19 Burst results for "John Harrington"

Christopher Columbus statue toppled outside Minnesota Capitol

iHeartRadio Podcast Premiere

00:37 sec | 9 months ago

Christopher Columbus statue toppled outside Minnesota Capitol

"Then in Richmond testers tore down a Christopher Columbus statue and throw it in a lake and I guess this evening in Minnesota a reporter for one of the TV stations there said less than ninety minutes after I asked the Minnesota public safety commissioner John Harrington if he was aware of a threat to the Christopher Columbus statue at the state capitol I guess the reporters told yes and he was assured it would be protected L. wasn't protected it was torn

Minnesota Reporter Commissioner John Harrington Richmond Christopher Columbus
"john harrington" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:57 min | 9 months ago

"john harrington" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"For the other illegal activity following the release hello I don't expect it will be able to release some of the names of those folks that have been arrested and some of the background information that we have pulled together and we hope to be able to do that today who's gone missing John Harrington is the commissioner of public safety in the state of Minnesota we heard from the state's governor Tim walls as well as the mayor of Minneapolis Jacob fry in Melvin Carter who is the mayor of Saint Paul Minnesota I'm sorry St Paul Minnesota this event from much earlier in the day today to give you an update on the situation protests have continued tonight demonstrations on several big cities around the country among them a large gathering outside city hall in San Francisco shutting down a highway in Miami and an attempt to topple a statue in Philadelphia in the week all of this in the wake of the death of George Floyd who died in police custody this past Monday in Minneapolis the demonstrations have spread to what is now a reported three dozen cities across the country curfews have been imposed and some of the nation's largest cities that includes Los Angeles Atlanta Philadelphia and of course Minneapolis and St Paul and as you heard from the governor this event earlier today he is activating thousands more members of the Minnesota National Guard and he did say he declined an offer from the federal government to send U. S. army military police to be deployed on the streets of Minnesota cities but as we mentioned protests continuing around the country in what is believed to be as many as three dozen U. S. citizens those protests going on now C. span radio American history TV this week a conversation with civil war scholar Alain Gilles he talks about president Abraham Lincoln and Confederate general Robert E. this conversation took place in September twenty seventeen hosted by the university of Virginia's civil war history center opening comments by historian Gary Gallagher of you via Allen is the Henry R. Luce the third professor of the civil war era at Gettysburg college read also serves as director of the civil war you're a studies program he did his graduate work in history at the university of Pennsylvania where he focused on the history of religion he also has field holds a master of divinity degree his roster of publications is so long that I'm not going to even try to read them all to you can go to Alan Kelso dot com and get a full accounting of not only his publications but other salient elements of his biography and that doing so what I'm going to do here is mentioned five books that I think are especially pertinent to what we'll be doing this afternoon and I'll just read the men are the first is called Abraham Lincoln redeemer president published by William B. organs in nineteen ninety eight and one the first of Alanson comprises Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation the end of slavery in America published by Simon and Schuster in two thousand and four I brought him his second Lincoln prize Lincoln Douglas debates that defined America also Simon and Schuster two thousand eight for some reason didn't win the Lincoln prize April lightning whose new history of the civil war and reconstruction came out from Oxford University Press in two thousand twelve and the fifth title mention is Gettysburg the last invasion published by can offer in two thousand thirteen which brought a third Lincoln prize to Allah is the only person who's won three others have one too he's currently working on a biography of Robert E. Lee which also will be published by can often that will be one of the things will get to today he and I are going to talk about his work today and about the field of civil war era studies more broadly and I want to begin with I have a question relating to the opportunities for people in our field to try to reach a broader audience Allen writes for national newspapers and other publications he's done courses for the teaching company the great courses company you have reached a broader audience and I would like your thoughts about whether this is something we really should strive to do why you do it how effective do you think it is and what it yields for our field in terms of disseminating really good scholarship to a broader audience well first of all let me thank you for the opportunity to be here and especially to the now senator will courteous to everyone here has to lose variances as Stephanie to everyone who has just made my visit here over the last several days such an exceedingly pleasant one Nick in some research in derives I have I have been within the reach of many manuscripts of some diaries and one off like that looking at what people are writing thinking and saying in those tumultuous times a hundred fifty years ago I'm glad to be here on this very very significant and special day one of the greatest days in American history and I'm noticing that people are starting to look at each other like this is the fourth of July no no no it's it's it's September twenty second and we did this on purpose a hundred and fifty fifth anniversary of the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation writing about that back in twenty twelve in the Wall Street journal got me some unusual responses they got a death threat it often happens people writing in the Wall Street journal we get all kinds of threats I suppose but I imagine I did manage that I succeeded in injuring someone sensibilities and writing about the Emancipation Proclamation but in a way if testifies to the fact that if you say you saw it was a good thing yes I I did I know that someone that someone I think what it does speak to the fact that there is a large audience among Americans for trying to understand our history because what I would have ruled how do we identify as Americans we don't identify ourselves or or shouldn't on the basis of a language of an ethnicity of an established religion of race of any percentage what I've what I've done for us as Americans fundamentally Lincoln nailed that and the guys were dressed what identifies us as Americans is proposition that all men are created equal and the history of how we have unfolded and live with that proposition is really the most important aspect of our identity so when we write about our history we're not just doing antiquarian ism we're doing a constant here by here check a five decade rejects Fundacion and sometimes referendum on that proposition I regard what I have done in the popular press fully as much as the academic presses really being two sides of one coin and that is how do we explain ourselves to ourselves as Americans and that should draw in more than just an academic audience I should draw in all of us because that's what touches all of us and that's what identifies all of us so if I'm writing for instance for the journal of the early Republic four four civil war history one from writing for the Wall Street journal or from writing for The Washington Post really regard those as being part of an overall endeavor is our constant reminder of ourselves of who we are and what we are dedicated to something that involves more than academics it involves more than just college students it really is something which embraces all of us so I think it's important especially especially for for historians like ourselves to be able to speak to everybody because really speaking to our identity as Americans speaking professionally speaking as citizens there is one and only one identifier I'm an American and that is that you are a citizen to being a citizen of the American Republic is in my book just about the greatest privilege honor for specially well positioned to reach a broader audience because so many of the issues from the civil war continues to resonate we can see echoes of them in we can see echo seven in our day to day life including responses from some states to our and president are preceding president talking about secession Texas when president Obama was in office California with president trump in office now it's you don't have to look very far in current American politics and society to find echoes of the civil war era so sometimes it's even more than a coach there was an op ed in the Sacramento bee I think I'm citing this correctly but it was not that in in the Sacramento bee yesterday thank in which the leader of the office said that California is a twenty first century state which is mired in a nineteenth century country and therefore it should separate itself which is a way of saying California is an entirely different culture from the rest of the United States and I thought yeah that is exactly what they were saying in South Carolina in December of eighteen so I'm trying to ask people if they're really striving to emulate South Carolina in eighteen sixties that's your role model well short term I think long term it didn't turn out so well for South Carolina but it does come back to the fact that it was so often questions that we think are uniquely current and uniquely modern really have these long routes and sometimes are replicating even the rhetoric of a hundred and fifty years ago on longer civil war scholar Allen goes up in a conversation with Gary Gallagher of the university of Virginia this conversation took place in twenty seventeen yes there's almost nothing new I think it does seem to be that what seems new if you don't know anything this is because of everything this is because the fundamental questions that are posed by the American experiment really do not change either we really are all about the business of debating that fundamental proposition so in a sense it's not a total surprise the kind of rhetoric the kind of assumptions that kind of stances that you hear people strike today will find on canning and sometimes on Irving echoes of those a hundred and fifty hundred fifty five years ago for the historian what we have to do is to signal this is what the relationships are be careful what you wish for whether it's whether it's the Sacramento bee or the Charleston mercury when you write do you write specifically with more than one audience in mind you I mean obviously your books are reviewed in the main line scholarly journals but do you have one or the other of those audiences more in mind or do you not even think about that especially I can't say that I really think about it some sometimes impassable what kind of schooling to do have in writing how do you go about the writing and said that hi I can only shrug my shoulders I never had a writing class I never had someone struck me this is how you're right this is a right that arrived at the other thanks I have no better explanation is simply to say I want to explain something to people I want to communicate with people and I look for ways to do that and I don't really have a better explanation usually read a lot of good price I I think I do I think I did and I'm I'm probably good at imitating but I it's nothing in my mind of these it it's nothing more complicated than that I can't I can't make it work all right we'll try to make you more complicated than that I have a question I really want to get to the net is did you wake up one morning thank Corey for him Lincoln he just hasn't gotten enough attention writers I think I'd better write a book about Lincoln what what brought you you're you're trained as a historian religion wrote about Jonathan Edwards in your dissertation in your your early work how do you get from Jonathan Edwards in religion Abraham Lincoln well it's a little unusual but not more unusual than well let's say a chess game there's a few strange moves after it made in process but not too many I wrote my doctoral dissertation on Johnson Edwards on the problem of determinism and free will in eighteen century moral philosophy that's a title made for wide public consumption yeah I was in the nineteen they actually they actually did do a second edition but it was the one with macular McConaughey really resonates yeah the one with Nick Nolte is says energized lurking no with Nick Nolte is George Whitfield right but I had a group wrote the.

