19 Burst results for "John Harris"

"john harris" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

05:40 min | 3 months ago

"john harris" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"This happened. Reading from John Harris is peace at politico dot com, and I think that's the spot on at first blush. The comparison may seem overwrought, obviously, nothing that has happened in the past 10 weeks, including the grotesque and deadly mob take over the Capitol during the official certification of Biden's victory. Is of the same horrific history altering magnitude 9 11, But the similarity flows from the way that both events demand public understanding. John. Welcome back to Double DS, Sir. How are you? Hey, It's good to be back. Well, thank you for joining us. Let's start there. Give us your thoughts on how the events of last Wednesday is similar to 9 11. And while why why A lot of people are calling for some sort of blue ribbon panel or congressional investigation into the genesis of this grotesque event. Well, I think because there's a lot of questions. There's a lot of basic facts that haven't been established, and I don't think they will be established for history. Unless there's some kind of official body that's got subpoena power that can establish your record. Uh, I'm more interested in establishing clearly the what happened even more than I am in it in terms of punitive measures for the people responsible. I think both our parts are part of this, But I think we have to know what happened comprehensively, not just in the insurrection at the Capitol, but all the events. Leading up to it, including President Trump's role in those Africa. You know, Joe Biden probably wants no part of this. He would just like to turn the page. Trump can go down to Florida and sit and he would just start Working on his agenda and quote unquote trying to unite the country. If Biden doesn't want to do this, it won't get done, Will it? Well, first off, I agree with you that at least in part, that's what Biden would wish and to some degree, maybe we would have all wish you would just avert our gaze from what happened. Get life back to normal, But I think What it happened in this transition since the election on up to now he is a profound historical that we've never yet had a transitional like this one. In which, uh, a new attack. You have to call it that on the outcome of the election has been waged by by a sitting president. And I think if we don't establish clearly incredible, transparent way, uh, if we don't get answers to all those questions, what's going to happen instead is this event's going to live in mythology and different people will shape the mythology to suit their own purposes. Sometimes those mythologies air very dangerous, and they end up. Uh, inspiring more dissent. It even more violence. Yeah, but even the people if there is a commission of blue Ribbon Commission, congressional Castigation. People are going to believe what they find to be true. You know, already the rumors are swirling This. This show does not trade in rumors. Unlike a couple other ones here on this station, But, uh you know, why did the Capitol Hill police while they had they were so overwhelmed? They just weren't prepared. Why? Why did Esper leave on November? 9th? Why wasn't the Pentagon ready? Why did the D C police and one inspector in general have to come in? They're not. Inspector General Book one Investigator or inspector from the D. C. Police actually really saved the day. Why did Attorney General William Barr get out of Dad's just before this mean? The rumors are already swirling. I'd like to have all that sorted out. I don't think half of the American people will believe the results. Well, Both things are true One. Those are legitimate questions, many of them that deserve answers. And, yes, you're right. There's a lot of people who are going to be impervious to anything that doesn't comport with their own worldview in their own their own biases their own agenda. But I think that doesn't mean we try. We don't try. We have to try to establish is clearly as we can credible record of what happened with all those questions that you mentioned. Well, I hope I live long enough for them to sort it out. To be honest with you, John Harris. Yeah, I think, uh, By the way, it's not gonna be something. It's gonna be down in just a few days. Um, And frankly, that's my concern with impeachment. It's a way of expressing, uh, outrage toward President Trump. But it doesn't actually go very far in answering these questions that I think really demand answers. What specifically was his role. In not just the, uh, the event of the capital, the insurrection on January 6, But all these other questions leading up to that, uh, these mysterious departures and forced resignations at the Department of Sense at the Department of Justice with the U. S attorney down in Georgia, Um in one light, they certainly look like a calculated after that. By the outgoing administration, Tonto create support for an organized effort to deny the results of the election. John Harris. I see it that way as well. Thank you, Sir. John Harris is the founding editor of politico dot com. We appreciate your time. Have a great week, sir. Good. Let's talk soon. Yeah. Heather Cerone, Chicago Politics reporter for Channel 11 on Mike Madigan suspending, but he's not done. Noah s suspending his campaign for speaker while he counts the votes at least one more time. Heaven's throne will join us next. And 4 35 double the LS breaking news.

John Harris Joe Biden President Trump official attorney blue Ribbon Commission Africa president Mike Madigan Heather Cerone Esper Noah Pentagon Chicago Investigator D. C. Police Castigation Florida William Barr
"john harris" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:20 min | 3 months ago

