20 Episode results for "John Dykstra"

John Dykstra

Maltin On Movies

1:10:04 hr | 7 months ago

John Dykstra

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Hi Leonard Maltin Maltin on movies and our guest today is a man who if you don't know personally air by site you know his work you've just got to know his work because he's the guy who did the visual effects for Star Wars. You remember that one a couple of Batman movies a couple of Spiderman movies so much more but more importantly John Dykstra is one of the creators of the modern era of visual effects. And it's a real privilege to have you here John. Oh It's a pleasure to be here. I I like my intros. Should tell you it's not him it's a Hologram that he created sent over. Help me OBI ONE. I'll be honest. I wasn't even going Star Wars. I was just going special effects. Okay I respect your life choice. I mean it is. An amazing is amazing history and as we often say to people you know. It's not history while you're doing it. Not just what you're doing and What you thought you were going to be doing was industrial design. Now what led you into that field. Well listen I mean again. Life Choices My father was an engineer on. I was a burgeoning artist. I liked to sketch and draw and I like to take things apart. Put Them Together. So it's kind of an interesting combination if you think about engineering and design in together. It's industrial design ended up as fate would have it when. I signed up for school. I was a liberal arts major. I had no specific major and The Guy who was the head of the Industrial Design Department was responsible for people whose last names began with D. and so I was introduced to him and he says you know you ought to be in our department. I I guess he was furthering his own nest so I ended up in industrial design but it was a great fit because I like to draw and I love to think about the way things work and so a fate may have intervened but it was in a good way and was this Long Beach Long Beach State. Where did you grow up one beach? I was born and raised in you and Snoop Dogg. I like it yeah. Local local knowledge. Of what kind of things did you? Where do you think you were headed with that cars house? Of course I mean you know when I when I was growing up. What I wanted to do was to have a motorcycle. I actually built the motorcycle out of parts. It was anybody but it was that kind of stuff. This is the interesting thing about it is It would be nice to have a strategic point of view when you're that age but I'm not sure that that's necessarily available so it was mostly tactical decisions and one of the things that led to my involvement in visual effects. Is I became enamored of cameras. I really liked the idea of capturing images I like drawing but what I discovered was that I could go out. And and instead of spending a half an hour doing sketch and then developing it further. I could photograph it and I could capture lots of images and I enjoyed the mechanics of it and the business of optics so I was A had. Photography is in avocation. And you were you a darkroom guy. Yeah Oh yeah had my parents. To my much. To my parents dismay. I turned a kitchen in an extra kitchen turned into a dark room for me and it had all the attendant smells and and Paraphernalia and tape the windows up. No less time. It was great. I really enjoyed the process And so what was that next step because that was a giant step and maybe maybe I should call it a left. Turn into visual effects. How does that all again? I again I in the Industrial Design Department. I had friends who were working for a man named Doug trumbull which we all know and He was going to make a project called silent running. He was working on Andromeda strain at the time and he had pension for hiring college students and so I went to work at trumbull film facts. I had completed my college education. An actually I I had an issue with the head of my department and I ended up not graduating at that. Time so I went to work for Doug and was doing design industrial design and photography which were my two favorite things so doug we should explain for those who don't know Is One of the people who worked on two thousand one a space Odyssey Stanley Kubrick? And which was the the first modern era visual effects movie. That mattered and that pushed wasn't an envelope. There was no envelope. Sorta helped develop the idea of modern. I keep saying modern but you know new era special effects. I know modern is dated word. It's interesting modern You know it's interesting because that was one of the things that led to me becoming involved in visual effects. Even before my college I I I went to see two thousand one space odyssey and I was Totally engaged by the movie and are totally enamored of the idea of being able to create A reality such an unreal situation I think that was a turning point for a lot of people. Yeah and inspiration for a lot of people as a couple of generations earlier King Kong had been for for kids of that of what but but of course two thousand one had that perfect combination during different opinions about the movie. I think is fantastic But it's the atmosphere the Kubrick creates and the he's a spellbinding spellbinding filmmaker absolutely and so. It's not just affects perfect sake. It's part of an organic hold. That is that movie. Well it's the environment too. I mean that the whole idea of the setting it was to me. It's a subtle stuff. It was sort of an odd way. His projection of what industrial design was going. That's true to its to provide in in this Advanced World and you. I you know. Listen he's what can be said it's Stanley Kubrick an and he. You know it's that's a stew took five years to make so it's going to be very finessed and and gourmet but the choice of his ingredients and the way put the the components together made me feel as though that place existed in a way that I you know movies sort of did that. But his went beyond the telling of a story to creating a totally Believable environment so much. So that you go that place actually exists and and there's two components to this entertainment one is on seeing an alternate reality. That is absolutely real and totally down to the minutia. You know the Bush baby or whatever that kind of stuff and and at the same time a compelling story albeit confusing unless compelling and I was I was thoroughly enjoyed and visually it was just stunning art direction and the visual effects themselves and the choice of the choices that were made with regard Obviously score I mean all that stuff Yeah well it's a hell of a film and made me want to work in movies and that was before I'd even gotten to college before. I'd become an enthusiastic photographer. The Saddam trumbull is sort of like kind of ground zero away for me. Yeah for a lot of people and you see Liz. Yeah well he's alive and well thank goodness So you went to work for him. And and what what? What was the atmosphere like there? Was it like a workshop? Was it like a A think tank more like a think-tank. I mean listen I. It's hard to describe. I had good fortune of working with him in an environment. Where we're all collaborators and not to put to find a point on obviously doug ran the show but People were asked to be a common volved in the process and more limited to one particular area. We all focused on one area. We all I did model building to begin with and then photography to pursue an following that but the guy who is the would come in and make comments on the design of the miniatures and a lot of the and the model makers were designing the miniatures as we built them and the whole idea of kit bashing Picking fine detail from existing model cars and tanks and other vehicles and then applying those as surface detail to The basic substructure. I just taught me a new word kit bashing yet cash. Yeah well you know what's interesting. It's so funny. Because the contemporary the Digital Environment. It's come full circle and they now have essentially something that's analogous to kit bashing in the digital world. They go in and they have shapes and and components that are performed in the guys can go through and just pick bits and pieces in them on on models for purposes of creating You know a designs for vehicles that don't exist Wow I'm going to be saying wow a lot. I think this conversation. So so you're you're there and you're learning and you're being inspired by this think tank of humans sure and then what well we worked Let's see okay so that was trumbull film effects. Then I'm trying to remember what the how it broke up. Then he went. He signed another contract and became a tutor. General and worked we worked on is really fun because it's an rnd environment right. We were doing even in the early days of Doug's I shop. We will working with a two thousand line video. This is in what the sixties And A computer control two thousand nine video system clunky which is at a time when American television. What six thirty three lines something? Not even that European and it wasn't even it was five twenty five. Us But it was too interlaced. So it's only explain that for anybody my age. No you don't WanNa Know Okay. Touche in the pre digital era in the pre digital television era. Tv. If I get this right a television screen image was actually made up like as a newspaper photo was made up of lava little dots or used to be a television image was made up a lot of lines very very tightly. Compressed so you'd aren't aware of the lines you don't really looking at the lines if it's a good quality image and when I first went to England and saw British television which was liked wild. This is so much better than American TV. I didn't understand why and it was that they had. Yeah it just. It's basically it boils down to the component pieces that comprised the image the bigger the component pieces are the lower the resolution the image and the less fine. The detail is that you can create so if you have lots and lots of information meaning lots and lots of points you can make very high resolution images and it has an effect on the color and it has effect on the gray scale so the higher the resolution generally the closer to what we would consider to be a real experience terms of what the real world looks like. Two people thank you so so Jesse was asking what the next phase was with trouble see moved into all in all be listen. That's a long time ago so Essentially I worked with Doug. We worked on show right which was incredible. It was a it was motion based simulator with projectors and screens mounted on board discrete four channel sound and Trip through space. That was in sixty seven. And I don't know one star tours at Joe. Wow and the problem was as so many things at Doug does. It was so far behind before. Its time that nobody could fathom it and we took it to show I can't remember was Atlanta or someplace for people who buy roller coasters and things for museum parks. We had a had a display there and did marketing there and and it was a conventional ride was two million bucks. It was two million bucks and people went on our would. We don't think we want to do it. He did. We didn't have A. We had a functioning prototype but it wasn't transportable so we're selling the concept. They had to come and see it. Anyway I don't know what the the intricacies of it where I was there at the show and help I. I did the sound scape for the for the the ride and we did a lot of the programming and stuff so it was again. I got to work on lots of different things. I got to work in sound. I got to do photography. Got To design mechanical things It was just you know it was it was. It was a dream environment. It's like Aruna of a giant garage full of all the tools you've ever wanted. We had a machine shop and all of the metalworking tools and woodworking tools. In you name it sounds like now. South sounds fantastic. It's a perfect place for jack-of-all-trades so then at some point in the mid seventies this young Turk George. Lucas comes along and he wants to make an outer space saga. Well there's A. There's one segue in here this kind of important with regard to my story and that is. I went to work after A. I can't remember what happened. But Future General Stall I went to work for The Institute of Urban Regional Development at Berkeley and hired me on and I was. I became a professor and I have no idea. There was some contractual issue that requires that I teach so I went there and worked on a project That was is verbal racial development which was miniatures being photographed by miniaturized probe camera in representation of the environment and a comparison of that to photography done in the real environment. They were trying to pursue figuring out what components are necessary to deceive people thinking that they're seeing a real environment Interesting right which is perfect. It's like okay. Great so industrial design photography like building things and now I'm into deception. Seems totally appropriate considering what I ended up but What we did is we built a very small scale version of Marin county portion of Maroon County and had a camera that was controlled at that time by computer. The computer that we used to take up the wall of the room here and it was probably as powerful as your toaster oven in terms of computing power and it moved to camera around that environment and photograph this miniature and then they did the same route in a real car with a with a a full-sized camera and at the same speeds and then they had comparisons in which they are reviewed the people who saw the miniature version and the people who saw the live action version. And what their response. Where did they they go? Oh there was a red mailbox in that one. I really liked the horizon. The view was gorgeous from the middle of the Parkway or whatever and so that was there was a psychological it was a psychological component. Now This was Berkeley and it was a it was federally funded and so I got a hunch that there was some defense component in there somewhere but I don't know what it is anyway You had you had no interface with weaponry. So we didn't blow anything up and that was one of the things that one of the reasons I left because I'd like to blow things up which will come to later. Would sell the the upshot of this was I learned about computer controlling cameras and the interface between them and the photographic environment and all kinds of feedback on how miniatures relate to things in real life in terms of perceptual. How people look at a miniature version of this Particular drive and relate it to a live action version particular drive so I have secrets secrets that that was a useful Training ground for you then a lot area. Yeah Yeah his great. I enjoyed. I enjoyed working and happy. Good time lifting Berkeley and Was good life was good so finished up at Berkeley. And that's when Gary Kurtz and George Lucas called me up and said you know since grip and I read the script. I thought it was really fun. I go this is great. This is what could be better. I get to go I get to do. A dog fights in space. I was a pilot as well. I'll really yeah. I'd I'd been flying gliders for. I don't know it all together but since Doug's place and sleep is shoot. We were pretty serious about pursuing life in that motorcycles surfing you name it skiing you or was it was the thing that was so fun about working at Doug's places it was a it was a community was like a family and that was one of the things that I tried to bring to the company. Apogee when we formed our company later on coming later on in it was the paradigm was trumbull film effects. For how I pursued organizing which wasn't well received by everyone so some people think that you're there to work period the thing that's interesting about this you know it's 'cause you work with students all the time there's this manic energy that people of that age have and if you give them a goal and define at least the path you want to take and the strategic in result you find that that cell focusing all of those guys. I mean my friends. People I brought together for alum where people with whom I worked at Trumbull film effects and In other environments Related to filmmaking and on a personal level the guys who I rode motorcycles within flew with and all these other things with so it was it was a group of people who already knew one another. How shorthand had already worked in. The film industry already worked in a call. It lays a fair for lack of a better term environment where your job classification wasn't rigid. It was it was much more of a collaboration If you had a great idea it was to be considered What a lovely thing I think makes so much sense that you all created what you did because that kind of environment fosters everything. Well you think out of the box and you know it's everybody's got their own box. They're not all the same. So it's it's it's bringing a bunch of boxes together. The guy whose focus is on Making precision parts in combination with a guy who's focus is creating a camera in combination with a guy who has an application for a camera of a specific nature in combination with a guy who can build a computer system that will support the specific name of the camera that the guy has etc and all of these guys come in as individuals but are become a part of a family. If you want to call it out I don't know collaboration And it's it's great because there's everybody feels as though they're pursuing the same goal and everybody respects if you have good people they generate their own respect because the guys who are working with them are in awe of their ability to do something that they don't necessarily understand and that and the guy who office and all of them for their capabilities so that it it's a very I don't know it's it's it's a situation where the whole actually can become larger than the sum of the parts So you know I interrupted because you said you were flying. They brought you in not just for the one but because you re pilot glider experience yes. Oh Oh you mean. They brought me in because I was pilot. No no no. I'm saying you were talking about doing the that George brought you in. Yeah George brought me and because I think I had. I don't know who recommended me. Maybe Doug trumbull short could have been a variety of people. I think Doug had something to do with it but they he wanted. George wanted to do it in a different way. He didn't want to do a traditional visual effects house. Not that there were that many visual effects houses around at the time so he decided he wanted to do in much the same way. Doug hired people from college. Because let's get somebody new. Get some new blood in here and I was at Guy. Because I had had unique in the sense that I had worked with Doug Trumbull. I had done a lot of photography a done. A lot of model construction understand understood Colm positing meaning optical composites putting things the other optical printers and and deconstruction of an image and I was An adrenaline junkie So there was sort of for what I think. Georges vision was was kind of an ideal Marriage the first shot the shot. That just sleighs you when you're young and you see star wars for the first time is the gigantic spaceship. Space Transport Star destroyer. Thank you thank you Sir. I get it right. Aristotle is definitely in the other room going. Oh you mean are you talking about the rebel? Blockade Runner is the first thing you see and then it's just flies over overhead and just keeps going and going the Star destroyer and it does not look like an Aurora Model Kit. It does not look like something made of plastic. It looks for one of a better word real. We broke a lot rules. And and you know there's a filmmaking in particular in that area had had some very set things that you didn't didn't do and the one of the problems with miniatures was that this becomes incredibly technical. It's called depth of field. Meaning that your focus extends from a surface close to you to a surface far away from you and that varies dependent upon the focal length. And the the Iris Setting of the aperture of the Lens that you use Traditionally models look like models. Because either the thing that's close you'll be out of focus in the background will be sharp or the background will be out of focus the foreground sharp and you inherently understand because of real life that when that happens that that's a small object no matter how it's presented perspective was so that's a dumb thing but it's part of the deal so they had to build Mon- miniatures big enough and light them with enough light to create a deep enough stop. Meaning the aperture. Smaller aperture makes more depth of field so the entire miniature was in focused which meant that majority of the miniatures at that time were pretty good size for his ass. Oh Jeez I duNNO SCALE MODELS. Were One tenth scale does it. Which doesn't even apply in Sikhism. A star destroyer. It'd be even one tenth scale at a quarter of a mile long so let six foot long ten foot long four feet long. The analogy word. I'll get the starter squares too. Big The the point is what we were doing. We were making miniatures a fraction of the size that conventional wisdom said. They should be right so we were breaking. Rule and part of breaking that rule was that we had. We had to design a camera that would allow us to have a tilting Lens Board. What a tilting Lens Board does is allows you to tailor the depth of field. Meaning that by tilting the Lens Board you can. You can skew the depth of field so I can keep a smaller miniature in focus as if it were larger miniature by tilting. Landsberg CONVENTIONAL MOTION PICTURE. Cameras didn't have that it goes on and on but the key things. I think from the point of view of what happened was that we designed a system that allowed to camera d'or to move during exposure. That was one of the things that was so effective about the thing that I did at Berkeley was that the camera moved during exposure as cameras in real life. All do now as you guys know because you're sitting in a studio where they do. Stop Motion Stop. Motion is a series of still images. And there's a stutter. That's apparent because each of the images. His sharp no matter what the camera move or the subject move when you look at photography cinemagraphic photography of the world. The camera is exposing the film but the Movement of the camera and the subject continues during that exposure so it gets motion blur right so the thing that we added with our computer controlled camera was the ability to make complex moves and to repeat those moves. Well let's not get into repetition yet to make complex moves during which the shudder of the movement of the camera was continuous during shutter open phase when it was exposing. And pull down which you don't need to know about so the the ships had the proper blur on them for the speeds that they were traveling which made them creditable if you did that with. Stop motion without the Blur would be here and it just looks like it disappeared Right so that was the depth of field and putting that motion blur on. Were soon things that linked it to our subliminal cues for what's real and what's not and it's like anything else there's so many of those cues you have to be very have to be precise and you have to be to do more. You can't just do a couple of it'll help. But the more of those cues you can satisfy the more realistic or the more willing. People are to suspend disbelief. Well it worked. No no well listen you look at it today. I want. I went through there was we. Were under the gun. You gotta remember that was. I think we took eighteen months from the point at which we opened a facility with built the cameras built miniatures. Did the photography did all the composite. Ing and Completed the show in eighteen months and big shows. Don't get done in eighteen months now but they don't build the camera you also inventing what you were doing. Of course I'm anymore. It just wasn't just a job. It was a job where you had to reinvent. Redefine the tools. Yeah and the and the imagery. We got to harvest a lot of good ideas. That was what was so fun about having people who come from variety of backgrounds One of the guys was a social worker. Another guy was a lab tech. Another guy was a sandal maker. We all came from these odd places. We were all involved in invention and and design and construction fabrication in some form or another in different places but we all came together to do this project and the the great thing about it was that we got to pick the best things from different environments and put them all together in our in our new version of what this machine looked like and there were a lot of interdependent. Stuff I mean. This was like A several bets were made several things that could go wrong. If any one of the concept's right the blue screen the motion blur the camera. Computer control the larger format film? The optical printer that hadn't been used for thirty years all of those were weak links. So if any one of them failed there was a good chance that it could bring the entire thing down and fortunately We got lucky and all of the stuff worked and it. There's there are anomalies and errors in the work. That are really obvious. But the spirit of it in terms of the people who worked on it and Georgia's concept for what it was overcame that it's you know it's the illusion that really counts as opposed to the reality. Sure add to that you know. Great Cast John John Williams music package of course is in the studio. Thought it was gonNA be the kids. They just wanted to keep him happy. Gareth wiggins I think was the only Fox Executive I. I don't know for fact because I wasn't involved in that I was in my warehouse out in the man is exotic than I do was next to the airport. That's pretty good. A lot of wood. Flying out of the airport was good of is. This is a dumb question. I'm sure you've been asked many times before but this is our first conversation on the subject. Is there a shot or a moment or a or an effect in that film that you are proudest of that? That makes you smile and Edmund. The whole film is Great I mean it's interesting. You know 'cause that's a question that gets asked a lot. I don't know that there's I'm not sure that there's a real answer to that. The opening shot is great. It is I. I love that shot. It's is it the is it the essence of everything about the the facility that we built That is is worthy of praise. Probably not but like to shot a lot The experience it was it was absolutely wonderful. I mean I it's it's it's hard to get around The idea that you are working on a job that you are so engrossed with it. You're willing to do it. Twenty four seven under without being under duress. And you know listen. We had our. We have our hot tub in the in the in the parking lot to cool off on hot days and and you know we went. We assume motorcycle rioting and some other things As a part of the program there but It was just it was wonderful is working with your friends and being successful and it is the key element to it with. All of those pieces fit together and they worked at because of their efforts the individuals dedication to making their concept's integrate with the other concepts that were being presented to create the final product and a capital off to academy award. Well yeah exactly. Yeah we did. We got the technical work for the facility The the mind boggles boggled. Then looking back on it. It's it's quite. I was going to get him. You know no one does too. That was drunk in Canada at the award. Show I'm sitting there in the audience and I've been drinking and I'm going and we won. I went Christ guys why my speech was so. I can't even remember what I said and anxious to not remember. Well came away with a lovely souvenir. Yeah no kidding. Distribute that is the epitome of not history. While you're making it because you're just trying different things you guys. We were doing what we enjoy. That was I look at it. If there's anything to be said about your life's endeavor is it. I pursue your bliss whatever that is I mean I've had the good fortune to be able to do something that I enjoy for my entire life. And it's it's terrific. It's a beautiful thing. Yeah this scorgeous In going over your credits doing my homework for our conversation. I did not realize that. You've been working of late with Quentin Tarantino. Yeah on his last three films in fact for four Doing what that's the key. You can't tell you know my favorite kind of visual effects are the ones aren't you don't know there. There's not a lot of a lot of stuff in in Clinton's movies and he wants to traditional stuff the most recent Once upon time in Hollywood and we did some building removal comes in the digital age some fairly straightforward kinds of things We did some aging film for the clips that were from the TV show and from a fourteen fists. Mcklusky the drive in shot where the car drives into. The van is drive in which is obviously no longer. There now has done with a miniature really. Yeah wow well he. He wish all on film we shot a miniature with motion control on film instead of doing digitally That's his preference and the you know inglorious bastards. We did the the big fire sequence in the theater which is really fun stuff. I like to do and something. That's kind of unique I don't know that you naked. I don't know that this job isn't any longer available but One of the things that I used to really enjoy doing is mixing mechanical effects with with photographic effects in the early days. During you know we blew the models up. We had the we had the guys in house and they blew the models up and we photographed him and all that stuff and Since with the advent of digital imaging income positing it's it's become much more specialized in the mechanical effects. Guys have their part of the movie in the visual effects. Guys have their part of the movie they collaborate but the you don't as an individual often get to do you know say well let's blow this up so I got to do that on. Inglorious bastards working with the visual effect the Special Effects Guys German special effects guys and I'm embarrassed to say I can't remember their names at this point At any rate so the whole business in the theater at the end and the fire was he wanted to practical so we had to figure out how to project in image onto the screen. Have the screen burn synchronize. The speed of the fire with action on the screen had had to the fire had to go over her image at a particular point and that had to be done practically in an environment where once screen burned it revealed an inferno behind it and there were stump people in the theater in the seats while this is all going on all took place in an abandoned cement factory in East Germany. And it was it was it was just. It was great. 