John Harrington commissioner
"john harrington" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

02:26 min | 9 months ago

"john harrington" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"During the preceding program are not those of K. H. O. W. its staff management or parent company iHeartMedia incorporated ABC news in one week's demonstrations continue across the country after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis former officer Derek shelving behind bars now charged in his death governor Tim Walz activating one thousand more National Guard service members in Minnesota officials say those causing the destruction and chaos are from out of town Minnesota officials say up to eighty percent of those causing the damage and destruction of come from outside of the state John Harrington is Minnesota commissioner of public safety that little group that that started out embedding themselves into George Lloyd memorial service is no longer a little group the mayor of Minneapolis tweeting out that they're confronting white supremacists and possibly foreign actors Ryan burl ABC news Minneapolis the mayor of Atlanta denouncing protests that turned into destruction there overnight in Denver there's now an eight PM curfew this weekend and a public safety alert activated in Columbus Ohio this is ABC news SpaceX made history the first privately held space shuttle blasting off on schedule just before three thirty PM eastern time today in Florida ABC contributor colonel Steve Gaillard says this is the first page of the next chapter of space travel you're taking the best of government and the best of the private sector in together that's the tribe here today this is the triumph that's going to drive the cost increases safety reliable launched already that's going to allow us to put colonies on other planets astronauts Robert bank in and Douglas Hurley joined NASA's program in twenty ten they are both fathers and merry to fellow NASA astronauts the shuttle completely reimagined ABC's Jim Ryan this is a completely different animal from the capsules that were launched in the sixties in the seventies the diodes and the knobs and dials in them though the little windows this is has two flat screens in front of the astronauts in seats that are designed specifically for those individual people so that there is comfortable as they can be for the next nineteen hours learn ways ABC news I've always wanted to learn another language so I decided to give babyliss try and I really like the teaching method of the app I started with the beginner lesson on babble and soon you're putting words into a conversation each lesson takes about ten to fifteen minutes and they're all really different which keeps things interesting.

