23 Burst results for "John Green"

"john green" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

03:32 min | 8 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"This year and I I mean. We should emphasize every time we talk about. This of the things that are are horrible all around the world. This is the least important one and I totally understand that. And you know this is the right absolutely. This is the right decision but my God. I mean we went away from the title. I said this to you when we first started talking about the these huge changes to our daily lives but four weeks ago my life was completely normal except that Liverpool were about to win the Premier League and now nothing in my life is normal except that Liverpool were not about to win the Premier League. I've always been a fan of symmetry. John I can't believe it happened with two games to go in fact right now my son and I are supposed to be about to board an airplane to go to England to see. Afc Wimbledon play Sunderland on Friday and then to see Liverpool play and perhaps clinch the title. But instead we're here the ECHINACEA it's the the ECHINACEA. I'm not a man who likes Tikolo. I'm trying to approach football out of love right now. So let's go back to our old lives. The glory of this season last time we spoke on camera. I mean this is a while ago I went back. You were betting the bank on Danny ings becoming a cop icon to lead Liverpool to glory but the glory we Tobao. He's going to bring it back book and that just puts into context for me. How remarkable it was. This happened since the glory has happened for real for twenty nine thirty eight of this season. You John Green annual family and your friends have grown could from the CUPO GIDDY glory. How have you experienced processing? I've just mostly. I've just been overwhelmed with gratitude. You're call up because I think there are a lot of people involved in Liverpool's success ownership club has been run But it's impossible to imagine this happening without without your club. He makes he turns doubters into believers. He makes people believe in him. He makes people trust him like I would do anything for him. You know like if you're GonNa cop called me needed a favor. Godfather style. I'd be like yes. I will stand outside of the hospital pretending to hold a pistol. Whatever sure of course so I had just been so taken With with him I enjoyed every second I watched at least most of all of those twenty nine games and even the one we lost I enjoyed. I enjoyed this season so much and I kept thinking to myself. This will probably never happen again in my lifetime and so I should drink it in and I did I really did and I know lots of Liverpool fans did too I was. I wasn't on twitter for the last year. And but instead I was. You know in hubs in Indianapolis watching the Games with with real fans you know with real people which was wonderful or I was watching.

Liverpool Danny ings twitter John Green Indianapolis Afc John I England Sunderland
"john green" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

03:07 min | 8 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"Tone it's akin to wallowing in one of FDR's finest fireside chats. How Quarantine Life for you in Indianapolis how is it? You're always you've always had a gift for hyperbole but perhaps never more than in that moment. I am doing all right Today has been a nice day. It's Really Beautiful Day here in Indianapolis which certainly helps. I miss so much but I I miss football. Maybe the most. I knew that there would be hard times in my life. What I what I didn't know and what I don't think any any football fan expected was that we would have to go through those hard times without football. Football is always there for years until it's no but you ready to me about some of the substitutes that you've been trying to fill in like everybody else you you've immersed yourself in the fine work is king but unlike everyone else you ready to me and I find this standing. You wrote to me that telling you king is evidence. The most people are basically good. John Green explained. That is my optimistic. Hot Take on tiger came after I watch tiger king here or my broad conclusions. The systems that exist to keep us from being monsters to each other are clearly not very effective as evidenced by every major character in tiger king air go most people must be basically pretty good because we're clearly not being constrained by the systems. We must be constrained by some genuine compassion for our fellow humans and also hopefully for big cats. Most people south suffering the even tempered manager bitten off. I'll give you Eric Cowie. Dome Brother Gone Awol. Who's just doing it for the animals. Yeah you've got through in the legs. John Rinky Baby. Maybe that Dude on the Jet Ski. Because of the Jet Ski and the Jet Ski Load But Can you make the case for the goodness of Baggage van? Dok Antle for no no. No no no no no. None of the people in the show are good but the fact that they're able to get away with their for so long is evidence that the rest of us must not be that bad inherently because we could be monsters without any repercussions at least according to Tiger King so the goodness of people allowed to even though the people on Good Joan Green perpetually blew my mind thought did not blame a mind that Julie as much as your next statement that you made to me. He said how much comfort you find in reading books during the pandemic about previous pandemics. Yeah I've been reading about the eighteen. Thirty two color offender make in New York City which has been very helpful for me because well for one thing. Everything old is new again. There's so much of history repeating itself but also you know here was a situation in which.

Tiger King football Jet Ski Indianapolis FDR John Rinky Baby Dok Antle John Green Eric Cowie New York City Julie Joan Green
"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

05:31 min | 10 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

"That wasn't that wasn't really my dream. Like I know that that's the dream but like that really wasn't like necessarily what I Like what I thought of as as success good morning he gets Thursday special surprise bonus video so I have written a book that feels good to say. Also a little terrifying. It's called turtles all the way down. It comes out on October tenth and it is available for preorder now Lincoln to do we do below my previous. This is another clip from Johns Youtube Channel. Which posted in the fall of two thousand seventeen when turtles all the way down came out. Although it sold well it was by no means the smash hit that. The fault in our stars was which meant his life is getting a little bit back to normal. He still lives in Indianapolis in an undisclosed location. He still shops at target. He still gets recognised no more and no less than his best friend Chris and he's still spends his time writing and making videos for his brother. Hank I mean that's weird. Basic Question John. Are you happy? Yeah I mean I yeah. I When I was younger when people would ask me that question it almost like offended me because I thought that happiness was so beside the point and that the reason we you know the reason we were here was to try to be helpful to each other And then to try to pay attention and that when you're trying to be helpful in you're trying to pay attention sometimes you're happy and sometimes you're not but happiness isn't the point and part of me still feels that way but I do think that that younger than me might have slightly undervalued happiness because when you when you can approach the world From from base point of a feeling of well-being it's easier to pay sustained attention. It's easier to open yourself up to the world You know it's easier to make yourself vulnerable to the world and that's really important. And so I I yeah yes I'm I am happy and yes. I think that's important but that's another question which is sort of going back to the very beginning part that we've been circling around this whole time. Which is the sort of the wise. They're suffering right and lake. Yeah it seems like. You've you wrestled with the question of suffering in like the idea of suffering and actual suffering yourself and I and I guess where you had a version of God in your head when you graduated from college and and like that version gut sort of like guess destroyed by your time in the in the children's hospital do you have a version now. Yeah yeah I I still read the Gospels? I still go to Church sometimes. I still I still value. Though the lenses that religious experience gives to those big questions I find it. I find it helpful like I I I I find it helpful to Like in the Episcopal Church we We kneel a lot and I'm I I really I. It may be that rather than having anything to do with God or faith or whatever that I just like Kneeling are just like You know yeah get it getting down on my knees and saying please and thank you. Even if there's no one to please or thank I never i. Just don't I'm not that interested in the question of whether God is really real or like whether we made got up like I think the critical thing for me is that we don't suffer alone and we don't have to suffer alone that that we can be with each other and care for each other right so for me. It's not a question so much of. Why do we suffer? It's a question of how can we? How can how can we lessen suffering? And where we can't listen it. How can we be in solidarity with those who are suffering without fail hosted by me and produced by Rob Zip go molly Mesic Caitlyn Buki and it is edited by me and Devin Taylor mixing by Keegan's Emma Music by Bobby Lord Special? Thanks to Jenny Heller. For sharing her John Green tour video with us. If you like without fail follow the show. You can get every episode for free through spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks for listening. Hey before we go. We have a favorite ask. We would love it if you took just a few minutes to answer some survey questions for us. It would really help us out. Good without fail dot show slash survey seem small but it really does help us find sponsors who support the show one more time. That's without fail dot show slash survey..