"john harris" Discussed on Pantheon

"It's interesting reading the loss of three pieces which is a select pace from one thousand. Nine thousand nine bus makoni. It's essentially conversation with bola. Paul was death of policy about. It's about the con- how how crumbled and as particularly interesting hearing graham cox and talk about his disenchantment with you know what blower bow around the time of country house which speak away sister number one is we will not. And he's talking about how he was going out with jo from huggy bear and he found he really he was really turned off by the lavish of own. As was i. I have to say and then of course. He's listening to pavement. I mean he says one point you know. He's this pavement. When they're making the greatest skype and his band mates rule snaring asset. But that turned into song and yeah then i'm by them. Brit pop really wolves was gone. Wasn't it will who loses leave. It didn't off limb paul. I mean. I realize bali. You will know this right if you're working in music publishing and not not i don't mean publishing songs. I mean music magazines right as against music journalism because the two things at different right being a writer is quite different from being involved on the editorial side because once you're on the editorial side it becomes all about what was last month sales figure out your budget. Look-in what's your pagination and all of this stuff you know and it was obvious. So they're not one of the key. Select magazine. I've been conceived as the brit pop magazine not been invented widely by the same publisher sounds within the tiny stew at something. Yeah is nineteen ninety. When the late and much miss david cavern was involved with it and it was a bit more like q really and then what happened was founded voice. Really when what we now know was break came around the corner but by mixture of accident and design. Because that's what music magazines do. They often attach themselves to these things. Genres upsurges wherever you go so select at really attached itself to this thing and of course you know if it shows any signs of decline. You don't wanna see that it's like you must carry home. This is the key to my daily work in life and the scream of of an existence time having in london at a time. Let's not forget when you could live in london. A young music right. You know you could live the life of riling so no one really wanted it to finish. I'm so as either artists so fell off the ship. So in other words their records go in the charts were so fetch is an important at this point. If you'll record went in twenty nine new were gonna you know if you if you have a new entry in the top fifteen. I could get cover unless you were in the top ten. The whole thing was mad. You know you'd walk into. I remember walking in music magazine offices of you at this. This is a good record that someone would say. Oh it's midweek's only twenty two and you'd say i didn't say anything about its mid week. Said it was a battle go right so the point was started to fall off and then people started making bad records so that third oasis album. I can remember this is gone. I was right now. Will gal. I remember going to music. Bank rehearsal studios berman z. To view them for cover. Noel gallagher toby. The record wasn't very good. Which i i wasn't allowed to hear it. But he told me it's not very good and he went through it and he said this song is cut really and this one's like a crap version of wonder will i was going. No no it's going to be brilliant. It's crate your great great. Don't always not very good shut up eight. Just made it. He was he was going to know. It was crap right so everybody was reluctant to say this finished. And then the end of it was really revealed. The fact that you'll magazine sales start to slide and you in a position to put in groups it you need where much cop on the cover and god bless him but i did think the stereophonic with the band of the year and i went free. You'll books published in two thousand three which is close to year. The iraq war broke out. Yeah which i think for many of us left the policy then Seventy four when. I left labor party. Subsequently rejoined save written a book and blazes part of it and then effectively what blasted full for so many of us as a progressive political leadership was the smushed by this costly event. How how did you see that. What i wrote a book about on the back of The book after the spa is a is a out who to vote for of which was a book for disillusioned labour goes right and i was definitely a disillusioned labour about them but it set in pretty quickly. I mean directors back but the standards of the ten years of all star. We got from twenty ten woods and let alone. the experience of being run by the clowns. Got now the new labor period. If it's possible to take iraq out of it which i'm not sure is but domestically my son was born in newly bill hospital and the secondary school where i went in. Cheshire was completely rebuilt to the point of on recognizable in all of this stuff. Yes no i think it's easy to be disillusioned with their and some of that. Dissolution was inevitable but iraq. Iraq was ele- thing but the whole process. The political process leading up to right went back quite a long way. So if you wanna know. When i started to feel oh god what. Solis was in nineteen ninety. Eight when they think they were trying to enforce no-fly zones in iraq and there was a bomb bobbin of iraq and there was a candlelit vigil on whitehall and i went and i remember standing with the candle surrounded by people. Who didn't like tony pann. I was thinking that was quick to share a year ago. I was putting him in the magazine. Oil protesting against the joe. It more took you into political journalism and in the first place. When did you make the leap. It always been there really. I cut my teeth as a reader. Music journalism terrifically passionate most writers. You know i mean. I'm a creature of the weekly music press was. I bought the enemy in the eighties. And as you will know about. Because i was probably reading things you'd written politics was straight through it. I mean some weeks you buy it was it. Felt like to try to find the music in it when it was neil kinnock on the front of the german. The famous was piece about vivisection.

graham cox Select magazine brit pop magazine david cavern makoni bola Noel gallagher toby jo london skype iraq bali Paul paul labor party tony pann Cheshire Solis Iraq neil kinnock
"john harris" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

08:07 min | 3 months ago

"john harris" Discussed on Pantheon

"Brill high bonnie and just murison by hello bonnie and being from somerset meanwhile is special guest. Joan harris. welcome. John thank you for having me already one outlet. He doesn't reach the guardian. John has become one of the papers. Most respected voices his anywhere but westminster videos. Which i think at ten years old. This year are essential. Viewing john has a monkey paused. Some of you may be unaware of yes. He was once a music journalist and he also defense ministry of In the nineteen so we talked to him about that time quite possibly abouts brit relationship with brexit clips from a nineteen eighty with mccaw. They will be saying goodbye to charlie pride but as joe had each musical obsession. Start for you really it started. I can remember. It started when i was five years old when the baby and it was one of my mom's friends i must've been at work. I think she just come back to work. She puts pepper on and gave me a copy of it. And i can remember hearing within you without you. One of my first memories. I must have been four or five and as you can imagine thinking. Wow this this is quite something isn't it. You know and in my head. I thought whether this is me projecting it onto the memory after the fact that it was like mr sunny day everything was like sunshine these indian instruments. And that's glide in vocal. And she also gave me the cutouts to play with so i remember either her omi out the kabul moustache and the stripe That that was it really shouldn't spot. Tv lasted story psychoanalytic memory in its own way generating my own hallucinogen. This is the saint louis. The beatles expert in philip norman's book shout it as the memory of him in sixty seven. I mean i was born is mark. Lewis and jumping up and down with the kabul moustache clips under his nose. Which is pretty much what happened to me. Then within about a year or two years when the royal family was quite late getting a record plan but i would go down the public library we can get battles records out initially twenty five two weeks when these little cards inside them with drawings of the recold if they got scraps the librarian withdraw where the scratch wa wa firoz car insurance for an once once the whole thing started at like a bike. Quayle laid salom. You could buy. You could buy heavily scratched records by all sorts of people. The whole slips find the graph generally november these banned in the in this box williams a library. You could buy records. also i was. I was off then. And it was the beatles. I still is really. That's been with me all the time. But that's when it started. I used to have on the music right. Wise i was. I was quite with kit eight or nine years old. This beatles funds kobe. Oh monthly the ice to ride myself makeup interviews where the not in seventies beatles and pictures of them out from the music papers prince to come down and all so it was pretty. It was pretty obvious. In retrospect all that was go actually of kind of order on my parents of executive with all. I don't know about mental streak. It's also i have no. There is no extant copies of great. Hack it really. Was you went to oxford. Actually more than fee journalists They will get outed in the end may included. But i know that you. For example wait did radiohead anthology a couple of years ago. There was i think. One maybe two pigs radiohead Sublease the first music writing. You did one with that joe well. In order goat walks university. Because i'd i'd want get and image. Didn't work and then i level results were as good as they were predicted to be. I was it was suggested that i gamble. What was then called year out. It wasn't called got you. I'm applying again. So very strange era is eighteen. When i really do much but one of the things i did do during that time was all when so-called baggy manchester and all that was happening which is very exciting. Time will come up and talk about british pop in a minute. I think that point around the house what did for guitar music and so was much more exciting interested in the brick Probably was. I went to say happy mondays. Plant the famous hacienda. Where i used to go in manchester and i wrote a archetypal unsolicited review would send. It sounds magazine. Oh sounds of course with younger listeners. If there are any that was one of the g. I was one of the anyone. Listen doesn't know that there were four music weeklies in existence. At that point we were sound was one of them shown phillips who's now a commissioning editor at times you. That missed the reviews at every foam. Up when i arrived. Oxford there was bat. Review must have sat tight on a typewriter. That must've sat in a pile. Three or four months seventy found guilty. Said this is good you know. Do you want to write about stuff for us. So i ended up doing a live view then. Quite quickly moved up features by was based in oxford at that point which by an absolute stroke of luck was when this thing which they subsequently made it felt about. Anyone can play guitar a feature length documentary about the oxford music scene of the early nineties just by happenstance around and so radio had to that point called on. Friday is to my shame. Really the ed. O'brien that guitar player sent me a letter on on a friday note. Paper asked me to come and see him. And i pretty much ignored it. And i didn't actually go and see him until inside bhai. am i but they were still. They were still call at because the night so awful just so on a friday. That's going to be crap. And they were still called on a friday the late and much phillip paul. Who was doing that. Press for reopening said. Look i think he probably said look. I know the names crop. That good and i went to see the road place. Which is dan called the co op. Paul and it was the social club fed cup. I went to see on a friday. Play and i reviewed that for the melody maker suggested they change their name and they did grilling there is a parallel universe. Of course in which radiohead still cooled on the fraud and probably still playing pubs on the right gene-o right because people forget that being called radio was not the key to instant success there. I run a single salt focal. So you know what i mean. I think i think in the end the the brilliance would have been all right. Most successful groups are terrible name. John wrote for light probably older. We're yeah dance on ended up on me. Yeah i want to say that the main feature rights there and then you became editors select in. Yeah nineteen ninety five Done six six six nine hundred six. Yeah severance told you. I'm interested in the relationship between select and yet from raisins two years before you become threes. Grandma did that. Famous kaba week brought on swayed on the union. Jack memories of kind of how we go to. There's a great piece of the three pieces of featuring on behind pies's the pace one of the elites to fight accident-free inventing britpop house. When you look back how did Up how's it doing well. So the first thing that happened when he was what i made reference to a moment ago which was acid house a wall that did folk guitar music. Which isn't really the main story. The main store is electric dance music. What happened there but that was that was really the end of the eighteenth so everything is represented.