'cause we went through the process of figuring out how to make the screen burn at the proper rate how to ignite the screen. How to synchronize the IGNAT ignition to the screen with the film that was being projected how to to Meggett so the inferno didn't burn the screen from behind and how to secret is that infernos looked like it was already a light as the screen burned but to not have it burning before that transmission transition took place so it was this. It was integration of mechanical and visual and performance stuff and it was like as brilliant and that was what the stuff was for Star Wars. So that's why I enjoy working with Clinton because we get to do that kind of thing. How cool very very cool is now. I grew up watching old republic pictures serials. Yeah and so the lie decker brothers were heroes of mine. Howard and theater the guys who did all of their practical yeah and their optical effects too and so the one thing I learned. I made a few home movies when I was a kid with my friends. And they'll our eight millimeter camera and the two things that I learned from experience and from watching with the the toughest things to crack our fire and water. Sure 'cause if you shoot a a A vote in your bathtub. It looks like a boat in a bathtub. Exactly it's not looked like it's in a body of water right and if you light something on fire it looks like it goes up and it looks like you just let something a road flare. It's for the road at the back of it and smokes going up in the road for spitting Now just just before we We rolled on this conversation. I mentioned I worked at paramount for many many years. And they have a famous tank there with Sky Cyclorama behind it one time and I used to park in that tank and one time. We couldn't park there for a couple of weeks because they were flooding the tank. So that you and your crew could shoot right irritation of central Park Lake. Yeah for Stuart Little. Yeah you had a little boat sailboat. Your against a real sky backdrop very convincing sky backdrop and real water. Yep Talk about detail wagging the dog. It's a tiny little boat an acre and a half of silk which was used to cover the tent. And that's no Phoolan. It was like being on a boat. We had rigging in the overhead and the SIL which dis- diffuse the sun because it needed to feel like The sort of a high sky. A clouds didn't Wanna be hard sun and That tank was Setup and I'm trying to remember I think we had now which is how to take. We didn't have. We had a bridge on one side or something. There was some set-pieces anyway. The boat is like about six feet long but the boat had to travel specific path in the tank. They had to have a wind blowing sale. So it looked like we're outdoors and it all sounds fairly simple except that the boats thirty feet away and to try and make a fan blow thirty feet and fill the sales. It's like well that's not going to be so easy. And the boat of course was already to control boat and you couldn't ever make a radio controlled boat. Do what is you wanted to do? So tracks had to be built in the bottom of the tank and there were guys with scuba gear in the tank during the photography. It was like it was so funny because it was like this giant thing around this little boat. They'll six foot boat and again six foot not so little no well. Yeah that's true. It wasn't but it was big. It was a that was the that was the hero boat. The stuarts boat was like three feet or something something like that anyway. Like to work with us. He a diva and I'm really. That movie was that movie was great. I love it. I felt the character was. He was really developed all of the acting performances regret and Sony. That was their one of their early entrees into visual effects for movies. Did a terrific job. Without characteristed in an era before for was a known commodity and they did a terrific job of making the character look realistic their composite and the integration the lighting for the. Cgi character was stunning. And as like I to this day. That's still one of my favorite Environments or favorite movies in terms of the integration. The character He really fits in nicely. You know again. All the components have to work. Yeah and and you forget it. He's a little animated mount exactly because actually character you invest in that. Yeah exactly that's the proof is in the right there. It was great fun. And you know it's like the the that whole deal at the tank was. I can't remember how many days we spent her. But when the wind would blow we had a nanometer and we had to refocus the silk when the wind speed reached a certain point. So we'd be in the middle of a shot and the Guy Grips would call out. We got a refit. And they'd pull the Silk Back and the thing all the lighting with change and we couldn't shoot for it was like it was great it was a microcosm of a much bigger movie idea of everything being driven by these random events. Wow now you worked on both Spiderman and Spiderman two yeah and of Spiderman moved differently in those two films. Yeah looked like you. You actually progressed in your ability to to make him a hobbyist convincing obviously Anthony Lamar Lamola. Nora was the animator on the Spiderman Spiderman two and he he We had done a lot of motion capture to begin with and that was the early days of motion capture but one of the things that was true was that for Spiderman when you took him and motion captured a stuntman and then tried to interpret that into a CGI character The it didn't work it. He looked to moral. I mean the stunt guy would jump off of a platform. He'd go ten feet and land on a pad or put him on a decelerated and let having dropped him twenty feet and have him land on the pad his posture. His reaction didn't look real. It looked like what it was. Looked like a guy on wires. And if you imagine you know a guy jumps off the top of a twenty story building in hits the ground. He's going to turn into a little puddle of blood and bone but our character has to hit the ground and looked like he can absorb that energy and then recovering and you know go on to do whatever it is that he's he's arrived to do and so it was a lot of exploration of mass musculature human motion and A healthy portion of postures that came from the comic books in terms of that larger becoming what it is. You expect him to be kitschy. It's weird right. 'cause he's he's a his human being but he has these spider capabilities and so when his physiognomy does things that humans don't do it's gotta be something that a spider does or or it's got to be one thing or the other can't be he can't suddenly become some other kind of creature and I I think that Anthony. Due to all the animators did a terrific job of doing that integration. Both on the first showman subtle in the film. I feel you know there's more I was really good. Yeah But then you when you see the second one I felt anyway that It was it was better. Yeah but you know from that point of view. Yup We also got to improve. Every you know it's funny because there's a whatever it is it's the Moore's law of visuals right the Because of the integration of digital imaging the the learning curve is fairly steep. I mean you improve in a very short period of time and with processing just processing alone between the first spiderman and Spiderman to increased exponentially so all of a sudden the characters could be they could have more polygons which is the same as the more pixels. We talked about before which defines their shape so their shapes were more on. The surfaces could have a more variation reflectively because we had the ability to render a broader. Getting Gray scale. Improvements occurred in terms of what the the digital lighting instruments. Where you could make something other than just a point source. You could make diffuse light. You could Create a what's called ambient inclusion which is basically shadowing that occurs From the SKYLIGHT THAT STRIKES. You it so those things all brought the Spiderman two guy forward so even if his animation was the same he would have appeared to be more creditable simply because he was he was it was a better render it will end his integration the way his motion blur integrator the backgrounds and our ability to create an environment inaccurate environment. Got Better so that you know it's there's it's like the the paint job has something to do with it now. How much of this is driven by in this case? Sam Raimi's the director Is He is he pushing you guys? Is He Is he directing you? Of course of course. Yeah no I mean. The the process working with SAM is Great. The process in that environment included the actual animator. Who was going to do. The shot doing a provision ation which is essentially a very simple form of animation of the shot and that would be given to the editor and the editor and Sam would integrate it into the story as they wanted to tell it. And he picked the the previous that he liked and then the shot would be executed to make real and high-resolution of after he had chosen. And then it'd been reviewed in the cut. So that's so I if not just Sam Ramey but any director says I wanted to bounce a little more or can you. Can you give me a little more or less density in this in this stunt that we're doing those kind of notes are they? Are they commonplace? Sure and we also get. Can you make more French do? Are you allowed to ask for a definition of that as one of the beauties? It's too it's too. It's sort of traditional visual effects. Supervisor's Issues are. Somebody will look at it and go. Just make it more real and the other one is split the difference so you always show up short with three things so that they can pick to split the difference on you know listen. The process varies with every director. Some directors do not want to work with previous. They want The freedom to invent as they go I. I'm sure that's true of the temple moves that are in the current marketplace. The you know you as a visual effects supervisor. One of the things that we used to do is show up and go. You can't do that. I need more stop. Can't point to camera that way camera has to be locked off. Can't wear that suit. It's blue you know so you were. You were the Naysayer and it was terrible. And now you're going set and you can pretty much do anything. But and so the onus is on the director and the other filmmakers because just because you can do something doesn't necessarily mean you should But the IT'S CHANGED. The personality has changed and a in an odd way. It's really It's really great because I get to think much more about how the image integrates with with the telling of the story. Not that I didn't before but there was a huge component of. How the hell are we going to do this before? We strapped cameras on airplanes and motorcycles and boats and stuff like that and we had a great time. We got to Greenland and Lear jet with Cameron. The knows got to fly all over Greenland and at low altitude and do all kinds of crazy stuff and that W- that you can see me just highlight up because that was the stuff that I love doing. But the Contemporary Environment require a dozen require that I mean we didn't you don't have to go. Well you WanNa go to greenland was just pull up a greenland got the I got the digital. I got the The lighter of of You know the icebergs and we just put some Cgi water into knows. Icebergs in new in cameron fly through it and that I think it's too weird in a weird way. Visual effects is sort of become commodity. And I don't know whether that's good bad or just inevitable But it's processing power and if you've got an processing power you can make pretty much anything you want to. And if you've got enough time you can make that thing be however you want it to be so it's a challenge because it means obviously it's it's There's no limit to the bar has been set pretty high now. Oh Yeah of course. Oh yeah but it's but the bar could be much higher. We could be at eight K. Instead of four K or two K not that anybody would ever be able to tell but we could be at eight K. And the we can render on the fly which means that the the movie can be done more quickly but the all the things you talked about water and fire those were the things you took a long time to where the we got a creditable image out of the computer environment and now You know that's it's kind of. It's a mixture. Look it's it's funny for years. When digital was first introduced it was the challenge was to try and make the digital image either captured digitally or composite digitally. Looked like Phil wanted to look like Phil wanted to have that one have grain wanted to have. Hey listen one. How all of these things. That are. Basically anomalies to a certain extent in film and that that was the that was the gold standard well digital has now gone pastoral. Now not to say that the style of film isn't great and some people prefer it including myself to a certain extent But digital cameras now capture enough information. That if you want to make it look like film you have to degrade it right. So you're doing it's it's it's an odd thing it becomes a stylistic choice as opposed to being a goal. You're going I am going to degrade put grain in it. And then I'm GONNA I'M GONNA make I'm GonNa add shutter angle and we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA shoot with old lenses so not razor-sharp precisely and and but the thing is and I guess that's what's interesting to me to I don't know that this makes sense or not. But you there was serendipity I mean the whole thing of. Im when we started. It was serendipity and there there was always when you blew up and we love to blow things up. You'd set up six cameras and you never knew which one of those cameras was going to either break shot or have the little piece it flips right towards the lens out the left hand side. So yeah you never knew until the next day but now you you go in and you make peace and flips over non. I want to. I want to see that bolt is. I don't want to see the name on the bolt as by the Lens right and it's like I don't know what it is but there was something about that. Gamble that was cool. Sounds as you're describing it very easy to relate to what you're saying so I lament the loss of that and I applaud Clinton's willingness to do quote live TV. That's my metaphor for him. The way he shoots he doesn't have Videotapes he bob. Richardson looks at it. Says it's good. And they move on and Quinton watches from the side and he decides whether or not the performance was right without ever seeing an image. And he has he'll he'll have a video monitor cameras in some curious position or something but And I that's that live nece life stuff I think shows up and I think that showed up in that for star wars because the part of the flavor of the dish was the the mistakes or the non-conventional components you referred to as mistakes. Yeah yeah the in more recent times you've worked on one of the Godzilla movies and Kong Yuk that King to his friends on Skull Island and was that your first experience with creatures. Well let's see. I did the mouse. Well of course we don't know the mouse is a hero crater. Here's a tiny man okay. That's the same deal if you WANNA make thirty foot gorilla believable. I you got to figure out how to make an a mouse believable. We've all seen a mouse. We've all been in close proximity to a mouse and the subliminal cues you gotta vocabulary this huge about real animals in real environments. You don't have much of a vocabulary about thirty foot girls in terms of their motion except for the Lizard Brain stuff. Which is how fast it moves tells you how big it is. Whether or not the first the right scale relative to the creature Whether the muscular musculature moves in a way that looks like there's some subtext to the skin and it's not just a balloon So I mean it's all the same stuff when you do big creatures. It's all the same stuff. But frankly when you do be creatures or Godzilla or or or Kong or a Dragon. You you know it's easier than doing would just did this stuff for do little. You know got an ostrich polar bear and a gorilla and dragon the dragon and a sugar glider but the but those animals real animals and they they're harder to To animate and to to create to built from scratch than the Dragon Dragon. Nobody drag us all. You can do it any night. So that's that's one of the I. I don't know that then answers a question. No that wasn't the first preacher the skull on and stuff I consider Stewart probably to be the first creature Probably because we did some the first Batman we did some Cg Batman stuff but it wasn't it was limited by our capabilities at the time. But you know and creature stuff is always fun because there's performance involves so you get to try and figure out what they're supposed to be saying you're doing or feeling or you know it still blows my mind that we are able to whether you're Disneyland. If you see Mickey Mouse and you know that it is a man wearing a costume. Same thing you know when we watch we watch stuart little or something like that. If it's done well you just go with it and you just want it to be real. Short is yeah and that always amazes me that we're just has to be all those things and asked if he said has to be done well and has to be presented well and has to be conceptually evocative otherwise it doesn't make any sense. It's like okay Mickey Mouse Great. What's he doing Meghan sandwiches? Oh Okay I believe that. Make you live. La He's Vegan. Okay Yeah but No it is it is fascinating every piece of it and that's the thing is for you. This is your work at. It's something that you love for us. We're the ones receiving benefits. Well did you feel is. It's a benefit. I promise I mean if you took a poll of people saying is the world a better place because we have light sabers. Oh yeah most people would check the box. That says yes okay. Well that's good well. Listen and that's what's so fun of that back to industrial design The one of the things that I hated about dust design is I actually had to figure out how to make this stuff work as an industrial designer. You sit down and go. Okay what am I going to do? I think I'm going to make I know what I'll do. I'll make a a toaster radio and you know you go okay and then you design the toaster radio and it's everything you expected a toaster radio to be. But then as part of the design process you have to figure out what the materials and processes are that create this toaster and then you gotta be. You're limited by how much money you can spend because the material that would be ideal for this is too expensive. So so there's this whole Infrastructure the goes around the execution this idea and four to come to fruition all of these components after work and you have to do a lot of nasty math and draft angles for mold release and all this kind of crazy stuff and and I found that in visual effects. All you gotTa do is make it look like it works in surround running. Doug had this pool table and there was this robot arm right it was. I can't remember who is early. Robot arm anyway and it's supposed to shoot this pool ball into the The proper hole on the table and they could get the try as they might. They could never get the robotic thing. So Don Crumble. Doug's dad was off camera with a broomstick and a and a manipulator arm any shoved it over there and hit the ball into the deal so it was four all the impression that you you know. It's like he's just off camera. There's there's guys you know. It's like smoke and mirrors. And that's great. That's part of that same deal. It's like a certain rogue quality to the idea that you create illusions. I'm that's one of the greatest joys being that we we watch this stuff you know it. It is joyful to see what people can create. Even what you're saying with Stuart and for now it's ridiculous what can be done and how lifelike but if you watch anything that's part of to me. What's fascinating is how certain things hold up beautifully. Because if they were done really well they were done really well. You know I'm not looking at it and sang off. That's not moving exactly like I think. No it's beautiful. It's art was advised. Stage STAGE ORIENTED THAT. God every I mean it was it. Would you choose to make the Emerald City more realistic or would the show be better because the the you know the flying monkeys weren't guys on wires I like? Oh I think so so John You are. I was GONNA say you're as busy as ever. What are you working on now? Nothing actually I just. I've just finished working on Dr Doolittle and I'm taking a hiatus. Well how nice yeah. That's great you've earned beach more the dog on the beach. How can that be not at all not at all well? We're glad you had the time to come to spend an hour with us. Sure my pleasure. Very kind of coming to my dad's class because the students really appreciated I'm glad it's it's it's an oddball deal. The you know the biggest thing when kids to me and go. What do you have to do to become a visual effects guy? I always say get out more. Well that's just it as they say in a larger sense about film school altogether. Yeah you WANNA BE FILMMAKER. Go live life exactly. Yeah have some experiences to base your assumptions and and projections on. Yeah exactly well. You've done all of that and you still doing it and we were so happy to have you here. Thanks thanks for being part of our little menagerie of I don't know where that's going. Didn't work menagerie okay. That would be a bad start to all right. Well we're so glad time to spend with US and Are you a social media person? Not particularly my daughter is why did I guess that? Why do I guess that your guy likes to blow things up and go to the beach and fly gliders I I it's I- social media's fine. I don't have any problem with it. I find if it's sunny out I'd rather be outside. I will say everyone whenever they have a moment. Go to Rick Baker's instagram because watching him create is the greatest joys of life and anytime I tell someone that really yes go watch. She's printing miniatures. He's he's made a doctor Frankenstein's lab. It's fantastic. I know it's a separate tangent but it just brings me joy. Good you are at Leonard Maltin at Jesse Molson on instagram and twitter. You can Leonard Maltin Dot Com for movie reviews book round ups and all kinds of good stuff. And we're on patriotic folks miltary Patriots Maltin on movies North Patriots Dot com slash malt non movies to a better than I do Practice anyway if you want to support what we're doing and let us keep doing it. Thank you very much for that. And thanks for listening. We'll see you next time. Today's episode of Maltin on movies is brought to you by Legion m. The world's first fan owned entertainment company. If you love movies as much as we do why not own a piece of them find out more at? Www DOT legion. M Dot com.