Lincoln Jenny Heller Indianapolis Episcopal Church Mesic Caitlyn Buki spotify Hank Chris Bobby Lord Rob Zip Devin Taylor John Green Keegan Emma Music
"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

02:42 min | 10 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

"And I bought I bought into that lie Out of I guess a feeling of desperation and and you did discover that it was a lie. It sounds like didn't yeah. Well Yeah I mean for one thing. It did not did not result in me like suddenly being able to write. Well it's it's a little hard to. It's a little hard to try to lake. Rationally analyse some of these choices. Because they don't come from a place of reason they like. It's a little bit of the wrong matrix to apply to it. I think but you know eventually. Eventually I realized that I needed to a needed to find a medication. That was going to work for me and I needed to take it every day and I mean in addition to the other things that I do take care of myself including you know going to therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy techniques that I've learned over the years. Yeah must've been strange. I think I don't know if this happened or not. But while you're struggling with that there's this other thing that I that I would imagine as equal insidious which you should be happy. Yeah for sure I like because you you like what your life. It was like you were at the pinnacle of your success. Yeah and like I guess with like outwardly. You've had the most sort of public you've got this really successful youtube business you've got like a a bestseller you've got a movie based on the bestseller. You're you're you're living the dream and and and and that's the point where you're sort of at one of your lowest moments in your life right. I think that's pretty common. Actually is it so I mean I'm wondering like it's it's clearly not there's no relationship between sort of outward success and and happiness or it seems like there isn't is is the is there an inverse relationship in some ways like you said it's it's pretty common like is it actually the opposite like this kind of like outside. Success can can trigger sort of a breaker or decline for me. Personally yeah I mean you. You said like you're living the dream which which was which was true and I don't I really I. I am so grateful that That that all of that happened and and that you know these really lovely movies were made by wonderful people.

youtube
"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

10:15 min | 10 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

"This is a youtube video from right. Around the release Felton are stars you see dimly lit wouldn't stage a medium sized theater. John's brother Hank introduces him. John Walks out onstage shyly with a book in his hands. The crowd going bonkers the screaming like that free book reading the fault in our stars shot to the top of the New York Times Bestseller List at the La Times festival books. Align of two thousand eight hundred fans waited to get their copies signed. Take that Stephanie. Meyer John's life. As he knew it had changed for good we ended up having to move just because people kept Like we hadn't taken any steps to make our address private and that became a bit of a bit of an issue as look you up and just come to your house yeah. How often did that happen a lot like multiple times a week? Are you kidding me? No what would they do? How does that look what happens? You're just in your house and there's a ring on the doorbell. I mean there were a variety of a variety of responses. I mean I think sometimes it's just you know young people who are curious or who have heard that like we live in that neighborhood or tell me about the first time that happened. Somebody knocked on my door and said that they heard that I lived there. And what their book and so. I signed the book but then the next day like five people came I think that the first person might have mentioned it in school or something and then My wife was like pretty frank with them about like the importance of having those boundaries. I guess she yelled at the kids know she yelled no. She didn't yell. It was she who is she. She did say like he's not he's not gonNA sign. Your books should probably the right call. You know it's just it's a weird. It was a weird thing overall because we had never even crossed our minds to think about our. You know our privacy. We're you like I mean. I'm just trying to picture this in Indianapolis which is sort of like it's a pretty you know it's a medium size midwestern city. Where like there's not a lot of Bestselling authors wondering around was the fame more concentrated on you there. I don't know how did that impact what it was like for you. The fact that you were in Indianapolis I think maybe at first it was a little more concentrated but then like people just were like. Oh yeah these areas at target again. I don't know I I I remember complaining about it. Once or like feeling mean always felt bad about complaining about it but sometimes. I would complain about it. My friend Chris And Chris told me something that that was really helpful. He said you know. Every time I go to target I get recognized by someone. I went to middle school with somebody. I went to high school with or you know by somebody. I work with or somebody. I played golf with fifteen years ago. And I don't have all of these issues about getting recognized at target like I just expect it and you know you should probably just expect it. That's a really good advice. You've really good friends. Start making an stop making such a big deal out of here like cry me a river. Mr bestselling author just target man. People know each other but still it was weird and John. Process the weirdness in real time on Youtube Channel then the people start to show up and there are a lot of them. They were my face on their torso or doctor who shirts and they bring book aches and they have things. I wrote tattooed on their bodies sometimes in borderline inappropriate places all of which is amazing and beautiful and also of course completely terrifying. When did you return to your desk and start writing again? And what was that like? Oh not great. It's not was. It wasn't good in in two thousand fourteen and twenty fifteen. I did try really really hard to write. Write a book and it didn't happen and it was. It was pretty painful. And and how did the inability to write manifest? What would like before you? Just go and sit at the starbucks and then I was aware of the fact that like lots of people wanted me to write another book right readers but also people who worked in publishing foreign publishers. And you know all all kinds of different people Really wanted another book for me. And and so you know I I'd be lying if I didn't acknowledge that pressure before it's something that they that it feels like they're letting you do. Yeah and all of a sudden it becomes something that they want you to do quickly or that they or that they need you to. Do you know that they have like quarterly results that are contingent upon you doing this thing? Yeah do you remember meeting in particular that that that that was made clear to or you felt that or Su. So the only time I felt it directly was one time when I was travelling in Europe. And I don't want to say who it was but one of one of my foreign publishers was was like we really. We really need a book from you. and laid out the reasons why like it was an existential threat to the company not to have a book for me which was which was not super helpful. How not to get a book out of an author? Let me lay out the powerpoint like I should. I should have just heard that book guy. Of course you should've gone. That's the whole point right. Yeah I get for me. I've always I've always liked writing partly because it was I. It's an escape it so it's a way out of myself and because I couldn't write it felt like that had been taken away from me and then over time it started to feel more and more like I was stuck inside of this this prison of myself I was never gonNA have a way out of it again coming up after the break. The prison closes further in on John. This episode is brought to you by mail chimp. So you're ready to be your own boss. You're asking yourself now. What start with mail chimp? That's what they're all in. One Marketing Platform puts easy to use tools and expertise right at your fingertips so you can give your business. The strongest start with an e mail. Builder website templates in social posts scheduler. You can jump start your company and grow your audience testing and learning as you go. Learn more about the all in one marketing platform at MILL CHIP DOT COM. This episode is brought to you by better for it. A new podcast from ADP hosted by Francesca Ramsey. We all make mistakes better for it. Looks at how mistakes have shaped the lives and careers of visionaries and business leaders and helps them think differently about what they're working for. You'll hear from an entrepreneur who ventured out on his own and so I went out. I took seven hundred dollars had in the bank but my own pickup truck took some fliers business cards and a week later ahead of business and HR rule breaker. Who's learned why we all care about work in the first place? Proud of the work that you do. You Wanna be able to tell your friends about it. You Wanna be able to to feel like you're making a difference. You'll hear how. They worked their way through their mistakes and came out better for it. Listen on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Look back without fail at my conversation. With best selling author. John Green. So it's been almost five years since my most recent novel. The fault nurse Stars was published. Why nothing new since then? Well in my case because a very public success happened to coincide with a series of very private failures. This is a video posted to Youtube Youtube Channel in late. September two thousand sixteen as usual. He's sharing his struggles with his audience. An audience that by this point had bloomed to over a million subscribers talks about the struggles. He's been going through to write. His next book has gone through several different drafts of several different ideas. About how the movie? Adaptation of the fault in our stars came out and let him to a sort of unsettling realization and somewhere in that period. My job stopped being person who writes books which is a present tense job title and became person who wrote that one book which is a past tense job title. I was elated in grateful that the fault. Nour's was reaching so many readers but at the same time I was terrified because I felt like I could never follow it up John. Son's anxious in this video but it doesn't really convey the severity of what he was going through behind the scenes at a really bad really bad period where I was really really sick like I couldn't reader function or I wasn't a very useful parent and couldn't pay attention to the world outside myself with any kind of clarity For several months and it yeah it sucked it was it was awful an the the intensity one of the one of the things that so horrible about pain and I think I think for me anyway. For of psychic pain and physical pain is it's like essential inexpressive ability. It's like resistance to language. I was in this intense psychic pain and I also felt like I didn't have any way to share it like I couldn't find any kind of direct form or expression for it I could only find like Simonis to describe it I mean the short answer for for why this happened that I I take medication and I stopped taking it Can I ask why you stopped taking? Yeah Yeah I- I worried that it was keeping me from writing right and I mean that's that's It's an insidious and old lie in in creative fields that somehow untreated mental. Illness will make you more creative.

