws of chickens Get in there. And after 30 minutes adorable, closed and the lights will. Come on. Let's go away the craters. Wow! Wow throughout. Ao You know how you have those wire? You know, like that since Weir you know that, usually like you'd put around a tree to protect The tree right throughout the whole corral that keeps the hawk attacks down. On and ever since I've done all that stuff I haven't lost any chickens have nots, no chickens. No chickens. The only time I lose, um, is due to old age. Wow. No kidding. So it's been a good experience for you up there in Somerset. Raising the chickens it it took a long time. It was a process over several years. You had to learn you have to learn, especially for you because you work at night. Yeah. If you had an automatic door like that, or something like that, you can go to work knowing that The door's going to close 30 minutes after the sun sets and you don't have to worry about your chickens getting that's a really great idea at a problem with skunks that I got. One night I went down there to collect the eggs and there was a skunk in there. It's cancer. It's spread. You dumped me. I thought, Yeah, I thought I dodged a bullet. But when I came back up to the house, I said I told my wife Hey, I dodged a bullet. Almost got some issues, but no, he didn't dodge that bullet. You state. You know how so you did that this hole? I've always been always been curious about that, Did you? What was that, like to be sprayed with? The sky had just two B. Oh, my gosh. It was horrible. But here's the thing is, I went down to Lee's feet, and they have always stocked because ever since my dog's got something they carry the stuff called Nature's Miracle formula. And I just doused myself with that portal, but more clothes in a bucket doused me with that and basically took a cold shower clean by the John. That's got to be brutal, John. Thank you for the wise advice. Wow. Thanks, John. That would be tough. Didn't see the station. All right,.

John Hello Keys Somerset Weir John Lee
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 10 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"john hello" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"john hello" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Illustrated, Indiana, the man himself. Tom Brew. Hello, John. Hello, Bob. Welcome back for another great year. Thank you very much. Congratulations on the outstanding work being done. But you and your colleagues Sports Illustrated I you Sports illustrated by you and for doing your eye you site number one in the country where you go. Yeah, it's been a good summer growth is phenomenal concerning there's no games going on. And of course, you're part of that. Sadly, it was. You know, we've had a few people die and things, but, um, you know, but you know, we write what we write and people enjoy reading it and we have been just a tremendous Coming up on in today starts here too. So, uh, where were we launched August 1st last year. And now, here we are You two of a second full time person writing on the wall like grand. Just a really good young writer really cooks tried to have him on staff now. And that's just the start. So we were kind of waiting to see where what happens with games and such. But we're all prepared to start covering some of sports in the end as well. So we just need to start playing games. Were we good? Well to that point Monday. We're start. We're getting into practice. Things begin. We're taking that next step. So bring me up to date on what's happening and what's transpired over the summer and the voluntary workouts where the are relative, Tio reported cases of Copan 19 and just exactly what's gonna happen in this upcoming week. Yeah, it's uh it's actually gets to me football season Now the big can is his the last of the conferences to still determined. You know how we're gonna play games in a way. We're still waiting on that. Of course, we are still waiting for them officially say, put on the pads and go. I think you know if they still don't want to keep things in smaller groups and then to it some distance until they know more. But No leave very least the moment now it's no. They're ready to take the next step. The summer's basically, um, no voluntary work, but, uh but everyone's their way. Don't voluntary, but I would be in the game and back to campus in a totally renewed environment, you know, right in the first wave. I came in mid June, and they were all adjusted and kept away from campus until we get positive results. And then when I started to work out, they work down in really small groups. They worked out mostly with all their roommates. So they were going around all the time. Um, videos. They had exposure to the number of people you were around, you know, to a minimum, and you're the first way with Justin there where they give zero positive results from the few places that comes to Alice. But then then I kind of broke out a little too much about a week and 1/2 ago, and they took a pause for the football guys to work out. Um, but, uh, well, uh, men's and women's basketball back on campus made basketball guys just finished, um, there summer. Allowed to work in the on the court and they have all that out there. They've all been fraction they've learned out to work out in the weight room. With mast on on DH, maintaining Distance and you're on record. There was no five on five being played.

Tio Indiana Tom Brew Bob John football writer Copan Justin
Elsie's Letterman Jacket

She Podcasts

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Elsie's Letterman Jacket

"Hello Hello everyone welcome to. She podcast episode two seven six. I am your host sorry? I scared Elsie shoes over driven. And I said I and she's startled. I'm sorry. I am your Co Host Jessica with me as always the lovely and Very Hispanic L. C.. It's hard. And our producer John Hello. How are you guys doing today? Pretty good although I still like China understand the difference between I'm not. I'm not even Gonna I'm just GonNa lay it out here because I've been studying it for a while, but we do not have to go down this rabbit hole. We can continue with the show, but I. don't really like the term Hispanic Myself I. Just Tina I like Latina better, I. Look more native American today than you do Hispanic, but it's probably the. The longer hair along. You're you're wearing a rather earthy type top that makes me think of native Americans also the glittering your hair does not help you more Latina. It makes you look more native American to me Maybe it's a feather in my feather. Ref. I don't know. But. I just wanted to say because you know sometimes. When I'm introducing you, I have to think on the fly of an adjective that I haven't used before and their affiliates. Right there you go. Maybe I should just have like a list of adjectives next to me when I started the show so I can just pick one for each of you. Maybe I Guess Patrick didn't like that. I'm sorry it was that offensive. She does look more native American Hispanic today to me. I probably look more like someone's grandmother than forty five year old woman to you. I'm cool with it. We look like what we look like case. And I hope that was an both male and female. God boom okay all right so I before we continue with the what's up and all that stuff I really do want to really quickly. Have you all go if you haven't already because it's happening I, think when we release this episode all the tomorrow the day after popped on having. This week as well. That's what I'm saying. When we released this show, it's the day after the bathroom right right, right Yes so pop Don Twenty twentieth starting. Our friends have put it together. They have worked very very hard. It is a virtual summit for podcasters that is July eighteenth and nineteen. The schedule is includes over thirty speakers, and they have to Keno panels, including pasta organizers like podcast and frozen audio and podcasts news publications, so you guys if you listen. I'm asking all of you. People who are listening right now. If you don't buy a ticket. I'm going to be very angry with you, so everybody needs to nine and ticket. I don't care if you go. I don't care if you attend. I don't care. I don't care you know she's dying to care. That is at Lincoln. A show notes she don't care link in the show notes, but it does not actually link to. Fix the link because you linked it to the article and article by tickets you. Buy Tickets tickets, Don Dot com I think it is. Ties on the it's hosted by the Asian American. PODCASTERS, association and women of Color Podcasters so it's really important that we support them, and also there's so much we can learn from the speakers that they had to have amazing speakers. And it's going to be really cool, so please sign up. Elsie will find you and she'll your eyes out. I will yell. I'M GONNA. Be Yeah. I'll I'll be sneaking into your ears alcoholic this when you're listening to other people's podcasts. Did you already buy Pudong? Tickets On ticket she acts so nice, but it's all a ruse I tell you. Not all kinds of stuff anyway other than that though moving onto catching up on things. We are going to be doing some special stuff that's happening with the chief podcast. Super Squad the Su-. What I feel is happening with us. She podcast Super Swat. It said it's becoming extra. So it's so, she cast. Extra, like seriously. If you guys go, look out why people use the term extra right now as a you know, what in the past decade five years no extra has become a thing. look it up and that's what's going to describe our sheep youtuber squad actually extra. Will be extra yes. So, Do you WanNa? Say a little something about what's happening with our. She podcast Swab Y'all yeah. I can tell you that okay so what? I'm trying to build in our membership. Currently is very similar to if you have you attended the live event or even if you didn't, but you had a virtual ticket. The. Mobile APP had a lot of fun things that normal conference APPs don't have. You could oaths. I'm banging things. You could upload photos like as you were doing things. You could poke an and message other people. I. Don't remember if you can use gifts, but I'm trying to create a membership where we you can you. Can you remember you could create your own like meet ups? This is going to be very similar where you can have the Asian Association, and you can have women of Color Podcasters, and you can have newbies. Who podcast about health, and you can make them yourself you don't need. An administrator to group you can