Doug trumbull Berkeley director Turk George Saddam trumbull Industrial Design Department Clinton King Kong John Dykstra Multan Stuart Little Snoop Dogg George Lucas Leonard Maltin Maltin Long Beach Long Beach State entertainment one Stanley Kubrick engineer
Star Wars' Cinema Technology | 6842 Valjean Ave | 1

American Innovations

46:00 min | 1 year ago

Star Wars' Cinema Technology | 6842 Valjean Ave | 1

"April nineteen seventy five Los Angeles, California. John Dykstra isn't going to be late for this meeting the twenty seven year old special effects assistant drives onto the studio lot and full up to bungalow four twenty six it's shabby, single-story, and small pre-production offices always looked like this. They don't always sound like this, though. He pushes the door inside. It's dark. The directors back is to his hands on his hips as he gazes forward. Totally immersed in the action. And this is serious action World War. Two documentary footage projected on a floor to ceiling screen p fifty ones and master Schmitz in a dogfight the plane swoop shoot explode without turning the director comments when he speaks his voice is light slightly nasal. But there's also something friendly reassuring like Kermit the frog. It's all going to have to look like this only, you know, faster more intense Han safes. Luke, Luke drops a bomb on the death star at blows up. Good guys get medals credits. The director turns around he's short and skinny thirty years old with a jet black beard. He's in his uniform blue. Plaid shirt jeans and thick glasses. He's not surprised at all to see this new visitor and greet. Some warmly. Hi, George Lucas. John Dykstra, good to meet you. To the side on a worn leather couch, sits the producer. He looks reserved thoughtful whereas an Abe Lincoln beer he rises switches on a light. Then introduces himself Gary Kurtz introductions out of the way to men, take seats. This is a job interview after all Dykstra is six four gregarious with a thick beard. Genius level intellect and a lot of confidence. He's waited years for this opportunity since nineteen sixty eight when he and his boss, the legendary affects artist Douglas, Trumbull did the effects for two thousand one space odyssey. Lucas gets right to the point. Doug Trumbull tells me you're the guy says you're ready to run your own department on a picture. What do you know about over planning Dykstra response? Honestly, pretty much nothing. I know it Saifi and you wanna see spaceships do what those ones did. Believably fluidity of motion. The ability to move the camera around, so you can create the illusion of actually photographing spaceships from camera platform in space, the technology to do that doesn't exist. But I think I can build it for you. What's the movie about exactly? Lucas smiles? And with some enthusiasm begins to break down the Jeddah, the empire laser swords talking. Robots mile long star ships hyperspace, a galaxy far far away by the time he finishes dexterous head is spinning Lucas, leans forward. Serious kid, if you take the song, you're going to have to build an effect company from the ground up. You're probably not going to have enough time. You're probably not going to have enough money if you're not up to now's the time to say so. Dykstra, thinks it over for about five seconds. I'll get it done. One thing though, what's it called? There's a glint and Lucas. I the adventures of Luke star killer episode one the Star Wars, but we mostly just call it the Star Wars for sure. None of these men. No it, but as of this moment, they've just taken the first step on a journey that will change the face of cinema forever. American innovations is brought to you by wicks dot com. The prospect of building a website can be overwhelming. It seems like there are thousand citizens to make. I mean, the look and feel of your website is an extension of you and you want to put your best foot forward. I recently faced this very challenge. I needed a website to showcase the kids at uptake of my book how we got to now and thank goodness wicks made it easy to get started for free. I could choose from over five hundred templates that are built to look beautiful and intuitive to use. I'm still working on the site making tweaks here and there to make sure it's exactly how I want it before launch, and with wicks, it's been quick and easy to change. Customize add anything I like I'm excited to get it live soon. So you can see it, and with the built-in SEO tools that come with all wicks websites. I know it will be easy for people to find build a website. Of your own with wicks today for free. And if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code AI you'll get ten percent off any premium plan with wicks premium plans. You get more storage, a free Demane for year and much much more. That's wicks dot com code for ten percent off any premium plan. From wonder this is American innovations. And I'm Steven Johnson on may twenty fifth nineteen seventy seven Star Wars was released in thirty two theaters nationwide, as word of mouth spread its popularity exploded across the globe. It gave rise to an enduring pop cultural phenomenon. Unlike any the world had ever known nearly everything about the original Star Wars films was iconic, particularly the special effects and sound design the young George, Lucas, and his team envisioned, something so Embiid, radical, it almost never came to be to make Star Wars. The reality existing technology had to be utilized in ways never before. Imagined new technology had to be invented, and they didn't have much time to do it in this series of American innovations will follow the creatives technologists and even demolition experts. That made that vision a reality. Nineteen seventy-five George Lucas was a young director on the rise, his first movie THX, eleven thirty eight was a provocative and original Sifi masterpiece, though. It failed at the box office next up was nineteen seventy three's American graffiti, this movie helped Lucas prove he could please the crowd. It was one of the most profitable movies of all time. It made Lucas, a millionaire and gave him the clout to breathe life into an idea he'd been kicking around since the late sixties George Lucas envisioned, his third movie as buck Rogers meets Fash, Gordon, meet seven samurai meets well, every archetypal hero's journey since the dawn of storytelling. Lucas knew that in order for his space opera to work, the visual effects would have to outshine all visual effects that had come before special effects artist. John Dykstra was just the right hungry, brilliant, ideal. For the task Lucas wanted his affects team to be independent of the film industry, establishment. He didn't have much of a choice, anyway. Simply there, weren't any special effects companies can handle the creativity and innovation needed to make the Star Wars, Lucas gave Dykstra, free rein to choose the personnel of the visual effects department with emphasis on hiring, the young non union and ingeniously talented this unprecedented company would race against time to do the impossible, and at times clash with their director, the truth was George Lucas knew that he could hire the best concept artists cast, composer, costume designer and set builder in the world, the none of that would matter if the scene set in space, look cheesy, and fake this now legendary team had no idea back in nineteen seventy five that they were working on arguably the biggest and most impactful Moshe. Shen picture in history. They would defy the odds to get their epic struggle to fulfill. Their destiny is the story of American innovations Star Wars. This is episode one sixty eight forty two foul gene avenue. It's late may nineteen seventy-five George Lucas stares at the drab concrete warehouse. John Dykstra can see his new boss is frowning. Sorry, what was that George? I said, I hate it sixty eight forty two Valjean avenue. In van Nuys is in the aired flat central San Fernando Valley, but eight miles north of downtown LA, the building is across the street from an airport. There's going to be a lot of shouting involved here. Lucas and Dykstra, joined by Gary Kurtz, who found this place, along with Dykstra, handpick staff hired to get this facility, up and running. There's grant mccune thirty two bio grad turned lab technician turned model builder. Jerry Greenwood thirty six former actor who made the pivot to the technical side of the business, he'll build the special mechanical equipment for this movie. There's also a production manager addition. Model makers electrons and Richard edlund thirty four. You'll get the camera department underway. Fun fact about Richard edlund on several occasions. His hand was used to play the thing on the Addams family TV show. It's time for the tour to begin Dykstra leads the way as they walked through the space, Lucas, literally turns up his nose extra catches this. Okay. I know it smells like a gym locker, but trust me, this is what we need. The group looks around at this gross empty cement, cave. There are no walls on the inside. No offices yet. No equipment no air conditioning. And it's about to be June in the valley in southern California. That's certainly not going to help the stench still Dykstra. Excitedly lays out his vision, pausing periodically to tape off sections of the floor so over here, we put the two optical, printers, and just over there will be the rota scope department. There's enough space in the back for two shooting stages, and against that wall the model shop next to that machine. Shop over here would jump my office will be here. Okay. You'll see the second floor is a lot smaller than the first but still a ton of room for what we need to put up here. Aditorial animation. Art department, boom boom, and we can squeeze our screening room in right rate here. Dykstra can see that maybe slowly Lucas is beginning to accept the concept extra point straight up. Plus, check out the sealants CO high. They are it's twenty four feet to the bay. We can put lights real high to get the angles we need or we can have the camera on the ceiling to get a good wide shot looking down Lucas nods. But he'd rather set up shop in northern California closer to his home outside, San Francisco, you might be able to have that one day George, but you've got to trust me on this. The bay area doesn't have the film development labs. We need or the color, processing shops, Kurtz backs Dykstra. He reminds Lucas that they have three hundred fifty effect shots to make an only two million dollars to make them with. This is the perfect facility. It's out of the way and the rent is cheap sides. They're in a rush as of now the plan is to release the Star Wars around Christmas of nineteen seventy six. Lucas just stares off into the distance mulling it over while the rest of the team stands in suspense finally Lucas speaks industrial light and magic extreme Kurtz look at each other confused Lucas explains. That's what will call this place where in this industrial park in van Nuys using light to Crete magic industrial light and magic curt smiles at Dykstra. That was Lucas giving the seal of approval just before he turns to leave Lucas looks back at extra you better. Get to work. Get clock's ticking. I'll 'em officially went into production, just days later, June first nineteen seventy five over the next six weeks. Walls went up equipment moved in and staff was hired. Twenty five year old Joe Johnston was one of those new hires. He was entrusted with initiating. I'll alums art department. The blonde Texas native had already made a name from self as an inspired affects technician and concept artist. He planned to spend the summer lounging at the beach that was until lambs production manager called and said, hey, Joe on come out to van Nuys and help us make a space movie. Johnston was going to decline until he saw I limb for himself. A bunch of people his own age setting up, cutting edge effects, Queant themselves, vivid, and transcend up, concept, paintings of spaceships, heroes and villains. Droids drafted by the masterful Ralph mcquarry, Johnston quickly changed his mind about taking off the summer and got to work on Johnston's. First-day Dykstra, walks up with prototype, models of imperial, typhi, here's rebel alliance. X wings. He's also. Got Hans solos vessel, which he simply calling the pirate ship. All right, Joe. What do you think of these beautiful really great work? I agree. But they're going to need a few adjustments. And, and that's where you come in. We have in mind Dykstra, tugs on the rebel fighter. This is an x wing Luke star killer flies this, but I need the wings to be a little wider here. They won't show up on blue screen then for the pirate ship, I need you to draw version. That's a little fatter here. See and need to be able to fit suspension bars. Also see what you can do about the cockpit. I gotta fill light in there, make sense. Sure. Chirp. Now aesthetically. What are we thinking gleaming kind of futuristic or Dykstra, cuts them off? Exact opposite George wants him to look secondhand old and beat up. He calls it used universe Johnston. Odds this. Movie is really going to be different. I can get you about a dozen sketches by the end of the day, just curious. How are we going to actually film? This stuff likes loves it. When people ask him this question. We'll let me show you, thanks leads Johnston over to the pride and joy of it's currently under construction, Johnston can tell right away. He's looking at about sixty thousand dollars worth of hardware, tracks or surplus Dr stepping Motors lenses and more Dykstra beans with pride and says, this is what's going to make the Star Wars different from everything that's come before Lucas wants dozens spaceships dogfighting in space. So how would we do that? Johnston knows the answer to that one, take one piece of film, with the spatial model put that on top of the piece of film, with just star field put that on top of a piece of film with just lasers. Then combine it all with. The optical printer. So it looks like one shop exactly. But if you're capturing each element, one at a time camera moves are out of the question. I mean, there's no way for cameraman to repeat, the exact same moves over and over again. The shots would match up Dykstra, grins the camera system. We're building here, fixes, all of their typically device. Like this has been possible for a while. But this is real deal better electron guidance better mechanical drive mechanism. It's called the motion control camera machine. Master Jerry Greenwood has been used job, he pipes up with grin. It's called the Dykstra flex Dykstra. Waves Greenwood off. You don't have to call it anyway. The Star Wars is going to have around three hundred fifty shots with as many as seven to eight elements per shop motion, control, combines it uniquely designed camera, the special patented mechanical Rick. And the whole thing's controlled by this specialized electronic control system, then we command the camera to repeat the same move again. And again, and again, on each element, you understand. Joe Johnston can't believe what he's just heard movies, couldn't depict shots spaceships flying through space, unless the camera was perfectly still the stillness of the camera was a dead giveaway that the shot was fabricated, this begs, reflects will be able to convey, the allusion of space travel, like no movie before Johnston, excitedly, lists, the possibilities, you can watch spaceship, approach from a distance pan along cited, and then watch it go way hundred eighty degrees, just like real live, action photography. And if you mess it up the first time, it's okay just program. The camera to do the same move again until it comes out. Right. That's incredible. Dykstra, nods, then looks down lovingly at the extra flex its far from complete, but it's taking shape, Johnston can see where the camera will be mounted on a crane attached to a platform that will roll back and forth on tracks. It'll be incredible. All right. But it's just the beginning Dykstra size. I mean, it's just a workhorse device, one day, maybe we can get computers involved. I don't really change the game from summer into the fall, the burgeoning effects wizards were hard, designing and building a fleet of magnificent fantastic. Spaceships, one of the ships, however, has an unseen flaw. It may be the first major roadblock, these technologists face, but it certainly won't be the last. Thanks to the art of shaving for sponsoring our show shaving, you know, you'll look great, but it can be such chore. The art of shaving was created to help men, enjoy every moment of their shave by elevating it from mere act, too. Well at art, the art of shaving began with a husband wife devoted to helping men solve everyday shaving issues, their original recipe for preshave oil, soon evolved into a complete start to finish shaving ritual called the four elements of the perfect shave they've gone on to develop the ultimate male grooming experience with products for Beard's skin-care body and fragrances. Elevate your shaving routine. Listeners of American innovations can get fifteen percent off their first order at the art of shaving by using the promo code a experienced the perfect shave for yourself or discover perfect gifts for every guy by visiting the art of shavings. One hundred stores are going to. The art of shaving dot com. Just enter promo code AI at checkout to get fifteen percent off your first order and learn to love grooming again at the art of shaving. American innovations is brought to you by chase. So you're ready to downsize at chase. They get it. You've had the garage sale. You've shipped the last kid off to college. You've even sold your old house. Wait, you sold your house, where are you gonna live, relax? Chase has your back as a chase customer. You're guaranteed to close on your next home quickly. Or you get a thousand dollars so you can skip the storage unit and crashing on your son's futons. Chase gets you in your next home faster. Learn more at chase dot com slash AI chase. Make more of what's yours. All home lending products, are subject to credit and property approval rates program. Terms and conditions are subject to change without notice, not all products, are available in all states are all amounts. Other restrictions limitations apply. Homeland and products offered by J P Morgan Chase Bank and a an equal housing lender. It's November nineteen seventy-five George Lucas visits the van Nuys model shop in person to deliver some bad news, Han solo needs a new pirate ship. The one you guys built isn't going to work. Oh, what's wrong with that? I saw commercial last night for this show. Space nineteen ninety nine the main starship in that looks just like our pirate ship shaft, like structure with rockets and back and a cockpit up front. The pirate ship is the most important spaceships in the movie if even one person thinks we ripped off space nineteen ninety nine the Star Wars won't work. Lucas Dykstra and Johnston hunker down around the drafting table. Trying to build a new ship for haunt solo Lucas Thurs out, ideas Johnston sketches away. Let's make it round Joe flying saucer. No more like flying hamburger radio shape completely different from everything else anyone's ever seen. Yeah. Yeah. That that's good. Make the engines bigger make it feel like a hot wrote. The idea should be that, it's, it's a smuggler's freighter with a lot of modifications. Dykstra, makes us suggestion. Joe move the cockpit from the top to the side. Yeah. Yeah. Perfect. Lucas was happy. He jokingly nicknamed Han solo new ship the pork burger, but it seemed like a waste to just dump the original pirate ship in the trash, especially since it costs twenty five thousand dollars to build Lucas came up with the solution. What if the original pirate ship was the rebel blockade runner, instead, the rebel, blockade runner would be the first ship scene in the movie alum was relieved their hard work. Didn't go to waste. One last problem, though. The new rebel Bokke runner didn't have a cockpit anymore. It got cut pasted onto the pork burger Johnston suggested that the front of the blockade runner, it looks like the front of hammerhead shark. Lucas loved it model grant mccune next took to. Cardboard buckets filled them with styrofoam covered that and paper and then decorated the paper with styrene and model parts boom, the rebel blockade runner now had a cockpit and the pork burger got a new name Linnea falcon over the next several months. I'll continue to develop test and build the technologies needed to make the Star Wars of reality in January nineteen seventy six Carrie Fisher, Mark Hamill Harrison Ford and sir. Alec Guinness for cast as the film's heroes principal photography commenced into nesia at six thirty A M on Monday, March twenty second. The shoot was a disaster from minute one the weather crew, and onset practical effects refuse to cooperate and Lucas was unhappy with most of the footage. But there was no turning back. Back in the states. I m run into serious troubles of its own. It was way behind schedule. Lucas vision was unprecedented. An uncompromising to bring it to life Dykstra, team had to explore equally new technologies. But the RND process was time, consuming and unpredictable one such technology was blue screen precursor to green screen blue screen could save the crew a ton of time with their composite work if they could get it to work. But so far are indeed was just pushing them further and further behind schedule this officially became a huge problem in may of nineteen seventy six by then Lucas, and the crew were an England shooting scenes on the death star and millennium falcon sets to make the shoot work. They needed pre filmed effects foot or front, projection pleats from Iowa, but I m didn't have the place ready, Lucas. Team needed the front projection plates to create the convincing seen when Alec Guinness. Stairs out of the cockpit of the millennium falcon and declares. That's no moon. It's a space station. What the actor an audience are actually looking at is special effects footage projected into the windows of the falcon with front projection plates. At least that's the way it was supposed to work Lucas received sixty plates clips of affects footage from I'll for use in front projection. Every last one was unusable some weren't lit rate. Some were just playing out of focus Lucas demanded Dykstra, jump on a plane immediately and personally, explain himself on the set at L street studios, forty five minutes outside of London. And so that's what Dykstra does. Structure pers- lined up outside the gateway to the falcon quickly. Please. Thank you. Extra finds Lucas bundled up in a director's chair. Gary Kurtz stands nearby and reviews. The latest progress reports both director and producer, look miserable. And sick Lucas appearance suggests he hasn't eaten or slept in days. The movie is nine days behind schedule. Lucas lost his voice three days ago, it has yet to return he glares. Well, look, who it is the genius sent me, sixty useless front projection plates. Dykstra knows he's in the hotseat knows, Lucas has good reason to be frustrated Dykstra disappointed in himself. He feels like he's let the whole production down, still they might have an opportunity here, George. I really don't know what happened. I'm sorry. Look, I, I know we screwed up. But projection is a flawed technology and it's hard for the actors to react convincingly to it. I want us to try something different something that's guaranteed to work. I'm listening blue screen everywhere. We were going to put front projection. We put blue screen instead, the actors have to use their imaginations a little more. Sure. But at least they can deliver the lines at their own pace and the backgrounds don't have to perfect in the moment. You're shooting Gary Kurtz frowns blue screen is cutting edge technology largely untested in the Hollywood film industry, actors aren't used to it. And now Dykstra wants to entrust the fate of the movie to it. The release date was recently pushed back from December nineteen seventy six to may nineteen seventy seven that buys them all some extra time. But is it enough? So basically John, what you're telling us is that your plan is to just stick blue screen up everywhere now and figure out the rest later. I know how that sounds but yeah, we have about a year until this movie is in theaters. And we now have ten more shots to add to the list. That's three hundred sixty shots to get done of which you have completed exactly zero from this day forward, you need to average about one completed shot day. I'm gonna ask you a question, and I want you to think carefully before you answer. Are we gonna finish on time or not? Dykstra takes a moment. He knows that. It's all on the line, the success of this movie his own career and reputation he gives the best answer. He can't if things go right? Yeah. We can do that. The only problem was on the Star Wars. Almost nothing had gone. Right. So far. It's Friday, July. Sixteenth nineteen Seventy-six L street studios. The last scene of principal photography is the moment, we meet Darth Vader, for the first time the script page reads, the awesome, seven foot tall dark Lord of the Sieff makes his way into the blinding light of the main passageway, Lucas order's about four takes and cut. All right. Thanks, David think we got it. That's a wrap on the Star Wars. The next day he's on a plane back to the states, he tries to think about the film as little as possible, but can't help himself visit Steven Spielberg, who is on said in mobile Alabama shooting. The arrival of the mother ship for close, encounters Spielberg has never seen his friends so depressed. But he likes the production stills Lucas brought with him. These great affairs. Luke stark killer fantastic Skywalker. It's, it's Luke Skywalker. Now star killer was starting to give me Charles Manson vibes. So I changed the name also that the from the title, we're just calling Star Wars now I gotta tell you buddy, I Star Wars is going to turn out better than you think. Or worse. We'll see. Lucas leaves to catch the next flight to California on August first he pulls up to I lamb in van Nuys Luca's needs to see good lighting and convincing motion. He needs to feel like he's looking at actual star ships in space, not models. Set against a backdrop in San Fernando Valley warehouse, what Lucas fines at sixty eight forty two Valjean avenue that day is indeed worst than he'd ever feared. He looks around in disgust at the lack of progress, forget good versus bad shots. There are still hardly any shots at all. He angrily confronts, John Dykstra inside dexterous office. It's cramped and cluttered with stray film, negatives, and San crawler models. You've been here year you've spent a million dollars. And what do you have to show for it? The escape pod ejecting from his ship and spiraling down towards tattooing. Okay. Great. You still got about three hundred fifty eight shots to go and only eight months to get them. George believe me. We don't think you quite understand the critical nature of making a movie all the pieces have to fall together. Lucas storms out then boards, a plane for the bay area where Star Wars is being edited in part by his wife Marcia as soon as the plane touches down. Marcia can see her husband is not okay, George. What's wrong? I. I don't know. He clutches his chest, the color begins to drain from his face Marsha fears, it's a heart attack. I'm taking you to the hospital, the doctor concluded that this wasn't heart attack, but it was exhausting and hypertension for on by stress. Well, it's official Star Wars is practically killing him. Lucas knows something has to change. Support for American innovations comes from Capital One with the spark cashcard from Capital One. You earn unlimited two percent cashback on all of your business purchases. Think about it unlimited two percent cashback on everything you buy for your business that cashback can add up to thousands of dollars which you can reinvest back into your business so you can keep growing imagine what unlimited two percent cashback. Could do for your business. Learn more at Capital, One dot com. What's in your wallet? It's August nineteen seventy six George Lucas is recovering from his visit the hospital and he's newly determined to get this film done the right way. Once he returns home. He calls his producer. Gary Kurtz, Gary island is not working out. It's it's time for some serious changes. Have you been down there lately? It's like a frat house way too laid back. We need to do something. Look Dykstra, a sharp guy. That's obvious, the Dykstra, flexes amazing. I'll give him that. Things can't be this inefficient Mondays and Tuesdays. I will personally be there all day to keep the pressure on. I wanna season production supervisor in there the rest of the week cracking. The whip no more experimenting, I lamb is no longer a research facility as of today. It is true production unit by mid-september. I lamb is a very different place. No more downtime. Mandatory completion of five shots per day. But the explosions aren't looking rate, x wings, Thai fighters ultimately, the death star must blow apart spectacularly no matter what extra and his team, try be explosions. Cartoonish unacceptable. Lucas is very specific about how he wanted to look when a Starfighter blows up, Dykstra, explains to his newly hired demolitions expert Jove coastal. So George wants the outline of the ship to be on fire entire outlined should spark away. And then the shiploads no. Can you figure that out this coastal ponders this dilemma? What compound are you using the settling? Well, that's the problem right there, settling, we'll just give you a few sparks, then the disintegration of the model you can't get a real fireball like that tell you what I'm going to try this with bigger explosives. Magnesium gasoline silk based on us Squibb's to electrically detonate and I'll shoot it at one hundred frames per second that should do the trick. This coastal solution does the trick. The aylum crew is amazed. By Tober thirtieth just six months to go and till Star Wars scheduled to come out I l m had a quarter of the required shots done and they were picking up the pace with each passing day for the first time. Even Lucas was impressed by the quality of the visual effects being created. January nineteen seventy seven alum. Stab his to cruise to work simultaneously to get the movie. One is run by special effects Taga for Richard edlund and the other by special effects. Tiger for Dennis Muren, who has just turned thirty at Linden Mirren divvy up shots between okay? Danis. It says here, Luke nosedives radically. My team will take that one. And I'll handle most of the millennium falcon shots and I'll get the multiple ship shots. Why wings diving together, we can do that, and we'll split up to death star, trench stuff works for me. The two men get to work edlund sets up an X wing model shot to be filmed Dykstra, flex improvises, with what he has on hand based off of what he sees in the moment, we've got a little bit of light flare on that portion of the wing. Grab some cardboard will you tape it on? Okay. Beautiful beautiful. Okay rolling. February nineteen seventy seven I lamb is moving fast, but not fast enough, not wanting to argue in front of the crew. Lucas Kurtz and Dykstra have it out in the parking lot. George. We are killing ourselves to make this happen for you. But there are very significant technical reasons why every little thing can't be done exactly the way you want it done. I can't be any clearer John the poster says coming to your galaxy this summer if we can't pulled that off, it's going to be your fault. Like I can't talk to you guys Kurtz ways, in John, you know, Georgia, I respect your talent very much. But when we bring a problem you spend an hour just telling us white can't be solved. Well, we don't need that what we need is someone to say how we intend to solve it. There are a lot of great minds here. But it's like organized anarchy. And you have to accept responsibility Dykstra. Here's this and loses. The job started great back in nineteen seventy five but since then he's just been beaten up by these two relentlessly. Yeah. Okay. Great. I get it. I'm the bad guy on. The bad guy here. Forget that I stood next to Hugh and built all this. You need a scapegoat. This rate here is exactly why I want out of this business. I can't wait to get out of your when this is done and do something else with my life Dykstra. Just shakes his head emotion getting the best of him. He heads back toward the warehouses front door. If you need me, I'll be inside. I've got a movie to finish and it will be finished on time. That's a promise. April nineteen seventy seven the movie is supposed to hit theaters. In a matter of weeks. Everyone at IOM is an agreement about one thing, the most important shots of the film are not done yet. The first one to knock out is literally, the first shot of the movie, the opening crawl disappears into the distance in the camera than tilts down toward the star destroyer chasing the rebel blockade runner, Lucas, consults with Richard edlund. We have to get this perfect Richard this shot sums up my whole vision for this movie. No pressure there edlund preps his team and they begin setting up but there's an issue at the models. The star destroyer model is only three feet long, but in this scene, it's going to fill the screen for about fifteen seconds that close and that long of a shot there's the risk of it looking fake. Then there's the rebel blockade runner model. It's six feet long twice the size of the star destroyer. But later in shot, one hundred and to the rebel ship needs to appear small enough to fit into the star destroyers docking bay building a new model would be a major construction project and extremely expensive. Ettlin has another idea. He shows Lucas test. He made the night before. So what you're looking at onscreen this, this is a test. This isn't the final version by any means. But with the creek lands shooting distance and angle, we can make this three foot start a story or model. Look like an actual five thousand foot long spaceship. I like it, but make sure there's plenty of detail in the star destroyer hire extra people. If you have to this shot must hold up to the highest scrutiny, and Lyndon Johnston, put two guys from the model shop on the task of detailing the star destroyer painting, it scoring it adding bits and pieces from various models. This job alone takes weeks. Meanwhile, I lamb spent months building the trenches of the death star. It was also tedious work. The effects technicians created three different sized trench pieces. That could be configured in an endless number of arrangements. They spent the next few weeks, filming with the Dykstra, flex to cover the necessary dogfights over the death star as well as Luke Skywalker. Connecting speed trench run. Spoiler alert. Luke, then fires to proton torpedoes that proceed to blow up the empire's most powerful space station. And what about the explosion itself, Lucas Dykstra? And the rest of the team watch his demolitions expert, Joe Visco SEL wires the death star model for detonation to make the explosion extra mind-blowing. He's brought a rare and unique toy with him. He's taking the business of filming pyrotechnics to a whole new level. What we've got. Here's special trick. Thirty five millimeter Anamour fit camera from photo Sonics it can run up to three hundred frames per second. We'll blow the model at self with the special titan bland of my own design, and when it's all done, we'll have a very convincing gas explosion silver. Sparks will come through, and you'll get faint gas type or all right, everybody. Stand back. A week later. The crew screen the finished explosion for Lucas in the second floor IOM screaming room. There wasn't any sound yet, of course, but they didn't need some to know. They had succeeded. The destruction of the death star truly impressed, Lucas, when the explosion lit up the screen the entire crew of industrial light. Magic cheered when the screen went dark Lucas walked out into the parking lot at last he could breathe a sigh of relief Star Wars would be finished on time. I lamb got the job done. Lucas just relishing that thought when he realizes there's someone else in the parking lot with its John Dykstra. Extra turns smiles Lucas miles to Star Wars is over there war is over, both men thoughtful. Not quite sure what to do now. Dykstra begins to say something but stops himself Lucas looked out towards the airport. Finally, he speaks. There's not a lot of people out there who can do what you did. You're asking the impossible people, they can do it or they can't. But you can't blame or fault somebody for not being able to do the impossible, but finishing it's impossible Lucas shrugs. That's the best. He's got he extends his hand Dykstra, takes. Two weeks later to the day, Star Wars hit the IRS, and everything changed. Industrial light and magic was destined to not just change making, but reinvent it again. And again, but I, they would have to make it through production, even more difficult than Star Wars, The Empire Strikes back. Episode to track the evolution of aylum as they continue to pull off the impossible through the next two episodes of the original Star Wars, trilogy and beyond. I hope you enjoyed this episode of American innovations. If you did, please give us a five star review and tell your friends to subscribe available on apple podcasts, Stitcher NPR, one in every major listening app as well as that wondering dot com. If you're listening on a smartphone tapper, swipe of the cover art of this podcast. You'll find the episode notes, including some details, you may have missed. You also find some offers from our sponsors, please support our show by supporting them and thank you. American innovations is hosted by me. For more information on my books about science and history of innovation, you can visit my website at WWW Steven, Berlin. Johnson dot com. This episode was written by Hannibal divas, if editing by Lynn. Z credit will sound design on this episode is by spoke media American innovations produced by Emma Cortlandt executive produced by marshal Louis and her non Lopez for wondering.