youtube Meyer John Indianapolis John Walks New York Times Bestseller Felton Stephanie Chris starbucks John Green Europe spotify Nour Hank Simonis ADP Francesca Ramsey
"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

05:59 min | 10 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

"Writing during the day and making videos. And how? How are you feeling about your future at that point? Is this like. Are you thinking like this is going to be my life were thinking? I was hopeful at that point that I could write for a living for for the rest of my career but yeah I mean I. I certainly didn't have any expectation of of what what ended up happening. Thank you for providing a perfect through to our break by the way I what ended up happening after these words from our sponsors seriously. That is what's coming up after the break. This episode with that fail is brought to you by Asana. What if you could spend less time juggling emails and meetings and more time doing the work that matters most to your team? Asana was built to answer that question. It's a work management PLATFORM DESIGNED TO GIVE TEAMS CLARITY. So they understand their plans and goals and how achieve them together? Whether you're planning your next marketing campaign launching new products for on boarding new vendors. Asana is there to help you. Reduce the busy work that wastes time from small companies to global enterprises millions of people across one hundred ninety five countries around the world. Use Asana plan organize and execute. Their work try it for free and learn more ASSANGE DOT com. That's S. A. N. A. DOT COM. This episode is brought to you by better for it. A new podcast from ADP hosted by Francesca Ramsey. We all make mistakes better for it. Looks at mistakes and lessons. Learned how they've shaped the careers of visionaries and business leaders and helped them think differently about what they're working for. You'll hear from an entrepreneur who ventured out on his own and so I went out took seven hundred dollars. I had in the bank but my own pickup truck took some fliers business cards and a week later ahead of business ended visionary. Who learned from other visionaries? I was around innovators all the time at net flicks. Nobody says yeah. I know it's kind of Funky but we'll just work on it making a little bit better. We'd be like throw it away. We can do better. You'll hear how. They worked their way through their mistakes and came out better for it. Listen on spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome back to without fail and my conversation with John. Green by twenty ten John Green had published three Solo. Novels hit growing Youtube Channel that he ran with his brother and he built a quiet and successful life for himself in Indianapolis but all of that was about to change police. The quiet part because it was around this time that he was entering the homestretch on his fourth book. The plot was inspired by the death of a young woman who was part of his youtube community. The book tells the story of two teenagers with Terminal Cancer. Who Meet in a support group and fall in love. It's got kids and cancer and heart break. It's unbelievably sad. That book of course is the fault in our stars so I read it recently. I hadn't read Because I was already a very old by the time you're young adults who came out and I was. I read it in basically one sitting and I pretty much wept the entire time My phone I was on the couch sitting next to my wife who was like you know sort of like answering emails or whatever and then she added me asked me a question. I would look up and I had tears streaming down my face and I was like what she thought I was like. Just really pathetic. Sorry I feel bad. Did you cry while you were writing it? Oh Yeah every day. I mean. I think from the perspective. I rooted at at the starbucks at eighty six inch in Indianapolis almost all of it and I think from the perspective of the people who worked at starbucks. I was just a person who come in at like eight in the morning and open my computer and cry for three hours and then close my computer and leave. I definitely cried every day. One of the weirdest. I guess things about this about your story. Is that you you sit in a starbucks and you cry every day for months and months and months and then you send it to your publisher and then the world the then it just explodes. What was the first inkling that like that you did have a hit on your hands will before the book came out. I told my publisher. I wanted to sign the first printing like I wanted to sign a sheet. That would be bound into every copy of the first edition and they're like. Yeah that's doable. And I thought that'd be like ten thousand or twenty thousand sheets of paper and it turned into like one hundred and fifty thousand and so while I was signing their sheets of paper. I was cognizant of the fact that like. Oh if I didn't know that every every one of those copies would sell but like I was signing more sheets than I sold hardcovers of all of my books combined so I definitely knew that it was already different. You know but then after the book came out it was Like it had a big first week but then the second week was almost as big which which was very unusual and weird and I called I remember. I called my agent and I said when when when is this going to end and she said I don't know if the twilight line seem stressful to you vicariously. Yeah here you have your own line now. That is actually yours. Yeah Yeah just reached an audience that I never..

starbucks Indianapolis John Green publisher Youtube spotify Terminal Cancer ADP cancer Francesca Ramsey S. A. N.
"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

08:33 min | 10 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

"Hello John by now. You have received my message that we will no longer be communicating through any textual means no more instant messaging no more emailing only video blogging. So this is the first video they ever posted. Its from Hank to John. Just a couple of minutes long. Hank is in extreme close up in what looks like a dark bedroom or a basement with this poster of a bear on the wall. Next Day John responded with his own video. I'm not going to be good at this. Good Morning Hank is January. Second two thousand seven. I just spent two hours and thirteen minutes downloading your two men one second video which can mean only one thing that I'm at mom and dad's house the last residents in the United States of America with dial up Internet. So we're you even thinking about this as something that you wanted people to watch her with that. Where was that on your list of priorities for this project? I would say that we were conscious of having an audience. I mean early on. Hank said to me something that I have held very close ever. Since which is he said. It doesn't matter how many people watch what we make it matters. How many people love what we make and you know. The Internet is terrible at that metric. It's terrible at measuring depth of affection. I mean four or five hundred people were watching and so to us like those amazing like to be able to make something for for four hundred people twice a week or three times a week. Was You know a wonderful opportunity to go back to the beginning of our conversation? You know in some ways like I had the the room full of people that I wanted to talk to when when when I dreamed of becoming a minister rate I didn't yet know. Like what kind of conversations to have with those people but felt really cool to be able to talk to a few hundred people and they were you know they were really really involved In in the show from the beginning so how how did they show that well like early on our member I was. I was hospitalized for this weird infection behind my eye and my brother said if you can take a picture of yourself with something on your head to cheer John Up and I think of like the three hundred fifty views of that video initially got we received like three hundred twenty pictures and this was in an age before the iphone so like it was R- reasonably hard to take a picture of yourself with something on your head and so yeah. That was really. That was the first moment which was only a couple of months in hank and I were both like. Oh that's weird like all most everybody who's watching. This cares enough to go out of their way. Send an email to hank with a picture of an Iguana on their head or something. That's what we call the business. A higher response rate slowly over time. The audience for the Youtube Channel grew a couple hundred subscribers than a couple of thousand and John continued to write two thousand six. He published his novel an abundance of Catherine's and in two thousand eight. He published another one called paper towns. He was married. He had a house with a lawn. He had a beloved Youtube Channel and a successful career as an author. John was content and at this point. Like how did you think about? Did you have like? Did you want more readers? What were your hopes and dreams? When it came to finding an audience and the size of that audience I really liked my audience back then and I felt really lucky to be able to to write for you know for for anybody and you know from my perspective. I mean I I think. Paper towns sold thirty or forty thousand copies in hardcover and that seemed great. That seemed wonderful. I didn't I remember. I did a I did assigning once like not too long after paper. Towns came out in two thousand eight with Stephanie. Meyer who wrote the twilight books? Okay and they were all the. It was the biggest audience I'd ever I'd ever read for a very wide margin. Most of my events at that time were attended by between zero and five people and there were like two hundred kids in this in this room and they were all they. All these like handmade t-shirts You know talking about Twilight and and and the characters and you know the questions that they asked were like so detailed and so in the weeds and they'd responded so deeply to the world building of of this book and then we did the signing and I had like a line of three people and you know next to me. There's this line of two hundred kids and I remember thinking like that's just never going to be me because I I. I'm just never going to write a book like that. That people respond to in that way. Did you want it to be you? I didn't really to be honest. I didn't it. Seemed seemed stressful You know like it i. It seemed a little scary like to to to be honest with you like I. That's what I was thinking. You didn't have any jealousy of her line. I don't I don't know I maybe I did I pry again i. I thought I was doing good like I. Yeah I don't know I I I never Did I maybe I did. I don't know You can't remember you. Did you being honest with me Tom? Green like are you like or is it like I try and now I'm trying to figure out like are you trying to dig up feeling of jealousy so that you'll seem like more like a normal human being and you actually didn't feel jealous at all. I or did you actually really or did you actually feel jealous and you're just like night. You're sort of embarrassed with that feeling which has no because I know I want a no. I definitely would prefer to Joe because I worry that if I don't if I don't portray myself as having been jealous than I will seem ungrateful rate if I'm if I'm if I'm running how I wanNA come off in the interview I was. I was jealous. Yes I think but you weren't. Actually I mean mostly I just felt like. Oh my God like. That's that's intense like that. That seems A widow overwhelming. Yeah well it's also like a little bit more to be clear. You had a pretty. You had a pretty great gig right like you were. You were successful enough that like you got lots of great positive feedback but it wasn't like a gigantic hassle. Yeah exactly so so I guess just sort of like like. Let's pick a day. I don't know around two thousand nine You're writing novels. You're making these videos. What does an average day look like for you now from the outside so now? I'm living in Indianapolis a married we're living in. Our first home has a lawn. I after like mow the lawn which I had romanticized so much but then it's it's terrible. I don't know if you've I imagine that you have never Mo- mode along I've I take that as a compliment because I have in fact muddle on but I sound like such a witty or being Urbani that that that I must come off as a person who's their middle on I I I I just always. I imagine you living in a living in an apartment somewhere. I grew up fan seventy miles from Cincinnati Ohio. Are you serious? Oh I'm from West. You know exactly you know exactly where I'm with. Yeah so okay. Let me let me go back. Then I apologize for maligning. You're a year You're one you're one experience. I accept your apology. Animals so secretly flattered that you made the mistake and embarrassed about being flattered if we can continue down this rabbit hole of my emotional response to your comment. Cake has many layers..