Robert bank George Lloyd memorial Minnesota National Guard Derek shelving iHeartMedia K. H. O. Jim Ryan ABC NASA Douglas Hurley George Floyd Steve Gaillard Florida Columbus Ohio Denver Atlanta Ryan burl Minneapolis
"john harrington" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

10:50 min | 10 months ago

"john harrington" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Pay welcome to invention my name is Robert Lamb. And I'm Joe McCormack and we're back with part two of our discussion of the history of toilet technology in the last episode. You should probably go back if you haven't been listened to that episode first before you listen to this one. That's where we get all into the history of toilets in ancient civilizations into Latrine tack into the Klay Maxima the the the maximum sewer of ancient hailing a ship. Right through it But today we're going to get more into directly into the invention of the flush toilet and I think we gotta start off today by Dispelling Common Myth that myth and I've actually. I've heard this like repeated in movies and stuff. It seems to be a thing. People actually do think is that the flush toilet was invented by a Mr Thomas crapper now crapper does play a role in the history of the toilet but he is not its inventor by any means whatsoever not even close now first of all. We can debate about what it means to have a flush toilet. If we're going to be discussing the the idea of its invention I'd say by some definitions since waste was like washed away by water. You could argue that. Some people's of like ancient Rome in the ancient Indus Valley had flush toilets. But that's not usually what we mean when we say a flush toilet we we usually mean a device that automatically removes waste with a simple mechanism. It's not like a whole over a drainpipe in which you can pour water. It's not something that constantly has water run running underneath it. It's a machine with mechanical flushing action. That doesn't need to be situated over like a flowing ditch or anything like that and so there are a number of technologies. That really needs to be in place for this to come together like your your plumbing. Technology has to has has to reach the appropriate level of advancement before you can attach a toilet as we. Modern flushing toilet to the scenario and to and make it practical. Yeah and this is going to be a big problem with the earliest models of the flush toilet so to see one of the Pro probably the first real flush toilet since we mean but an impractical early model. We need to meet a poet And I think it is appropriate that the first real flush toilet was created by poet We mentioned him in the last episode. Inter Sir John Harrington so Sir John Harrington was an English courtier and an author who lived from fifteen sixty or fifteen sixty one to sixteen twelve is in his life stories that his father had repeatedly sort of married up into royal circles. I HIS DAD married one of Henry. The eighth illegitimate daughters and then later his father married a woman who served Queen Elizabeth. The first before she was queen in this seems to be what led to Elizabeth Queen Elizabeth Becoming John Harrington's Godmother Though apparently little John Harrington was a troublesome Godson he was prone to writing on embarrassing and morally impure subjects. That repeatedly got him in trouble with the crown he wrote insulting stuff about other Kind of pompous court people As for his literary works he was probably best known for his translation of the Italian poet. Ludovico Ariosto's epic Orlando Furioso And we can come back and mentioned that in a minute but That's like a that doesn't know or Landau for IOS. Got Like a big dragon slaying thing in it Turner remember. I know I came across it when I was in school. That sounds familiar. I I feel I feel like I read it in schools. Well but I don't recall much about it but at any rate Harrington guys that sounds a little bit like he was kind of a a brat. Yeah a little bit. I mean so he wrote these poems and epigrams and boy. You can find these online. I don't know maybe something's lost in the mix here but if this guy is considered himself a poet I I really hope toilets were good so the poems are full of like really obvious. Groan inducing turns of phrase and then all these kind of catty burns on other court. Here's who he gives these like classical influence. Nixon nicknames like sex stice and Itis It also seems it seems to me. At least like Harrington was serve kind of a fan of himself like he the he thought he was pretty. Cool Robert you feel like reading a couple of his short little poems here. Oh sure why not okay. So this is This is the one he wrote called A comparison of a book with cheese old Haywood rights and proves in some degrees that one may well compare a book with cheese every market some by cheese to feed on Eddie Free Mart. Some men by books to read on all sorts eat cheese but how there is the question. The poor food. The rich for good digestion. All sorts read books. But why will you discern the fool to laugh? The wiser sort to learn the site taste sent of cheese to some his hateful. The site taste sense of books to sums ungrateful no cheese. There was that ever pleased feeders. No book there. Is that ever liked to all readers? Yeah already hate this. You're delaying better here. This one's just a short four line epigraph here. It's called against writers that carpet other men's books this and sounds like there's a little venom and yeah the readers and the hearers like my books but yet some writers cannot them digest. But what care I for when I make a feast I would. My guess should praise it. Not The cooks So as an ABA rhyme scheme there. But I think he's saying like hey I don't write for the critics I write for the fans man. I don't know maybe this is all just like if we think of the the literary scene at the time as being like kind of you know kind of like a like a few driven hip hop culture than you know that that's probably the place for all of this. Well there's some of that I mean I get the feeling that he was sort of he was sort of like you know man about the court. He was like within the scene He was he added. These relationships as poems are very like gossipy. And they're full of all these burns and stuff you you get the sense that they were sort of writ written not for a wide audience but for a select audience who would get the you know who. He is anonymously before sending his burns at. I also notice how a lot of his work is about how his poetry is good How his critics are dumb about food and comparing things to food is kind of weird? Al is usually thrown back by the idea that the poor cheese for food but the rich only eat cheese for digestion. What I'm missing something there. It's like the rich donate food. What seems like it reveals some kind of attitude. I can't quite put my finger on plus eating nothing cheese. Sounds exactly like the kind of thing that some You know upper class royal would do and then be guilty for it. Didn't Henry the eighth die of a surfeit of cheese? Yeah so anyway. So John Harrington Little Godson of Queen Elizabeth I John Harrington. He's busy at court. He's trying not to get caught up in political rat traps. And there's a lot of those going on right now you know they're they're all these plots and stuff He gets in trouble anyway. He writes some terrible poetry. At least in my opinion I should point out that around the same time. This is around the same time that Shakespeare is writing his plays and Christopher Marlowe ended. One Point Harrington addresses some of his little barbs and epigrams to somebody named Faustus I have to wonder if Christopher Marlowe is the target solid burn referring to To him as the the great work that he would forever be remembered for right and yet we don't we didn't even name the toilet after Harrington so decree all the toilets in the land will be named Harrington's all right. So how does he get around to inventing the choice? Sounds like he has a pretty full plate with all of this. These promos that he's cutting on other literary figures. Well he's getting in so he gets in and out of trouble like apparently one of the I mentioned earlier. The thing is most famous for historically. Is this translation of Orlando Furioso Apparently the way the story goes is that he had translated one particularly racy passage and sharing it around with ladies of the court and Queen. Elizabeth was not amused and as punishment for his body behavior in his corruption of good ladies. She told him he would be banished from the court and that he shouldn't bother returning unless he had finished translating the entire epic poem so he did he finished the translation and he came back only to get banished again some years later for insults and toilet humor so sometime in this whole mix. Zinn like the fifteen ninety S. It seems I think maybe around fifteen ninety four so he actually invented the flush toilet. He put together the plan for one any installed one in his home and then later he actually installed one four Queen Elizabeth herself at her home at Richmond. Palace in what was then. Surrey and we have some details on this because in fifteen ninety six Harrington publishes his notes on the invention of the flush toilet in a very strange book link text called a new discourse on a stale subject called the metamorphosis of Ajax. Okay as so. This book is part description of an invention in part like satire and then part meditation on excrement and Related Subjects And a lot of like it seems like a big part of it is just like a defense of him publishing the book that you're currently reading I I was trying to understand. Like what the real vibe of this work is. And it just seems extremely odd The title is kind of interesting. What's the deal? With the Metaphor metamorphised. Ajax Herrington apparently referred to the flush toilet. He had he had invented as Ajax is in like. Aj Ex character in the Iliad right now in the great Greek Warrior yes And so apparently this is a pun on the word Jake's which was already at the time a slang word for toilet obviously wouldn't be a flush toilet before like you know normal types of like pit toilets and stuff who'd be like going to the Jake Sir you know I'm GonNa go sit on the Jake's it's like I need to use John so now. He had the Claire. The clever nature of the titles reveal. But it's still weird. It makes me wonder what stages syphilis was was that well maybe we should take a quick break and when we come back we will discuss. We'll discuss the details.