Lucas Dykstra George Lucas Dykstra John Dykstra Gary Kurtz burger Johnston Luke stark Richard edlund director California Joe Visco producer wicks van Nuys Abe Lincoln Lucas Kurtz Jeddah Jerry Greenwood production manager
365: Market Saturation, Mind Mapping, Miracle Mornings, and More: 20 Questions with Nick

The Side Hustle Show

43:37 min | 10 months ago

365: Market Saturation, Mind Mapping, Miracle Mornings, and More: 20 Questions with Nick

"Market Saturation Mind. Mapping Miracle Mornings in more time for another round of twenty questions with me. What's what's up Nick Lowe per here welcome to the side Hustle show because building an income stream you have control over is the fast track the financial independence? It's time for another edition of Twenty questions with Nick diving into the listener mailbag from the last few months to pull out a few questions. I thought that would be interesting and hopefully beneficial to try an answer on air. This is the ninth in this series. So you'll find links to all the resources mentioned over Durant side-hustle nation Dot Com Q.. And A. Nine in. If you like this format you'll find all the previous episodes done in this style over there as well question number one comes from GNAT who asks. I'm curious to know. How do you monetize your blog? I've tried Google ads but that is terrible because it drives traffic. Take away from my website. So great question there. You're not gonNA find display and like Google ads on side-hustle nation but the site still brings in five figures in monthly revenue and in my case the bulk of that these days is coming from affiliate marketing. Which is probably worth defining affiliate marketing meaning pointing in your audience to the products or services? You think would be most helpful or relevant to them in earning a commission for doing so but there are lots of ways to monetize a blog. I've got a video that walks you through some of the most popular ways over at blog starter course dot com for example. You can tell your own products you could sell your services you you could sell sponsored posts. You could sell membership lots of different ways to get it done in a sense. Affiliate Marketing has some of the same drawbacks. That adds ends does in that. It sends people off your site so you have to make a call as to. What's your goal? Do you want somebody to join your email list to book a call with you schedule. An appointment right do you. I want them to buy your product but still there are entire sites. Entire businesses built solely from a monetization standpoint in any way to earn that Ad Revenue Avenue. It's a very viable model. And someone were following in that space. Is John Dykstra from fat stacks blog DOT COM. He's got some great stuff. He's got an interesting resting and worthwhile email newsletter. It's one of the few that I still open almost every time and actually John Is. One of the people who recommended are brand new sponsor sir. Easily if you're publishing content online you gotta know about ease oik SOS Google award-winning technology. Leverages artificial intelligence. Tell P improve manage and monetize your websites. The new site speed APP optimizes website speed with a guaranteed eighty points or better on Google's page speed score for you know this stuff is important. I want to invite you to try out. Zoellick's new site speed application for yourself. GO TO ZOELLICK DOT com slash side-hustle show to get a seven-day seven-day free trial with no credit card required. That's easy oh I see dot com Izzo ICK DOT com slash side-hustle show in if there's anything I've learned my now fifteen plus years as an entrepreneur. It's that there's always going to be more to learn and I think that learn as you go. Peace is really critical. That's actually where are sponsor skill share dot com. Comes in inside skills. Your you'll find more than twenty four thousand expert taught online on-demand classes in marketing Business in tons more. You're sure to find the exact material you need to take your skills your business to the next level skills here. Is the online learning community for creators eaters like US and signed also show listeners canal. Unlock two months of free unlimited access to start leveling up your skills at skullshaver dot com slash side-hustle show that's skullshaver dot com slash side-hustle show to check it out for free question. Number two comes from James. He says nowadays since the market is so saturated saturated. Can you really start an online business and earn a decent side income to James. I think that is a great question and tactics of course will change over time but the broader strategies of helping people in solving problems. Those never really go away and the exciting thing is there are always new opportunities -tunities opening up. We see this in action even in some recent episodes of the show checkout saw l.. In episode three fifty nine he started simply insurance just just a couple of years ago and when we recorded he was bringing in thirteen to fifteen grand in revenue a month super competitive space right supersaturated but he found underway in and is making that work in the personal finance base. There's a site called dollar sprout which I want to started in twenty seventeen and is now one of the dominant players in the niche their pace to over two million dollars this year so yes the online space is more crowded than it ever has been but there are also more people turning online for answers to their questions than ever before just as a personal example. There were plenty of other entrepreneur interview shows when when I started this podcast in two thousand thirteen and it would have been really easy to say hi. It's too competitive or now. You know it's already been done and I'm reminded of a quote from Jonathan Mendoza from choose F. I.. On the show a couple years ago where he said. If you can't be I be different. Is it easy to build an online business today. Of course not but it is achievable and I see lots of people getting after. It's kind of like the old adage of wins the best time to plant a tree well thirty years ago. Oh but a year from. Now you're GonNa wish you started today you're GonNa wish you plant it today. Question Three is from Valerie she says already paid for hosting. I've we've got a domain but I'm struggling with conceptualizing in categorizing. The things I want to write about. Can you help me out. Alright so Valerie on the blog front front. One thing that you might find helpful is to organize some kind of mind map especially when you're just starting out where you bring all your ideas and you kind of categorize categorize them. There are some online tools to do that. Mind MUP- 'EM. Up is one that turned up in search for free online. Mind map or you can just do it with pen and paper or a stack of posted notes for me. I do this in a couple of ways if I'm out and about I'M GONNA put new ideas down down in the notes APP on my phone in if I'm by my desk or this added to a master. Google doc I have called article ideas and no super original right from there. I dumped those keywords into H.. Rafts to see the approximate search volume and competitiveness which just helps me prioritize which topics topics to tackle right all else being equal. I'M GONNA go after the lower competitive terms that have higher search volume. But after that then I start building my outlines of what what I want to make sure to include in each article and then more recently. I'm trying to find audience members or colleagues to connect with for references or quotes or stories to help build out that content. And I want to know too that the categories on your side even the content on your site. Those don't have to be set in stone. From from the Gecko the categories. On side-hustle nation have certainly evolved over time as my interests have changed as the interest of readers have changed in my case the broad topic. The theme of the site is making extra money. So I have categories freelancing online business e commerce and investing. If you have a site about out skiing you might have categories like gear reviews a ski travel skiing skills something like that. But in general if you have three to six high level categories I think you're going to be in good shape in terms of site architecture and then you can start to brainstorm the type of content that would go under each of those question. Four is from an she says. I'm very good at using websites. Like Zelzal snap fish and shutter fly to make personalized calendars Christmas cards and party in wedding invitations. Do you think there's a market for me to do this for other people as a side hustle and if so how would I get started. So am I like this one As someone who has struggled to make photo books and other products on these sites. That's definitely a good skill to have. In fact some wedding photographers offer a photo book. Either as part of their package or as an upsell so it might be worth the conversation to ask how they get those done if it takes a ton of time if that's a pain point for them right. I've seen other services where for every hundred instagram photos or something like that. They'll automatically print in ship. You A little photo book. But targeting we're getting a broad consumer market is pretty tough so I had I look at that partnership angle for a potential done for you or done with you type of service. Could you find a local photographer or several local photographers and offer this. As an add on service to their client base. Maybe it's even behind the scenes things. Where do the end customer? You're kind of invisible. They're just. It's an add on service from the photographer because even though Zaza land charter flight like interfaces they get easier over time I am the. Diy Route is hard. You think I'm saving money. But like when you calculate your time and I spent four hours put this thing together like eight. They've done it once. Maybe that make sense to hire that out a second time and it's kind of funny. This is actually really similar to business. Idea Brennan I kicked around over here for a while a few years ago she had made these really cool personalized. ABC Books for some friends kids using mainly instagram pictures. But we never made it a priority to go out and try and validate it and market that to to a broader audience audience. But I like this one. I think there's something there question five comes from Julia she says. Do you have any tips for developing a routine to wake up earlier. I WANNA start waking waking up an hour earlier and have time to work on my side hustle so this was actually a question from the facebook group. SIDE-HUSTLE NATION DOT com slash F. B.. We'll get you over there if you're not a member already. This is a good question and prompted some good discussion in in that threat so getting up early was actually one of the leading responses when asked side-hustle nation this year. What's the one habit you feel contributes most to your success? The other that made the top five were getting physical activity learning the new things having clearly defined goals and creating what several members called an external brain meaning. You have some sort of system to store and keep track of your tasks tasks and ideas. So they don't clutter up your mental ram but back to getting up early. This was like the number one response. What's the one habit you feel contributes most to your success in the idea behind this is to create some space in your day where previously none might exist in doing it first thing rather than and waiting until late at night when you're potentially drained willpower and energy because if you don't create that space no one else is going to do it for you so I think this we're getting up? Early is a really powerful and up until this year. I've never been an early riser. But for the last several months especially now that our sons have a semi consistent wakeup time. I've been getting up around five thirty doing a quick workout and shower and just generally getting proactive start on the day. I've actually started added waking up without an alarm at that time. which must mean? I'm officially getting but seriously feels great. The biggest tip I can share. That will make this easier is going to bed earlier. It's still going to be tough for the first week or two in probably harder in the winter when it's dark out when it's so much easier to stay warm and bundled up in bed but after that especially if you start to see and feel some positive benefits from doing it it's going to become natural and what I've noticed on the other end is it's meant not working late into the evenings. We're usually heading to bed around nine thirty these days maybe doing a little reading. And that's it. That's probably an Our earlier than before this little schedule shift among the other suggestions from the facebook group were using these sleep cycle APP which theoretically leave gently wakes you up during a period of lighter sleep to do it in increments like set your alarm ten minutes earlier each day until you reach your desired time. I actually did the opposite. Sit in highschool right. Set my alarm a minute later every week and try and sleep hunger and and just be more efficient in getting out. The door in the mornings and other suggestion was put the alarm arm clock across the room. So you have to get up physically get up to shut it off. It's not GonNa win a lot of friends with your spouse or partner if they're not on board with your new wakeup plan and the final suggestion was just do. It reminds me of Jaakko will links answer to how to be more disciplined. Just be more disciplined question. Six comes from Joe. He says I signed up through websites for blue host to start my blog about personal finance through the eyes of an educator what I was not ready for was for them to build. Build the site for me for around two thousand dollars. I really know just about nothing about site building affiliate marketing plug INS marketing. The site or anything to make the site runs smoothly and make a a few bucks while doing it. Do you think it would be worth it to have them build and market it. I know I have my ideas on what I want to blog about. But I'm thinking if this gets me from A to be a lot sooner with a lot growing pains maybe that's worth it. What do you think so first of all Joe thank you for supporting the site signing up through my affiliate link but second of all the deal would be a hard pass? I think you're GonNa find far more affordable web help on platforms like five or or in groups like side-hustle nation that that side hustle nation dot com slash. FBI again the thing is he just want to be super clear about what you're looking for. So what I would do is find a theme that you like. And then work to customize it until you're happy with it. There are thousands of great looking mobile responsive free themes side-hustle nation for the sake of reference runs on a theme called generate press. which I think is like forty bucks a year and on top of that? I layer a service or software beaver builder which allows more kind of dragon dropper opera or what you see is what you get editing. The basic rule though would be to start with a barebones foundation. You can live with. And when that won't immediately Taylor's eyes bleed in design wise and then add expense and complexity only as the revenue justifies. It now. Sometimes you're going to have to spend money to make money right but early early on I would love to see you bootstrap this thing and learn as you go rather than dumping a couple grand on development the investment in your own education you make up front and by investment. I mean just taking the time to learn the inner workings of wordpress yourself just enough to be dangerous. I'm not talking about becoming a software engineer. That's GonNa make you so much. It's more self reliant down the road because you don't WanNa have to be in the position of writing another check for every little tweaker. Update that you want done. But I'm curious what you think about this my off-base when does it make sense to make an upfront investment like that. Let me know what you think. Tweet me up at end loafer or in the comments for this episode road side Hustle Nation Dot com slash. Q eight nine question. Seven is from Chad who asks my idea is to start off with a blog to create learning learning content and hopefully accumulate following once the following is growing at work to monetize the actual site with ads and affiliate links then eventually at products to sell with the end goal of making it an e commerce site. The question is do you think I should just go straight to the structure of an ECOMMERCE store either through private labeling wholesale or drop shipping the products Roddick's. I eventually want to sell. Do you know of any business that started primarily as an informative blog in his now an e commerce site so I like this the question Chad a couple examples come to mind. The biggest is probably bulletproof started as a blog by Dave asprey is bulletproof executive or bulletproof roof exact and turn into a huge ECOMMERCE and non ECOMMERCE empire. I see their coffee at whole foods. Now the second example is by a couple friends of mine BAR ABOVE ABOVE DOT com. This started out as a content site for bartenders and cocktail enthusiasts and now they sell a ton of bar equipment on Amazon and through their own website the benefit of the content. I approach is when done right. You have been engaged audience to validate until products to one. You eventually create source them. The downside is a much longer road. I mean we've seen people go go straight to private labeling. Lean on Amazon's traffic in just skip that whole audience building step entirely like look. The audience is already over there on Amazon like. Why don't I just go straight to that step? But of course that's more fragile as well right. You're building on somebody else's platform. All the other example is travel fashion girl dot com as I understand it. She was selling a ton of these packing in cubes as an affiliate product example. So something she knew. Her audience was into before ultimately creating her own line of products as an ecommerce seller but came me posted on this one. I'm excited to see what you come up with. Question eight comes. From Noah says I appreciate you emails and actually tried out advertising on craigslist for power-washing Washing and was successful receiving apply. However I was just starting a fulltime job and had to politely tell potential customer that No? I wasn't going to be able to help him. So my question is how do I create a side income. That may turn into a larger income without losing my main source of income meaning. The full-time job takes so so much. Energy and resources that it becomes impossible to do both I off Noah way to take action that is awesome and this is a good question and maybe there is a balancing act especially in this transition phase. A lot of times. What I see is people building a business to a certain point maybe to cover their monthly monthly expenses? All on the side and making the leap to running fulltime. That's especially true on the service side since it can be harder to scale. You can always hire your help. In this example. I'm confident he can find a reliable pressure. Washer to fulfill these gigs for you if you ended up getting a steady stream of them or maybe something. You could go so do yourself on the weekend. If time for me I tried to bake some time. Leverage into the business from the beginning in this was an affiliate site in in the footwear niche as my origin story as long as the servers were running and all the technology was cooperating. I could go to work all day and still make money from the side Hustle. Now still it did get to the point where it was almost like having two fulltime jobs and that's when it was time to make the leap because I saw a much greater upside from the side Hustle question nine comes from Ela Ela says I just started ninth grade am fourteen and I'm ready to get started with the hustle that will meet Max Prophet it. What are your suggestions for junior hustler's what other teams done to make money in my situation? I feel like this is the right time to get the ball rolling for future expenses like a car here soon in college in four years. Look forward to hearing your suggestions and ideas. Thank you ella. You've got an excellent head on your shoulders to be thinking about this stuff. When I was fourteen it was a lot of babysitting and cutting grass? I also took some Costco Candy to summer camp to sell to my fellow boy scouts in the Winter Sir I taught skiing but that was not a paid gig. It was just all I got was a free season's pass which looking back was probably not a great hourly rate. If you google best side hustles for kids. There's an article online. That will pop lots of ideas among those that might be interesting to. You are tutoring private. Sports coaching the babysitting. That I mentioned shoveling snow depending on where you live yard work dog-walking dog poop pick up even in lots more. That's yeah yeah Google side hustles for kids or best side. Hustles for kids in that article should pop up but I love that. You're thinking about this stuff in curious to hear which direction you end up going question. Ten is from Eric. Says I'm working as a field service mechanic and getting paid around thirty five dollars an hour plus good benefits. But it's still not enough enough to get by living in the San Francisco Bay area and it turns out. My company is charging our customer around one hundred seventy dollars an hour for every time. We do our repairs. Got A lot of customers asking me if I can do the job on the side instead. They'll just pay me cash so they can save on labor costs. I told them that even though it's tempting I can't do it because we're want. It's not ethical conflicts of interest with my current job. My dilemma is. Should I start my own business and compete with my current employer. Is it ethical to quote steal our current customers and service them myself also if I do set my own business. I'm still going to end up getting some parts from my company is. They're the ones that manufacturers these machines hoping to share your insights on this Eric. This is a tough one. I think you're right that it is a big it conflict of interest to straight up. Poach your existing clients and undercut your company but at the same time. Even if you charged triple your current rate. That would still be a big win for both both parties. So I I know how frustrating that is if nothing else maybe that gives you some salary negotiation leverage if you were set up a separate company for these side the jobs I think you totally could just market yourself through other channels. This is actually really common. Like auto technicians working on cars for friends in the garage. But I would steer clear of doing work for your existing customers because that just seems like a recipe to get you in trouble. Also I'd want to check the letter of your unemployment Lehman Agreement if you have one just to make sure there's nothing in there about starting a competing service and since it will still be relying on your company for parts you may need to explain up front what your plans are. And my guess is you won't be the first to have that idea so they may already have a process in place and be totally cool with it like they don't own you. Twenty four hours. I Day so what you do in your spare time. As long as it doesn't negatively impact their business shouldn't be an issue but tread carefully because this is a tricky one and I wouldn't want you getting in trouble in jeopardizing your current income stream. So what do you think. Questioned eleven is from Stephen From Papua New Guinea. He says I'm working on producing ECO. Friendly only products to sell offline and online but haven't started yet to sell my eco friendly products online. What steps do you think? I should take when creating my business blog or website. So Stephen before you do either I'd ask you to consider the competitive landscape. What makes your stuff different or better than what's already out there? Like what type of ECO friendly products are you thinking of selling. How are you going to reach customers? Are you gonNA sell through your own website. You can sell through Amazon through Oetzi. We'll be shipping the products from your home from a Warehouse House with a physical product business. I would try and validate it with real orders through some of these other marketplaces before going through the time and expense and setting up your own shop. Once you have some proven demand. Then I'd go out and build your own shop door question. Twelve comes from Paul. He says I've bought thousands of dollars worth of Guru. Courses listened to hundreds of hours on Youtube podcast and web sites including yours in. This is the only to pattern. I've seen work. He calls it M. D. A. R. That acronym stands for Mentor. Do what the mentor says. Analyze your results results. Adjust course as necessary in. Repeat until you have achieved your goal at M. D. A. R. Mentor do with the Mentor says analyze the results. Adjust course as necessary in. Repeat until you've achieved your goal pause question is do you have any specific piece of writing or video of any kind that really to help you. Personally I feel like consistency. Your persistence is the biggest factor. So Paul I love this. MDA Our acronym or formula and India. Right persistence assistance is key. I'm trying to think of a specific piece of writing or video. I feel like individual pieces of content. Fantastic for picking out concrete tactics. Sir I D is to try while the overall practice of continually studying your craft contributes to grow your overall understanding and body of knowledge edge or foundation to stand on like just read expert secrets by Russell Brunson Amazing Book on sales psychology with tons of concrete examples. You can go out and apply since I was working on my course launch. That was an example of just in time learning for me as far as other pieces of content. That have really helped me. Personally I really liked the go. Give her by Bob. Berg about being helpful I I really liked. Ritchie had poured out about buying or building assets to achieve early financial independence. There's a Tedtalk from Peter de Amandas that save of mine it's called. Why abundance is our future? And it's his argument for optimism in spite the all the negativity and all about news that surrounds us. And of course I'll link those poor you add side-hustle nation dot com slash Q in a nine but let me flip that question around for you. Do you have a specific piece of writing or video or podcast episode. That really helped you personally. Let me know. I'm at and lower on twitter and instagram. You can pause the episode into right now. Otherwise let's keep on rolling question. Thirteen is from Riley. Who says I understand from some of your podcast? That personal branding is very important in can help establish yourself as an authority put at the same time. I generally prefer to keep my work in personal life a bit more compartmentalized and I'd like to potentially grow my side hustle into a small team down the road which makes me lean a little bit more towards creating a separate brand or agency in your experience is one of the approaches. Generally better than the other for this type of side-hustle. Am I doing myself a disservice. In any way by creating an agency as opposed to operating under my personal name or some sort of alias. Like that do. You often see a combination of both where an individual has started an agency and then support. What's his personal brand in some capacity or vice versa so early? I think you're right setting up shop as a branded agency probably gives you more room for growth down the road because because clients won't always expect insists that you're the one doing the work. Remember Kai Davis from episode. Fifty nine. Are you selling your time or are you selling results. If you focus on the results from the start there's no expectation of you being the one to physically do the work. An example point to a lot is Chris. Schwab's think maids from from episode two ninety five to the customer. He's largely anonymous and largely irrelevant. He's got a team of cleaners and place. He's got a support staff in place and he doesn't need data's face plastered all over the website. But if you're going down the content creation especially youtube might need to be your face upfront. Especially at the beginning the people do business with people. So you've got to figure out some way to build that trust and normally that's GonNa come through one conversations or at least at the beginning it's going to have to be. You could have to be at the front question. Fourteen comes in from Neil meals. Question is when starting a new venture how you plan your day or activities that need to happen step by step. I find myself sitting down to build my website. Maybe with an hour or two after work or on the weekends it just feels like there's so much to do or learn before before I launch often often time going in circles reading about all the things that I need to do so much that nothing actually gets done. How do you lay out steps in a new business in small small enough chunks said that they're not overwhelming? Will Neal thank you for the note. Thank you for tuning in unique and totally been there and truthfully still there a lot of times uh-huh the only way to tackle this is just like eating an elephant right one bite at a time which is such a weird phrase by who eats elephants so for big Projects like building a website or writing a book. What I do is break it? Down into as many micro steps as I can think of and then go after those for example instead of right book book which might sit on my to do list for months I might have instead outline chapter one or mind map. The section about Xyz that helps build awesome positive momentum and from there. It's so much easier to write a first draft of that section than it would be starting from a blank screen. The other thing I'll try and do is figure out my top three priorities for the next day the night before this is part of my nightly shutdown routine and maybe there's only time to tackle one but at least we know what to work on instead of having this awkward ramp up time trying to figure out what prioritize what to study on. There's always going to be more to learn and I I really applaud you for having that learning mindset but also understanding there's a balance to strike like I mentioned it a moment ago it's philosophy called just in time learning basically you know getting bogged down with everything you'll eventually need to know right out of the gate. But instead tackling in overcoming challenges as they come up and this is probably a good time time as any to plug our sponsor for this episode which is skill share dot com millions of side hustlers professionals in entrepreneurs are building fuelling in expanding their creative fire with skill share with thousands of classes in marketing productivity entrepreneurship and tons more. It's the online learning community for creators. Like US pretty much. Whatever you need to learn next? They've got it and it's all online on-demand so you can learn at your own pace in on your own terms. These are high quality courses taught by practicing experts including Guy Kawasaki. Simon cynic reinfection Gary Vendor Chuck more. I want to invite you to try skills here. Free two months kind of like an extended test drive to see if it's right for you. Side Hustle show listeners can claim that offer over at skill share dot com slash side-hustle show that skill share dot com slash side-hustle show for two whole months of unlimited access to thousands of professional classes for free. Let's skip the net flicks tonight. Go do some learning question. Fifteen comes in from Cheryl and she starts out with some flattery she says I'm very interested in starting a podcast in the next six six months I really really enjoyed your interviewing style and think you have a lot to teach others about. How did you engaging informative and helpful interviews? I would love to learn from you how you do that. For example do you agree on talking points ahead of time. What's the prep prior to the interview? What's your approach or philosophy of interviewing? What are your rules interviewing? How far in advance do you schedule? What you find interviewees? What are the editing guidelines? I want to learn from you. How you guessed? Shine your stay fully engaged in the process alongside of them. Is that something that you've ever think about doing training on and if you've already done a training on that where can I find it so sure. Thank you for the no thank you for the kind words those are great questions in truthfully. There's a lot of work that goes into each episode. I wish I could tell you that there was a shortcut and I think if you go back and listen from the beginning starting in twenty thirteen. You'll hear that. I'm not super comfortable behind the MIC early. On and that the show has definitely evolved evolved hopefully improved over time. So that's a part of it for sure starting before you feel ready and just getting the reps in now tactically. I do do send guests talking points or proposed outline ahead of time which they may or may not look at. But it's really more for me to come up with that story ARC or outlined for the show you Google podcast production process. I think you're gonNA find my article that goes into depth on start to finish what I do to make each episode but but the broad strokes are starting with the hook or the big picture reason for tuning in like what are People GonNa Learn here putting myself in the place of the listener in trying. WanNa ask the right follow up questions to get more details or clarify certain things editing the show to make the guests and sometimes myself sound better sound great as a podcast listener. I can tell which shows are well edited. In which ones aren't there's a place for both for sure but I appreciate the ones with the host is is is respectful of my time in through the magic of editing. We can usually salvage a conversation that was less than awesome live. We might record sixty five seventy minutes in cut that down to forty or forty five for the show and how that works is I'm markup transcript with sections to cut and send that to the editor and he does a good job of cleaning those up and other kind of false starts and filler words just to make tighter listening experience Josh Elhage recommended free transcription service called Otter that Ai. which is awesome? have been using. Timmy T. M. I.. As another one which is not free so transitioning over to honor being being frugal self into prep guests. I let them know look. We're not live if we screw something up. That's not a problem at all. We normally chat for a few minutes before recording just to get comfortable and check sound on quality but again if you Google podcast production process. I think there's a side Hustle nation article that should pop up over there with a little more detail and I think the other piece of this is that really works in my favorite is genuine curiosity. I'm still simply fascinated by all the different ways to make extra money and that that curiosity drives almost all the interviews like wait. How did that work wait? What was that tool again? I hadn't seriously considered doing a training on this topic but certainly give it some of the hot. If that's something that would be interesting to you to explore. Let me know maybe if I get enough demand for it I can bump it up. A few spots on the on the project list question sixteen comes from West kind of a related question. He says congrats on the ten million download milestone. That is amazing. I don't have a fraction of those numbers for my own. PODCAST sometime into how I can grow it. Literally every guest said they love my style my insightful questions how easy easy conversations flow. So what's missing. Did you do a lot of paper. Click advertising joint promotions to grow. Did you get a lot of traction from the custom handouts for each episode episode. So Wes I wish I knew the exact secrets couple things to address. I haven't done any paid ads for the show. I did see some spikes and I do continue to you. See some spikes from guesting on other relevant podcasts. Some of the most notable ones that made a blip on the chart were entrepreneurs on fire mad scientists. Bigger pockets. Money money to afford anything. Don't keep your day job but interestingly the only one of the proactively pitched to get on was ill fire and that that was back in early two thousand fifteen you mentioned the episode giveaways handouts so starting to do the episode specific lead magnets in two thousand. Fourteen definitely helped helped because those gave me a way to communicate with the perhaps infrequent listeners and attempt to convince them to keep tuning in more it gave them something in their inbox. That was an easy thing to forward to a friend if they thought hey this sounds interesting. That sounds helpful all about trying to climb that listener pyramid right right from stranger to listener to subscriber to fan and that goes for podcast that goes for blogs youtube channels instagram accounts whatever medium. You're going after after trying to climb pyramid stranger to listener to subscriber to fan. The interesting thing is maybe interesting. Too interesting to me is kind of shifted away from doing those. PDF highlight reels. As often today and for full disclosure the email list growth has suffered because of it. But I mean that shift in in favor of a more. Seo focused strategy for a lot of the newer episodes for example if you Google start a junk hauling business. The show notes page from my interview. You with Brian Scudamore from when eight hundred got junk ranks really well at least at the time of this recording. That post has fifteen hundred words and it doesn't get a ton of traffic six hundred visits over the last thirty days. It probably wouldn't get as much or any organic love if the show notes page only had three hundred words like many of the PDF highlight reel episode. Let's do one other thing that I think works in my favor is the big list of side-hustle ideas that side-hustle nation dot com slash ideas. That's my most popular a page in generates a lot of traffic from Google. In on that page I spyder people into in reference a bunch of different interviews on the podcast so that could be one consistent source of new listenership in fact. Now that I'm thinking about it. There are probably a handful of other pages that work similarly kind of drawing in fresh visitors offers fresh traffic from Google and hopefully converting a few of those into regular listeners. The best performing shows for me and I think the ones that attribute most to word of mouth are usually the simple relatable repeatable tactical episodes that. Get people saying well she. I could do that. So that's the job in every interviews to find those elements but this question is probably another one. That would be good to turn around and ask you the person who's listening right now. How did you discover that the show Joe was it? Word of mouth was through some Google search. Did it just show up in your APP. Somehow I would love to know tweet me up and low per orly become it on this episode. side-hustle nation comes Q. and A. Nine question. Seventeen is from gala. She says the duck duck. Go out on fire Fox rex. All my Amazon links that use an image. I think this is a pretty big deal. If privacy blockers are in fact GONNA kill affiliate links and I would love to know more about what's going on and what to expect to gala. It is super frustrating. Knowing that some people are going to have a less than optimal experience on on your site but more importantly I would love to see you focus on the vast vast majority of Internet users who've never heard of duck duck go in go go out and serve them as best you can. There are plenty of people making boatloads of money with Amazon associates and other affiliate programs. And I've got imagine if I'm an Internet Internet user with this extension installed and if website after Webb's after website that I visit looks all messed up with broken images I might have to turn around and reevaluate things a little bit Ask if the promised benefits outweigh that poor user experience question. One thousand nine comes from Tyson. He says what was the biggest challenge in making your course so this is in reference to the start my side hustle course start my side. HUSTLE DOT COM. If you WANNA go check it out a couple big challenges for me were number one narrowing down the scope and then number two coming up with a launch plan. I expanded felt like a lot of brain power on those two things is coming up with a curriculum of what works around a specific side hustle. I thought would be best for people just starting out or that was the stated goal. Start my side hustle. Gil Oh from new ideas to your first income and then figuring out a way to launch it in a way that made sense that I felt good about I was reading a lot of of course launch case studies and trying to pull out the bits and pieces that I liked and ultimately put together a quick email series to launch it which converted horribly really. I'll definitely be doing a case. Study at right up on my own blog for kind of the beginning to end journey of creating this thing through the teachable creators challenge so so stay tuned for that. We're on the home stretch here. Question nineteen comes from Tanya. She says you recently mentioned the adding tables of contents to your posts was was a quick. Seo Win basically taking a little more screen real estate with Google results any other SEO tactics that are working well for you at the moment so Tanya yes. I am seeing some positive results from the table of contents which I think is helpful both for Google and from a usability standpoint allowing readers to jump jump straight to the section of the article they care most about. I'm sure there are others but I'm just using a free plugin called easy table of contents which delivered what it promised as as far as other SEO tactics that are working well at the moment. One that I'm paying attention to is internal linking that means linking to other posts on your own site. It's easy to do as you writing new content to link back to your older archive posts that are relevant. But it's hard to remember to go back. Update those old posts with links to that article that you just published but when you have a brand new article it's got zero links so I've been testing this with a few posts hosts that I really want to rank adding several internal links to them like at least five but as many as twenty in some cases and for most of those a house seen improvement in the rankings so when I hit published on something new. I've actually added this to my processed my publishing checklist to go back through relevant archive content and added internal links to that new post. And here we are with question. Twenty is actually came from multiple people who has A. Did you ever end up making a higher for that executive assistant slash content manager position. You posted over the summer and sadly I did not. This was something. I didn't pull the trigger on despite a number of very well qualified candidates totally case of. It's not you it's me so I'm kind of going back to the drawing board on what I could really use the most help with and envisioning what that position might look like. Obviously I would want any higher. I make to simplify life rather than adding an extra layer of complexity in really allow for the acceleration of certain projects. That's probably been the most frustrating thing about this process in this year in general it just feels like kind of like stuck doc in molasses like. I'm moving painfully slow at times and nothing against slow businesses great but the challenge that I run up against. Is there so much more I and I want to do. Not just because I think I can make more money but because I think these projects would genuinely be fun interesting helpful projects to build so no no no executive assistant yet and I'll make that my homework going into the new year to really define where a new team member can make the biggest impact and then see who might be the best fit for that role once again. Notes for this episode and links to all the resources mentioned are over at side-hustle nation dot com slash. Q in a nine. Keep those questions coming big. Thank you to everybody who submitted questions for this round. And that's it for me. Thank you so much for tuning in until next time. Let's go out there and make something can happen. And I'll get you in the next edition of the side-hustle show where we're exploring a popular by buttons platform. In the new ways you could start earning passive income there. I'll see you then hustle on.