Hank John Up Youtube United States America Cincinnati Catherine Indianapolis Stephanie Meyer Ohio Tom Joe Mo
"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

02:24 min | 10 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

"Even though they're very busy people and they you know dropped everything and then took me you know and then took me home. You know the twenty four year old and a very very fragile state and you know fed me and got me to. My doctors appointments every day and and slowly. Over the course of several months I began to kind of recover. I guess you know a a a sense of strength A feeling though starting to feel a little more resilient over time eventually that feeling of resilience became strong enough for John to go back to Chicago and pick up where he left off got his old job back doing data entry and conjoined twin book reviewing. And you start to think more seriously about his own writing over the next several years John would go to work in the morning and then come home at night and right. That writing eventually turned into a book that book got the attention of a publisher and in two thousand and five looking for Alaska. John's debut novel was published. It went on to win a prestigious award. The Prince Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature. Which meant John Officially had a new job novelist? At this point most people in transposition would probably hunker down and focus on writing their next novel. Mike that would be enough rate and that is which did but it was also around this time that he stumbled onto a side Gig when that would grow to become as much a part of his identity as being an author was. He launched a youtube channel with his brother Hank. Well let's talk about your Youtube career so tell me about like your journey to Youtube. How did you first decide? You know what I'm going to put up a video myself on Youtube and do that. What was the? How did that happen so I went to boarding school in my brother was eleven and I never really knew him outside of childhood and I admired him? I thought he was a cool guy. Thought it was interesting but I didn't know him that well. Oh interesting and we were by two thousand six. We were becoming closer but we never talked. On the phone we only communicated via instant messenger and and so we sort of together this idea. Well what if we started making of a video series where we talk back and forth to each other and if we did that for a year we might you know really get to know.

Youtube John Hank Mike Young Adult Literature Alaska publisher Chicago
"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

09:09 min | 10 months ago

"john green" Discussed on Without Fail

"January twelfth two thousand twelve novel. The fault in our stars was published it was the fourth solo novel for my guests. Today young adult author John Green and in the first week of its publishing. The fault in our stars sold more copies than all of John's previous hardcover books combined. It reached number one on the New York. Times bestseller lists received acclaim from critics and authors alike. Two Thousand Fourteen movie adaptation of the book came out in other words. It was a massive massive success but other success for John it ended up leading to some dark places which actually brings us to a warning before we get started. There are some discussions of mental health difficulties in this episode. So that's subject can be difficult to triggering for you. Please take care listening gentleman that back. When he first graduated from college in two thousand he didn't think writing was a realistic career path for him literary stardom all the problems that it could bring with it. We're not at all on his radar. His first job out of college in fact was as an Episcopalian Minister in training in Columbus Ohio. Why did you want to a minister? being a minister appealed to me partly because it was a way to talk about big ideas with smart people but I had completely romanticized all the ideas around being a minister. What was your romantic ideal of being an Episcopal priest like what what are the version in your head. Look like Getting to deliver a speech once a week about a subject that interested me to an audience of people who would care about my opinion but I remember like early on in that process. I was in the basement with the minister who is like the head of my discernment process or whatever and he was ordering candles out of Out of a catalog and I was like. Oh you got to order the candles out of the Catalog. And he was like yeah. I mean what do you think happens to candles man like they burned down and then you have to buy more candles and I was like oh no I don't want that job ordering candles too greedy and real for you. Yeah it just seemed like stressful and on the kind of person who forgets to order the candles and then suddenly it's Sunday morning and the poor kids who light the candles on any candles. Elijah's all that stuff started stressed. Me Out and then the other the other thing that he said to me that was pretty impactful was he said you realize you're going to have to go to church a lot and I was like yeah. I LIKE GOING TO CHURCH. And he was like yeah. I know you like going to church but do you like going to church eight times a week every week for the rest of your life and the answer. That was like no. When was the moment you decide? Okay I WANNA do this any more than well when I was working as a student chaplain at the children's hospital it was apparent to me pretty early on that. All of my fancy ideas about why suffering happens in the role that you know a an omnipotent. God has an suffering all of those like ideas that I'd read about in books were completely useless and total bullshit. Whoa so like what ideas. Oh I mean there's all kinds of the problem is is called like theocracy in Religious Studies like the problem of evil. How do you deal with evil in a world where there's extensively this God who's all good all knowing and all powerful? It's just none of that stuff even though I believed it none of it was very helpful. none of it could really stand up. I guess to the To the scope of suffering. And that's what you're confronting every day as part of your job. Yeah Yeah This this kid came into the hospital with bad burns and I It was the scope of this kid suffering. You know the amount of Just the amount of pain that he was obviously and you know he was an innocent kid in my opinion in you know and I know I. I don't want to step on anyone's faith or anything. But in my opinion there's no world where that where that happens and And God is powerful and that was. That was a change in your faith. Yes for sure for sure that that kid he was only three or four years old had yeah had a huge impact on my life and and for a long long time. I just assumed that he had died and I was really. I would think sometimes you know I could just google him here. He had had a pretty easy to Google name. But then I just I didn't WanNa know you know and then eventually I did. I did Google a few years ago. And he's he's fine keys. He's fine. He's doing great so many wrong about you never know. Did that thought to you know it didn't occur to exit. It's occurring to be now. Yeah maybe I need to go back and reevaluate I. DuNno back in two thousand though young post-collegiate John Green didn't know what to do next. His faith had changed. He didn't know what he wanted to do with his life. But there's one thing that he had always loved writing he'd been doing it since high school and he thought maybe I could get a job not as a writer necessarily but somewhere in the vicinity of writing and so we moved to Chicago and got a job. A Magazine called book lists which reviewed books mostly data entry. Okay but they did a review books as well got it. You said I. I read some some someplace where you said that. You specialize in reviewing books about Islam and conjoined twins. Well I had a number of reviewing niches. There's a lot of books about conjoined twins. You'd be surprised. I am surprised there are. There are far more books about conjoined twins than there are conjoined twins currently in the world. I think it's just ears instable two novelists as You know as as a metaphor for like where it is one person end and another person begin and all that stuff. I. I don't know the extent that you can talk about this or want to talk about this but I I understand that it was like during this period and Chicago. That you that you underwent sort of beer. Bad of anxiety and depression. Can you talk about that? Like what was how did what what brought that on. And what was going on in Your Life. At that time well had gone through a big break up that. I thought at the time caused my depression but I now of course understand that The depression contributed to the break-up And I just There's a great Emily Dickinson poem. There's a line something like and then a plank in reason broke and I dropped down and down and that's what it was like for me. It was like You know almost like the ground fell out from underneath me and I just kept plummeting and I got you know I. I got really sick I have I. I've always had problems with anxiety. I have obsessive compulsive disorder and I've had periods I'd had periods before Where I struggled with with depression but this was much more serious and then eventually I I called my parents and And they came in. They came they drove up to Chicago and and took me home and I tried to quit my job. I went into the office explained to my boss that I that I needed to quit because I had to go home because I had to like get into you. Know a a more serious Mental health treatment kind of situation and my boss was like Why don't you just take a few weeks off like who said anything about quitting? Let's take it down a notch. Take a few weeks off and let us know How you're feeling after that and So I was like but you know how. How are you going to? How how's the magazine? GonNa come out like how are you? You gotta find someone to do my job. These books aren't GonNa Review themselves. This data isn't going to enter itself more like he's like a character out of a mystery novel and he would always call me kid and he paused for a long time. He said I want you to take this the wrong way kid. But I think we're going to get by and you know it's just incredibly generous and and and then that job was there for me when I when I got better what what was the. What was the event? What led you to call your parents. I was suicidal.