murison hello bonnie Joan harris charlie pride mr sunny philip norman kabul salom mccaw John Brill goat walks university oxford joe bonnie somerset saint louis Quayle beatles Lewis
Trump's Loyal Wing Man Pence Gives RNC Speech On Wednesday

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:06 min | 8 months ago

Trump's Loyal Wing Man Pence Gives RNC Speech On Wednesday

"The Republican National Convention enters Day three and tonight The list of speakers will include more Trump family, White House staff and vice President Mike Pence, who will be the headliner? The veep won't be speaking from the White House. Instead, he'll be at Baltimore's historic Fort McHenry. Let's dive a little deeper on who's up there talking points and how the convention is faring with Politico co founder John Harris High you, John Good afternoon. So let's start with Mike Pence. Any idea why he chose Fort McHenry for his speech and what theme he will be addressing Well, it certainly is. Ah, majestic setting. If you've ever been up there in Baltimore, the theme he's going to be stretching is like the others. Donald Trump's Competence in leadership. It's really the the rebuttal to the indictment the Democrats made so persistently against him a week ago. Ah Ah, and then also when a vice president speaks to a convention like this, obviously, in most instances, they're also looking to the future. Might he be the one accepting the Republican nomination four years ago? And so certainly that is on his mind. Outgoing adviser Kellyanne Conway speaks tonight, John She has been a steadfast ally and important voice for the president, any idea what she'll be touching on as she winds down her tenure? Yeah, I think that she is going to be part of the reassurance campaign. This convention. Hillary so far has been one mobilisation. Getting the Republican base worked up. Primarily, they're doing that with indictments. Ah, warning that Joe Biden would be a terrible leader and then also it's about reassurance. People who think that President Trump is too this or too volatile. Ah, they're looking for voices to say. He's actually steady year or more empathetic presence. Then he's portrayed in the media. And I am guessing Kellyanne Conway will do a little of both those but more on the reassurance. So we saw the other day the Nielsen ratings for the first night. We're down for the Republicans. The Democrats had more people that particular night. Is there any way to know what this point whether the convention is striking a tone and message that's resonating positively with Americans? It's really hard in this environment, Hillary. The thing we always look to from a convention is what the bounce usually you can see, Uh, parties and their nominees go up in the polls immediately following Conventions. I think this year is a little different for a couple of reasons. One. The country's already so divided how many people are really being moved by these events, and then also, as we've seen, the ratings are down. This isn't a real convention essentially to three hours a night of political programming, and I think it's unlikely that's going to have a big echo as measured in public opinion polls. All right, John, as always good talking to you. Thanks so much. 00 That's politico co founder John Harris. Let's

President Trump Mike Pence Vice President Kellyanne Conway Fort Mchenry John Harris Baltimore Hillary White House Co Founder John Good John Joe Biden Nielsen
"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I don't think so I I <hes> without giving details. <hes> we did just fine the group of people that <hes> <hes> that started politico <hes> it's also true that there is a an owner who ultimately bears responsibility makes decisions and I do think for reasons. I understood that they wanted something where they were the owners <hes> and that so that's a different experience I I don't begrudge them. <hes> for making that decision and I don't think it was <hes> <hes> I think that narrative that was <hes> about com <hes> in a narrow sense <hes> to near with it. Just wasn't the case we all we all those wielded fine <hes> <hes> and it was never a principal motivation for doing it. I doubt that that's the principal motivation for those guys now. So that part was I I don't buy for my point is we had pretty serious responsibility of five hundred people who were reading in The Washington Post Politico implodes food and <hes> I I felt it was an imperative I I'd say I felt it was immoral to make sure that that was not true that that headline was wrong and I think Robert Alberton Caribou Brown number of other people feel rather proud that that <hes> that headline was wrong here. We are two-thirds bigger <hes> in that's a lot of growth and just <hes> three three years in a couple of months. He's proud to and you should be congratulations and thanks for making time to come talk. Thanks to you guys for listening thanks to Cola and Jalani Joel who make all this happen. Thanks for sponsors who let us bring this show to you for free. We'll be back with another episode soon. See Them. Hey It's Peter if you like this conversation. I have something else you're going to like. It's not free but you're GONNA like it. It's called the CODA commerce. It's a two day event that takes place in New York on September ninth tenth hosted by my good pal and Co worker Jason Del Rey he will be talking to people like Walmart C of e commerce. That's Mark Laurie Marnie Levin who leads partnerships for Facebook instagram. That's a very big deal and the CO founder and co CEO of Harry's Jeff Raider in addition to that you'll have the chance to visit the most innovative retailers and delivery hubs in the city. I've gone on some of these show and tells the great co- commerce is a must attend event for tech and retail executives anyone who wants.