John Harrington Harrington Queen Elizabeth Inter Sir John Harrington Robert Lamb Henry Klay Maxima Joe McCormack Christopher Marlowe Mr Thomas Ludovico Ariosto Jake Rome Indus Valley Eddie Free Mart syphilis Turner Orlando Furioso Nixon Herrington
"john harrington" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

Poetry Off The Shelf

07:27 min | 11 months ago

"john harrington" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

"Can you tell me a little bit when you look at that page today or even the entire book that this page is a part of what what sort of interesting. Scribbles and and drawings appear in the margins of the poems There's this math on the left hand side which is Subversion of Algebra. I had the great fun of getting to read Seventeenth Century Algebra. Textbooks to figure out the you know the notation and took a little bit of work to even figure out what's written there but again what what a pleasure to read a century work of mathematics and figure out that that squiggle actually means X. squared and so on. Yeah but the math is a sign that the person doing the math didn't care about the poem and in the rest of the manuscript. This is much more obvious thereon. Other pages straight lines drawn through each of the lines of the poem and then the pages just covered with other kinds of writing so the person structure basically simply struck through so then sometimes pages are covered in prose. Sometimes there's geometry problems so that there are triangles that are drawn over poems and the idea that a person's sitting with you know a book that we now consider a priceless treasure. Yeah in the reasons that it's a priceless treasure is that there's a poem written on the page. There's person sitting there with this book who actually can't see the poem right so it's exactly the opposite of us. We look at that page. And it's like oh was their math on the left hand side. I'm sorry I didn't see it. I was reading the poem And that seemed to me to be. It's just a really important part of the life of this poem that there are people and You know my thought is that. There's a resonance between and the contemporary world were a lot of people wouldn't be interested in that poem and I tried to tell that story. Sympathetically that is there's lots of reasons why you wouldn't be interested in that palm and it doesn't make you a bad human being and it doesn't mean that you're not sympathetic with other humans or that you don't have a nuanced inner life yourself or that you're not interested in the inner life of others that just means you're not interested in that poem And so you know it's like it's a healthy tonic. That you can drink while you think about the history of this poem because there's always this temptation to regard it as some kind of mystified magical and holy relic that and it really is not that it's a it's a poem written by a person in fifteen thirty right right. Yeah you know if you try to write about these people who scribbled in the margin sympathetically. Well you've succeeded because I really. Yes such warm feelings for them. You know at this John Harrington I mean they're all called John called John Harrington yes generated call this guy. Mp You know because he was a member of parliament. Yeah what what I love. So much about him is that he seems like the antithesis of a poet sort of insensibility He likes math. He likes While he works in government he sort of interested in science and it's very practical and so he uses it sort of to conduct his business and to also just write down notes. Sort of like a to do list or something you know and Yeah one of the things. What was it again? That that he wrote something like I helped my friend's son I'm constipated just like sort of A. You know whatever that that was also sort of like you say an inner life you know. There's many many people who wrote things into this book after Thomas Wyatt Road in it but John Harrington who's the person who wrote the math he wrote really a lot into this book was a judge he was a magistrate. And there's addresses to juries are sketched out in this book and what I ended up thinking about as I meditated on Harrington's lack of interest in the poems his diary and his daily is that in this really Broadway there's a generic resemblance between his diary and the poem. That is somehow the writing out of the things that happened to him. Some of them very intimate. You know not very appealing constipation is not you know. Generally a great subject for lyric poem. But that there's a resemblance between his urge to write out the stuff about himself. Just the these are things that happened to me There is a resemblance between that and the work of lyric poetry. Which is somehow the writing out of an account of inner life. makes us feel that it's more manageable or that it is more. Maybe it makes it more thoroughly a thing of the past if that's what we want or it makes it more understandable and so that relationship between writing and what amounts to self understanding or just the management of everyday life is not entirely different from Thomas. Wyatt's use of that book. It's just really different from Thomas. Wise Use of that book. Yeah I mean that's a gorgeous way of looking at it and it really Seems to be exemplified also in the way that the MP Or that the judge John Harrington His son used that book he was just sort of learn how to Rights right like he was a little kid and had a tutor and he had you know do his alphabet and stuff and and what is so lovely as how you describe this kid was maybe not you know the most interested in school and that he sort of would draw these monsters enlarging exactly. I. I find that part like you. I find that part. Really beautiful actually and You know in my general feeling. That poems are things that people right because they have reasons for writing them by Thomas. It can be in some ways about his job as an ambassador. Desperate hope to stay alive and tutoring England And that again. There's this kind of generic resemblance between that and little We'll Harrington there is finally Harrington who's not called John Harrington you know this little wheel Harrington making drawing this little monster in the manuscript you know. There's a kind of habit of mine where we think. Well you know. It's a kid and he's just drying a monster but again it's that act of sort of getting something out of your head and onto the paper and then you look at it and it's done something for you. Something that was inside. Your head is now out there on this piece then so again. It seems like it's a good companion further poems in that book. It's it's you know it's it's the same kind of newborn of the spirit.