John Green Google Chicago depression A Magazine Times New York Elijah Columbus Ohio writer Emily Dickinson
Author John Green: Reaching young adults and dealing with mental illness

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 10 months ago

Author John Green: Reaching young adults and dealing with mental illness

"If you don't know John green the teenagers in your life as an author dominates the young adult bestseller list good morning heck it's Tuesday you're on the line he is really right so John green fans don't know in Willard tonight he is a serious mental health condition I had a lot of self destructive impulses and I felt scared all the time were you scared of the short answer is

Willard Young Adult Bestseller John Green
Author John Green: Reaching young adults and dealing with mental illness

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 10 months ago

Author John Green: Reaching young adults and dealing with mental illness

"If you don't know John green the teenagers in your life as an author dominates the young adult bestseller list good morning heck it's Tuesday you're on the line he is million YouTube subscribe so John green fans don't know in Willard tonight he is a serious mental health condition I had a lot of self destructive impulses and I felt scared all the time were you scared of the short answer is every

John Willard Young Adult Bestseller Youtube
Ingesting Poison: Hot Dogs vs. Chemotherapy

The Anthropocene Reviewed

02:53 min | 1 year ago

Ingesting Poison: Hot Dogs vs. Chemotherapy

"Hello and welcome to the anthroposophic reviewed a podcast where we reviewed different facets of the human centered clan it on a five star scale. I'm john green and today i'll be reviewing two forms of ingesting poisons on the one hand. We have chemotherapy of medical intervention to treat cancer sir on the other hand. We have a hot dog eating contest. Let's begin at the corner of surf and stillwell stillwell avenues in brooklyn's coney island home to nathan's famous a restaurant that started out in nineteen sixteen as a hot dog stand run by polish immigrants nathan and ida hand worker the hotdogs were made from ida's recipe and if they tasted like contemporary nathan's famous miss hotdog they were fine. A nathan's famous hot dog is not the best food you will ever eat or even the best hotdog you'll will ever eat but there's something special about the experience of eating one the brackish smell of the atlantic ocean in your nose the fading in in of the once great coney island in your ears and the hot dogs do have a pedigree they've been eaten by king george the sixth and franklin delano eleanor roosevelt stalin even supposedly eight one at the yalta conference in nineteen forty-five coney island used to be the huckster capital of the world where fast talking barker's wearing straw hats would sell you on this carnival attraction or that one now like all places that survive on nostalgia. It's mostly a memory of itself. The beaches are still packed in summertime. There's still align at nathan's famous and you can instill ride the carousel but they're not selling fun anymore. They're selling reminiscence except one day. A year are coney island becomes. It's old self for better and for worse every year on the u._s.'s independence day of july fourth tens hinz of thousands of people flooded the streets to witness a spectacular exercise in metaphorical resonance known as the nathan's famous hot dog eating contest like the most widely observed annual celebrations of american independence are one fireworks displays which are essentially imitation battles complete with rockets and bombs and to a contest in which people bowl from all over the world attempt to discover how many hotdogs and buns can be ingested by a human within ten minutes to quote the great yakov smirnoff enough. What a country like

Nathan Coney Island Franklin Delano Eleanor Roosev Yakov Smirnoff John Green Yalta Brooklyn U._S. Barker Ten Minutes One Hand One Day
Author John Green: Reaching young adults and dealing with mental illness

60 Minutes

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Author John Green: Reaching young adults and dealing with mental illness

"With his multi media multi million dollar empire John green is using his can his keyboard in this video camera allies teeny social awkwardness in also to de stigmatize mental illness you've said that it's important for young people to be able to see successful productive adults challenge by mental illness yeah expand on that well I have a really wonderful life I have a really rich fulfilling life I also have a the serious chronic mental health problem and those are mutually exclusive and the truth is that lots of people have chronic mental health problems

John Green Million Dollar
John Green And Million Dollar discussed on KRLD Programming

KRLD Programming

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

John Green And Million Dollar discussed on KRLD Programming

"With its multi media multi million dollar empire John green is using his pen this keyboard in this video camera to normalize teenage social awkwardness in also to de stigmatize mental illness you've said that it's important for young people to be able to see successful productive adults challenge by mental illness yeah expand on that well I have a really wonderful life I have a really rich fulfilling life I also have a the serious chronic mental health problem and those are mutually exclusive and the truth is that lots of people have chronic mental health problems and still have good lives

John Green Million Dollar
Author John Green: Reaching young adults

CBS News 60 Minutes

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Author John Green: Reaching young adults

"Well you may not have heard of the author John green be assured that the teenagers in your life have he's America's answered a JK Rollings with his mega bestseller responding blockbuster movies green has become wildly popular thanks largely to his loyal teenage audience as we first reported in October green is also the rare literary talent who doubles as a podcaster any YouTube star his success stems from his intuitive understanding of adolescence his ability to meet them on their level and on their devices to those who consider today's teens a disaffected tribe rarely glancing up from their phones in video games John green offers a counter narrative so do I teenagers sixty minutes core audience I understand Sir you know you write a lot about teenagers yeah why this covert they're doing so many things for the first time and there's an intensity to that you know there's an intensity to falling in love for the first time and also there's an intensity asking the big questions about life and meaning that just isn't matched anywhere else you said before that adults underestimate teenagers well I think sometimes teenagers maybe don't have though language to talk to us in ways that seem compelling Thomas and maybe that makes it easy for us to dismiss them or think of them as less intellectually curious or intellectually sophisticated than we are but I don't think that's true at all

America Jk Rollings Thomas John Green Youtube Sixty Minutes
"john green" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"john green" Discussed on Fresh Air