principal Mark Laurie Marnie Levin Jason Del Rey Facebook Robert Alberton CO founder The Washington Post New York Cola Peter Jalani Joel Jeff Raider Harry CEO three three years two day
"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I don't think it's GonNa last three years with him gone with him and Mike in that grip on that's right yeah and the remaining congrats well <hes> we've worked very hard and we've continued to build a business. What what do you have to do in this? You know two thirds larger than the one we had that what do you have to do internally the co-founder you have sort of moral than actual business responsibility to fix fix. This thing that has lost co-founder star reporters of media attention is focused on what you have to do internally like right what you're doing to get. Everyone redirected acted say we're GONNA go ahead well. When we started back in two thousand sixteen thousand seven period it was just doc in a very small group of people and <hes> you know that was the real fragile period where you can say well? The thing might just might might not work <hes> at the time these events which I guess is the first part of first half of two thousand sixteen that wasn't true we had <hes> a company of five hundred plus people in in the United States and in Europe a lot of people who really had no no connection to the original launch other than that they liked what we built in and they wanted to be proud of it and wanted to work there and we had dozens of of the people in leadership roles in that and I felt my role at that time was making sure that those dozens of people and then probably most of all the the probably a half dozen. Maybe a dozen people who are the most important part of that <hes> that they believed in the idea of what we were doing and that they I thought that their responsibilities here were was good work that <hes> you can have a lot of fun doing <hes>. That's why we do journalism we have fund have impact and and the says that you walking around being visible that you popping in that was what making sure that <hes> people oh felt connection to what was important <hes> again not trying to be a scout about this <hes> but I I think most people in all of us at the original founding back twelve years ago did so for idealistic reasons and <hes> we had bumps along the way but the those idealistic reasons for doing our work we're we're still out and they still are today. <hes> and they're still what inspire people. I don't even know on our our teams <hes> in some cases <hes> so yeah it was it was was that <hes> trying to folks people on on what's most important why we do these jobs and then I would say there was some very specific things you know my couns terrific <hes> talent on I've known since I I knew we were in our twenties so to replace Mike doing the playbook Jake Sherman Anna Palmer <hes> they've joined by Daniel Lipman of those guys to keep that franchise going and actually grow it. That's a terrific achievement on their part. We carry boot up around and I had to decide who's going to be <hes> at the time Susan Glasser now. The New Yorker was also part of the mix who should take over the playbook franchise so that's a very it took our morning. Playbook goes out two hundred seventy five thousand or something like that <hes> people we had to replace the authors author so that because my <hes> one of the Susan Glasser had made clear that she was leaving at the end of the two thousand sixteen campaign so that was the decision of who should who should take that wasn't my student loan of course that's the owner's but I had to make a recommendation to robber who should take that job. One of our original reporters carry Harry booed off Brown took that job as editor of our U._S. operations <hes> and so those were big decisions to make the reporting around the split of the time sort of lower down in the story was well. This is about competencies about wanting to own a piece of the company that you guys are owned by Auburn's <hes> and that Jim and Mike can those guys wanted to sort of own a thing or own a piece of a thing and went out and did venture in retrospect. Would there have been a way to sort of keep them there where you incent them. Financially show here is that they were gonNA build their own thing..

Susan Glasser Mike co-founder Playbook United States Europe Daniel Lipman Auburn Jim Harry Anna Palmer editor Jake Sherman Brown twelve years three years
"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Other. There's no demonstrated connection. Just a pool of I guess a celebrate example from way back <hes> impossible for me to answer in the abstract. <hes> I guess what I'm saying. I don't really regard it as a sort of a sacred matter of the way uh printing something knowingly falls making up detail <hes> like that. That's really okay grid violation. I just think it's a little bit of <hes> it just this seems a little pompous to me <hes> John. Let's let's all pat ourselves on the back because we had the nerve to we call it like it is as has though is so condescending to the audience who <hes> is <hes> full of discerning intelligent who <hes> can make these judgments for themselves and you WANNA looking to to <hes> John Harris or or my successors carry a brown or Matt Kaminsky or Dean Back Kedo <hes> off thank goodness he reached an oracular judgment on highs to what it is worth Cresswell's up too much. I think that is part of the the <hes> thrust though is is from the audience again. It's on twitter which is not the real world a letter saying you must call this ally. We are your audience. If you're not gonNA speak the truth if you're not gonNA describe this accurately were screwed. If you guys have to dance around what is it obvious untruth and you have to bend over backwards to not say that then what what are we going to get done. I guess I don't think you should bend over backwards. I just think he should've kept the task with a certain amount of <hes> of modesty and respect for the audience certainly none of the people that say that <hes> usually say I myself was duped. I thought this <hes> was true. Because <hes> <hes> The New York Times was so delicate and so <hes> <hes> constipated by. It's a century-old the conventions is that <hes> <hes> you know I was tricked until I clicked around and educated myself. No nobody says then they say that about <hes> I see the truth Peter but you don't and that's that's because the Times didn't have the guts to call it up one more trump naval gazing here inside media thing you were at this really fun Colin pointing out that and and I think people in Media In D._C. Certainly know this but I think people outside are surprised that Donald trump while he spends a lot of time demonizing the press and literally describing them as the enemy of the people apple. It's very upsetting Sulzberger Hunedoara conference. I'm very upset about it. He loves media and not just Hannity and and and <hes> Tucker Carlson he's constantly reaching out to the beat reporters who write about him constantly. He's obsessed. A Win wants. The disease of coverage with personalities of WHO's <hes> he's gone in. The green room is going to the bar of WHO's yeah we came across some instances of that like well. Donald Trump was trying to track me down right. Put a request in they said sure we'll get back to you this afternoon. You know he calls back. <hes> somebody's cell phone <hes> I. I don't didn't mean to imply. Don't apply now that that's a commonplace that he's just doing that. <hes> jude example all the time. There's definitely reporters that he's interested in and that he follows and that he reaches out to to me. I couldn't really find a an example. I have to go all the way back to <hes> <hes> J._F._K. Totally Different Arum of of journalism were Kennedy Woods and a lot of time on the phone with reporters or socializing with Them Gossiping Subpoena with them gasping out them <hes> so I to me the paradoxes. <hes> trump for all is a state of hostility to the the news media and I think that's philosophical L._e._d. Does he doesn't have the mindset of an authoritarian. He feels like he shouldn't be challenged. <hes> the uh-huh the he's also probably more engaged with more aware of in bluntly pretty accessible to the press in in West..