Elsie John Hello Producer Don Twenty China Asian Association Pudong Patrick Administrator
"john hello" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"john hello" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Com hello John hello Jeremiah are you doing I am well thank you and glad to have you on your your suggestion that you put forward of a stimulus package acceptance of the government is going to give every adult twelve hundred dollars a list of ten records each word up to twelve hundred dollars or more and I think that's a splendid idea and so as is often happens with John appears on the program you you can check out those old vinyl records that you've got somewhere maybe yours or your parents your grandparents of the garage for the basement to the attic a closet and every now and then people come up with that they had to if the the jackpot now we should make it clear that the John himself does not buy these records he maintains the website money music dot com as a resource but he could point to the direction of people who might want to buy such a record right absolutely tell us more about of what people find if they go to money music dot com well there are several things you can do you can have your records appraised right online if you're in a hurry we turn around about twenty four hours with the appraisals or if you have a lot of record you might want to pick up our price guide that lists the values for over a million records by over seventy five thousand different recording artists and that's nineteen ninety five we pay the shipping and you can sit back like another to do and look up the values for any record that you have how did you come across this line of work well I started working in radio back in the sixties and then I went to work for a marketing company that sold products like memory courses in speed reading courses and I thought what do I know that the average person doesn't know that I could market and I said people don't know about the value of their records as a matter of fact I was working for Stephen King at the time and I remember we were in his office and he rolled over Beatles record with his chair and I said Hey you know you just broke a hundred dollar record Nick is what do you mean I suspect record worth a hundred dollars I said people have no idea about the value of the records and he said well why don't you tell them and I thought someday I will and basically that's how it all happened wow that's that's pretty cool it died again the for those who have not heard John before the people who are interested in in these records often have shall we say quirky reasons for being interested for example they might pay more for a mono record that a stereo record for example the record sleeve or jacket might be more than the record itself in terms of value there all kinds of of strange reasons why these people are willing to pay money that's very true that's very true but mostly they're looking for rock and roll country blues soul or jazz those are the big five categories one eight six six five oh Jimbo our number one eight six six five oh five four six two six John Marshall is our guest today he has a list again of the ten records each worth up to twelve hundred dollars or more depending of course on the what date they may need to have with the baby like a picture sleeve or something at least that should to be in pretty good condition right to be worth that much yeah we always say a record is worth up to a certain amount because condition is very important obviously the better the condition the more value all right then let's go down our list of these records worth up to twelve hundred dollars our own little stimulus program right here and the number ten quite an eclectic list we start off with Kurt Cobain and nirvana forty five called love the buzz this leads up to twelve hundred dollars nirvana and inspect it gets as vital goes collectible vinyl this is a fairly recent record right one nineteen eighty eight you're right most of the big money tends to be in the Elvis or the Beatles era but as time passes in times the great factors increases value of the seventies and the eighties will certainly start to go up in value and this one this one requires a picture sleeve to be the full value right yes and the but in this case is about a fifty fifty split in value between the vinyl and the picture sleeve all right very good up to twelve hundred dollars one eight six six five oh Jimbo one eight six six five oh five four six two six as we take just a departure from all virus all the time and that we go to Dennis in canton Ohio good evening Dennis Hey are you guys doing today we're fine thank you were opening up the show great good will thank you all my pleasure well I have best of muddy water but she has black label Chas one four two seven well I yeah right just would be the original label collectors always want these things on the return label very popular blues very collectible he's not extremely collectible but detestable movie up around seventy five dollars okay good yeah I have I have four I have Bo Diddley on chest fourteen thirty one black label yes but Bo Diddley okay yes bold worth a little bit more than money so both would be around two to three hundred dollars a great good then I have David Bowie on Durham mono one six zero zero three yeah if you have a title about as it's simply just David Bowie yes the him just he on the cover so in other words it's an album but it's not okay outlook I got you okay you're very young lieutenant can down the hallway with little page boy type hair cut I think that's the one it's up to about a hundred dollars okay good well then my last one well I have many more but they said this one does stand and little town flirt that you know black top label or a a big black laid out big time yeah because right away the big one but Luton for would be up around a hundred dollars as well you're so not not not a maybe a gold mine but baby a copper mine their dentists that's that's pretty good thank you for your call by the way Dennis really provide an awful lot of information it's not critical that you have that but it's really makes the makes jobs job easier if you've got the label of the record.