"We've handed over to computers from assigning credit scores to recommending YouTube videos to diagnosing cancer. The more we rely on them the more of a hash. They seem to make things are linguist. Jeff numbered has these thoughts on a word that has come to stand in for the power technology wheels in our lives, algorithms were around for a very long time before the public paid them any notice the word itself is derived from the name of a ninth century, Persian mathematician, and the notion is simple enough, and algorithms just any step by step procedure for accomplishing some task from making the morning coffee to performing cardiac surgery computers. Use al. Them's for pretty much everything they do adding up a column of figures resizing a window saving a file to a disk. But all those things usually just happen the way they're supposed to we don't have to think about what's going on under the hood. But algorithms got harder to ignore when they started taking over tasks that used to require human judgement, deciding which criminal defendants get bail winnowing job applications prioritizing stories in a news feed, all at once the media are full of disquieting headlines, like how to manage our algorithm overlords, and the algorithm -cation of the human experience. Ordinary muggles may not know exactly how an algorithm works its magic, and a lot of people use the word just as a tech inflicted abracadabra, but we're reminded every day, how unreliable these algorithms can be ads for vitamin supplements show up in our mail feet, while wedding invitations are buried in the junk file an app sends us off a crowded highway and lens as bumper to bumper in local streets. Okay. These are mostly just inconveniences, but they shake our confidence in the algorithms, that are doing more important work. How can I trust Facebook's algorithms to get hate speech? Right when they've got other algorithms telling advertisers that my interest include the celebrity apprentice, beauty, pageants and the world wrestling entertainment, hall of fame. It's hard to resist anthropomorphized these algorithms, we endow them with insight and intellect or with human frailties like bad taste and bias. Disney actually personify the algorithm, literally in their two thousand eighteen animated movie. Ralph breaks the internet in the form of a character who has the title of head algorithm at a video sharing site. She's an imperious fashion east recalls. Meryl Streep the devil wears Prada as she sits at a desk, swiping through cat videos and saying, no, no. Yes. Tech companies tend to foster that anthropomorphic allusion when they tout their algorithms, as artificial intelligence or just a I to most people that term evokes the efforts to create self aware beings. Capable of reasoning and explaining themselves like commanded data of Star Trek or Hal in two thousand and one that was the aim of what computer scientists called good old fashioned by. But I now connotes what's called second wave a or narrow a that's a very different project focused on machine. Learning. The idea is to build systems that can mimic human behavior without having to understand it. You train and algorithm, in something like the way, psychologists have trained pigeons to distinguish pictures of Charlie Brown from pictures of Lucy, you'll give it a pile of data posts that Facebook users have engaged with comments that human reviewers have classified as toxic or benign messages tagged as spam or not spam. And so on. The algorithm. Choose over thousands or millions of factors until it can figure out for itself, how to tell the categories apart, or predict which posts are video somebody will click on at that point. You can set it loose in the world. These algorithms can be quite adept at specific tasks. Take a very simple system. I built with two colleagues some years ago that could sort out text, according to their Jarrah, we trained in algorithm on a set of texts that were tagged as news articles editorials fiction and so on, and it masticated their words and punctuation until it was pretty good at telling them apart. For instance, it figured out for itself, that when a text contained an explanation point, or question, Mark, it was more likely to be an editor aerial than a news story. But it didn't understand the text. It was processing or have any concept of the difference between an opinion and a new story. No more than those pigeons know who Charlie Brown and Lucy are. The university of Toronto computer scientists Brian Cantwell Smith, makes this point very crisply in a forthcoming book called the promise of artificial intelligence. However, impressive, they may be he says, all existing AI systems. Do not know what they're talking about by that. He means that the systems have no concept of spam or porn or extremism or even a game. Those are just elements of the narratives, we tell about them. The algorithms are really triumphs of intelligent, artifice ingenious systems that can mindlessly simulate human judgement. Sometimes they do that all too. Well when they reproduce the arrows in judgment. They were trained on if you train a credit rating algorithm on historical lending data, that's infected with racial or gender bias the algorithms going to inherit that bias and it won't be easy to tell, but they can also fail in alien ways that betray an unhumorous weirdness you think of the porn filters. That block flesh colored pictures of pigs and puddings or those notorious image recognition, algorithms, that we're identifying black faces as guerrillas. So it's natural to be wary of our new algorithm overlords. They've gotten so good at faking intelligent behavior that it's easy to forget that there's really nobody home. Jeff number is a linguist at the university of California Berkeley. School of information coming up, I.

Facebook Jeff number Charlie Brown Lucy YouTube Meryl Streep Brian Cantwell Smith university of California Berke Disney Ralph Hal Jarrah university of Toronto editor Mark
"john green" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"john green" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And she gets worried that there's an infection underneath that callous, she covers it up with the band aid, because she's very embarrassed about it. But she often has to kind of open that up and try to drain the wound because she's worried that there's an infection there, of course, unless she does unless she risks infection of course. Yeah. I mean, this is not uncommon that these are these are not rational behavior. So, you know, I, I find that like trying to apply logic. At least in my own life like trying to apply logic to it is fairly ineffective. So have you had a physical manifestation like that, too. Yeah. Not not exactly that, but I count on my fingers as a way of calming myself. And so I think that's probably why I started thinking about it. And then I like the idea that, you know, it's, it's literally affecting her fingerprint. You know it's affecting who she is in a in a pretty profound way. The characters in your new book are also dealing with the deaths of parents and in the fault in our stars. The two main characters are dealing with cancer that is likely to be terminal. So, you know, death plays like a major role in your books on I'd be interested in hearing. Why, why think it's a big problem for big question things I like about. Majors. They're looking. I mean it's a big team. But I. Right. Yeah. I mean, I'm I'm concerned about it. That's probably one of the reasons, but also one of the things I like about teen characters is that they're grappling with the kind of questions around death and the problems that death creates for the first time sort of separate from their parents, and so they're asking, you know, is there an afterlife, and what are the implications for what we think about the afterlife, and they're asking, like is meaning and human life changed by the fact of death. And I I'm still really interested in those questions. And I like the way they approached them like there's a lack of irony and, and passion for those questions that I found really appealing when I was a teenager, and then I still find really appealing. One was the first time you dealt with the death of somebody who you knew when I was in high school, a classmate of mine died, and it was, we I went to a very small school. And it was devastating to the to the whole school had the classmate die. She was in a car. What was your way of tuck into your friends about it in order to get through lack? How did you do you remember any of those conversations in which you try to talk through not only the loss that you were experiencing but also like why do these things happen? Yeah. I mean, I think when you're in that position, those questions about meaning in life, and what meaning you're gonna find in life, they stopped being rhetorical questions and they become matters of life and death. They become the questions that you need answers to if you're going to figure out how to go on. And so we had a lot of those conversations, you know, we had a lot of conversations where we were looking for meaning in life that could hold up against against reality, as, as we found it, and I've never found a lot of comfort in the straightforward answers to those questions, though, like everything happens for a reason or, or, or, or that sort of answer. And I think that did start in high school. And it did start with, with those conversations with my friends was there, any kind of, like religious service that provided answers that you either found comforting or. You know, just like bromides that were not helpful. A lot of bromides weren't helpful. I mean I I'm the Piscopo alien and I worked briefly as a student chaplain at a children's hospital. You know, I thought about going to divinity school religion has been part of my life for a long time. But at the same time, I don't I don't find the answers to those questions in my religious tradition to be honest with you or at least not answers that satisfy me. I don't I don't find a satisfactory answer for, you know, the problem of theocracy as they call it in the world of religious studies. Like the problem of evil in the world. I don't have a good answer for why there is so much deep profound injustice in the world and why you know, the world I behaves as, as if it were random. So if it isn't random it's behaving as if it were. As I mentioned, in your last two novels teenagers are dealing with death death of their parents or the possibility of their own death. 'cause they have cancer, so you spent some time working as an assistant chaplain at a children's hospital. So what you said, let's do a student chaplain. I think is the technical term, but either way, so what, what were you exposed to there? You, you know, you're with people on the worst day of their lives and people who work in children's hospitals for longer than the few months that I was. There are real heroes to me because. It you, you see the worst things that can happen to, to people every day. And it's it was it was it was really difficult for me. I I was not. I you know, I I couldn't do that work. I couldn't I couldn't let it go. I, I still can't let it go fifteen years later. And it was it was very it was very hard. Will you mostly to see that we in Leslie talking with the parents or the children? Mostly with the parents, but I did. I did hang out a lot with, with, with some teenagers who were sort of their long term for various, chronic, health problems, mostly playing video games to be honest. I was twenty. Yeah. And so if somebody had an XBox, I would play play video games with them. Did it feel awkward to be twenty two and trying to help parents through a period when their child was was, you know, dying or possibly dying? Did you feel like who am I to help them? I'm twenty two. Of course I did. Yeah, I felt I felt unqualified in every possible way but, you know, interestingly, I'm now forty, and I think I would still feel unqualified in every possible way and if anything I might be worse at the job. Now, I think it was a pretty poor chaplain all those years ago, but I think I would be much worse at it now, because now that I have I, I just think that I would I'd I more, and it would be even more difficult for me to, you know, to be there for people in the way that they need when they're in that situation. Because you're a father now. Yeah. Are you surprised that? So many teenagers want to read stories about teenagers who have the kind of problems that make you feel different from everyone else like OCD or like having lost a parent who died or like having cancer and maybe dying yourself. I mean so many t- teenagers are just absorbed with, you know, school finding a new boyfriend or girlfriend, just like having friends figuring out how to make your way without being bullied, or hated by other kids. But I mean you're dealing with really major problems in your book, not to not to make light of those other problems. Because when you're a teenager those other problems are a really big. Right. No. I think that's actually that's actually the answer, though. Is that when you're a teenager, no matter what your experiences, the problems are big, and they're in many cases, new in many cases. It's the first time you've had this problem. So you know when I fell in love with my wife, you know, we have a great, awesome marriage. But I was also like this is like the other times, I fell in love like I understood what I what was happening to me when I fell in love for the first time I was like, what is this completely unprecedented thing that has never existed in human history before? And so, I think there's a you know, that, that intensity to the first -ness of all these experiences that teenagers are going through, I think, is part of, what makes them connect to people who feel who are who are going through really unusual experiences author John green speaking to Terry gross in two thousand seventeen his latest young adult novel turtles all the way down has just come out in paperback. After a break, we'll continue their conversation. Also, I got algorithms are linguist Jeff number will explain how they determine what we see online and how they often.