Donald trump The New York Times Hannity Cresswell Kennedy Woods twitter John Harris Matt Kaminsky Dean Back Kedo Tucker Carlson West Sulzberger Peter Colin apple
"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Building it onto an existing one learn from your experience the one constant that I've believed when we started putting still believe it now lots of things have happened that I didn't forecast and <hes> <hes> <hes> lots of the ball bounces and funny ways and and <hes> the thing a lot of things are very different but one thing is the same which is I think you have to be producing content that can somehow capture premium that somehow doesn't <hes> get commodity sized? There's two ways to capture your premium. One is to build an audience. That's engaged enough an attractive enough that you can <hes> not charge a couple of cents <hes> <hes> <hes> Percy P._M. But you can charge you know many tens of hundreds of dollars <hes> for every thousand readers <hes> that capturing premium the other way to do it what is to produce content that somebody valuable enough to pay for it and I would say the the subscription will happen is people aren't going to WHO <hes> just a couple of bucks pay for Gosh. Those guys sure need a helping hand and <hes> you know I read it. So why don't I chip in <hes> sort of maybe the P._B._S. Pledge Week model and then maybe that works for them but I don't think it's very promising for most people <hes> in most publications Lisa price value of some kind and get people hooked. I mean that's what the New York Times has done. <hes> <hes> certainly I'll pay for it and I it would be hard from you to envision my life as a consumer of the news somebody cares about lots of different subjects without pain the <hes> the the dough make a thing people wanna buy a good lesson and works for The Times and the Journal and the Washington Post and you guys in a different version <hes>. It seems like it's not GonNa work or certainly hasn't been proven to work in mid market small markets and we've talked to punch on this podcast about within means and it's bad I do think there's there's a script a subscription model that works in a small town and even a medium sized town for news you sure hope so because the alternatives so unattractive and deemed cases. They're all going to go to business five years that the majority of them well. I think he's got to be wrong or maybe they go out of business in in their current incarnation but <hes> something comes up that replicates the function because I do think there's demand for it and incidentally <hes> The Times lines is pretty good illustration right than five years ago certainly ten years ago he's is just it's <hes> inconceivable to imagine the times and the sort our business model is to challenge it's going to be it's going to be crippled and if they'd stayed on that trajectory that would have been true circumstances and they <hes> <hes> they change their trajectory. We've been waiting for that to happen. <hes> in <hes> in the mid markets and I think the evidence is pretty mixed. You know you and I were talking before we went on from the twin cities in Minnesota. I like I watched closely just because I've been reading it for so long I happen to know the editor <hes> Rene Sanchez at the Star Tribune in Minneapolis and they seem to maybe not prosper like they did in the old days as book put out a a good publication <hes> not with a single sort of a high. Here's the formula but with a bunch of different <hes> good meat and potato stuff. It's also so owned by a local billionaire subsidizing it indefinitely I don't know he probably is indifferent to Coralie fluctuations and the way that markets would tell you runs as basketball basketball team to <hes>. I've got to be an answer but I I think you'd have to say the evidence so far is that the the nobody's had a really persuasive or seemingly enduring example and and you guys have tried taking this model to other markets in some cases. It looks like it's worked. <hes> Brussels ready mentioned. You've got to international version we do you know business and editorial over there. We must have one hundred thirty eight hundred forty you try doing this. New York.

New York Times basketball Minnesota Lisa Brussels New York Star Tribune Minneapolis Rene Sanchez editor Washington Post Journal five years ten years
"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Tech EXEC investors sisters <hes> but when you guys started this in two thousand seven I mean there had been trade publications and newsletters for a while but you would you do Jovana higher both very successful at the post left to create this new thing. What was the impetus in? Why couldn't you do it at the Post? Well we saw the world <hes> certainly I grew up in. I sometimes refer to it as the old order <hes> in what you had a handful of really powerful news organizations that had disproportionate power to set the agenda on the on on the topics that I care most about are the ones I've organized my career around and your politics in Washington and you saw that old order Crumley <hes> and even more <hes> <hes> the business model that supported that old order was crumbling but not just the business model <hes> the editorial model which says look something's on the front page the Washington Post and the New York Times there for almost by definition. It's the most important story in politics that day <hes> that was becoming defunct all kinds of places where <hes> might make a claimed to be the most important story in politics that day or the news cycle sped up that our and so that old order. I found pretty comfortable. I would've been happy to stay in it but it was crumbling. The question was what was the risk that the post couldn't keep up with the pace or the post you could even see in two thousand six. The financially was going to be in real trouble there. There was a clear sense of palpable. I'd say of relative decline and anxiety now. It's not like the anxiety didn't didn't have <hes> I I was rooted in wasn't irrational. It was rooted in circumstances but it wasn't like there wasn't a pathway forward to them. <hes> I had some concern certain about the post in that it was <hes> it didn't seem to be a robustly exploring those pathways <hes> forward <hes> and <hes> at that time had kind of backward-looking gays. I'll emphasize at that time because it did it did shift we could've started something like this at the Post we act and talked about it a lot <hes> and <hes> an offer to stay at the post and do it to me and this was really more of a personal decision rather than a reflection of any <hes> thing or anybody at the post it just was much more intriguing seeking opportunity to start from scratch and early start with a blank slate and this is sort of I think in retrospect by the way Peter Probably was the right soon. I'm not sure even with best intentions by us in others <hes> that this would have taken root <hes> in the post what what what is the the CIA because there's another version of this we should which is why we have dot com right we the of Ezra Klein and Melissa Bell Leaving The Washington Post the new thing here basically <hes> there's different versions that story but basically they concluded they were better off building this thing outside of the Washington Post inside what makes it difficult for the Post specifically or any media legacy company like as he media company to sort of incubate a new thing like this <hes> that there's different imperatives within the organization <hes> and those other imperatives usually gonna be superior to the new imperative imperative right because they've got a lot of money behind it. They've got formidable. <hes> we have procedures. Here's how we do things and it's I'd say it's just hard you have to compete and you probably would compete in an inferior position for attention resources <hes> kind.