John
"john hello" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"john hello" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Dot com hello John hello Jim how are you doing I am well thank you and the glad to have you on your your suggestion that you put forward of a stimulus package since the government is going to give every adult twelve hundred dollars a list of ten records each worked up to twelve hundred dollars or more and I think that's a splendid idea and so as is often happens with John appears on the program you you can check out those old vinyl records that you've got somewhere maybe yours or your parents your grandparents in the garage to the basement to the attic a closet and every now and then people come up with that they hit the it the the jackpot now we should make it clear that the John himself does not buy these records he maintains the website money music dot com as a resource but he could point you in the direction of people who might want to buy such a record right absolutely tell us more about of what the people fight if they go to money music dot com well there are several things you can do you can have your records appraised right online if you're in a hurry we turn around about twenty four hours with the appraisals or if you have a lot of record you might want to pick up our price guide that lists the values for over a million records by over seventy five thousand different recording artists and that's nineteen ninety five we pay the shipping and you can sit back like another to do and look up the values for any record that you have how did you come across this line of work well I started working in radio back in the sixties and then I went to work for a marketing company that sold products like memory courses in speed reading courses and I thought what do I know that the average person doesn't know that I could market and I said well don't know about the value of their records as a matter of fact I was working for Stephen King at the time and I remember we were in his office and he rolled over Beatles record with his chair and I said Hey you know you just broke a hundred dollar record thank you what do you mean I suspect record worth a hundred dollars I said people have no idea about the value of the records and he said well why don't you tell them and I thought someday I will basically that's how it all happened wow that's that's pretty cool it died again the for those who have not heard John before the people who are interested in in these records often have shall we say quirky reasons for being interested for example they might pay more for a mono record that a stereo record for example the record sleeve or jacket might be more than the record itself in terms of value there all kinds of of strange reasons why these people are willing to pay money that's very true that's very true but mostly they're looking for rock and roll country blues soul or jazz those are the big five categories one eight six six five oh Jimbo our number one eight six six five oh five four six two six John Marshall is our guest today he has a list again of the ten records each worth up to twelve hundred dollars or more depending of course on the what date they may need to have with the baby like a picture sleeve or something of these should to be in pretty good condition right to be worth that much yeah we always say a record is worth up to a certain amount because condition is very important obviously the better the condition the more value all right then let's go down our list of these records worth up to twelve hundred dollars our own little stimulus program right here and number ten quite an eclectic list we start off with Kurt Cobain and nirvana forty five called love the buses this leads up to twelve hundred dollars yes.

"john hello" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"john hello" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Zero nine six five let's take line nine John hello John welcome to the show hello Sean what are what are your thoughts about this Lysol issue I hope so too thank you think he's on to something really I think you know the something wow so how do you think we can actually ingest Lysol which by the way anybody listening if you get covert nineteen do not ingesting any sort of don't do it don't ingested don't inject it don't be a fool all right go to the hospital if you need to anyway continue John B. T. W. this is the same John you've been talking to one G. mail well you know what that sounds really weird because you sound like a kid and you are a kid and now you are openly saying that I talk to you R. G. mouse and now I have to go into a whole explanation but I appreciate you give me a call John I guess I'll see on the G. email have a good night all right let me explain myself everybody because this is all in writing and all of my bosses are aware that yes I am talking to an aspiring very interested twelve year old reporter who his parents know that we are an email kind it well according to him and he's just really into what we're doing here on the show even though he's young he you know it's tough for me not to try to inspire somebody because I remember being his age I remember being twelve and there was nothing more than when somebody who is older than me and doing it for a living talk to me like I was an adult and that's what I've been doing with him and my boss to see all the emails don't worry but I hope we've been inspiring you John and thank you for giving us a call here all right let's move on eight four four two two zero zero nine six five I love that I had to get a little explanation there but all of that is true all right we're gonna take Caroline Caroline what's up welcome to the show kulit no hello how are ya do you sound good well you sound great is this really Caroline are you somebody else you know LA yeah you're a liar this is this sounds like yes listen listen we've had problems with your phone you sound great so what did you do differently I didn't do anything differently I just randomly call then maybe maybe you're not calling me from a cave or underneath the toilet all right talk to me about this disinfectant issue I think if I if not it will be something like this and something like this in fact in I I think I think he's very good at all I need to be very good were trolling people give you the map yes of course Donald Trump is the greatest troll of all time well Kylie or Caroline whatever you want to be called thank you for giving me a call really appreciate it we're gonna move all we've got genie the crazy turtle lady lying to can I mean can I call the crazy turtle lady or a stout offensive to you no no no I had some training I went a bit nervous system training and and herpetology and I what a one up top what's it called it's not like her book on the civil rights it's not her but not before I are you sure he is this big study of reptiles and amphibians that sounds right all right continue I have no idea what you're talking about you're the crazy turtle ever never told Long Island there on your right go ahead long Islander mmhm it goes back to reading labels and I and I don't use anything but my animals unless I called them back and it okay and paper animal things are for topical use to be in yeah here yeah well it's common sense you can just Lysol am I right yeah I agree it would be it would be absolutely insane it would be like owning eight turtles all right eternally I love you Jeannie and one of these days you're gonna tell me all of the names of your turtles hot Charlie one of these days one of these days all right yeah all right John Christmas show Carl I'm listening talk dirty to me staff salmonella E. coli influence on the dirty you realize you just took me to the toilet and kept wiping in between tweets no wonder one and six phones contain fecal matter whatever your hands touch I touch I am covered in filth it's enough to make both of us sick please can you get me a phone cell phones phone soap safely kills ninety nine point ninety nine percent of all those germs with clinically proven UV light it won't damage my screen like liquids or chemicals because you're all of god that's so sweet karafun.

John Sean
"john hello" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

KTKR 760AM

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

"In my brothers were team captains they're always first string from the very beginning MRS went close he pulled me to the side and he knew I was kind of a loss kid in high school and he said John if you if you listen to me and if you take this wrestling thing seriously you know you do summer camp and and you do the things that they did you I promise you man I'll get you into college and you know help you find your niche and I did I focus my energy and support press one and it led me to a scholarship to wrestle in Iowa and allows the law school and I will upon the ju jitsu school which is a lot like wrestling and I got really good at that pretty fast and and that guy encourage me to to try to become a full fledged mixed martial arts fighter and nine months after my very first practice I had signed a contract with the toughest organization be a part of the in the UFC and shortly after that became the youngest champion in sports history and and I realized that I found my calling in life and what position were you trying to play in football same the lawyer on the defense of them but I was freaking terrible absolutely terrible slow better water boy for sure why I mean some of your best moves would definitely earn your fifteen yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty as I would think if you tried any of your UFC on this on the football great are that would be it that's fifteen yards each time I imagine you know I always try to you know having to Superbowl champion brothers but I'm always trying to challenge myself against them when we're at barbecues or whenever we get the chance to be together and their light on in town be kicking at me I'll be posting that me as with a game anything to do with it with the kicking and punching well John if you're or when you're in Los Angeles next come on and I'd love to have you here in studio year old man now the great I really would what we do a lot of media tour is in LA and have you talked to on the P. R. members I'm sure they can set of that I'd be honored to come in studio are you you're tied with glaze right with Jay Glazer are you tight with Jay or check whether the man okay maybe I'll see you did did the unbreakable Jim because you know I work out there to John that's right that's where on the the Jewish knockout artist I've never for the Jewish nightmare for kiss hello John just come on somebody's going to call back hi John hello yeah I will all right Jonasson said good luck this weekend your arguments over a shameless Instagram blood please John how you get that Johnny bones yes Sir act on the ball than the really cool thing is I have a have a really good video out of her and photographer.