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#244 Dennis Muren

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

1:23:17 hr | 1 year ago

#244 Dennis Muren

"This is David McCallum. And you're listening to give God treats, amazing colossal podcast. The next Gilbert ten francs, colossal obsessions. I mean, I'm sure you, you know, there's so many of these stories I used to hear like on the Murph worth can show, whatever. And and I also they were bullshit stories until you experience them, right? And like one of them is the hey, didn't you use the b? Oh, yeah. Which I'm getting now this thing year and a half, you still hosted HQ? Do you still use to be? I'm still doing it. I gotta do it tonight. Sixty. But until you that's what how fast our society moose now. I'm a nostalgic. Actor ready? I was co headlining with Dave Cooley at a college game. He you know, he. Possess cheapest confess to give. Gilbert, and Frank's amazing colossal obsessions. Every Thursday only Stitcher premium. Hi, ditches, Gilbert Godfrey niche, this Gilbert Godfrey to mazing colossal podcasts. I'm here with my co host Frank tanto Padre, and where once again recording with our engineer Frankford Orosa, and our guest this week is EMMY and Oscar winning visual fakes and special paints hardest and the senior visit visual of pick supervisor and creative director of industrial light and magic you may appeared of treaty base. Spans list of critics a staggering and overwhelming. But what the hell will take your crack headache? Star wars. The Empire Strikes fact close encounters of the third time raiders of the lost start e t the extraterrestrial willow the abyss. Terminator two judgment day. Wore out, the world's and Jurassic Park. Just ten name of view among his many achievements was spearheading, I l M's move from models and miniatures to see GI for Terminator two and helping to usher in brand new age of computer generated imagery with. C g dinosaurs Jurassic Park. He's been nominated for. Vip teen out kademi awards winning nine of them. Giving him the most Oscars of any living filmmaker he's also been honored with a lifetime achievement award by his peers in visual fixes science, and he's one of only story special effects artists. Doura see by star on the Hollywood walk up page. Joining STAN Winston and his long time friend and hero Ray, Harry house. It. Please welcome to the show. One of the most significant figures in twentieth century cinema and believe it or not. Planes. He enjoys they Sperry pied guys. The legendary Dennis Muren. Hey, thank you so much who's that? Yes. Yes. Dennis. It's actually true. You listen to the show. I listen to the show. Yes. I've heard I probably at least three quarters or more of shows. How jeez where it's not easier way. Your numbers are way up there. Now, we're thrilled. Believe it was true. We talk. I I'm came across equinoxes on TV. And and at first I thought, well, this is gonna be some awful crime. And I'll watch five minutes of it. And I wound up watching the I it's a fun movie. How did that come about? Well, it came about because I had some time between my freshman year and sophomore year in college summer, right? And I said, let's make a movie was like Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland. Literally that was and I borrowed the money for my grandfather who put away some money for college for like if I could get into UC USC, and I couldn't get into it because of my grades. I took the thirty five hundred dollars and with two or three or four friends made that movie all in sixteen millimeter. And this is started in nineteen sixty five finish, the sixty seven and full of a special effects. It was just a way of getting. Affects out there because I was sort of tired of just neighborhood kids and friends and people in school looking at him. I said I want everybody to see this work. So what do you do you just make a movie, and it wasn't very good? But it was okay. And had some good stuff. And I told a couple years later to Jack Harris who had done the blob and for demand all and he bought it and put another like forty thousand dollars into it, which is eight times at what I put into it or something fixed the sound up shot some new scenes, and that's the version you saw that in the theater, you got three fans of that movie right here. I'm going to introduce the third the third one to the gentleman sitting to my right has done this podcast before Michael Juki knows here. Hey, dennis. How are you fine? Fine. Only one Oscar just once I know the man has nine I know, I know I know way he's got he can start a bowling alley which is. We see behind. You wanna see those behind you? Dennis. On the shelf. You know? No, no. He's a bunch of stuff there. But there's one Oscar up there and one c3 peo-. Okay. Vader's and other things I've got a rabbit. Most of the Oscars are like all over the place the monster for me Quin hawks up there. I not up there. It's on the floor. I can get it. You want to see it, really? We insist you actually have it. Okay. Hold on. Dennis is fetching the monster from equinoxes. Oh, I see a copy of it over there on the shelf out from twenty days from twenty thousand fathoms on the shelf. This is fantastic. This is to go. Why aren't we doing this and Dennis's living room? Let's go look at all my God. He's holding it out by fantastic. Are we visual medium in that the other? What about there was that monster that was like this one on this shelf over there right behind your head? Wait a minute. He just put his phones back on say it again Gill here. What this one right behind you right behind you, which one? Yeah. Okay. Let me see if we can get a clear view of this. Oh that one that one. It's like kind of greenish on the left one on the far left. Yeah. Isn't that the with empts the that's was a gift from Ray hairy house? And that's a. Version that he did of the Email from twenty Mazda earth. He made those, and I've I've been lucky enough to have one of them. Can I ask you something about the equinoxes monster? There have an armature in it. Does. And what was it? Doc it or wire what was it? Yeah. There's wire in the wings the bodies all armature. Wow. And you made that at the time. No, my friend, my friend. Dave Allen me. It was a couple years older than very impressive. I grew up on the on the stop action and it still wear my heart. Is this something about stop action? I remember watching a show with they had guest on and somebody was talking about the new CG, I fix and the guy said, oh, you know, when you look back on those old stop action. All you could think is thank God, facetious GI and that pissed me off. Good. We because. He was like that that to me. It was still it still magical. The look it's action. Well, and also, you know, what it is. You can sense. There's an artist behind trying to make this work. Sure. And struggling you can just field the performance that they're trying to do with this hard old-fashioned way of doing things. And you you appreciate it and computer graphics. You can't tell how it's done so slick and Mathematica looking was quotes him on set on this show that Roger Ebert? He said that. CGI looks real. But feels phony stop action looks phony, but feels real. Feels very emotional the whole point of it's emotion any movie anything you're doing a performer. You wanna get emotion from the audience, and there's hardly any emotion when you're looking at, you know, some sort of some something it's too sparse CG's too. Sparse and simplified, although I love it. Because if you do it, right, but it's hard to do it really rights. Specially with the demands now it it was necessary because the audiences did not really by the old style. And I don't just mean stop ocean. I mean, all the oil sil- affects it was really harder and harder to get the stuff to look real. But CG is because anybody can kind of do it. You know, you can go to any computer store by the stuff by the download the materials off the internet by a book or training program. Do it yourself. It's it's open to so many more people being able to do it that it's all over the place. But that doesn't mean it's all good. It's it's never the tool. It's how you're using it. Yes. S? It's and you certainly know how to use it for God's sakes. Yeah. I mean, it's ridiculous. I remember being hit and being completely disappointed after seeing being raised on Harry house. And then we get to those films where they put the prosthetics on the lizards and had them running around. Remember that worse. Yes. I remember how this appointed. As a paid off. And I'm waiting for some stop action dinosaurs. And I see like, you know, fucking one is with plastic horns on. Concert a Seattle. It's being pushed into the scene to doesn't want to go. They said make matters worse. They had like people with prod sweat was stabbing burning them and stuff. Tied together. And look like they're fighting on the ground terrible. Yeah. Well, we're all we're all Harry housing kids here. And obviously, you you just mentioned him Dennis mentioned that he had a gift and he's an important person in your life. Dennis. Yeah. He was I was also a big fan of all affects a loved the stuff that John Fulton did with bridges the Tokar re. And and the ten command not so much ten commandments actually. But I like the rain's ranch poor disaster. The tornado in the wizard of Oz. I was ineffective fan, and I still am. And you know, again, it's the emotion. You could look at something. You can see Harry as film and say, oh my gosh. You know, I feel something when I'm looking at it. Then you look at your at your Twentieth Century, Fox loss world movie where you have lizards and you say, I'm not feeling anything. Now, I care about that interesting. I heard about with that remake of lost world that with Claude rains in it. That they had asked Willis O'Brien who was the creator King Kong to be part of it. He was very excited thinking he'd be creating heat up more money to work with and Cree. And then they just used his name through in fucking lizards. Isn't that sad? Imagine how excited he probably got there for a while to. Yes. So unfortunate 'cause he thought he could use his talent for that. But with more money behind it. Yep. But that's that's show biz and run Allen. He's made, you know, some real fun movies. But he was always tied on the dollar the story of mankind and had the bright idea to separate the Marx brothers. Never forgive them for. All in separate seat. Yes. That was in. Oh, my fan of old, and I was reading about you Dennis your fan of the thief of Baghdad, and and and I guess what the disaster movies of the day were and just an event movies. They weren't called tentpole movies than they were. But they were like these you like big movies. Yeah. I always I always did. And I never ever thought it'd be working on them. So it my whole career has been like where the heck did this come from? Because I was a we've been doing this. I was like six or seven years old with a still camera. And then I got a movie camera when I was ten and I had plastic dinosaurs. You could buy a hobby shop, and I built a toll toy boat or an airplane and blowing up, of course, everybody did that. But I do two or three times and have a movie camera on it, you know, and then and then week later, you'd see the film he got back from the cameras sewer was Rick Baker with signing. Rick may. Rick together. No, I got the no Rick later. Okay. When I was about twenty or so I'm talking about back when I was, you know. Okay. L problem. I know eight eight eight. Yeah. If if computerization is stunned badly, a just looks too, shiny and glossy. And it's like I mean what I love about stop action. Is you could put your hand into the screen and touch the thing. That's their. That's exactly right. You can feel it. It's not. It's real people. You can do that. Sometimes CG if you get it. Right. But a lot of people don't see it. I think we've got a lot of a lot of towel that computer graphic people around now, but they haven't had a chance to really learn the aesthetics. They just you know, the technical they're higher yet. And you work on games, which don't have to be photo. Real you work on commercials before real you get into the age, you know, the realm of feature films. They really have not ever had any classes that I know of I've talked to schools about doing this classes about what reality looks like on movie film or undid movie digital interest, and the people don't know, they know what they think they know. But it's not enough. You can you can learn more the more you look at something the more you learn and you realize I just scratching the surface of all this. We're gonna I was gonna say it's also about bringing Perry house, and again, the idea that he put character into those figures there was like they would stop in scratch their leg or they would do things that we all would do. So it just felt like a real creature walking across that screen. It wasn't mindless nothing. He did was mindless. That's what I was a also a performing creature was opposed to that lizard from the loss world xactly where you know. There was just the two hot under the lights and thing I just want to go to sleep in. How old were you? When you decided to look up in the phone book and place, a call Dennis twelve or thirteen. He lived in Malibu was in Lakhan Yadav near Pasadena. So he was in the phone book, and I managed to get over and see him. I mom drove me two hours across town. And he was the nicest guy with his wife and all and invited me in. But you know, he never talked about how he didn't think. He would I don't even know if he talked about using rear projection. So interesting, I knew from the people. I talked to all how is but he was really secretive and. You know, he's a magician. He always just wanted to sort of keep his secrets as long as he could. He didn't wanna eight him on reveal anything. And he he was an apprentice of Willis O'Brien wasn't. Yeah. Correct. Yeah. He was he they they were, you know, rate took his early early dinosaur films that he'd done to Willis in like middle nineteen forty five or six just went Lovie was starting up with lost with Joe young and hired him onto Joe young right away. So he he saw something in that, you know. And I don't think there was anybody other than Ray that was doing it. You know, there is obese thirty years older forty years. And then I everything I've heard Ray was kind of on his own. I mean, he knew other fans of scifi Graham berry and for yakim, but I don't know of any other people that he was actually doing his home movies with same with Peter Jackson. You look at Peter Jackson's home movies ever seen those early ones where he never put the puppets into him. It's always just like one person. You know, it's it's him shoot. It and then somebody somebody else out there that's performing to the creature was never in there. And I think rainbows the same thing. And I was kind of lucky being later on that I have four five friends that love this. And we would gather around and show each other are affecting quences all during the late fifties and sixties so we weren't really working on a Roan. We encourage none of us are in the business, but we weren't courage in each other. And you had to figure out how to do all this on your own to whether any publications available when I was a kid. It was I sin effects and things like that affects Siniphen tastic affects. And but for when you were doing it. What were you? How are you figuring this out? You know, you just learn on your own you see enough in the movies. A lot of the stuff you can just look at it and tell that's a model in a in a toy in bathtub. It looks like, you know, it's actually some huge tank Warner Brothers. But looks like a toy and you just see enough of that stuff. And you say why? No, that's not the right way to do it or whatever I didn't know why they did a one way or another. I understand now because. Usually economics. But also at some people don't have a vision. And they're not really tried entertain. They're telling a story. So I will I need to have, you know, World War Two battleship go from you know, in the right of the screen across it left because it's about to shoot a tornado. Okay. So they shoot that. As like, a a wide view. Somebody else gets in there and says, no, it's dramatic. It's the power. It's about to shoot. This. I want to see the waves splashing up front of the ship. You know, and you shoot it from another angle will a lot of people don't know the difference. And you know. No, one is emotional and one is telling the story, but in any director once every shot to tell the story, and it's much more important to be able to do that. But you can really see it in the old films. And and I've made a point of always trying to figure out why I like something why like genie and thief, Baghdad and not the giant cyclops and Ulysses or something like that. Oh, you're a kid to Mike. I all I did was make stop motion films growing up. That's telling me that of them tons of them. I mean, we could sit here for hours when Harry housing kid. Are you kidding me? And then of course, when you started working and doing your thing, I was around thirteen or fourteen when ET came out, and then I became obsessed, and I can I bring it up to my loot favorite things that I have ever seen has been the shot. AT is coming up over the hill. He's walking up, and he sees the valley all the lights in the valley there that to me was one of the most magical things I have ever seen in my life and to this day when I'm on the four oh five and I Chris at the top of the four oh five into the valley. I think that and I want you to tell me tell me everything you can't about that shot. Well, won't me too. Yeah. Yeah. Sure. I thought of course, less shooter for real. So we go out there. And this is back in sixty or eighty one film. Stocks aren't bright enough to do it. But I really wanted to do it. And we tried it then and then we can put the head to be walking away in that shot. I think if that's the one you're thinking of just after he sees it seem walking away. Yep. We can never get the light to do it into being a model, and we didn't have much money on film, and I made this tiny little model about four feet square. And we just did it, you know, with the that's where the trees, and the background was a paint like a piece of masonite or glass painted with little holes in there with lights behind it. And we had a little tiny e t made about two inches of no more than that five inches tall that somebody was just moving down there shooting a little slow motion. But you would've Cam to boom, they're very small squint the lights twinkling though in and they were very much like it would with the atmosphere. So how how did you how did you have to? Member either. It was like really simple, and we had a bunch of like hanging string pieces of film or something with a little fan on it and chewing slow motion. I mean, it was real simple. So that's entered work because it was so powerful, you know. And then I also really have felt the cameraman part of me thinks that every moment should be like perfect like you're there Stevens there with the cast crew the camera manure to shoot and suddenly everything happens in the moon changes in the and it's beautiful. And that's when you shoot. So that's what I try to do is come up with a better moment. Like a magical moment for most of the stuff. I do. Well, you did. And that's one of those, you know, and it's the bright twinkly sorta here here's something when they don't do stuff, right, which special effects is sometimes when you watch him movie, it looks like the movie stops, and it's like, ladies and gentlemen, special effects. Doesn't go. It does to me. That's the organic seamless part of the story. Oh, I know, you know, why that is because they have a story board. So they save you want this. You know, again, we want this ship this World War Two battleship to go from the right across the left the show these about to shoot the tornado we have to show his pursuing, and that's all the the crew may be as given. Okay. And they just shoot it. But the story board artist may not know what he's trying to do. So they're not thinking as a director. There are things filmmaker that real in. That's so that happens all the time. It also used the happen because you couldn't really move the camera very often for some affects you had to keep it still. So you shoot a lot of different elements put them together. And that's one of the reasons for that sort of static feel that you're talking about. I just wonder that always drove me crazy. Did you know crazy doing that? The Bruins the whole film. Yeah. Changed like the movie is at a standstill. Right. And that's why the sequence in temple of doom works. So amazingly. Well with the mine cars because it keeps moving the Cam. Moving your alongside, and you are cutting back and forth through that entire same between practical set for and what you did. And if you could just again, I'm going to ask you to break one thing down a little bit. And at what point did you realize you'd have to make a new camera or modify a thirty five millimeter camera in order to get those shots on the mind. Car-chase will I been over in England I saw him shooting. The the big loop that circle there was probably one hundred feet around that they could shoot this car going in with the actors in it and everything and we're just thinking, okay. How long would a shot be when you're gonna wider view and and needed to be like seven seconds, eight seconds. You want something like that to really feel the energy, and you figure out how big a scale you're going to build something. And then how long how long, you know? The smallest camera. You could find everything it was too expensive at the do it as a model, and we didn't have space. I limb we we were really busy at that time on a lot of projects. And there was a back. Back building we had there was probably seventy five square. And okay. The only reason that we can't get a seven second shot in a seventy five foot run is that the cameras too big which was like ten inches wide. And I said, well, that's silly. Why can't we just do with smaller camera? We solve it. And I just because we had a lot of Nikon's we'd been using for Linux shots up and everything I said, maybe we can do with an icon and see why couldn't we just have to rip off the back and put a take a movement. They call him from the movie motion camera put it on the back of that and do at one frame to time. And I got friend of mine here, my Callister engineered the whole thing. And and we did it in a made a huge difference. And it meant it meant that the the walls of the cave didn't have to be concrete ring that we could do with a Luma foil. So you just emissions stop motion. Right. But you just crinkle the set around from behind till it looks good. And you spray the Colorado and shoot it. And that's it sounds simple task. But it love it. It's one of those things that you know, there's a lot of those, you know, being boxed in and having a problem, or is it to a real advantage because then you learn things, and there's a reason why you're you were in the first place to try to solve that in. And I learned something on. On Empire Strikes Back that I've never forgotten. It was a shot flying over at the beginning of the film flying over Hof, and which the ice planet, and you kind of look down, and you see a Tonton and it's running along down there. And it's like, you just think of it. Well, that's that. Okay. Great. It's it's lucre. I don't know if it's lucre Han running after. Looking for the other one or whatever and the way that Sartre started was Georgia's walked in right near the end of the show and show me this background plate from helicopter where you pushing in over the ice. He'll about hundred feet in the air and the cameras tilts down to the icefield. There's nothing there. And he said can you put a Tonton in here with the guy running on it? And I looked at and this is pre computers, right? No. There's no way with all those camera movements that you can do it and get a stop motion character in there. There's no way, and he said just think about it think about it. Okay. And he walked out and within fifteen minutes figured it out. That's fantastic. And I just learned the power of not giving up and thinking about there's usually some way to put pieces together to get something that's going to work was that up, and it it was awfully printed. But the trick was getting the Tonton the perspective on Taunton to be correct. One to lock it to the ground. So like it was running on the ground and then getting. Slightly bigger as you move in. Then as you're supposedly over looking down on your now looking