cancer John green Jeff number Leslie Terry gross fifteen years
"john green" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"john green" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"I mean that is network yet, like and was not necessarily a thing in a strategy prior to the twentieth century while you cut might identify things about the parents or siblings, or family members talking about the effect of those relationships on the native psychology and their future life choices. That's a huge in very important contribution. We should establish in psychological Serology. Yeah. I mean, I think it's a balance if you like. And I think one of the criticisms. And not just. Psychology is this idea of blaming blaming the parents? And so therefore, you know, sort of escaping any blame yourself, but. Being the four of your parents. You got the problem. They fuck you up your mom and dad, which is the classic to the thing that is Paul stone from generation to generation. The way we tend to is this is an image of mom, dad siblings, isn't just it's not just what they did. It's not about them description in charge. It's not just saying this is what they were like, but how your perception of because we all work with without throughout filters perception, we filter things through our child as we do stroller as well. And so therefore that it may be the needs of the client sitting in front of you. You know, maybe you say they've got to. A moon in cancer square. Yours, for example. And so it could be that they saw numb as that moon and so being clingy. And. Wanting to hold them and keep them in the family. And they feel the urine as part of the square, and this is too much stuck with one was stifling. She was oppressive, and this type thing or it can work the other way, which is months doing the right thing. And you get on with that. I'm doing my own thing, and the client sitting there with the cancer moon guy, but actually need some contact here. And you wanna give me enough contract that I wanted. And so that's not a blame on anything don't that. It's a bad mother or whatever it's just there was a disconnect between the needs of the person. And how parents worked with that. And I think that that's important way to work with it. You know what this what your mum did? Bad mother, you're playing but to talk about the expectations of the client, from structure that, John, you know, what are they looking for, because that's going to carry through when nice dating, you know, we'll having relationship absorb having relationships. All of those patterns are going to pop up again. And those expectations will be there. So the fall vanden, you becomes the both. That never helps you in your carrying the responsibility. All the pollen that also always seems to ban. And it's important to address the, the client is, is part and pulse. You can't take it out, and it's not a blame game. But yes, those early relationships are very, very important. And I mean, one of the things been working with more is the idea of narrative in the stories that we tell selves. And whilst say Freud denounce his union Nancy, spins overload time sitting preps going through these pulse patterns and talking about the things that the one of the moment. He's how can we rewrite things not than stomachs? But, you know that idea of taking it from a different perspective. And what is in your control and what isn't? But. Of, of narrative is will here is a story, and it is a story, you know, the story of your life is not the truth. Joe tell it one version. You've been telling stuff by your own, you're on Cousy of what you like if the child and you take that because you're not child or you is such an angel as a child. And, you know, you type that go, I must have been that I don't remember in that becomes part of your story..

Freud Paul stone Joe John Nancy
"john green" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"john green" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"And she still does weapon for us once a year. Which is which is fabulous. So that's basically how it set up. And then I just set about finding the cheetah's I wanted I took. I probably ones that it already worked for the CPA, but then it was students died. Studied alongside that I too ready to take that next step. And so that's what we set up, and then since then we should've expanded I did some other shooters. We've brought in people like sure Nygaard from the states, and then we have guest coming in as well each time. So that's the way I see it constantly evolving, too. Chimes that no new ones who come in. I like to go round the conferences around the world. And look for people, I think will will fit in that way. We coming from right? Yeah. Because you're part of than like lineage, which is interesting, like, the, the restarting of a modern astronaut lineage of the strollers through your school in through that school, the CPA, but even going back, maybe even a generation before that could we talk a little bit about on the podcast of talked a lot about the origins of modern astrology in the revival of modern astrology in the early twentieth century, especially in the first half. But I haven't covered a lot, the psychological revival or the focus on depth psychology that really got going in the nineteen sixties and seventies do know a lot of that history is that. It's not a. Especially subject of mine, but I mean this grow out to work of, of Leo and Rajar coming forward, and then it sort of starts suddenly again, becoming focused in, I think, with the work of least green in an how they would they started teaching when Liz came to the UK in the eighties, and they got together, which me teaching from people's houses and. Appall, thank borough in this type of, and she was a young an analyst, and was he is well or what was his back. Howard had trained insiders insis. So he'd followed Saudi. And obviously that game was quite a Astronautic based. Psychology..