fifteen yards fifteen yard nine months
"john hello" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Back we go more Handel on the law. John. Hello, john. Welcome to the show. Hey, bill. I have a tenant's rights question. Yes. Sir. So I rented house in Los Angeles been here for about ten years and recently are heater broke down, and it's one of those floor older. Oh, yeah. The gravity heaters. Oh. Those are great to have one of those. And you can't get parts for them. They break either. That's exactly right. And so the, you know, the guy eventually came out to check it out. And he said that the the only option is to install central heating. Yep. So he went back to the landlord. And and I got an Email the landlords telling me that that basically it's too expensive. He can't afford it and uh. The the rent is below market. Anyway, I don't like it. I should just find another place to move. Okay. So my question is is this get into for me or how about staying there for the rest of your life without a heater and bringing in and bringing in your own space heaters, never paying rent. Because it's a habitability issue. He has to provide heating for you. He has to that's the law. So what what do you recommend? I do. I recommend that you let them know. Thanks very much. You won't be receiving any rent for me until heat is established have a nice day. And what part of town is it, by the way. Silverlake and you so you're right in the middle of rent control. And so he's got to even though it's a single family house. Doesn't matter. It's all rent control. Yep. So he's got he it's time for him to either get a loan and put it in or sell the place or get a mortgage on it. But he's got to put in. He he has no choice. Let them know say thanks for the free rent. I appreciate it. And just a lot of sweaters. Warm blankets electric blankets, saying don't pay rent, isn't that special. Let me see. Okay, michael. Let's try that. Hi, michael. Good morning. Yes. Sir. The other four thousand out of voter side. Michael. I'm barely understand. You. You have a what I haven't storage laid. Okay. All right. And on a motorcycle. Four thousand. Michael. I can't hear you the line is so bad. There's not much I can do about that. All.

michael Handel John Los Angeles Silverlake ten years
"john hello" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Okay. Everybody has Prager here. And this is the era of the week third hour on Friday, where whatever's on your mind. Oh, wow. That's really rare. About audio equipment cigar. I should do. Yes. And let's see and fountain pens. All right. And classical music. Let's see what we got a full board here though. Okay. All right. Let's see. We got somebody in Washington DC, John. Hello, john. Dennis prager. Identity trying to be watchful in Washington DC just turned on the constitution avenue. I just want to. Oh. It is. I don't think they all report. They're probably not reporting it. This is incredible. It is a solid wall of people probably stretching a mile. It's just incredible all heavy down to vanish. That's the reason. I took your call. I want people to know about this. And and why this will I predict this will beat other example of why there's fake news. How many people will attend the women's rally and how many people attend the right to life rally March for life rally, and what is the percentage of coverage to each? They don't cover it. Exactly it is fake media. The dominant media are frauds. Okay. Just though that it's a sad. I there's no joy in me and acknowledging it. The left has has screwed every institution every major institution. Universities the arts the media the boy scouts. The now now psychology American psychological association has come out asking its therapists to to acknowledge and work on the fact that traditional masculinity. That's it's words is pathological. If you only know that whatever the whatever the left touches it destroys you already understand a good part of the last one hundred years. So to say other things haven't been destructive. But they, but they have a they don't live as long Nazism lived from nineteen thirty three to nineteen Forty-five. Okay. Let's go to Gabby in Pittsburgh. Gabby of Pittsburgh Dennis Prager. Hi. Hi, Mr. Prager. It's pleasure beyond my name is pronounced Dhabi. So a quick back story before my question. So over the summer, my friend reached out to me, and he said, I have a big problem. My brother wants to convert Christianity. So I know that you see a lot of virtues in both Judaism. And Christianity, you think in the case someone wants to convert from Judaism Christianity you intervene. I have told people whether Christian or Jewish or Mormon, and I'm Catholic whatever it is. I always say before you, leave your religion, make sure you know, what you're leaving the vast majority of people not all who leave their religion don't know their religion. They know a caricature or they know a few little things from Sunday school or in Jews case Hebrew school. So if you if you truly know what you're leaving. Then I have to respect it in a free country. I have to respect the choice. The only difference. There's an emotional difference among Jews, then there is among Christians though, that has nothing to do with theology. And that is sociology and that is that the Jews correctly feel endangered there like an endangered species like the white rhinoceros. And so every Jew who ceases to be a Jew is. Whether it's through station two to nothing which is far greater than any Jewish conversion to Christianity. Jews. Get unbelievably upset when a Jew becomes a Christian. But they don't get unbelievably upset when a Jew becomes nothing. Which results? Ironically, the jubilee comes at Christie's, probably more pro Israel, the Jew who becomes nothing. I mean, this is the world is a complex place. But yes, I think you have a right to intervene anymore than a Christian would have a right to its v. If somebody wanted to leave Christianity in the family or friends, look, you know. You know, maybe maybe you missed the this this beauty in Christianity or you. Maybe you missed this profundity in Judaism. But beyond that that is the only way you could prevent that is to live in Israel or to live a very orthodox life in an orthodox neighborhood. Then your your chances are lessons tremendously in terms of converting to another religion okeydokey. Let's thank you is a very important question. Actually and Jeff in Jacksonville, Florida. Hello, Jeff Jacksonville. Hey, thanks for taking my call. Thank you for calling Mike. My question is about the region's per one that was outlawed by the supreme court. Yes. What do you think the impact would be on America? If those twenty two words where somehow reinstated in our public schools today with that be a good thing. Looking up the prayer? I wanna read it to people. Because it is here it is it is so beautiful. And what does it say? Twenty two words. I believe it's twenty two words you'll hear they are almighty God. This is folks this is what the supreme court this this. I believe ushered in the cultural civil war. The supreme court decision in nineteen sixty two. That this was unconstitutional. Almighty god. We acknowledge our dependence on the and we've begged by blessings upon us, our parents, our teachers and our country. That's it. That's it folks. That's what that was what was considered unconstitutional by the liberals of the supreme court of the United States in nineteen sixty two. Yes, I think it would have a profound effect. I do if it were reinstituted half the kids would object to saying..