down at its head because you're like looking down. Then how did you do it that you just have to break it down frame by frame and match. No. It's the rig was always done frame by frame. But it's real there's some talk about it. But it, but it's the motion was done an animation stand and the Tonton was being held on a rotator. So he could rotate from looking at in profile to to looking down at the top. And it's, you know, the animated just push in to get closer to it. And we plotted it essentially the same way they used to do all those all the Tom and Jerry cartoons with Gene, Kelly and everything that was all hard work on animation stand. I just did it in three D space instead of in to space, but you know, it it took a leap of faith. And all it took the challenge to do it, and knowing that that shot was better than if I said, let's just do it as a big. Model and it'll be fine. No. Because it's better if it's real so I took the time to think about it. I want to see a question about the problem solving. And this is something we asked you Mike when you were on the show you were trying to solve the problem of that specific piece of music for up. And you said it finally came to you in the shower. Yes, it did. Dennis. Are you just sitting when you need to solve a problem like that you just sitting at the computer and say and just to do you have to walk away? Do you have to go for a walk? You have to do some kind of other exercise. I mean, how does it happen that say, that's it? You're Eka there. It can be both. There can be the Rica moments. But often it's there when you're just trying to figure it out at the moment. But you know, if you can't figure it out you're still are thinking about it. Your subconscious is really working. I mean, that's the that's the reason all of us. I think are alive I'm fascinated with this keeps going there was a special of fact that hustle people for years. He was finally revealed how they did it. But that was I mean, I always love transformation scenes that was like and there too. I knew how they did it. But I love watching it the old time, and that was the transformation scene in Frederick marches. Jekyll and Hyde. Can you explain how did that? Yeah. That that film was in black and white and what they did was they put it was red makeup. I believe on him and look at it through a red filter. You wouldn't see the makeup, and it was like under the eyes and stuff like that to make them. Look, really scary. And then they slid the Ray at filter that actually went from red to blue and actually disl- it it along transparence littered along or they change the color on the lights. So that when you see him in blue light all that red makeup goes black at that time because it's the opposite. So there was no cuts. No, Trey no lap, dissolves know, anything like that. But it only worked in black and white. But it was really great. They really job on it. Hey, go Gill. Yeah. Yeah. And by the way, we're talking to dentists before we turn the mic on. He's impressed that you managed to book Shanahan Gallo on the show Spanish speaking of Phil. You know, she is explained to Mike. Yeah. I was crazy about I kept saying that was the one I wanted Janet. Yes. I remember gosta Franken Sheild actor and goes to Frankenstein with with with Cheney junior Cheney junior and Bela Lugosi, what other shows going to these people Dennis I ask you. That's right. I nobody. Nobody angle cheat cheat thought nobody she goes. No one's going to know who I thought we were crazy. And I said on holy me. The people who listen to this show your bigger than Julia Roberts. I know you guys know who moved across the street from me when I was fourteen years old. Tell us Morris Ancram. Wow. Wow. Colonel fielding. I don't know how many kernels and and scientists he played in those movies in the fifties. And he was the judge on Perry Mason, but he's in a lot of Harry, films, and Burke, Gordon movies, and every Gordon still with us, and my mom, call me said, you won't you won't believe who moved across the street, and I met him. I was just shocked there. He wasn't person. I mean lived we lived in in Yatta, which is only a half hour away. We might as well been living on the moon, and as far as who you ever see in the business. You know, you have two kids that really really nice. Yeah. You have a fondness for these obscure character actors that we talk about on this show, you know, a little bit carriers, but also the principles and the directors and the production and how it's the package how it all came together and got done, and you know, the problems they had to solve. Here's some love that here's some trivia about equinoxes as it relates to our show, if I hope I have this, right? That one of the cameramen on equinoxes was Begley junior true. That's really Jack Harris version the I was only out there on the only shot for two weeks on his version. Mine was two years, but on his and I just saw out there. I didn't even meet him. But he was tall right in and. No. I remember hearing and Bakley junior. Oh, wow. Yeah. Turns into a terrific comedian a connection to this podcast. And this is also interested, Michael. And I were talking before somebody else who turns up an equinox is the legendary Forrest Ackerman, right? Yeah. He was a friend. Yeah. He was a friend of mine and Mark McGhee who wrote the script and Dave Allen who helped me with the effects so key used to open his house up. And and we could come by once we could drive we could come by and meet people on like Sundays mansion see Raihan, I've been there. I did that I was lucky enough to to do that a couple of. I I was there Twi. Oh, great. Yeah. And I heard as he he was a little too trusting of people with very. Like, he had the Jain actual dinosaurs. From the original, King, Kong and stuff. You can't and people just slip it onto their coats and leave with it everything. Oh, were you. I remember. I haven't seen them in the in the sixties the early sixties and between like, you know, sixty two or sixty three and sixty five or sixty six I think his collection of still photos. I think he'd lost their sin stolen, like a third of them were gone that said people would just open the he'd opened his filing cabinets to incredible photos from these movies, and they just people with take him, you know, so later on they just continued that, you know, at the Kong's stuff, and so much do I trust thing. Do I have this at all, right? Dennis will you profiled in famous monsters and film, and as a young man, you know, because you, you know, carry David Ankara Morris, his sons, and I put on this a museum in yada of because we didn't we were collecting still so I had photos from bird, Gordon, movies and affects and Frankenstein and all that sort of stuff again wanting people to see him, and and they had a back house, and we put on the walls all these phone. Does and posters and everything giant behemoth and stuff and put a big sign out in front of their house on Saturdays and Sundays for people to come and see this. So then forty I forty about it or wrote them or something I may have been the one of the first time I met for you, actually, and he came out and showed up there and put it in his magazine called it the mirror museum. But it really was. That was not it. It was the. I forget what it was the kademi of horror and science fiction museum. But but the only have two people ever show up. Famous monsters used to do that thing of wanted more fans like, and they'd have a picture of Acadia and one time I think it was wanted more fans like little Stevie Spielberg it could've been yes. Yeah. He did that with a number of friends of mine other too. Yeah. I haven't talked to Steven about it. I don't know about that. That's fascinating. So you were a collector too. Yeah. Yeah. You got to how else are you going to be able to keep those images unless you collect photos them? They're fleeting right there on TV or during the theater, and they're fleeting and they're gone. So there's only way to do it used to shoot eight millimeter off the TV screen eight version of destination moon known that the real the real movie on. Oh, okay. So he's look at it. Again, did you ever try? And I mean, I grew up in New Jersey, I was far away from Hollywood. But you were locking yada. You could go down and tally. What did you ever try and sneak onto the sets or sneak into any of the studios the see kind of what was going on? You know, I couldn't ever you couldn't ever do that. And you're too scared when you're like that young or so, but I had a guy across the street, a friend of mine school. His dad was a was a doctor at one of the studios, and they went in on the weekend and saw some of the set. So I'd Kazin she sets. If I was driving around though. And whenever you saw a big truck in LA was a film truck. Right. So I always stop and watch. And I saw a lot of stuff done. Then I saw all the all the stuff being done at John Marshall high school there in Las feeless. They were always shooting Mr. Novak that series. Yeah. You could just drive by and there they were and I'd walk up to it. And I look and here's the crew. And here's the actors all and and there's the camera. And I always thought if I'm gonna do I wanna be by that camera because where something's going on. Betty is focused, and that's where they're making it worked out. Did you ever think you'd see a big fancy schmancy criterion version of equinoxes? I mean, it's. Real following. You know, it's it's it's right in my collection right between the citizen Kane and grapes of wrath. Gloria. How about close encounters? Can you talk about what about and what was Douglas Trumbull? Like Doug was great really good artists in a really knew how to make things look really super nice and everything and good and completely different setup from Star Wars. They knew how to do things with Star Wars. We were going for speed on close encounters. It was more reflection of Stephen and with Doug in there, of course, which was going for for feeling and emotion, and and, you know, pictorial beauty in and all that stuff which I liked, but I'd never done that before in a big film. So that was a great education for me, and you know, a year and a half to go from one show to another. How did you get on close encounters? How were you hired on that? I was wrapping up Star Wars after a year. And I'd heard from somebody there. Everybody knew each other. I didn't know Doug or anybody down there though. But saying, oh, you can probably get some work down there and close encounters. They're doing something. And it was down to the other side of town is going to be a long drive, and I thought well, I can put up with it. And fortunately, I did and got went down and got the job Sarda four days later. And it turns out what I what they want me to shoot as the mothership. A, wow, I knew nothing about the script hadn't heard anything about it. But you know, what I really really I'm about ready to get out of the business, and I stayed in a little longer. This is before Star Wars, even to to meet the directors before I gave up is this when you were living with your mom with your maxed out credit cards. Oh, yeah. Right. That's it. I'm out of money seven hundred and fifty dollars in debt, and it was a lot of money to me. And so anyway, I wanted to meet George, that's what pushed me to get onto onto get unknown territory. Right with all these people, I don't know on Star Wars and the same thing to to meet Stephen for Trumbull because I didn't know anything about that fancy equipment. You know, you look at equal. That's all I knew would and sticks and glue and paint and everything, but I was so impressed by two thousand and one that I said, I wonder how these guys do this. And I knew kind of sours are going to be done like that and certainly close encounters, but it was scary going into into those shows not having a clues how the equipment worked or anything. But I was pushed the directors. I love those director. What was some of the tricks? You had to learn when you couldn't have the money for a look computerized up. What was some of the tricks have just glueing and folding he made equinoxes? Yes. Yes. With your hands getting a hands hands. Will you know? You don't have to be perfect. If you try to do something perfect. You'll never get it done. But in the context of a film, you can have some pretty funky things for a few frames here and there, and maybe you cut away, right? Or maybe you put something really bright over that part of the scene, or maybe if something falls apart you put a sound effect in something like that. There are all sorts of ways to do it. But. If you're going to have something break apart, you do it out of plaster or something you don't make it out of concrete. You know, their tricks, the mainly if you have a a model or a bridge that's going to collapse, you know, make did this as a kid. You don't do it out of plaster you at a balsa wood. So it can just break in painted to look like a bridge. And all, but you have to know all those tricks because it is all a trick. There's nothing real in it at all. And that's all stuff that you would've thought when CG came in that I would really been kind of obsolete, but I wasn't ops elite because I learned what looked real and with didn't look real. So I can apply that to see, gee, what looked real? But didn't look real beginning siege. Go ahead. No. I was interrupt. You. I've heard you say that you fear technology when you when you when you got into it. Yeah. I was feared it wasn't really interested in it. You know? I mean, they're, you know, I'm interested in the end image. That's all the end image. How how I feel about it when it's over. And I have a way of seeing it in my head the way I'd like it to be at it, always changes. But if it always gets better, which it seems to with good directors that I'm fine with that. Well, you know this show we we love to talk about turning points. Just to go back. You said something about getting out of the business. This is after equinoxes, and then you'd knocked around for weather. I have the chronology this, right? You worked on green giant commercials. And yeah, the cascade of California cascades. Heels berry Doboy. Yeah. I have this. Right. Right. Right. And you were fed up at a certain point. I was out of money and an all in LA was a union town. And you know, what a twenty two year old gonna do house ever gonna get a job? You know? There was no industry per se. There was no special effects industry to go knock on a door. No. There was like. Due titles and stuff like that. Right. And commercials were about the only place that was really just cascade in Hollywood right on Seward there right near where Harold Lloyd's first studio was very famous that lock. Yeah. Which I never I didn't appreciate the time. So but anyway, eventually ready to get you know to get out. And I said, that's it. I'm going to go into inhalation therapy. I'd seen in. Uh-huh. Yeah. The LA times I can learn that he had a brief. And but then, you know. Star wars. I heard about Star Wars, and I just pushed to get on it and manage to find it's people to talk to out there. How did how did Star Wars and Lukas show up on your radar? I was working cascade right before cascade closed up. And we sold the camera. We were like trying to consolidate to somebody who wouldn't say where he was working, but it turned out that he was working on Star Wars. And they were just starting the setup the animation department, and this one animated camera, and then a couple of friends of mine went out and actually heard an inter interview Jordan interview, they interviewed with George about working on the show, and they were stop motion guys, and and overall effects guys really good Jim Danforth and built Hayler and George said, no, no. I don't wanna go this complicated way. I'm gonna I don't mind throwing the models in front of the camera or sliding him now wires or something that's the way we're going to do. We don't have the money. So they went away and I'm friends with him. And they told me about it. And I thought oh, that's just too bad. You know that never gonna work out. And then, of course, everybody else in town said the same sort of thing said it was impossible the people that they. Talked to then they go with John Dykstra who comes up with his revolutionary expensive time consuming idea the change the industry. So they ended up having to go with new technology. You know? I just followed it. Yeah. The rest of the history, and then all that's like sort of obsolete wants computers came in. I mean, nobody talks about that motion control anymore, and how it really changed the industry. Do you think there's going to be a day when his going to you'll just make movies with no actors and no location shots because it could be done by computers. Still composers. No, you know, auto compose to that's all coming. I think it's probably they're based on the color the scene or the let's write my scores. Let's. Phones. Anyway, gill. Yes, it is. And it's happening right now. Right, and they're animated films, but you never gonna you're never gonna get the personality of the people. You're never gonna get the voice flexes ever gonna get the reality. Sure. You can do it that. And that's not the question. The question is should you do it for certain stories. You know, if you're trying to really feel something with people you wanna look at a fake image. Or do you want to look at the real person there, you know, in a relationship that is just breaking your heart. You know, far more than an animated character ever good. What what is this? I don't think I saw an interview with you Dennis. You were talking about the three d design adding three d to two d movies that you saw test with blanquita. Yeah. Yeah. Casa Blanca, Roger rabbit, you tell us about some others film. Wow. No. I forget the company that did it. What were they doing? Exactly. What were they what what were they doing exactly the demo reel they'd put together? And they they had like two minutes scenes. From these big movies. They had added, you know, post to d and they're doing a lot now or three d two two movies. See it all the time now, and it's mostly not done. Right. So it looks pretty bad. See the three d but they did it to sort of sell the industry on it. And it kinda worked and people started doing it. You know, and they were really neat. They did it much better than than most of the conversions are being done now. And I I really enjoy three d if it's done, right? But as far as I'm concerned, nobody's doing it. Right. And it's hard to explain why. But it's I did the two three conversion on the on episode two in three of Star Wars that have never been shown they were going to release them. And they never do. We showed him conventions at all. And they're done this different way where everything's much more spatial. You're like looking at a room. You're not like looking at the figure looking at the whole space and seeing people around, and I thought it was really neat. So, but I wish that Foote's were still around. Because his neat to see those movies, especially CASA wizard of Oz some wizard of Oz. And in three D it's been done since I got to see this. I know you I I am aware. Now, I remember watching Swen I saw house of wax in theater there. Devil. Oh, yes. Wasn't that the double feature one? I director Andrei tools, right? Of course. No Schwartz mysteries of Hollywood made. To is. In Hollywood brilliant, hired of one hydrate. But I wouldn't member those early three d when you'd watch look at a room of the actors, and it's like, you could see depth, but you every figure looked fled. It looked like a pop-up card. It looked like you could go into the room. But that all the actors were cardboard cutouts. Note you mean, that's even true of some of the movies now, they still shot in three d. Yeah, I agree. What do you think that's part of the future? Dennis that. No. I I mean, eventually I, but I don't think so it had a good chance. A lot of the problems. They had in the fifties and sixties they got rid of with digital. So now, there's almost like no excuse because you can see it on the set and they never used to. And but but I don't think people are thinking about it as much and under really is the story that is like a trick. But it's Sorious home portent. Then is what did you work at the shop in van Nuys when you were working Star Wars. So can you tell me a little bit about that? Because that is sort of a pilgrimage that I do once a year usually go drive do drive by where that used to be. I took my kids there. Whenever young I'm like, this is important this building right here too that that's where they blew up the deaths versus likely tell me tell me about that. What was it like? Well, it was it was when I start. Are there was mostly an empty building the model? Shop is going. There was some cameras being started. There was stages were kind of empty going on yet. And it was like a bunch of like hardly anybody over thirty five and most people about thirty or younger a lot of people from Long Beach state from the industrial design group that John Dykstra who was setting it up and gone to school in and hired friends, and France, so not many film people at all. And it didn't really so much matter because it didn't seem like it because George have the ideas and the storyboards are being done and everything. So it was it was fun place. And I didn't quite fit in because I was too serious about it. And they were they were like racing cars motorcycles on the weekends and stuff this really important, and I really respect it. And all but it wasn't who I was. So I I didn't have as much fun because I was too worried about how the hell gonna get this movie done. Right. And we. Have barely did. Responsibilities at that time working on the film. You know, I was called second cameraman Richard Ellen was being doing a lot of the stuff that I was shooting nighttime shooting as much as I could in the daytime the second camera. So I shot a lot of the trench. A lot of the the big battle shots that are the ships flying around. But there was so much that we we, you know, spread them among ourselves, and George was in there couple times a week he'd fly down from northern California say the for two days and go ver all the shots for the rest of the time with us and everything and we got along really well, George idea, I think we'd I think we had a shared vision. That's true of everybody. I've worked with you know, if I've got a shared vision with like, well, it's like Spielberg comes up, and he says, you know, this sky in in a we want this alien creature at the end of AI. I want him to look like that guy from man from planet x and I say, yeah, I know what you mean. People on that set of two hundred knew what he was talking. You. That's all that, you know, that, you know. And it was the same kind of George with someone with Cameron in those. You know, it's it's I enjoy those much more than if the director says do anything you want your the effects guy? I think I know. That's that's too easy. Yeah. I saw I'm giving I watched the video today of Lucas giving you the life achievement award to and he's talking about how you were. You were there in the middle of the night. Just just sitting right? You must have you must be nostalgic for those days. I mean, it was everything was happening around you. It was. Yeah. It was the beginning. You could smell it. You could feel it. Bigger, and and what in the future of special effects? You know, I can't say. It's a secret. Perfect answer. All the answers actually, have it. It's right. I'm just thinking about on this piece of paper. Wrote it down. 