CPA Nygaard Saudi Howard analyst UK Liz Leo Rajar
"john green" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"john green" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"This is death sex and money from WNYC. I'm Ana sale. A lot of John Green's books are about young people experiencing the all consuming. Rush of I love for John that I happened in college. I was nineteen. It was my sophomore year. And this was long before meeting people on the internet was a normal thing to do. But I was very early internet adopter because my dad brought home CompuServe and like nineteen ninety two or nineteen Ninety-three. And it was a friend of mine from the student forum on CompuServe in the early nineties. We just talked on the phone and became friends, and then I drove out to meet her one like fall break or something. And it was pretty immediate. I think that most of the work most the groundwork had been laid before we even met in person. Then we fell in wealth and had a really lovely and complicated and difficult and good romantic relationship for a few years, and then eventually broke up. Yeah. I imagine. It was two felt so exciting. It sounds like you're a person who from young age like loved the idea of love. Exactly. And then you're feel it. It must've been like yes here. No. I mean, of course, the great thing about falling in love for the first time that it feels totally unprecedented. It feels like nothing like that has ever happened before in human history. In his mid twenties. Not long after his mental health crisis. In Chicago, John started dating woman named Sarah. We had this one year long Email correspondence before we. Actually. Hooked up for the first time. I was trying to think if the proper word I was gonna say dated, but we didn't we didn't go on a date. So. A pattern for you seducing seducing people from long distance with your words over the I don't know about that. I would say I would say that it was a mutual seduction. The best gift I've ever received is when we got engaged Sarah had all of those emails. Printed and bound and gave them to me, and we do occasionally go back and look at them. And oh my gosh. Talk about two people who were stunningly oblivious to the fact that they were clearly interested in each other. But yeah, it worked out of actually they got married and when Sarah got a curator job at an art museum in Indianapolis. They moved their John settled into a comfortable routine writing full-time and making YouTube videos with his brother then in twenty twelve when he was thirty four he and Sarah had their first child and John published the fault in our stars. It has sold more than twenty three million copies and was made into a movie in two thousand fourteen the grossed more than three hundred million dollars. And when that happened. It was really exciting. And it was also a little bit intimidating because the felt like there was a lot of attention on on that story. And then kind of by proxy on me. And I had always wanted that. I'd always kinda sought that out. But when it happened. It was definitely a little overwhelming. I. I want to ask you about twenty fifteen. And after the sort of scope, the incredible massive success of the faults on our stars. Was clear we're become more clear, and you're working on trying to work on your next novel. And was that the the first mental health crisis? You'd had since you were in your early twenties. No. But it was definitely the worst since my early twenties. I'd had a few. But on some level that's to be expected. I don't think that there's like a magical way out of. Having difficult periods for me. Even with the techniques therapy and the medication. I take and stuff. But yeah, the what happened in two thousand fifteen was definitely much much worse than anything else until except for when I was in my early twenties. How was it different to to feel yourself in crisis? When you're now, not a single, man. You're married. You have kids. Yeah. Did it feel different? It did..

John Green Sarah CompuServe WNYC Chicago Indianapolis YouTube John three hundred million dollars one year
"john green" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

Death, Sex and Money

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"john green" Discussed on Death, Sex and Money

"For the past few weeks. We've been collecting your stories about sex, Ed fails, the things you learned about sex when you were young that you later found out. We're totally wrong. This Wissmann came in from the list her about a terrible sex Ed class he had an high school instructor brought up a boy to the front of the class. And then he starts talking about how condoms prevent pregnancies ninety percent of the time, which isn't even true. It's more like ninety eight percent if you're using it correctly, and then he puts the boy on the table. He hasn't laid down and then out of nowhere. He pulls out this cinderblock, and he's dangling over this boy's crotch and screaming faced screaming. How do you feel about those odds? Now, there's a one in ten chance I'm going to drop the cinder block on you. Is there something you learned about sex, either Niclas or just something you picked up from a friend that makes you cringe now recorded voice memo and Email it to us at death sex money at WNYC dot org. And also, I wanna let you know that John green and his brother Hank have three different podcasts that are now part of WNYC's studios where we produce our show. One of them is the anthroposophic reviewed every episode John views to completely random things on a five point scale like CNN, cholera pennies the Taco Bell breakfast menu. It sounds like it doesn't make sense. But I promise you it does. And it's actually a lot of fun. Check it out at the anthem proceed review dot org, and there's also a link on our website at death sex money dot. Four. On the next episode. I check in with Rachel swin Bank and her husband Hiroki Taki cheesy. I I talked with them last year after a rookie was paralyzed from the waist down a biking accent. They've made a lot of progress since then and gotten more used to the things that won't ever be the same. We be those like those lose a people who try and get through the apple as fast as possible in town of late is possible. I think off the plane is quickly and you'll be the fuss possible control like some of race. And now it's like always the last people off the plane. WNYC studios is supported by the thrilling new novel, the Kingfisher secret, her codename Kingfisher her mission to seduce and Marian American man of wealth, and political influence journalist grace Elliott has just landed. A scoop about agent Kingfisher. It's a story. So big so explosive that could decide the American election and launch a new Cold War page. Six says could this be the primary colors of the Trump administration? The Kingfisher secret available now wherever.

Ed John green WNYC studios WNYC Rachel swin Bank Hiroki Taki Niclas biking CNN grace Elliott instructor apple Hank ninety eight percent ninety percent
"john green" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

Writers Who Don't Write

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"john green" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

"This is off with gerard hello and welcome back guys off track with hinton rossi i am hinch and alex rossi and this week we have an exceptionally special guests that we are more talented than us in many many ways and we are thrilled and excited and thankful that he decided to join us ladies and gentlemen mr john green how's it going guys very well how are you good good it is super convenient that you live in indianapolis yeah no in nice for me as well because it's so easy to get to the track so let's so speaking of dogs we we saw your latest video about your dog yeah so doing he's doing all right willie has cancer and he's he's at the end of his life and it's it's rough man i mean somebody told me that owning a dog is making an appointment with grief and that's true i mean you know dogs have a life span yeah it's all right you know the thing about willie though is that i made that video and i thought this is it you know we really thought we were going in the next day or so head he just perked right back up and he's been great the last few days you've been in great spirits so who knows willie's had cancer for two years so i i'm not writing them off at this point who knows fair enough fair enough now we we sit here doing a new podcast yourself have new podcast yeah i have a new podcast called the anthropoid reviewed in which i review weird random stuff on a five star scale so i gave i think i gave canada geese to stars and i gave dr pepper five stars but also the one i'm writing now i'm reviewing.

hinton rossi indianapolis willie cancer gerard mr john green canada two years
"john green" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"john green" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Democrats get elected in a wave election in two thousand eighteen change everything again, and I'll be back here in two thousand nineteen. Nothing's the same as it was before who knows anyway, that's a quick recap. Then at twenty seventeen we're gonna launch into twenty eighteen in the next few weeks. So I guess this week is John green who really needs. No introductions. I'm not gonna bother less than office bona fides. Or what he's done because if you don't know, I can't believe you're listening to this podcast anyway. But John welcome to the podcast. Thank you. Great to be here. So we were gonna talk about mental health. And I think we probably still will. But I sort of feel bad because I feel like you've had that interview about eighty times probably in the last few months. Yeah. I I don't mind though. I mean, I I understood when I was writing a book for those who don't know wrote a novel recently called turtles all the way down that is bounded girl who has day, which I also have. And I understood when I like publish the book under my own name that I was going to be talking about it a lot. And it's it's, you know, it's important to talk about I think because people it's still something that people feel a lot of shame about and that there is still a stigma around I think especially in people's professional lives, like I'm super privileged in the sense that I can't get fired because of my OCD, and it can be an issue in my professional life. But only because it's an issue in my profession. In life. Not like because you know of the stigma associated with it the ways that it can impact your professional development. So I still think there's a ton of stigma around. So I'm going to be selfish. And I'm going to turn this over to me because I think I tweeted this yesterday, and it's funny because when I when I tweet about it, I feel like half the people that follow me, take it seriously, and the other have sort of blow it off. But I I've never really felt like I suffer from mental health. And a debilitating way the prevents me from sort of doing my job or sort of getting through my mental health issues. I almost feel like sub clinical where anxiety, and I don't even want to say depression, because I don't feel like it makes it to fall on depression, but my depressive symptoms or feelings start to overwhelm me. And I just don't wanna do anything, and I can muddle through it the vast majority of the time, but I came back from break, and I swear to God I went to work yesterday. And I just it was like walking through mud, and I'm still feeling it where I jokingly keep telling people like. I can I feel like depression is just over there. I can hear it. I know it's out there. It's like knocking at the door. It's not there yet. But I don't wanna do. All I wanna do is go home get into bed. I wanna go home play some video games with my kids and do nothing and get can't like a half to go to work a half to still be a dad a half to still be a husband. I gotta get through this. And I don't know we have no mechanism in society for dealing with that. Right. Well, it's weird because everything's a continuum. Right. So so when we talk about mental health disorders, we have to apply all these diagnose diagnostic.

depression John green OCD