Dennis prager supreme court Jeff Jacksonville Washington Gabby Israel John Pittsburgh American psychological associa United States America Mike Christie Jacksonville Florida one hundred years
"john hello" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Let's see. We got somebody in Washington DC, John. Hello, John Dennis Prager identity. This is Jonathan. In Washington DC. Turn down constitution avenue. It is forty minutes. I don't think they all report. They're probably not reporting it. This is incredible. It is a solid wall of people probably searching a mile. It's just incredible all down to that. That's the reason I took your call. I want people to know about this. And why this will I predict this will beat other example of why there's fake news. How many people will attend the women's rally and how many people attend to right to life rally March for life rally, and what is the percentage of coverage to each? They don't cover. It. Exactly. It is fake media. The dominant media are frauds. Okay. Just though that it's a sad. I there's no joy in me and acknowledging it. The left has has screwed every institution every major institution. Universities the arts the media the boy scouts. The now now psychology American psychological association has come out asking its therapists to to acknowledge and work on the fact that traditional masculinity. That's it's words is pathological. If you only know that whatever the whatever the left touches it destroys you already understand a good part of the last one hundred years. So to say other things haven't been destructive. But they, but they have a they don't live as long Nazism lived from nineteen thirty three to nineteen forty five. Okay. Let's go to Gabby in Pittsburgh. Gabby of Pittsburgh Dennis Prager. Hi. Hi, Mr. Prager. It's pleasure to be on. My name is pronounced Gabby. So a quick back story before my question over the summer, my friend reached out to me. And he said, I have a big problem. My brother wants to convert to Christianity. So I know that you see a lot of virtues in both Judaism Christianity, you think in the case if someone wants to convert from Judaism Christianity, should you intervene. I have told people whether Christian or Jewish or Mormon, and I'm Catholic whatever it is. I always say before you, leave your religion, make sure you know, what you're leaving the vast majority of people not all who leave their religion don't know their religion. They know a caricature or they know a few little things from Sunday school or in Jews case Hebrew school. So if you if you truly know what you're leaving. Then I have to respect it in a free country. I have to respect the choice. The only difference. There's an emotional difference among Jews, then there is among Christians though, that has nothing to do with theology. And that is sociology and that is that the Jews correctly feel endangered there like an endangered species like the white rhinoceros. And so every Jew. Ceases to be a Jew is whether it's through two to nothing which is far greater than any Jewish conversion to Christianity. Jews. Get unbelievably set when a Jew becomes a Christian. But they don't get unbelievably upset when a Jew becomes nothing. Which results? Ironically, the ju- becomes a Christian is probably more pro Israel, the Jew who becomes nothing. I mean, this is a very the world is a complex place. But yes, I think you have a right to intervene anymore than a Christian would have a right to veto if somebody wanted to leave Christianity in the family or friends look. Maybe maybe you missed the this this beauty in Christianity or you. Maybe you missed his performed in Judaism. But beyond that that is the only way you could prevent that is to live in Israel or to live a very orthodox life in an orthodox neighborhood. Then your chances are lessons tremendously in terms of converting to another religion. Oh, Cadeau key. Let's thank you is a very important question. Actually and Jeff in Jacksonville, Florida. Hello, Jeff Jacksonville. Hey, thanks for taking my call. Thank you for calling Mike. My question is about the regions for the one that was outlawed by the supreme court. Yes. What do you think the impact would be on America? If those twenty two words were somehow reinstated in our public schools today. Would that be a good thing? Looking up the prayer? I wanna read it to people. Because it is here it is it is so beautiful. And what did you say? Twenty two words. I believe it's twenty two words here they are almighty God. This is folks this is what the supreme court this this. I believe ushered in the cultural civil war. The supreme court decision in one thousand nine hundred sixty two. That this was unconstitutional. Almighty god. We acknowledge our dependence on the and we've begs I- blessings upon us. Our parents our teachers and our country. That's. That's it folks. That's what that was what was considered unconstitutional. By the liberals of the supreme court of the United States in nineteen sixty two. Yes, I think it would have a profound effect. I do if it were reinstituted half the kids would object to saying..

supreme court Dennis Prager Washington DC Gabby Pittsburgh Israel Jeff Jacksonville Jonathan John American psychological associa Jacksonville United States America Mike Florida one hundred years forty minutes
Your genes make you tea or coffee lover

Gary and Shannon

01:35 min | 2 years ago

Your genes make you tea or coffee lover

"Synthetic chemical. That's not actually naturally found in food or drink other bidder. Components usually a naturally and coffee and tea may trigger the same tastes responses, quinine or prop as they call proper little researchers in Australia and England examined DNA from four hundred thousand people if we're gonna do strange science, you should know how to pronounce the chemicals who in the world knows how to pronounce profile Russell. The only people not pronounce that that actual term are the people who put this study together, we should commit to sounding a little bit smarter. If we're going to be doing scienc- things that's not going to happen. It's just not gonna happen. There's no magic one for us to sound smarter. That's a guarantee. John. Hello, come to the show. I think we should commit to being smarter. Yes.