'cause I forget it. Now. I'm too old. They can forget it. I know the answer. Who knows the thing is that it's not up to any of us. It's up to the public. That's it only up to the public. What they like what they don't like. That's what drives everything we had Leonard Maltin here we were talking about and we hope see this day either. But we were talking about you know, what we see seems to be the slow demise of movie theaters. Yeah. I heard that show. Yeah. Long with I you know. He he sort of saying you think they're staying on or something. Gave us hope. I mean, the the zig obviously, it's a different situation. LA? I mean here we lost Zik feld, which you know about. No, you're right there theaters for billion dollar movies. But for anything else, it's like may, you know, movies set you'd see in every theatre as now you'll find like one little art house in the city, and you lucky to catch it there since I moved back to New York from LA in two thousand and three I think at least fifteen theaters closed. I'm sure in Manhattan, and that's what fifteen fifty years. Well, the other thing is different. That is the length of time a movie stays in the theater, it's gone before. You know, it, you know, when I was a kid I could see Star Wars fifteen times in six months. It was just still playing throughout that entire time. I miss it. Well, that's why I think that's why the multiplex started. You know, it was all my memory. It was all in defense of this big fear of of cable coming in. And you can see any movie called on demand back then on demand. You see it you'll pay your money. This is the sometime in the nineties or so. I think that's what started multiplexes going. So that you could play these movies all the time. You wouldn't you? Maybe it's on demand. But within an hour, you'll be able to find it your at your Cineplex because it's playing a two or three theaters. That's what kind of started all that. I think Michael has a question for you from a fan. That's he's gonna read it. We just we put this out on social media, and we were bombarded with questions for you. Okay. We'll throw a couple of match if you don't mind. All right. This is Robert Martin Robert Martin. Wow. For me. This will be up there. This will be up there with the Michael Jiechi to- interview. Thank you, Robert very nice looking forward to it. I would please ask to hear some discussion regarding all of his early groundbreaking breaking work with the nineteen sixties, Gerry Anderson supercar. Yeah. Tell us. I didn't work on it. They did it work the internet thinks you did the no, no. I don't think it's where it came from. That's British right. Yeah. Getting me maybe getting mixed with Brian Johnson. We were impressed. I know Robert Martin we're sorry. But there you have it. Okay. How about this one? You you did work on flesh. Gordon? I did. Yes. Oh, excellent. Now, I want. Somebody Peter said to Maria wrote this I just had to share this. How many minutes into the podcast until Gilbert asks Dennis about the source Munster? Flesh, gordon. I'm afraid I wasn't involved with those monsters some of the spaceships enough that would you think of doing a sequel and making more? Venus or no, I don't maybe somebody's done that already. I didn't make a sequel to maybe. Where was this one? This is this is interesting to us. Bob Burns Joe by as assist does. Dennis have memories of working on the Bob Burns Halloween extravaganzas in the seventies. Oh, I see. Oh, we have here. You know, the show. Yeah. Yeah. We talk about it a lot together whenever we see him. You know? And and wish she was still doing them. He's a sweet, man. What was that line is oh of so much fun? You know, it'd be like six or eight people getting together for like four weekends right before Halloween and Babadi in an idea. We're going to do the thing. You know, we're gonna build it corridors like, you're you're in the ice at the Arctic up there and doorways, and we're gonna have a guy telling them be careful, and they'll open the don't open that door, of course. And that's the one that opened up. I wanna give given to have been on there in those movies. You not only saw the movie, but had a live theater show with it. Oh, yeah. That's that's what this was. These were live shows like for two or three minutes long based on movies. We had a war of the worlds one. We did we did some fiction big Goumba creature was on the top of Bob's house. Mad? Love it jecklin, high kind of character with the with the blue and red light changing. And we did a really exciting when it was very hard to do on based on the exorcist where the girl levitated right there in front of your eyes in the in the attic. And then you're sitting there looking at it. But then at the last minute, you know, you get scared and you run out screaming. So it always had a punchline when they were alive. They were hiring gum. Glenn strange. In beta go, see some of those shows I heard I I don't think they were higher, but they become by that's great as as fans. Yeah. That's. I've never seen the. But you know, it's so funny. Walk into Bob's burns house one day. I remember walking in there's doodles Weaver. Wow. What? I didn't know it. Right. Name to bring doodles Weaver. Other for long. On people like that. So these guys would show up, you know, we'd have on the thing show. Some of the actors would show up were in the movie in the original there to go through the show. So I don't know how Bob knew everybody. But he did, you know, what's so great about Bob is there's no I run a there's nothing camp about it at all. Yes. He loves these creatures. Right. Absolutely. And we all do and the ad why? That's why we're still here in the other people have gone onto doing situation comedies or something. I think we'll all the joy this question from Michael Wagner can Dennis recreate the bicycle scene from AT with Gilbert in the basket. I'll do it. It's a challenge. Would love that. Wouldn't be very hard. Either. Sita says Dennis Dennis worked on captain EEO with Michael Jackson. Does he does? He have a story or or a memory. Well, I wasn't ever on the set. Okay. But so, but I knew about it because George was producing it and Francis was directing. So I heard all the stories about it. And it was it was really it was a very hard shoot. It was the most expensive, you know, per minute movie. I think after that time that ever been done in three D And Victoria, Dorado the great cameraman shot and stuff looked. I saw dailies from it. It looked just amazing. But it was a tough because that's sort of thing hadn't been number four and three D or anything spaceships and everything and analyzing how big the spaceship, look and three D coming up in the audience. Sure also things like that we had to deal with sure what why did you say? And I think I know the answer to this too. But will our fans will enjoy hearing. It will why why are t to Terminator two and Jurassic Park high points for you. Because for fifty years up till then or whatever, I don't know if that's numbers, right? I had been struggling not that long forty year sprinkling with trying to make things look real. And there was it was really hard. And I thought reality is well as performance, and you know. You know in the appropriateness for a movie was so important because the fakery can pull you out of it if you know and CG was opportunity something actually could do it real. And and it was so hard to get through the figuring out how to make CG worked. But I think in after the abyss which we only have like seventeen shots that was so successful. I didn't really understand it. I took a year off and I bought a textbook. On computer graphics. I think it was two thousand pages long. And I had no idea what an algorithm was or anything, and I spent about four months and a local coffee shop here reading the thing and came away understanding that it's not magic it. Everything's controllable. It's just that. It seems to me is the people don't know where the controls need to be to make it look real. And that's what I was looking for and hoping for and we've been working on it at I'll in for years with the computer graphic department. So we were kind of ready to make a big step and t to was the really big step, and I came up with ideas for digital composite. So you're no longer saw the map lines around the t to character any composite, and it was just great. And then, but I thought that was going to be the breakthrough film, but nobody to figure out what they were looking at in Jurassic came out, which of course, was the that the knocked everybody off and change everything you talk about seeing with. With an audience what that scene when when Robert Patrick passes through the bars at what is it in the asylum? Yeah. And what I miss about seeing movies with audiences is is the the UN the owing in the eye. You knew people had not or seeing something they had never seen before. Right. And there's a moment. Yeah. There's no flaw. Imagine. If that had been like, you know, much of the stop motion, stop motion animated figure something or in the dark, or you know, I just love that. That's the the magician pardon me. I guess the show that off do you actually do magic? Do you like magic? I did when I was a little kid like ten or twelve and I'm not good enough for it. I'm not I'm not that extrovert now films. Now, another thing that actors will have easier is that they don't need to wear bad to pays or get face. Lifts. I think they've been holed movies where they put hair on actors through computerization, and they they they make them. Look twenty years old. I was looking at Michael Douglas being made younger in the atman Bax mazing. It's pretty good. Yeah. I must say it's pretty damn good. I wanted to hate it. But it looked wonderful the aging. Yeah. Aging. Will you look at some of the credits, and and one of the big companies that does that work. They they got the second highest affects credit or not a big recent movie, and they just do the aging, and you look at and say who was it. Do they make look ten or twenty years younger? You know, they never say never say who you're what you're doing and fell never had to do that crappy old age makeup. I put the vessel lean on the lens. It soft. Yeah. Yeah. But you go back and you look at some of that old age makeup. You look at dick Smits work, oh on on Brando and and Dustin Hoffman for a little bit. And and. It holds up. They the exorcist and the exorcist because I heard like he max von Sydow is like forty when he did that. Yeah. After you forget, what brand over do you look like, but you look at any of those scenes now where he's in the makeup chair whether applying it you just can't believe it's the same guy. That's in that movie. The godfather. Brand was in his forties. When he did that. All right. Let's get to something fun you playing Nazi. Was my dream for our listeners that don't know. That's that's dentist behind the life magazine. I know that was the funniest thing. Original rated Stephen needed to get this other shot showing somebody was tailing Harrison in the in the Tri motor airplane. Go the point being the story. And they were I don't know how we're got up at someone looked at me and said, you're the one. We're gonna you got a part in the movie. What what? Okay. So we didn't actually enrichment which is only seven miles across the bay from where we were working, but the Tri motor was there and it couldn't fly. But it's where they're storing it so we went over there even came up, and you know, the whole crew and everything small crew, and we shot it in in a morning over there. And it was strangest experience the beyond the other side of the camera with everybody's looking at you. And you wanna what do I look wrong my wrong? But they're looking at, you know, the shadow of your nose on your cheek or something like that. Your hair or head the right half, the right way and stuff like that you have warranty neat. You have mobile warmth for the notch. She's now. Played hitler. I don't quite yet. I have to soften that. I don't think I'm ever gonna quite. I want to throw I didn't even know I was supposed to be a Nazi. He. Probably would've said no way. How about this question? This is interesting from my our friend, Mike Herman does Dennis think motion capture performers like Andy circus should be eligible for kademi award nominations. That's a lotta question. That's a lotta question. I think it's you know, sort of I don't have an answer for it. I think what they do is so important to get the right attitude, and so much of the detail. I it's just different. You know, I think some of the people are thinking about doing special awards that may be the way to to treat that you know. But they it's so important how about this one from Ray Garton dragon slayer was a big leap forward for Disney. What were some of the groundbreaking effects Dennis pulled off on that movie? Any I for one thing. Very realistic dragon. Yeah. Right. Right. I was we we had a shocker after Empire Strikes Back that we had a preview in a lot of the cards came back. People did not like that Taunton creature. They thought look fake the two legged creature on the we thought it looked. Bula? So so I started questioning my own wisdom is the am. I seeing at the way the public seeing realize, well, maybe I'm not maybe we should try something different on dragon slayer. I'm actually thinking of trying it as rod puppets, you know, with puppets with rods below it. And as a model, but people would move it in real time. But Phil Tippett said, no, no straight. Let's go beyond. Let's do it actually with all the Motors like we do motion control and do it that way. So it's gonna fluidity that's like real. And you had never seen that before. All you've ever seen was the relieve the, Harry, and sort of stuff and even the stuff we did not have the reality of dragon slayer. And then I kept real moody and dark, and mysterious and the design of the dragon was terrific, and the sets were great and everything. So it really work. We were really trying to something. You're always trying to top yourself. Aren't you absolute whenever I finish something? I I in my mind convinced myself as obsta leat, and I really do that that's an obsolete and. Part of it is that I don't wanna do the same thing. Again. I'm going to do something like different, but not just different better. You know? And so then you got to figure out what's better. You know? We're how'd you find that it has more? So when where are these nine Oscars scattered? That's. Michael keeps this. Family work a little bit around all over. I tried to get him back every so often, so they can talk to each other and exchange stories with each other. But Gilbert, we're sitting here with two gentlemen, who started in life. It's little boys making their own movies in the backyard. And now they have kademi awards. Don't you don't you think there's something wonderful about that? That that really is. That's amazing where to keep yours. Mike. It's in the printer closet. Why is it in the closet? I don't know. All that stuff in the printer closet. I feel like you don't put it on display. I don't know. I just Stewart gave his mother. Gave his mother, and he put it the hardware store window feel like my mom would yell at me. You're bragging. What do you do in your brag? And you're gonna put that out there. Make people look at that. Out put it out at least a question for both of you. Do you often feel like if you are looking at an Academy Award that you won that you'll get like a little lazy? Like, oh, look how good I am. I one that. And you won't try hard on if it's in the closet. Might be part of like why my psyche wants at that way is because I don't want to look at it. I don't want to be reminded that I won that. Because I constantly listen every time I finish a film. I think I failed. And I promised myself. I'm going to do better on the next one. And I'm gonna learn, you know, so I feel like I learn something every time and that's in my face. I won't I feel when Spielberg directed the second drastic park. He he felt like he was. So he his opinion was that he was so proud of himself for what they chief with the first one that he didn't feel like he worked hard enough. I I didn't see any of that. When I was on the film. I was the interesting thing that was when he changed the entire ending to take place in San Diego and that happened very quickly. And wait a minute. We're not gonna end it on the island. We're doing some completely different. We're gonna like make King Kong where he's in the streets t Rex in the streets. I it was a really good idea. So I never saw any signs. Steven didn't give one hundred percent. I mean, I know this. I mean, probably just him after watching the film like he's he wants it beyond perfect. Yeah. Could be it's a federal Michael. It's really funny about the Oscar I had mine for the first year in the drawer. He'll really. Or upper the probably the same reasons. I don't deserve this. Right. Oh. And even think about it. Oh, that's feel embarrassed. That didn't give to everybody who worked on the film. But now, you have nine of them they can't possibly all fit in that drawer. So you got to put them around somewhere. That's where he was when I got three of them. And I put him out three to do it. Pretty amazing Dennis we wrap up. I just want to ask you about your speech. I watched you received the life achievement award from your peers your visual fellow visual effects artists and you talked about glacier park. You talked about this wonderful phenomenon that you assembly semi that you experience as a kid, and you said that sometimes that's what it feels like when a director asked you to do the impossible. Great metaphor. Great metaphor with they used to call the fire fall, the Firefox. They don't do it anymore. The mountain up there at six nine o'clock at night under above were camp. Curry is still there. They used to draw push big flaming blogs that had fallen down down a two thousand foot cliff, and and hit rocks blow and would all go out and everything, but they did it every night in the summertime, and I was six or eight when I first saw it, and it was awesome. Just the most amazing thing and thousands of people would be there every weekend looking at this thing. And then they finally had to stop it. Because the ecologist said, oh, it's not natural. And like, and they're worried about something. I don't know what. So they don't do it anymore. But it was the sense of wonder and seeing that something that's impossible is happening. It's not a waterfall only work is Vicky assembly right or you've got waterfalls in the daytime. And at night, you've got fire falling down downs. Wonderful looks like. Flaming water and that had a major effect on me seeing that. Yeah. At least me to the question. Can you kinda guy like you? That knows how things work maintain his sense of wonder when you go when you walk into that movie theater. Is it hard it gonna work on? Are. They worked on it. All the time to remind myself. I'm a kid. Yeah. And to, you know, bring back stuff feelings I had when I was a kid you got to or else, you'll get kind of jaded and and board, and you know, there's a lot of excitement when you're, you know, six eight years old same question. Three years old. Can you can you do that? I mean, you've been in the business so long you've seen everything you've been a part of so much. It's it's like he says you have to work at it. And you have to force yourself to be in a certain mindset. But sometimes it just kind of overcomes you in happens like, you get lost in a movie, and when that happens, it's really one of the most wonderful feelings that really truly makes me feel like a kid again when it when a film, really works, and you walk out of there, not even thinking about how. It was made. You're just amazed at the story. I love that. The worst thing in movies is if you're anything that you notice if you watching if you're going, oh that scene was shot beautifully or the dialogue is so witty or the acting. That means you're not in the movie, right? You're not lost in. Yeah. You still carrying that picture of of Ray Harry housing around in your I've got it somewhere. Yeah. I still do have it. Yeah. It's so Sweden's always in my wallet. Isn't that? Sweet carries. It carries it with him. I carry a picture of Gilbert. I have a picture of Gordon. I want to direct to our listeners to check out. And it's on YouTube is the Ray Harry house ninetieth birthday celebration. It's so nice. And so sweet that he that he lived to see that. And to see all you guys get up there and and make such a big deal out of him because God he really deserved it. Yeah. He was great in a lot of great people showed up for the Terry Gilliam people. I didn't even. His you know, it's a it's some flew in. Yeah. Changed lot of people's lives. It's a great thing to watch. And I feel like you have to and I just want to thank you personally for you know, as a kid. I'd never thought I would grow up to write music for movies. I literally I thought it was going to grow up in do what you're doing. I thought it was going to be doing visual effects because I was so obsessed with that. I love special effects on the stop motion sort of fell into music, but my heart is is still hugely into what you do. And I just want to thank you for all the inspirational. Thanks very much. We all you jet tennis. So. Well, thanks. I was in the right place at the right time or the right brain or right? Mix up brand. I don't know what it is. We've been going on interview two hundred and fifty people now in this show. And so often it comes up, you know, I was going to leave the business. I had one out the door. I was fed up. I was down to my last forty eight dollars. And it's it's it's just wonderful. It's wonderful. How things change, you know, when you love what you love, and you you you stay through it you stay stubborn. Yeah. You stays them. Right. You know, you gotta be good at it. So in these times, come your you do them and you deliver. But a lot of a lot of people get out that maybe should have stuck around. Yeah. My friend Susie Esmond says just stay on the bus. What's next for you? You writing a book I room or my wife, and I mainly my wife in the Mona writing a book on sort of on on. It's not a memoir, but it's more about an art book on how to visualize things. And then how to how to bring the emotion out of something in in affects or can actually be an anything any art form. And it's a lot of. Like, I said a lot of folks. I know they're coming up aren't even taught about, you know, about feeling excuse me here, they aren't they aren't even talk talking about, you know, doing quality sound or sound but doing quality. To try to engage in audience emotionally. They are just taught the technical side of it. And that's something that that we're trying to encourage trying to encourage in this book to get people to to view things as a child, and the whatever they're working on music, art, whatever it is stir your own emotions up not just deliver. What you think you wanna tell? But actually, feel it. Well, well, that's title yet. No, not yet. Okay. Great. You know, that you know, that there's that school the master's school or something it's on the internet that a lot of people are talking masterclass. Yeah. Masterclass I saw I saw Africo Santana's. And he says exactly the same thing. The prefix dislike him is what we talking about visual effects. He's talking about music everybody. I think all of us that are in this field you've gotten you wanna feel it. We wanna feel we're what we're doing. It's not taught in schools. Yeah. And be original. What's coming up for you? Mrs Aquino, I got. Spiderman coming up your scoring Spiderman vitamin too far from home Spiderman from home, and some other things you can't talk about. There's always things you can't talk about Dennis. I'm sure way more entrenched in that than I am on can't talk about this. The secret that US Gilbert. He can't talk about. Yes. Show. What good are yours? This might be one of my favorite episodes. So thank you so much. Thank you show where tremendously flattered well glad to be asked. You guys keep it up. Thank you. Well, been Gilbert Godfrey amazing colossal podcasts with my co hosts Frank Santo Padre. And Michael, I still don't know how to pronounce your chemo. Keno. Oh. Our main casts a special effects wizard and tennis urine. Thank you. Dennis Bank back us, a pleasure work AT with Gilbert in the basket. Talk to you again bell. Women. Gilbert, Godfrey, amazing colossal podcast is produced by Darah Godfried and Franks Padre with audio production by Frankfurt Orosa, web and social media's handled by Mike Patton, Greg hair and John Bradley seals special audio contributions, by John beach, special things John Fodio John Murray and Paul Rayburn. Twenty here pilots before anybody else, we made a podcast he'd just for you. Your presents is full of great stuff. Like preview episodes for coming shows peaks behind the pay wall and pilots podcasts that haven't even been made yet. It's like getting to listen and behind the scenes here at your wolf starting January twenty first eagle presents. We'll have a bunch of new pilots for you like Edgar mumbo Sears the woke kissed catch conversations between the woke man in the world and comedians like Risa, also here upcoming pilots Florida cast. Wow, you're native American to this week in sports and Carl alarm all throughout the month. Let us know what you think of them with hashtag presents. Subscribe to your wolf presents to hear more great episodes from around the network and behind the pay wall. Like an episode of drew Tarver strictly business with der contraire or act one of my Beyers, punk, musical stolen idea. Just search for presents in your podcast app. And subscribe, so you don't miss enough date.