John Harrington Thomas Wyatt
What's the History (and Future) of Toilets?

BrainStuff

05:00 min | 2 years ago

What's the History (and Future) of Toilets?

"Consider the flush toilet. It's the fascinating device. If you think about it. This giant porcelain chairs installed into every modern American bathroom using gallons of precious drinking water everyday to whisk your urine feces into oblivion better known as the municipal wastewater treatment plant nearest you every time you flush, but have you ever considered? What else we could be doing with our poop in pee? You probably don't really want to think about it. And neither does pretty much anybody else, which is why the flush toilet we twenty-first-century century. Humans us hasn't changed much since it was first patented in seventeen seventy five by Scottish watchmaker named Alexander coming Cummings. Toilet was a slightly altered version of the commode designed for Queen. Elizabeth the first by her godson, sir. John Harrington in fifteen ninety two Cummings had an s shaped pipe to trap, bad odors, while Harrington's had not, of course, self flushing. Toilets heated seats in those vacuum potties like you see on airplanes in tour buses came later. But. Our one and done attitude towards commode innovation probably comes from the fact that we simply don't want to think about poop that much. We spoke with DNA. Mcdonagh a professor of industrial design in the Beckman institute of advanced science and technology at the university of Illinois at our banish campaign. She said within the American culture, there's still resistance and reluctance to discuss body waste the toilet has remained relatively unexplored. I think because we're failing to realize that to quote, a British saying where there is muck. There's brass we are failing to see the potential opportunity are modest toilet is offering us because the notion of immersing yourself in such a product because all feel so uncomfortable. But going to the bathroom isn't something. We've always been squeamish about long ago. It was just another experience and opportunity for relaxation. And hanging out the ancient Romans used toilet time as a time to catch up with their friends in the year three hundred and fifteen BC Rome had one hundred and forty four bustling public toilets lined with stone benches with keyhole shaped cutouts situated, all along them where people would sit together and do their business, and maybe some gossiping to later in medieval England, you could be walking down the street and someone might throw the contents of their chamber pot out the window onto you. They might say sorry about it. But it would kind of be on you for walking too close to their house. Fancier medieval, people used Garda robe a little closet. Stuck onto the side of a castle with a hole in the floor that emptied into a moat or cesspit clothes were also kept in the Garda row. But because it was thought stench of human waste would keep the fleas moths out of the garments public Garda roads in London empty directly into the Thames, which was an unbelievably poor public health. With move as the population of Europe grew over the course of the eighteen hundreds up to one hundred people would share the same public garter robe and the waste just washed into the rivers tainting, the drinking water supply, which explains why so many outbreaks of cholera typhoid and other waterborne diseases bedeviled nineteenth century Europeans, resulting in more than half the working class population dying for the age of five it was a mess. As a result of a particularly hot summer in London in eighteen Fifty-eight when these smell of rotting sewage bay living in the city completely unbearable Parliament Commission to the construction of the London sewer, which was finished in eighteen sixty five deaths resulting from waterborne diseases plummeted and cities all over the world. Followed suit and constructed their own sanitary sewers the toilet patented by coming eventually became standard in houses and wealthy countries. All over the world along with slight variations patented by others like Thomas, crapper. Yes, that's his real name whose contributions to the overall design of the toilet were minimal. But whose legacy endures because he made sure his name was visible on. All of his products. And hey, it's great that fewer people are dying due to poor sanitation in these places anymore. But the toilet is due for an upgrade. So what do we need? Our new toilets to do. Mcdonagh said toilets offer a relatively unexplored territory that offers significant potential in respect to healthy living and healthy aging as individuals are taking more responsibility for their health. Eating habits and wellbeing. The bathroom offers a somewhat blank canvas for us to integrate intuitive technology to support the individual imagine a toilet that could tell you. How hydrated you were whether you are deficient in particular vitamins or new of blood in your stools and changes in your hormones. We literally flush all that information away each day in the form of waste matter. So we could find out a lot about our own health from our toilets, but according to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which launched their reinvent the toilet challenge. Back in twenty eleven the next generation of toilets will also be able to kill pathogens compost human waste and keep up with the fast urbanization of the twenty first century. And all that without sewer, infrastructure electricity or a water source. They might even be able to minor waste for valuable elements like phosphorus nitrogen and potassium and separate solid and liquid waste in order to use them to make things like building supplies. But we'll the new toilets. Look very much different from the one in your bathroom now or the one, sir. John Harrington made for Queen Elizabeth in the sixteenth century, probably not much unless you've got any bright