Washington Post Washington New York Times CIA Ezra Klein Peter Melissa Bell
"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"john harris" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"John Harris one of the Co founders of Politico John. What's what's your current title <hes> I think I'm called the founding editor <hes>? It's a title I'm just getting used to. I don't use it much until recently you read it or sheep. That's very <hes> he stepped down spring in the spring. I guess in mid April or so <hes> you founded politico in two thousand seven the day right more or less. Our first issue was in January twenty third two thousand seven just as the two thousand seventeen thousand eight campaign was underway. I left the post or had been for twenty plus years. <hes> The Washington Washington Post in November right around thank you invent yeah <hes> created at the time a lot of sort of raised eyebrows. What is this now al where we doing yeah? What does politico going to be? There are a lot of criticism of politico for a long time and now twelve years later you guys are just part of the firmament and a good way <hes> you oh you are sort of a standard version of Washington reporting. You are a digital media success story. We are profitable last year. We are your based mostly around the subscription model which now everyone wants to have a piece of <hes> and you sort of define the way Washington politics is covered also who covers Washington politics your alumni or scattered throughout the media strategy this year so that's a good it's a good time to talk to you all that sure and I will say that we are a subscription model for about <hes> I think roughly sixty percent of our revenue forty forty percents still a good bit coming from advertising the way we think of it as our. We've got a consumer business which is anybody who's interested in politics coming to our site politics and government. I'm coming to our site and <hes> we don't have a pay wall. They're not likely to <hes> that's advertising supported. Our events are largely advertising supported our subscription business is for people who have kind of a professional interest in this the average person wouldn't probably pay a couple thousand or some cases of many thousands of dollars ars for really intensive policy covers. That's our professional business. I was reading an interview with your funder Strahl Britain <hes> and he said basically your core audience. This is five to ten thousand people. I'm assuming you think it's bigger than that. I don't know I'm reluctant to ever disagree with <hes> Robert <hes> a man of great wisdom <hes> ourselves and who does pay my salary and owns the place. I think it is good bit larger. There's about three hundred thousand people who <hes> seem to be addicted <hes> to West coming several times a day and then like everybody else we can <hes> spike too many millions on big days or people come and go a lot of times in this environment people aren't necessarily or even aware of <hes> with the reading of the reading they bounce here of our our core audience is probably growing. The three hundred thousand is one. I would have cited a couple oblivious ago. It's probably a half million people who really have the bug bad for whatever reason and they really have an intimate relationship with US probably what Robert Meant by the ten thousands the group of people <hes> they're in primarily three cities wash in New York and Brussels <hes> who are major customers of ours and they are reviver professional services they regard as important doing their job and their employers pay for in most cases their employers pay for it somewhat inelastic demand curve <hes> because they <hes> makes them more effective and therefore it makes them more money and I think probably that's what Robert Meant by the ten thousands of a really important part of our business model but <hes> I it's only only a piece of our larger editorial model so you know it works because people use you as sort of a standard sort of <hes> now xerox or Kleenex. It's a politico Cofer. We had emily ramps offering their shorthand was they were creating politico for Texas. Right and Jessica lesson is created sort of politico for.

politico John Harris Washington Washington Washington Post professional services founding editor US Strahl Britain Jessica emily xerox Texas Kleenex New York Brussels sixty percent twelve years
North Carolina Republican's son says warned father about operative's past

All Things Considered

03:34 min | 2 years ago

North Carolina Republican's son says warned father about operative's past

"North Carolina State board of elections. Just finished a three of a public hearing that it's trying to get to the bottom of what happened in the states ninth congressional district last year the outcome of that race still hasn't been called state. Election officials accuse a political operative named McRae. Dallas of running an illegal scheme to collect absentee ballots. He was working for the Republican candidate Mark Harris in what was very tight race NPR's miles parks has been at all three days of this hearing, and he joins us now. Hi miles. So understand today's session revealed tensions within Harris's family over the decision to hire. Dallas. What happened? Yeah. We heard some pretty compelling testimony from Harris's son, John Harris, who's actually an assistant US attorney in North Carolina. He testified that he had looked at previous election results from two thousand sixteen and noticed a disturbing pattern of results based on somebody who is hiring this political operative this McRae. Dallas basically he saw public records. That indicated ballots were being returned for this candidate in batches leading him to. Believe that somebody in bladen county where this investigation is centered somebody there was collecting ballots, which is a legal. So then his father in two thousand seventeen comes in and says he's thinking about hiring McRae, Dallas. And he really has an issue with that investigators show an Email where he even forwarded the North Carolina statute that said collecting ballots is a legal North Carolina to his father. What have we learned about this scheme that investigators say Dallas was running? So for the past three days. Former employees of Dallas described how they collected ballots and one employee even said she filled in multiple ballots down ballot races, which is a legal North Carolina. Again, it's illegal even just to collect ballots, North Carolina. They also described how they were instructed different ways to make sure that state and local officials. I didn't get any red flags about the operation, and the consultant who paid Dallas his name's Andy Yates, he said a number of times that he didn't have any warning signs about Dallas. That's even though the state investigated, Dallas and. Thousand sixteen and there were a number of. News reports about that investigation. Harris said that he knew of no illegal activity on behalf of his campaign. So what does today's testimony mean in light of that? Well, he can't really say anymore that he was not warned. Here's how his son John Harris put it I raised red flags at the time. The decision was made to hires Dallas. That's what I did. But he also says he thinks McRae. Dallas lied to his father about what he was doing to get out the votes. Andy Yates, testified that doubts that he was only registering people that he wasn't collecting ballots. John Harris says that he thinks his parents believe McRae Dallas, and he did not. He says also added at the end of his testimony that his father did things in his campaign differently than he would have these hearings were initially scheduled to just last two days. This was three that just wrapped up in. It seems like there's more left to uncover. How long do you think this is gonna last and how long before voters in the ninth district has a member of congress to represent them? So at this point if definitely looks that this could like this could last the the rest of the week if not longer we still haven't heard from Mark Harris, he's set to testify tomorrow morning. And his campaign says he is very ready and eager to do that. If the state board they're going to vote at the end of this hearing, whether or not to hold a new election order certify, Harris, if they decide to hold a new election that process could take months North Carolina ninth district voters in North Carolina's ninth district could be looking at not having representation in the house until late summer early. Fall at the

Mark Harris Dallas North Carolina Mcrae Andy Yates Bladen County NPR Congress Assistant Us Attorney Consultant Three Days Two Days
"john harris" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"john harris" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Real dangerous irresponsible strain of opinion, telling the Democratic Party today. The when they lose this because they're not fighting hard enough. Political editor John Harris trust outline that an article out today. But here's another way of stating the opinion from a writer at wired. The thesis goes something like this. The left has total dominance of the culture. Total dominance of the popular vote. So the answer to why they lose not infrequently is that the system is rigged against them. And they must fight all the harder and take the gloves off to achieve their ends. That's pretty much been the mob mentality for some time. And to fall. You see it in black lives matter. You see it in the new Black Panthers. Maxine waters. You see it when Maxine tells constituents by that. I don't necessarily mean the people who live in our congressional district, but her constituents at large those who listened to her nationally when she tells those people. To go out and disrupt other people's lives to find him at the restaurants at the gas stations at the grocery stores wherever they might be in disrupt their lives. She saying take the gloves off. I here. In fact, I spent too much time yesterday listening to. A bunch of different people. Talking about post modernism. To the point that I thought my brain was going to explode. You can talk about post modernism, which you very well may here just so, you know, one of the people that I listen to is somebody that comes on after me on this station. That I don't always agree with. But I listened to him talk about post modernism. I listened to a couple of other people that I highly respect talk about post modernism. Maybe I just listened to much. Thing. I think at some point where you tried to consume too much. Of anything. It just becomes so much noise. And I thought they're missing the point entirely. Because what? Well, John Harris is saying politico. What wired magazine? Is that the left believes that the owned the culture? And that they still have to take the gloves off to beat us into submission. Now, whether we're living in a post modern society or not. I'll leave to the intellectuals I prefer instead talk. The concept of the street level retail politics because retail politics, we talk about Postmodernism if I were to grab an average person. Off the.