Quinine Russell Australia England John
"john hello" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Fortunately. Be stellar supporting cast of the, sir. John. Hello, Mr. Seth Kushner, turn gonna die. Now. Half-life have led will need carbon dating. I'm not sure. Anyway. Saga about the biggest story of the day. Of course, the tragic news that you woke up to this morning that everybody woke up to this morning. I'm waiting to see if this is confirmed or not you remember Tia and Tamara the twins who were. That was it. Yeah. I thought about them in many years just like most of America, but our national content desk that sends us emails about news and stuff every day sent out a story that tomorrow's daughter might have been at the bar last night. And as of about one o'clock this afternoon, she was still missing. Oh, no. I no I didn't even realize that tomorrow was old enough to have a kid. But she is apparently and does say Tamara Maori Housley. Oh, her missing niece missing niece Tamara. And and her husband Adam are searching for their missing these their nieces eighteen years old. She's talk show host, by the way is that. Yes. I think I did know that one of them had one and she's married to a former Fox News correspondent, oh, they're looking good. I guess that's left pregnant helix fantastic too. You know, you you raise your kid, and you try to get them not to put a fork in the electrical outlet, and you try not to let them run near the street, especially if there's a semi truck rolling by pet cemetery. You do all you can whether you spank like a horrible parent or if you don't like a good one. And then you get your kid out of the house at eighteen or so, and you go a little birdie fly into the world, and and go on your own, and you feel like you've done your job that you did all you could. And your kid shows up at a country, western all ages night or eighteen and up night. And some twenty nine year old white nude former marine walks in and opens up with what Glock forty five I believe and took a bunch of lives. A dozen or so, and then you go what could we have done? What could you have done as a parent? Nothing. What could we have done a society? Nothing. What could our government's laws have done nothing? So then what's what's the point in assigning blame right now? Right. Are are are people still playing the blame game with these mass shootings? Yeah. All over the place. Whether you're trying to blame guns or you're trying to blame mental health or you're trying to blame prescription medication or or the armed forces or whatever. Hey, you can blame guns you can blame people for being desensitized, you can point fingers all day. But no one's figured out a solution yet. Right. And I don't know that there is one you're you're not going to take the guns away from law abiding Americans. And you're not gonna prevent those who operate outside the law from getting guns. So then what do you do is it not good enough to say, I will never I will never go in to any establishment and kill a bunch of people. Is that is that good enough because I feel like that's all I can do is promise that I won't ever be a mass shooter. I think you can even take it a step farther and say I won't ever be a mass shooter. And I want to be a resource to those who feel like they could be if you feel like you're at your wit's end. And you're ready to check. Out of this world. And you feel like you wanna take a dozen or so people with you, or maybe more I wanna be a resource for you to tell you why that's a bad bad idea. Other than that. Who do you blame? Why do you blame anybody? Can we just absorb this as a tragedy and realized that I don't want to say, it's the cost of doing business? But this is where we are in society right now, we have psychologically, damaged individuals among us are we doing enough to be their friends. No. Are we doing enough to point them in the right direction towards are already overloaded mental health system? No. So then what other than being overwhelmed by the sadness of it all the other tied into this is you know, we can't. As a society keep tabs on every single person's mental health like it's impossible the tie into this. That makes it even more heartbreaking is that this guy fought for our country in obviously has been battling with things. I mean, it's too early to rush to judgement and say he didn't get the help that he needed. But that is a problem that we have guys have to wait in lines for five days. And you know, they can't use a plan to heal themselves. What we do with our veterans and how we treat them is. Not right. I mean, if it's just a little added something to take out of the wrecked. Yeah. And again, we're not at all saying that the reason we have no idea you could throw that in there. You could throw the insulting out there that involuntary celibacy. Isn't that why the yoga dude went and shot up the place? He was an cell. Oh, yeah. He did it because he's he's insane, obviously. But he he was an end sell right, which which means what you'd be been rejected by women for so long that it makes you insane. Yeah. Which that's a step above. No, not November. But a very a very extreme one at that. And I was thinking about the thing today. Because guys when they don't have that nurturing presence of a woman at least temporarily we get kinda crazy on our own. We get kind of wild on her own. And if you don't have a woman around to go, hey, baby. Looking good today. I love you. Then you could go a little nuts. If we're focusing simply on the sax aspect of it. Sometimes like, I won't know that I have somewhat of a mental problem, and then you have sex, and then you're done, and you're like, wow, I really needed that. Like, I feel better now as a person no question does those endorphins get released and the what is it oxytocin? I think the chemical that exists when you're intimate with someone that's released in your body wants that flushes out of your system, and it floods you at that euphoria, you go what in the world was I so bent out of shape about this inconsequential minutia for why got to flush the poison. Yep. Cleaned pipes. If you will seven two seven five seven nine one zero two five we'll talk to you about this. I'm not interested in arguing about guns or mental health, which we've done that enough after these. I mean, how you do these happen? So frequently now, you'd be having a gun debate every single week. No question, and whether it's the Orlando pulse shooting or the Thousand Oaks, there's no play. Where you should go. This doesn't happen here. Because guess what you're in America. This could happen any where in America, the safe confines of Thousand Oaks, which I think I saw was the fourth safest city in the United States of America a couple years ago if not last year, even though it's adjacent to Los Angeles to live who are you? I'm alexis. How are you Alexis? Drew, grab a pleasure to meet you. I'm doing great today. Thank you yourself. Hey, good. I'm good. Just listening to what you guys were all saying. And I think it was John you said something about. The fact that you know, you can't blame this group to campaign that group I really agree with you on that. But here's the question. Not going if we're just gonna kind of take a step back and waiver hands in the air and say, well, this is where we are. Now. Society. You know, just be upset about it for. I mean where does that lead? The worst case scenario become apathetic. My dear you, don't don't confuse our I it's not apathy at all. We care. We have compassion. We have sympathy. We even have empathy for our fellow man. But both of those roads lead to the exact same place. Nowhere get worked up. If you want to get angry about guns and those bad guys with guns in the gun is the problem. Look how many people that guns kill and then write a letter your congress. No, no, no. I'm just saying, for example. And then write a letter to your congressman and watch where that gets you nowhere get worked up over the VA. And write a letter your congressman against we're that gets you nowhere. So if all roads lead to nowhere. What's the point in trying to assign blame to something that might have no blame? I don't think that assigning blame is necessarily the solution. What is that? Not. I don't obviously, I don't know this, obviously, nobody else does other societies seem to have some kind of clue. No. No, they don't have a clue they just don't have the long love affair with guns and violence that we do as America. You gotta look at our history. My dear. And I'm sure you're familiar with what happened in seventeen seventy six the whole revolution and whatnot. And then after that with great land expanse in the trail of tears, we are a country born from violence that has practice violence for centuries. So the violence has escalated to the point where now we don't have militias, but we have people individuals taking their weaponry and firing upon civilians and killing them, I'm certain that that's happened throughout history. It's it's highlighted now because of the media and social media, but this that's why we are the way we are and other countries like Great Britain. They don't have the gun violence candidate gun violence et cetera. They don't. Well, I I just think that stopping any kind of discussion on anything that this crucial stopping any discussion. Dear I'm having debate with you. We're enjoying conversation. There's no stopping of discussion what what has the discussion helped with so far? Let's go back to Columbine. And it's talking about everything what what has this discussion helped out? You know, at least it's increased awareness. Smaller level. But on a smaller level, I have a daughter. Okay. And I'm working on it on my level of trying to instill in her morals understanding looking at what she's doing as a youngster growing. What is she looking at? What is she thinking about her friends? A couple of weeks ago horrible story of this girl that were you know, going to plan this horrendous pot, right? I thought about I mean, I I have a daughter who's at age. I thought about that story a lot like how does that happen? How does somebody get to that point? Okay. I think I can answer that to a certain degree not every parent is as conscientious as you might be Reid might be yourself might be or any other good parents out there whose plugged into their kids. People BUSTER acid their jobs. Some people are just selfish, some people are neglectful, etc. You can do all you want. But you're never going to be able to eliminate the people who don't do a good enough job with their kids. And then 'cause their kids to lash out in society, you know. Okay. That sounds like you're blaming the parents a little bit. I'm not blaming anybody. There are many contributing factors. I don't know. Why you're you're you're nitpicking. With these words, a very odd agenda today. But I'm I'm just trying to tell you there are many contributing factors. But trying to go guns are problem parents of the province cetera. That's not gonna get us anywhere. I just think that ending. I think. Yeah. I think you're misunders. I I don't know if I'm missing. Definitely let me let me let me to solve the problem for you. You are definitely miss articulate yourself to the point where I don't think. That's articulating is a word it might be. And if it's not a word, it definitely should be laid it out. But yes, it's been a it's been a horrible. A horrible bouillabaisse. But I've enjoyed the conversation. And if you do get your thought singular together and you'd like to call me back. I'd love to hear it. Honestly, my only thought is I just think that it seems detrimental to us as a society to just not continue even if it's just like beating your head against a wall to trying to figure out what we can do about that. You do anything. Yes. We have. That is correct. We have lost that doesn't mean we have to surrender. But we have lost the battle. The war is not over yet. But you go ahead, and you beat your head against the wall. You let me know how that works out for you. And I'm gonna go ahead and not do that. And I guarantee you an hour later. My head's gonna feel a lot better than your head sweetheart, probably, you're right. Thank you. Thank you very much. But.