John Harrington Queen Elizabeth Mcdonagh Garda Waterborne Diseases London Garda Row Cummings Europe Alexander England University Of Illinois Rome Melinda Gates Foundation Professor Of Industrial Design Beckman Institute Thomas
"john harrington" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"You wanna talk about in sports. Just pick up the phone call. And then tomorrow open line that I turn John Harrington, by the way, let's pick our line prediction right now. I think the lines will lose by ten points here tomorrow. What's that score? Then. Twenty four to fourteen. Wow. I was going to say twenty four seventeen Minnesota. I'm right on that that same ballpark. A Minnesota by six and a half. I think they win by ten. Let's go take another call Craig in Livonia. Iran. How you doing? I was telling the story I watch you come up in punt for Harrington and you shake the. Ha ha ha ha. Yeah. Today's coaches birthday. Yeah. That he told me seventy eight, but he Di he was a couple of days or a few days early sing seventy seventy eight today. It was one of his main guys now that the not perfect that coach. I hope I'm not online. Now, he's going to join him in north Farmington too. All right. I got a quick question. What do you think about freeze this year? It's a pitiful. No, it's not pitiful. You let's break. What do you know about officiating? What are you know? When they go to New York. I know your I knew Europe on fire. But when they go to New York. I we see the things and it's reported how awful this that when they go to New York reported by who by who he talks about it. There's only you let me tell you something. Let me tell you something Craig. I'm Pires judge empires referees judge referees players. Don't judge them coaches? Joe judge because they don't know what you're talking about. Why wouldn't they have the NFL? Former officials I know I can. So many times they're wrong. They'll say, well, it's going to be it's going to stay with the offense. And then it goes to the defense. I don't understand that one. We'll see right. When you're watching the telecast, listen all the time..

John Harrington New York Craig Minnesota Iran Livonia NFL Europe Joe
"john harrington" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"The white male john harrington didn't invent the flushing toilet in fifteen ninety six imagine what the country would look like but nevertheless the reason that many people use that sort of scatalogical name of crapper is because during world war two servicemen stationed in england actually in world but once saw crackers name on cisterns and used it as army slang saying i'm going to the crapper and i'm just saying how it happened but the word itself crap which many people use is actually a middle english origin and it predates its application to bodily waste i do you want to know all of this stuff would rather hear me say uranium one democrat republican i can do that if you'd like but the word crab comes from etymologically not not frapp meaning sieff things waste or rejected matter from the from the medieval latin cropper or chaff i know this is too much i get it you like this stuff and not the little esoteric now but i just thought i would tell you what this all comes from because i started this show why i thought it was a clever joke but i see it went over like hillary clinton went over in the last election you know that's actually a new way of putting she went over like a lead balloon with the way hillary clinton still goes over like a lead balloon she is unbelievable but yes so where we're going to go with this look here i don't think i came in unprepared and i'm just blowing through the show i'm not here are the questions for wednesday the fourth of april that i didn't want to talk about because i can't should we completely withdraw from syria is it time to totally leave the middle east do you support trump pulling out went this is a family show what do you mean do you support trump pulling out of the middle east will create another isis number two question for the day with mueller admitting trump is not a criminal at target of his investigation do you think this investigation will be closed before the election.

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"john harrington" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on WTMA

"The white male john harrington didn't invent the flushing toilet in fifteen ninety six the country would look like but nevertheless the reason that many people use that sort of scatalogical name of crapper is because during world war two servicemen stationed in england actually in world but once saw crackers name on cisterns and used it as army slang saying i'm going to the crapper and i'm just saying how it happened but the word itself crap which many people use is actually a middle english origin and it predates its application to bodily waste i do you want to know all of this stuff would rather hear me say uranium one democrat republican i can do that if you'd like but the word crab comes from etymologically that's actually a new way of putting she went over like a lead balloon he went out with the way hillary clinton still goes over like a lead balloon she is unbelievable but yeah so where we're going to go with this look here i don't think i came in unprepared and i'm just blowing through the show i'm not here are the questions for wednesday the fourth of april that i didn't want to talk about because i can't should we completely withdraw from syria is it time to totally leave the middle east do you support trump pulling out went this is a family show what do you mean you support trump pulling out all u middle east willis create another isis number two question for the day with mueller admitting trump is not a criminal at target of his investigation do you think this investigation will be closed before the election i know you're gonna call because you heard this show before me that he said it's a setup don't call please not interested what action should be taken when the honduran caravan immigrants get to our border.

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"john harrington" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on WLOB

"Was born in eighteen thirty six was a plumber who found the thomas crapper company in london and he was a brilliant guy and if you go to england manhole covers have crackers company's name on them in fact while he didn't invent the flush though it's an interesting fact the flush toilet was invented by john harrington in fifteen ninety six and other great white male invention imagine what the world would be like if it wasn't for him think about white male inventions i mean this is probably one of the best this speech the electric light bulb this beats the teletype this beats the car if the white male john harrington didn't invent the flushing toilet in fifteen ninety six imagine what the country would look like but nevertheless the reason that many people use that sort of scatalogical name of crapper is because during world war two servicemen stationed in england actually in world but once saw crackers name on cisterns and used it as army slang saying i'm going to the crapper and i'm just saying how it happened but the word itself crap which many people use is actually a middle english origin and it predates its application to bodily waste do you want to know all of this stuff would rather hear me say uranium one democrat republican i can do that if you'd like but the word crab comes from etymologically she is unbelievable but yes where we're going to go with this look here i don't think i came in unprepared and i'm just blowing through the show i'm not here are the questions wednesday the fourth of april that i didn't want to talk about because i can't should we completely withdraw from syria is it time to totally leave the middle east do you support trump pulling out went this is a family show.