Maxine waters John Harris wired Democratic Party Black Panthers Political editor writer
"john harris" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"john harris" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"So they are doing good, but then needs to be the funds that needs to be other support for autism. Because as I said, she what happens is you spending area and have even two years on a book and publishes cannot hope to give you that kind of advance. So there has to be some sort of governments investment. What's happened is that if you look in America, some of the most successful American artists and writers are British. Most Scottish actually look at somebody like Frank quietly grant Morrison, Warren Ellis, Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Pete Milligan. I mean, these people are all Brits who are working in America because they call it care because they're just on the royalties in. There's been a breakdown of publications. There's no deadline. There's no crisis. These will weekly and monthly that were going superior just being head hunted and kind of brain drain straight to the US. Also, what happened was I did this exhibition at the British library, and the reason that happened was because I discovered that people who had archives people, Dave Gibbons, and more and stuff. Basically, I don't know what most doing with his material, but certainly a lot of autism writers are having to give the material to collectors in Europe or America because no one here wants them particularly. So for me, a big part of that exhibition was making museums and cultural institutions aware of this wealth of comics which are just disappearing because nobody values them on that sort of cultural level to be fed. The British library absolutely came onside did huge amount without archive and bringing material and making that material available. So that has started to change. But. That's what I'm saying. It's extremely that we have this talent, and yet it's being bought the material overseas and also it's been commissioned of sees that should change and there's money to be made. Presumably these, he's shows you. Just sold his his ideas to net flix, maybe hundred million dollars. I mean, this is stuff that makes money look at the money that Alamos matern has made look at grant Morrison success on that, fix this stuff that turns why? Like the real massive money generating. So yeah, happy with the royalty. Yeah, completely. We'll complete. And some of them really ready like it, you know, and and have benefited very much from it. But for me, it's just why isn't that being drawn back to some kind of support? And I realize ation that this is actually very good breeding ground for material in terms of what you were saying about the Booker prize and all of those things. I do think it's a moment. My husband took a lot of convincing about COMEX and what he would always say to me was he'd never read comics kit, and then I said, but did you retention did you eat after? Of course, it. I think people don't really make the connection between the fact that they have read COMEX. They understand how to read comics, but then they grow out of it. And maybe that like superheroes and not into kind of big action films. Have that realize that this huge wealth of material and that actually if they come back to them that they can enter it because as always say, COMEX is a medium, not John right? And I think people confuse that. And actually I didn't feel like men in tights, John. Thank you so much for coming in. I'm congratulations on two modes is out now you, you mentioned something over till global or something can see some of the some of those raw work and stuff. Yeah, it's it's over to comics, which is just the square, and there's going to be an exhibition from the sixteenth of August onwards. It's for two weeks and it is going to be the artwork from Cinelli the Michael Kennedy and also worked from the graphic novel Apollo. And that's the artist, Mike Collins and the rightist, Chris Baker and Matt Fitch. Thanks again, John and John Harris dunning excellent. New graphic novel tumult is out. Now this is the Monica, weekly, monocle twenty four. Time for music now and his something from the play John dunning together as inspiration for illustrator. Michael Kennedy. This is David Lynch and Carreno with pink history. That was pinky stream David Lynch, Karen? Oh, this is the Monica weekly on twenty four..

America John grant Morrison David Lynch Michael Kennedy John dunning Monica weekly Dave Gibbons US Neil Gaiman Warren Ellis Europe Frank Alan Moore Pete Milligan Booker Alamos Chris Baker Mike Collins John Harris
"john harris" Discussed on No Huddle

No Huddle

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"john harris" Discussed on No Huddle

"Of all the quarterbacks in this draft when he has the ball in his hand i'm scared of him as it'd be cut the coordinator the rest of the guys i okay good quarterback you'll baker mayfield is probably next on that list i watched the mark jackson he has a bone of saint he will give me nightmares i felt the coordinator and knowing that and when you hear what michael vick says about him you gotta think wow that's according to you're gonna have a lot of problems with lamar jackson i've been fearful that the jaguars would do that twenty nine because they've got played bordeaux's for the next few years lamar give a little time i fear for the jags dude at twenty nine hopefully don't but i think lamar jackson shoe go in the first round but some teammate trade up in the bottom of i tried to go get him i think it'll be a smart move whatever that team is really high a lamar jackson although he does that's the things to work on he's so dangerous with the bonus hand it can make plays in that is paramount at that position the nfl nowadays john harris from the texans radio network john let's make the move to free agency when you heard kirk cousins was getting eighty four million guaranteed from minnesota what was your thought what i thought was i'm gonna ask the show a washington take me out to dinner at a couple of years that happens for him but i thought but he you know here's the thing and i thought about this i think i would have been a little bit more shocked if there would have been a five or six year deal that was fully guaranteed because most deals that you look at the first two three years for any free agent for the most part of that caliber is is almost guaranteed anyway so to me was that third year that essentially got guaranteed on top of it where i went okay this is this is a little bit rich but i could see teams or players in ages looking at it going oh here we go but to me it'll really start to show when a player signed a fiveyear deal and all of its guaranteed aaron rodgers goes up for his next deal which i know it's coming up soon if he says look i.

coordinator mark jackson lamar jackson jaguars bordeaux jags john harris kirk cousins minnesota washington aaron rodgers baker mayfield michael vick nfl two three years fiveyear six year
"john harris" Discussed on No Huddle

No Huddle

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"john harris" Discussed on No Huddle