America John Tamara Maori Housley Tamara Adam Fox News Mr. Seth Kushner congressman Thousand Oaks Alexis Tia Orlando oxytocin Drew Los Angeles United States Columbine Reid
"john hello" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

Giant Bombcast

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

"Welcome Jeff. Hello, welcome band. Hello. Welcome john. Hello. Welcome. Me myself. Yeah. Welcome this bar south to yourself. Hello, everyone is welcome to welcome you. Oh, I feel very welcome. Good right now. You're welcome. Thank you. Yeah. I think that's how that works. Hello, blackout. I say marginally. Oh, you're welcome. Oh, hey. Whoa. Well, hey, hey. Well, yeah. It's election day here in America. That's right. Get the two nine polling place. Yeah. If you're listening to live, you're listening to this in line. Chair. I didn't even go a little booth because they're all. Oh, yeah. I felt like a child in the classroom again because it was in like elementary schools. Yeah. I'm sitting in a little plastic uncomfortable feeling things like make your Mark star. Just like, I don't miss this. Don't miss this field like voting don't misses feeling of being in school. I have not voted the I've been doing vote by mail for very long time. Do they let you bring stuff with you for that? Obviously. When was the last primaries last time, I voted okay? And yeah, I brought a voters guide in with me to the booth. Yeah. I felt like it was cheating on an exam. Yeah. Totally question's gonna see me. And they're gonna take are able to bring in a thing vote. Okay. Yes. Next to me on that chair. Looking at the notes, I had taken, you know, I know CNN's been out there like very much like posting stories about like, hey, here's what the rules are for taking pictures of your ballot or taking pictures. Of polling place. What's legal, and what isn't and also there are sketchy. It's state by state. I guess it depends some states are just like fuck, it, whatever and some states very much like absolutely not. Yeah. My my girlfriend did vote by mail the time she's actually volunteering at a polling place, which is a fourteen hour day. You have to be there at six AM till after eight, but why wouldn't man I wouldn't everybody. Why didn't I do that people forget, or you know, like the California's a state where if you're not even registered to vote you can go you could go register right now and vote like they're registered in time for because I had moved. Do you have to submit a request for the ballot because they sent it to you. And so I had to renew my driver's license. This last year. I guess what? I mean is there's probably some early deadline. Yeah. I watched her sitting there on the couch. Just like time going through the stuff. I was like, man. Yeah. That's the way to go. That's good stuff. Yeah. People like to get out there and get in the middle of it and see it and all that she was exercising her civic duty while I was wasting my time playing video games. That's you know, that is in a way your civic duties. It's part of the job. Yeah. It's it's part of what makes Erika. That's right. That's right. Your right to you know, what you would also make play unreleased video. Yeah. That's right. You know, what else makes this country is charitable donations. Yeah. Extra life. That's right. Happens. I guess our hundred and forty four straight hours of streaming. Just concluded. Yes. Yes. Full of friend. Yes. Yes. Scanlon Alexis Dwyer came through the way Lang kicked it all off. He I the first is Halloween. I saw him putting on costumes, and I hope that that stream got archived because I want to go back and witness some of the accent work that he did lane puts on a show. Oh, yeah. Show Alex fucking Navarro twenty four hours straight apparently two hours away from breaking the world. Yeah. I heard it both ways I saw some people saying it was like twenty six twenty seven hours for the world record for rock band drums, fan, drums. I think I don't know. I think it's Rochman drums. Okay. And then I saw something else. Someone saying actually one hundred and forty four hour some some insane illegal number, but out of his mind. Well, no. So Dan Reicher has done some of this Guinness stuff before. Because of course, he has. And he said the Guinness people have very strict rules about like, hey, you need to take a certain amount of breaks and stuff like that. I believe so because I do they allotted. I think he said it's like ten minutes per hour. Okay. But I didn't. I thought I thought that they were maybe like a little firm in that..

Dan Reicher Lang Jeff CNN California Erika Scanlon Alexis Dwyer America Alex Navarro twenty six twenty seven hours twenty four hours forty four hour fourteen hour ten minutes two hours
"john hello" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

The Tom Leykis Show

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

"And me at this number nine one three thousand tom dino one three thousand tom nine one three thousand eight six six john and prudhoe bay alaska you're on the tom leykis show john hello how's it going but it's going great how about with you oh pretty good working right now i had a quick question about my 401k contributions yeah i know i know you're order of things is pay off all your debt which i've done and i got my credit score up to like seven thirty i think it was really bad it's like down by five something five hundred so i did all that and then i use a lot of my f you find do that like to pay it all off and then on the other hand i also have my 401k which has contributing about twenty percent for check into that and i was just wondering if i should drop the contributions the 401k down to like either the matching or like six percent or whatever in order to save more in my issue well here's the deal you are a young guy as i recall right you've called before how old are you yes sir i'm thirty five how much is in your view not that much right now it's like twenty five hundred twenty five hundred the 401k are you getting a company match or they matching any party you contribution no they they contribute like an unspecified amount like every quarter so it'd be like a hundred and thirty bucks or a hundred twenty dollars there's not really like a matching thing for it inside how much going to put in and it's not that much yeah basically right all right sixteen thousand dollars in there right now right but i was thinking of yeah i was just wondering what you thought well here's the deal the tax benefits you get from a 401k you know once you don't utilize them in other words if you don't contribute in a given year you're young you don't contribute the maximum they're never coming back so in other words your opportunity to contribute and get a tax advantage for two thousand eighteen that goes away if you don't use it my recommendation though is that ryan down hard contribute your 401k and continue contributing to your fuck you fuck you gotta really got to do both they're just leave it at twenty percent and then the same as much as they can and my saving well that fall fund is very important i if i recall previous conversations you and i have had you haven't been in your job that many years and by design it doesn't seem like you have stayed in any job for a long period of tony so at any given time might leave that job and lose the opportunity to contribute to the 401k but at the same time if you lose your job how are you going to survive on twenty five hundred dollars so we need to do both things okay i was i calculated out for a whole year expenses including food and does and everything is about twenty four thousand right around there right like minimum that's what you need to get to that as you go about fifty five thousand before taxes are at before taxes and then after it's thirty maybe thirty thousand take home thirty thirty five thousand and you have twenty four thousand expenses that leaves you eleven thousand dollars to play with yeah i guess and how much are you putting in dollars how much you putting into your 401k every month but breaks down every check it varies maybe about around seventy eight hundred dollars a month so you're talking about ten thousand a year.