thomas london john harrington england syria uranium one
"john harrington" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"A tricky if so please please go easy honest ray no our man police were were were very data the a little baffled ira to assist so please please go easy us and let us know what other cultural impact you believe came about via star trek a also let us know if you have other examples of ways in which fiction and culture and the arts moved culture as a whole forward and speaking of examples here are a few examples of listener males the didn't hurt our feelings i first we have one from two uh t o o and that in the east said to pronounce it that way uh and the subject is an extra trivia for the great stink episode which was a fun one to do for us dear been inaugu warmest greetings from malaysia i'm listener to the show since its inception in of enjoyed the various topics you guys have put out so far your most recent episode on the great stink of london was definitely an interesting take on the matter adding some depth in perspective for me on the subject since i last heard it being mentioned in another house to forge podcast plug stuff to blow your minds episode on meazza theory envy evil air we didn't talk with the evil air but yeah the meazza theory is a duisi both your show and stb way uncovered the historical figure john snow while your show additionally covered the figure john harrington this is interesting what i found to be a missed opportunity for you guys may be a little trivial he said it was trivia um yet i can't help it mentioned that kit harrington who protrays hbo's game of thrones character john snow at least according to the actor himself and then he gives us a link is a descendant of said john harrington casey can we get a like a perfect he goes on he does go on he says talk about coincidences perhaps you guys were aware but opted not to mention due to its triviality no sir i can tell you we were not as you just heard our minds being blown and they are in fact all over the walls right now but just in case you guys run aware i thought you might find the little tidbit amusing at least anyway thanks a bunch of putting the show together it's been a.

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"john harrington" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"Preventing plumbing problems uh uh uh uh uh uh ever since john harrington invented the toilet in the late 1500s people have had plumbing problems uh our plumbing systems may be the least noticeable systems in our houses and sometimes we ignore them until we have a big problem or problems and that can get more expensive have you replace the toilet early water heater lately uh how about a dishwasher boro washing machine um did you know that you can spend three thousand dollars on a washing machine today and tear it up in a year uh if you don't have yearly plumbing maintenance and your water pressure checked and it's cheap to have it done the vote leaky faucet you know that one that just drip drip drip s uh maybe uh you've got one of those ones that leaks water out of the base of the handle every time that you lift a handle up is there a coffee kenner some sort of tinfoil container keeping dripping fixtures are pipes from ruining the underside of your cabinets uh do you have to tell your guest sir to jiggle the handle on their way out of the bathroom i mean isn't that embarrassing do you have that one toilet that always seems to clog up um did you know that you were supposed to have plumbing maintenance every twelve months so if you have a water softener a dishwasher a washing machine an icemaker all of those appliances can be severely damaged if your incoming water pressure is too high and let's face it water pressure varies overtime and it has to be checked at least once a year okay i get mine checked i mean saving myself just.

john harrington three thousand dollars twelve months
"john harrington" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"Plumbing problems uh uh uh uh uh ever since john harrington invented the toilet in the late 1500s people have had plumbing problems are plumbing systems may be the least noticeable systems in our houses and sometimes we ignore them until we have a big problem or problems and that can get expensive have you replace the toilet or water heater lately uh how about a dishwasher earl washing machine did you know that you can spend three thousand dollars on a washing machine today and tear it up in a year if you don't have yearly plumbing maintenance and your water pressure checked and it's cheap to have it done a d ayvalik he faucet you know that one that just drip drip drip s uh maybe you've got one of those ones that leaks water out of the base of the handle every time that you lift a handle up is there a coffee kenner some sort of tinfoil container keeping dripping fixtures are pipes from ruining the underside of your cabinets do you have to tell your guests to jiggle to handle on their way out of the bathroom i mean is it that embarrassing you have that one toilet that always seems to clog up did you know that you were supposed to have plumbing maintenance every twelve months uh uh if you have a water softener a dishwasher a washing machine an icemaker all of those appliances can be severely damaged if your incoming water pressure is too high and let's face it water pressure varies overtime and it has to be checked at least once a year okay i get mine checked i mean saving myself just one.

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"john harrington" Discussed on 1070 The Fan

1070 The Fan

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on 1070 The Fan

"The rise with gam three uh you got to see if he's ready he plays out care wondered is he played at the end of the year last year a meaningless game you play up when he's ready you play him do not worried about all the got a bit he has you'll be lost for how much longer as it going to hurt when he's ready you fly half the bride wiggs jmc weekdays three till seven fm wpro seven five at ten seventy the fat the gradient big joe show this is the kind of so alight through the so with a fourover all principal i picked so let's say through now was shocked last week when i went to the locker room and saw the little dance party they had going on little basketball hoop in the corner were they did in is all the receiver area and i told you eat something when you have no leadership in their nothing but chill over gradient big joe until noon weekdays on fm wpro seven five at ten seventy the fan up well yeah i'm goal easy deliver lemon archer on espn radio put don't give up don't ever give off while this of course the beginning of jimmy be week on espn networks and if you wanna do your part you go to v dot org slash donate donated all donations benefit the foundation for cancer research rich hollander john harrington.

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"john harrington" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on WEEI

"All all this john harrington larry hope here and there has little lyrics what are you doing is this a sense of justice a very beginning oak aspiration like i'd start again he needs help in any way let's be honest oh new water as the nosseir not a worry in the world a call pierre in my hair life is good today life is good today well the play touch bell just about three o'clock in the spill on my mind kenyans in palm trees beds still in the bag jude's lied dog rude and cars or the role and powers like this were the votes cast by moreover odds got word grow the talker that was it i could go on live say so far very close very safe sairi verse very active can would you picks are they could just turtles have identified oh are you should we are picked one for each of them i chair yes we picked one that those were your choices curse actually picked that song so much you're gonna sing schneider twain man i feel like a we're so excited for this one this is a job i do that we can turn the lights study the lyrics is tried to memorize number front of your chevalier to your i know you have the leader of course to its kariuki yeah he'll be fine and again you wanna carry out version not correct renault lyrics or voice notre employed lawyer says i won that thank you guys he's fighting i gave you the age of light edge liang church you close it outright more live music today on the apple these wonderful faint that's the of shirts a big part for him in.