"You're listening to the nfl on tunein as no huddle with brian weber and kordell stewart let's focus on take while barkley talk draft and free agency with a great friend of the program it's john harris from the texans radio network john we appreciate you taking the time let's start with draft analysis other than saquon barkley are you handing out any first round grades for the running backs this year tell you this if i wouldn't give out any first round grades i definitely have got a ton of second round grades whether it's sony michelle nick job i've been a big fan of nick shove i hate the fact that you had the injury and twenty fifteen because like he was on par at that point ryan the way that he was his size i felt like he was on par with leonard fournette it's been a long come back for him but the combi was good i think somebody's going to get a really quality running back at the top of the second round and they chubb but sony michelle nick chubb i think those guys are absolute legitimate top of the second round could maybe thinking too depending on what teams there at the bottom of the first round are looking for and that's actually good for them because those dot the bottom the i are playoff teams so that could end up being good for them but michelle chubb steepest is pretty good running back class overall obviously barkley is the guy but i think you can find some really good players i mean the chiefs found cream last year no what the third round i think you can find guys like capable lodge from arizona state who has a specimen he is a bigger stronger faster wait speed sorta guy but he's a guy that i think a lot of teams like naim highs rutta nc state ran the four three range to do a lot of different things for a team so i think teams when they look at these running backs they're gonna see a lot more than just a guy that can carry the mail they're looking at guys that can do a lot of different things whether it's catchable the backfield block and pass protection run the rock on first and second now so you're getting pretty versatile running back class but barkley is clearly above everybody else but i think if you took a back in.

nfl brian weber john harris leonard fournette michelle nick chubb barkley chiefs kordell stewart sony michelle nick nick ryan arizona nc
"john harris" Discussed on No Huddle

No Huddle

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"john harris" Discussed on No Huddle

"You talk about the law body strength to me uh even though he's come out of college and put in the working in and fill a guy your minds livers levy on bell he doesn't have livio's rot wanting ability just yet but he's dynamic you can kinda put him you know looking for as to being a guy that maybe can match levy on level production on the field is always we appreciate our days guys talk to you guys later no huddle podcast we'll be right back after this the boys of summer arm bad all well mlb spring training is here and you can catch every game from florida and arizona live with your subscription to tune in premium rivalry games splitsquad games tune in has it all when the pitch count begins for real catch every game of the 2018 mlb season from opening day to the mlb world series live on tuna major league baseball his own tune in premium listen all season long this his nfl nohuddle the podcast fewer your hosts brian weber and kordell stewart next on nfl no other podcasts we welcome john harris of the texans broadcast team john always great to have you on the show what stored under center of all the marquee quarterbacks which one do you like the most fair donald right at the top he's got every asset you're looking for quarterback you know what i saw him a couple of years ago right i was really worried about hitting the ball out of his hands fast if you've got quite a long why the motion but he short that up a little bit in 2017 and i just i love everything about his cool is calm but i know a lot of people will say uh you'll lamar jackson should be wide receiver but i like mark jackson my top free i go stand darnell and then i go baker may feel like a little more jackson number three i feel like i want the ball in the hands of the most dangerous player in a field it.

livio florida baseball kordell stewart nfl john harris donald mark jackson darnell baker arizona mlb brian weber lamar jackson jackson
"john harris" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"john harris" Discussed on KELO

"One john harris h thirty nine committed april twenty eight th eighteen eleven charged on suspicion of stealing one drake one duck and two fouls the property of sarah per for of the year her phd walton of the value of 10 d william privilege 27 committed april twenty nine th eighteen eleven charged in the oath of john freeman in holder on suspicion of having on sunday the twenty eight th of this instant april feloniously dolan a pair of steel snuff hersh the property of john freeman out of his dwelling house he was sent that slavery for that john lover brigitte seven they committed for stealing the bud end of an oak timber trait of the value of five showing i don't know what the bud end of a timber tree as moderate jennings h fifty four again rounded up an eighteen eleven charge of the oath of john bernard fervor than having on the evening of twenty second day of june feloniously stolen taken and carried away from the premises of the said richard pru in in sheltered ham a garden spade the property of richard peru and so in those days stealing was considered very very serious jerry brown of course has not only released felons on this low level is release drug dealers you have no idea what it's like to live in the state or how insane has become but don't call marina about that one of just giving an example of what how the world has changed on us right all right if these stories don't interest you will do more more and more and more gop senator is asking for amnesty concessions from trump okay here we go again the grand old party on the lindsey graham the backstabbing pink o the senator who put together the gang of eight amnesty in 2013 which screwed up the gop the same lindsey graham who boosted jeb bush is now meeting with donald trump to drop some of its popular proamerican immigration policies mm how do.

john freeman brigitte richard peru jerry brown senator gop lindsey graham jeb bush donald trump john harris john john bernard richard pru twenty second
"john harris" Discussed on No Huddle

No Huddle

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"john harris" Discussed on No Huddle

"You're listening to nfl nohuddle dump podcast with brian wherever the talk show we talk and former pro bowl steelers quarterback kordellstewart kitchen popcorn ready nfl nohuddle there's live weekdays from four pm to seven pm eastern while the nfl onto twogame your everything audio app low welcomed you nfl no although the podcast i'm brian weber long psychoward l stewart on today's podcast reward you visit would mickey spag nola from dallas cowboyscom and john harris from the texans broadcast crew plus will provide your fantasy fix in bribery going to kick off the podcast that they would peter king from immunme qb now it's time for 2010 national sports writer of the year peter king from m qb on the nfl onto hater always a pleasure let's start with your takeaways from the very physical game between the steelers of bengal last night i can't quite accept first standing up and telling espn after game that's afc north football if that's afc north football than they ought to be forced to secede from the nfl because the can't have these gratuitous shots you can have this uh this taunting prone players on the field um you know you can have guys lunging at antonio brown hitting them in the helmet i mean it's a made a antonio brown simply in games against cincinnati in his career uh i i i mean why women's the knockout blow he's been hit as much as joe frazier in the thrill in manila i mean i it to me i think the nfl has to look at games like that and they have to i totally agree with the two suspensions out of the game and they have to simply say quite honestly they have to simply say that look when stuff like this happens we're not finding people anymore finds.

antonio brown bengal peter king dallas mickey spag pro bowl manila joe frazier cincinnati brian weber nfl football espn steelers writer bribery john harris
"john harris" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"john harris" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Area business banking fifty five of the competent me the visit wdbo app use dot com it's reading hugh bigham him rough hor bidding for the two starters see if they have balanced back as john harris starts with that oversee of the second inning in a row graham pinset nine to bat scoring three in the fourth hitting in a strike one halas seventy seven pitch of the game is try harrison walk five struck out one at airstrike swinging amiss added snowball who strikes on overseas walk energy groundout tonight setting sun in field in the shade outfielders still we'll deal with the sun and max one back through the middle and oak who fast ball at oversee just rules right back up the middle abass it her dangam pin at number six hey become income enough and a long long run your last night a seven the year rumble holies known it many home runs thirty eight in all and thompson's seven leave the active roster while one while in the area and i can pick in some baseball said i love to have you we have it other game to follow this atlas fireworks after the ballgame on saturdays had on the outside corner hits birthright wanted one you can make tomorrow.

baseball john harris harrison thompson seventy seven pitch