alaska tom prudhoe bay 401k twenty percent seventy eight hundred dollars twenty five hundred dollars sixteen thousand dollars eleven thousand dollars hundred twenty dollars six percent
"john hello" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Not kfi am six forty billion old this is handle on the wall john hello john welcome to handle on the law thank you all right john john john john lewis tried again you're going in and out on your cell phone let's see if it's any better now all right i have an alarm system i asked him to cancel the contract i lost my house i made the payments adjustments but they said because i was a week late that it's been reinstated and i all this money when i paid out what they did i o one is that legal it's legal yeah no it's legal but a week i don't know let them it's going to be tough for them to they're going to sue you're they're going to ding your credit technically the have you john if the contract renews on april fifteenth and you inform them on april twentieth that you're canceling you know what what can i tell you i mean it's late payments kick in try to be one day late on your.

john john john john lewis one day
"john hello" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Yeah man this is fun hey david in the car and john and taunton john hello bradley morning quick question about your leather leathery things that you make you sell anything no not yet i'm getting an inventory and some day when i'm old and retired i will set up a little store i've gone on the west looks up your name and google anything weather and i couldn't find anything i'm in the market for a new wallet you know i i i would i would be honored to have your custom make one no i'm not i'm not selling them now but i tell you what tell leva andrew your address okay in case someday i do okay all right well i'm going to put you on hold and you can give him the address and i'll keep it on file okay john and taunton beautiful anju thank you six hundred seventy five four ten thirty it's wbz yeah it's interesting i have an inventory of finished wall it's now they're not all of equal quality because i got better at at assignment along but doing it for one year now and there are a bunch some are better than others because of that just got better at it stitching even they're all done with by hand not by machine by hand thread and two needles saddle stitching by hand initially i started out with it pebbled leather that was good but my design wasn't so great then then i went to a vegetarian like neutral vegeta in which i put on put olive oil i put it in the sun and that tans but the haven't figured out how to get a proper edge coloring little grubby looking because of the light color and they as i was making them get a little dirt on it before i got that the all of the olive oil la but that's kind of cool is that it's handtohand by me then there was a kind of a fancy louis vitton looking kind of leather that didn't so that well i mean it's okay but it's not tremendous then i got kind of leather called double shoulder designer double shoulder about three ounce to three hours and that.

david google three hours three ounce one year
"john hello" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's nine to eleven here on kqed public radio and acuity the time now is five nineteen from npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly president trump heads to texas today to address the national rifle association's annual convention npr's miguel perez reports from dallas people descending upon dallas's convention center will hear from a lot of high profile speakers this weekend including texas governor greg abbott and senators ted cruz john cornyn but it's trump's speech everyone is waiting for while support for the organization is firm there are attendees who want to see the president pushed for some gun reform such as background checks at gun shows this year's nra convention comes less than three months after the shooting deaths of seventeen people at a high school in florida a former student is facing murder charges the attacks sparks student led protests nationwide calling for stricter gun control public school teachers in arizona are going back to work their strike ended after state lawmakers passed an education bill raising teacher's salaries and putting more money into schools teachers will receive a nine percent pay hike in the fall and another five percent boost in each of the next two years katie sable as a teacher who turned out in phoenix this week she believes the walkout send a broader message to the legislature and governor doug ducey being here shows them that in november we have a saying and and we're watching what you do some school districts are resuming classes this morning others will wait until next week i'm dave mattingly in washington welcome to friday morning i'm dave freeman here in san francisco on key qb d and part of our morning edition kiki dee to a team is joe mcconnell he has traffic for friday hello john hello there dave mostly okay traffic there is one crash though an eighty just reported eighty westbound at happy and way panel looks like the who were involved in a crash over to the side but there's still debris in the left lane and behind that on eighty westbound american canyon road there might be a broken down car off to the left side but it's blacked out in it's officially a visual hazard least you come across it very quickly and how we for a discovery bay has been a crash for about an hour that is a big one with lanes blocked joe mcconnell for and we'll stay on top of that for you and keep you posted of all the latest traffic with joe brought to you this time out by alto pharmacy and later in the hour we're going to be bringing you.

san francisco alto pharmacy doug ducey katie sable murder nra john cornyn ted cruz miguel perez dave mattingly npr kqed joe mcconnell kiki dee washington dave freeman phoenix arizona florida
"john hello" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on WSB-AM

"On congress returning would no deal in sight on daca i'm wsb sabrina cupit we all know clark howard watches hispanics but i'll tell you the one thing he says he and a quarter million dollars on in a heartbeat and in fact he's done it three times we'll have posture wires and the hard freeze yet to combat kirk mellish's fiveday forecast first thing monday morning on news 955 at am 750 wsb with abc's handle on the law john hello john welcome to handle on the law yes oh yeah oh good quick question uh a long time listener and i listen to terrify through i heart radio from east coast west coast exile have a question i need to know how i can get a partition started to raise the speed limit for trucks here in the state of california all right uh you started petition petition by starting a petition so you can go on the web it basically what you have as a marketing issue john uh you wanna get maybe the truckers association to get involved in raising the speed limit maybe you want to get the otto club involved uh maybe it say it really doesn't matter what you're better off to a petition does nothing john will you wanted to hold i was told get but there is and that's the only way to change it because they have the federal fm he fa come in at because they just put us on his e l d computers and at mandatory now in a state of california you cannot move anywhere you cannot make any money you can't do it doesn't matter you talk about you talking about weight federal law that says that uh that now changes the rules yes there and roma put a petitions gonna do nothing we only you're gonna get to undo that is congress congress congress criminal warrant ilmor or it is if not congress advance on on who issued.

"john hello" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"john hello" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Mm mm with abc's handle on the law john hello john welcome to handle on the law yes oh yeah all good quick question uh uh longtime listener and i listen to terrify through i heart radio from east coast west coast excellent have a question i need to know how i can get a petition started to raise the speed limit for trucks here in the state of california all right you started petition petition by starting a petition so you can go on the web it basically what you have a a marketing issue jain you wanna get maybe the truckers association to get involved in raising the speed limit maybe you want to get the auto club involved uh maybe it say it really doesn't matter what you're better off to a petition does nothing john will you want to hold i was told it get a petition that's the only way to change it because they have the federal fm the fa come in at because they just put us on these eld computer and at mandatory now in a state of california you cannot move anywhere you cannot make any money you can't do it doesn't matter you're talking about you talking about wait federal law that says that uh that now changes the rules yes heavily they're enrollment petitions gonna do nothing the only thing you're gonna get to undo that is congress congress congress and always warranted or or it is if not congress expands on on who issued the mandate if it's the department of transportation than at some one high up enough in the department of transportation to change the directive am i guess i silver mandate the mandate it's not an issue the issue is the.