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"john harrington" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"The whole the whole season you know they i just like i though a messing with me when i'm talking but that's all obote again there's been questionmarks rounding that position in particular the offense in you know in college football when you see would a affective quarterback can have a game or the the changer the impact that they can have on a game you know everybody is going to be going to be right you know what i'd like we said we have we still have a lotta gate lot of games left letter games lesley i mean it's not i'm not saying hey it's time to see what we have no night saying maybe you won't get him ready you want to get him ready you know it may be time just to see what he can do in in in the line of fire that's what i'm talking about again because like you said because even you know garbage time or time at the end of the game wouldn't be the same 'cause that pressure the pressure's not on you like it is in the in the middle in the heat of that game when the outcome is is still up in the air so i i totally get would get what you're saying do i think we're going to see it i i don't think so i don't think so but again i would i be upset about it now i wouldn't be upset if if like you said even if they throw in their first year easier to you in the first quarter second quarter like they kind of headed scripted with without corn at the beginning of the season for that florida game would i be upset about it no do i think they're going to do it no seven three four to fifty seven three four let's go to the phones let's go to brock what's up bra no matter how you know do well man how about yourself over there are you know what relied but i didn't know that you were uh the peak it oh yeah yeah so your mom is that my son i gu harrison those hawks yes my started quarterback over there i hope are here may farmington hills hair's my way john harrington just broke the.

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"john harrington" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on WCTC

"Of this season a lot of guys to go around and not a lot of plague time for everyone as beta causi checks is swing anywhere around says the first space unpire john harrington own one i just think about it got minute qazi her colleagues if that's these plague time you've got carlos goose monnou who could play first rightfielder third base kyle roller could play first base dh omoro xorriyo could play third base second base or in the outfield as well a one here dominica's these felt off owing two and then you've got great goals and coming back who's it outfielder rica played a bunch of different spots the go along with aaron eggleston justic patchioli christian herrero could play the outfield in the infield scott kelly who's been in everyday player for the patriots this season as versatile infielder just a trap who's made a case to get more playing time now for your rodriguez has been it every day shortstop i mean is it these are all guy is that deserve to be playing every day it is just not enough spots for all of them oh dude admitted qazi outside corner for strike three minute qazi saturday she with puzzled albert strike zone all a game law he shakes said i thought that curve ball one was low at you went around the play not on the play but albert calls it a strike there's now it's your ways a third time admitted qazis struck out today so to out with her uttered first year the top at the seventh at up to the plate cubs yovani get zalis drew a basesloaded walk his last time up he's now reach base safely in 12 of his last fourteen ball games.

john harrington dominica patriots rodriguez albert qazis rica aaron eggleston three minute
"john harrington" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on WCTC

"A strike on one so it does officially go down as a sacrifice spun score that one three getting rodriguez over the second to the patriots playing small ball you're in the top of the first try to get out to an early lead patchily with an rbi opportunity doric against rami lewis from the stretch oon spout off noballs in two strikes the bar stormers in their traditional white jersey's today white pants at a twotone black cap with a wreck brim the patriots once again doubting their alternate blue jerseys with the gray pants and a twotone navy cap with a red grim it's rodriguez off of second one away top of the first were just underway after an hour and seventeen minute rain delay oh to pitch cutting here for lewis grounded up the middle it's over said fielding it is coronado spends around behind the second base bag but the throat of ours they say that patio he's out he was not out glenn parker's irate at first and cory predatory the patriots third base coach spree rents across the diving to have a conversation with john harrington who is the first up pirate today he was not out over a third base goes alfredo rodriguez i would love to see an instant replay of that one i'll take the foreign stormers broadcast youth selden see glenn parker get aggravated on the field for the patriots he jumped up into the air in sort of sworn is arms around in anger after that call from john harrington those are called it goes lancaster is way i thought there was no chance the court out it was going to throw out patchy yoli but they say that he did so there's two out now with a runner at third and up to the plate comes christian barreiro so backtoback please year where there is a close play at first both calls went the foreign stormers way i think trap was out but i could it's worn patchily was saved their herrero takes a fastball low year one ball the no strikes so we'll see what the call is all a look over the replay to see if we could get baby better angle on what happened there that it's the patriots that still have an opportunity to break through here in the top of the.

patriots rami lewis coronado glenn parker john harrington lancaster cory alfredo rodriguez seventeen minute
"john harrington" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"john harrington" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Month may notice reduce speeds side wbz they were talking baseball here it is our august forth it is roger clemens is fifty fifth birthday by the late tonight for those of you who want to field a little older than that yes we we celebrated tom brady's forty th birthday but as roger clemens told us last night he's fifty five at a big event down at the cape tonight on the phone with us is breakin he's with an lb network ahead of the curve he's obviously thought a lot about all of this stuff on bryant it in your book you talk about the baseball revolution in you talk about how many young general managers and also general managers coming out of places like harvard and yale the ellipse dean of course here was was in boston a whole group of people josh parents and others have come come out of the boston office then cherry ten who uh who who was here for awhile lot of young general managers that is that's part of the revolution in the old days the general managers were guys like george weise a here in boston john harrington ah it's or dead indentikit it's it's changing isn't it demographically or no definitely and like you just one smarter people really i mean it used to be where the general manager i would be the only guy in the phone office as well and frequently it would be an xbox player and the fed now although at managers are basically x major league players even though the.

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