Dennis Muren director Ray Hollywood George Dave Allen LA Harry Willis O'Brien Tonton Oscar Gilbert Godfrey Jack Harris Michael Juki Mike Dave Cooley David McCallum John Dykstra Gill
Star Wars Will Be a Bomb  | 6

Inside Star Wars

30:06 min | 1 year ago

Star Wars Will Be a Bomb | 6

"The following may contain mature content. Wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars, part six. On July sixteen nineteen seventy six principal shooting wrapped on Star Wars. George Lucas was twenty days behind schedule, and remarkably close to budget. Thanks to a devalued British pound, but over budget is over budget. And so FOX did what its contract said it could do. They took part of George Lucas direct to'real fee as compensation. Shooting was over that chapter was closed. But the troubles were far from over. They were just different. Lucas had to crack the whip I l m. Everybody everybody can have your tension place. Country club hours are over. Look, I know I know we don't have air conditioning in this building. But we can't do all our work at night, and no more. Makeshift pools water. Slides. And what I saw on my way in today that can never happen again. What he saw was John Dykstra, one of Ireland's founders in the parking lot at the controls of a forklift. Balanced precariously in the forks a full size refrigerator. Yeah, no more of that. Hey, george. You have to understand we've never worked on anything this complicated before. That's okay. That's okay. Nobody has I l m cranked, it up sixteen people to shifts eleven hours a day, six days a week. Things were beginning to come together. Inside Star Wars is brought to you in part by lifeproof makers of action ready phone cases, designed to let you live full time. So what does it mean to live fulltime? Well for rebel spy, it means stealing the plans to the death star of aiding capture and fending off squadrons of tie fighters on your way to victory. And for a podcast or like me it's spending every minute free recording interviewing and mixing defeat. 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So this cut featured a temporary score of classical music, and Darth Vader still spoke in the working class English accent of actor David rouse, who had worked as a bodybuilder in bouncer and had torn up phone books under the stage name, Jack the ripper before being cast as the villainous Vader. Lucas was for Lorne David's Welsh Jackson is just not working and he can't remember his lines. They call him Darth farmer onset. We need a different voice for Vader. How about how about? Orson welles. Wins gonna say, hey. That's awesome. Wells, the right one other idea. And that is how George Lucas approached voice that was born in Mississippi raised in Michigan and was a stutterer. The pitch perfect. That's so profundis of James Earl Jones. It was time to show the rough cut to its first audience. And perhaps it's toughest. Let's get this show on the road. George. That was Brian depalma with him, a room of Lucas's closest filmmaker friends, including John Milius, and Steven Spielberg. All right, guys. What do you think? Oh, that is not a good sign. The opening crawl goes on forever. All this shit. What's with Leah's hair? No, there's no sound in outer space, George, right? Where's the blood when they shoot people, the feedback was so noxious one of Lucas's, friends left the room in tears only one person in that room had been silent? George looked at him. Stephen, would you think? I love it. I love the story. I love the characters. I just love it, George. I think this could gross fifty maybe sixty million dollars. There was one studio executive in the room. Gareth Wyan, one of the few FOX exacts, who had supported Lucas, and laddy during the ordeal of Star Wars, he left the screening stunned speechless. What happened his wife asked him? What did you see? Why can just shook his head gather the kids around the kitchen table? What he said next. He would never forget. I want you to remember this day, I have just seen the most extraordinary thing in my life. That was it the first time George Lucas had seen as movie accompanied by. It's remarkable score. It was over. Now get the moment lingered. He had listened and watched his dream on fold on a thirty four foot screen as John Williams conducted, the London Symphony Orchestra in a rousing rendition of one of the great movie scores of all time. He was moved to tears. No matter what Star Wars had been before this moment. It was now something altogether. Different something better. Something amazing. That nervous FOX executive thumbing his fingers on his desk. That was Alan Ladd junior. He had staked his own career on George Lucas, what most of his peers at FOX considered this silly space movie, this ridiculous waste of precious company resources, a bomb in the making. He sat waiting. Waiting for the call. There would end his career. The FOX sales team the group tasked with the critical job of booking the film in theaters. They were just finishing a screening of the latest cut of Star Wars. He was waiting for the bad news. Was that call? Where the hell is disturbed of the speaker phone for a long moment. Maybe he shouldn't pick up. He knew what was going to happen. Why endure even more pain? Oh, the hell. Junior. Would've seen we're going to be talking about this movie for months, relieved Ellen lead junior shared, the good news with the board at fucks and they didn't believe him. They didn't believe the sales team. And they certainly didn't believe George Lucas. They were convinced that Star Wars could not possibly compete in a competitive summer movie market. Particularly not when it's up against William freed can follow up to the exorcist a thriller called sorcerer. Some exacts hated the trailer. Some hated the title Star Wars. It sounds like a catfight between Hollywood starlets. No this was way way too risky. Fox would play it safe. They would move the release date earlier to dodge the competition. Maybe then Star Wars could recoup some of its costs before being swamped by the big films of the summer and forgotten forever Star Wars would. Be released, but not the way George Lucas wanted in all it would debut and fewer than forty theaters nationwide. So certain where the suits at FOX, that this movie was a flop, they would go out of their way to make sure of it. Sunday may first nineteen seventy seven it was the premiere of Star Wars at the same theatre where American graffiti made its grand debut for years earlier. And it was a huge success. Alan Ladd junior, was there, Georgia I have to tell you, I've never experienced that kind of reaction to any movie ever. The applause splashed over us like tidal waves. It never stopped outside that the, there was one man, even more happy than laddy in George Lucas. He was shaking hands with every single person, passing through the exit. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for helping Georgia, the man was beaming glowing when George was young this man never thought he would amount to anything. He was sure George would come home a failure. If he ever came home at all. I'm so glad you liked it. Thank you so much. It's amazing, isn't it? It's amazing. George is amazing. George did come home but not as failure. He came home is the man who made Star Wars, and his father, George senior. Was so proud. A late night dinner at the hamburger hamlet on Hollywood Boulevard. George Lucas was still worried. What if that premier was a fluke already? He was getting reports from FOX about executive reactions to the movie. He was told that three exacts loved it. Three liked it too fell asleep and the rest didn't understand it at all. And with fretting about how they'd ever get their money back. The hamburger hamlet was across the street from Grauman's Chinese theater. He had stepped onto the street and into the middle of a mob scene. Traffic was blocked. Eight nine ten lines of people were wrapped around the block in all directions. Watched the limos arrive. Out from one step Hugh Hefner and a bevy of playboy bunnies. Somebody must be premiering a movie he said to himself, he was right in huge letters to words radiated above the theater from the massive marquee, two words Star Wars. Inside Star Wars is brought to you by the best mattress in any galaxy even one far far away. I'm talking about casper. I've got a hybrid, casper mattress, a combination of foam, and springs, and it is fantastic. I sleep well, on it, keeps me cool at night, and it's comfortable. They've also got the original casper, the wave and the essential now casper products are cleverly designed to mimic human curves, providing support of comfort for all kinds of bodies, even the exotic kind you find in collective Cantina and they're affordable. Because casper cuts out the middleman and sells directly to you. Look, you spend thirty your life sleeping. You should be comfortable. Come on now. Give yourself and your loved one a gift checkout. Casper. You've got nothing to lose and you can be sure of your purchase with Casper's one hundred night risk-free sleep on trial. There's also free shipping and hassle free returns in the US and Canada. If you're not completely satisfied. But I think you will be you can get one hundred dollars towards select mattresses. By visiting casper dot com slash iota and using code Yoda at checkout. That's casper dot com slash iota code Yoda Y DA at checkout. Terms and conditions apply. No matter who you are photographer restaurant, owner, burgeoning writer, you can manage your website and grow your business. All in one place. Easily with our sponsor, wicks dot com. We're talking total designed freedom, and limitless choices for personalization when you build a website with wicks best of all, it's free. And if you're like me, and you have trouble, narrowing down what you want. You also have the option to choose from over five hundred stunning templates, everything from video backgrounds to galleries menus form social bars. Even Email marketing tools, it's all automatically optimized for any device desktop or mobile. Look. I really use this with wicks building a beautiful professional website is easy. Just ask the over one hundred forty million people who've already done it. Get started building a website of your own with wicks today for free. And if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code Yoda you'll get ten percent off any premium plan. That's the one I have with wicks premium plan. You get more storage a free domain for a year and much much more. That's wicks dot com code Yoda, y yo DA for ten percent off any premium plan. It was eight AM when the line began forming at one theater in Los Angeles. All one thousand seats were sold out for every show from morning to midnight and then Star Wars got even more popular. People were seeing it three and four times they would leave the theater joined the back of the line for the next show, all day, long day after day, the critics were few sieve magnificent, the years, most razzle dazzle movie there was even a jab at the studio that had made George Lucas life, such a living hell for the years invested in Star Wars. There is no corporate substitute for the creative passion of the individual filmmaker, not everyone loved it. Gene, Cisco grouse that Darth Vader looked like a black vinyl coated frog. Another reviewer complained of desperate, boredom not caring. What might happen to any of the two dimensional characters and some critics hated to love it. It's a big dumb flick. But at least it's a good one director Ridley Scott saw Star Wars at Grauman's, he was he was awed by it. I don't know. I don't know what we're doing this guy's making Star Wars. I'm not even in the same universe aski-, the same century released got would be inspired, and would soon make alien and blade runner. A young James. Cameron was so overwhelmed. He quit his job as a truck driver if I'm ever gonna make movies. He told himself, I'd better get going. Star Wars was a smash after years of toil, and struggle pain and punishment. There was only one thing George Lucas wanted to do now. Leave town. It was a rainy day in London when Alec Guinness finally saw a completed Star Wars, he wasn't. He wasn't prepared for the spectacle oven for an actor who had participated in some films, greatest epics. This was something altogether grander. He wrote a friend. It's a staggering film, technically, brilliant, exciting, very noisy in warm-hearted, the battle scenes at the end go on for five minutes, too long, and some of the dialogue is excruciating when it isn't lost in noise, the only really disappointing performances Anthony Daniels is the robot fidgety overly elaborate not that any of the cast and stand up to the mechanical things around the. George Lucas had earned this vacation, he was in Hawaii with his friend, Steven Spielberg. Both were basking in their success, Star Wars was already on track to overtake jaws as the highest grossing movie of all time. But this was a time for play. Not work. There on that beach. George Lucas, and Steven Spielberg scooped in shovelled sand to form a cast. Now that I'm done with close encounters. I'm gonna take a run at JAMES BOND again. Why do you want action adventure? Sure, Steve, if that's what you're looking for Ivan ideas, even better, tell me it's about a dashing in adventurous, college archaeology professor, who's also a part time treasure. Hunter any searching for something searching for why. I, I don't I don't I don't know yet something. You know. You know something? Freshest important, like the ark of the communist, the lost ark. Yeah. Wow. I call the main character Indiana, Indiana Smith. Well, George, if you need a director, you know, where to find me, building sand castles, and y. The success of Star Wars finally gave Harrison Ford, the permission he needed to hang up his carpentry. Tools for good. George Harrison born, listen. Now that Star Wars was breaking records. Everyone expected a sequel, but that's sequel would come on different terms, George Lucas sat uncomfortably across the desk from an even more uncomfortable. Alan Ladd junior so laddy FOX get sixty percent of the profits from Star Wars, my partisan. I get forty percent now. I know what I do for my forty percent. It's my blood sweat, and tears. Tell me what you do for your sixty. Are there are no crickets in LA in the middle of the day. But if there were now's, when you hear him, well, George, we provide the money now you don't you don't you to Bank with the letter of credit and they provide the money you're not doing anything every gripe, George Lucas, ever had about any studio executive was spilling out now the speed of a rebel fighter. So here's how it's going to work laddy. I will be financing a sequel, myself using profits from Star Wars as collateral, I get final cut you get distribution and a whole hell of a lot less money. Deal FOX was stuck like it or not. They were no longer in the FOX business. Now. Now they were in the George Lucas business. Deal and because Lucas retained all merchandising rights. He almost literally financed. The sequels one action figure at a time. Toy company Kenner, was humming day and night, turning out Star Wars toys, by the tens of thousands, and it's still wasn't close to satisfying demand. The hottest toys, the ones, the kids wanted most wouldn't be ready until after Christmas in nineteen seventy seven so, Kenner, did the only logical thing. It's sympathy. Yep. Sold an empty box parents would pay for an early bird certificate package. Basically an I o you for the first four action figures, Luke laya are to chew Baca. They must've done something right Kenner, would go on to sell forty million Star Wars figures in nineteen Seventy-eight alone. By the end of nineteen seventy seven Star Wars officially became the highest grossing film of all time, toppling Spielberg's legendary shark at jaws. Star Wars would be nominated for ten Oscars. It would win several but it would lose best picture. And George Lucas would be shut out of the prizes for screenplay and director. Good. That was Lucas longtime friend Francis Coppola. Now, George will be back. He won't retire. He likes to win too much and win is exactly what he did. Not only did he win control and independence. He also won rights to the franchise today. Star Wars remains the highest grossing film in the franchise with an injustice, total of one point six billion dollars. Overall? It's second only to gone with the wind. George Lucas, I wanted to be a mogul. I never wanted to be rich. I always wanted to be an artist to make my own future. And not have deg borrowers. Steal to make my dreams come true. For the growing army of fans. Nothing was hotter than Star Wars. No one was hotter than. The seaboard The Empire Strikes back. Probably downst- that the funnel chapter in the trilogy will be called return of the Jedi. George Lucas was untouchable. He could do. No wrong. He was on top of the world. And after three movies in the Star Wars series. He was exhausted. He would spend twenty years out of the director's chair twenty years in which he would tinker with his original classics often suffering the IRA fans who preferred their Star Wars to look the way it did the very first time they saw his friends, like Francis. Coppola did not hold back. George stores is such a pity such an experimental crazy guy but you've got lost in this monster of production. If you don't stop now, you'll never get out of it. Francis stores is my destiny is what I'm here to do. No George, no. It isn't Lucas brushed him off. He finally had in mind, an arc for three Star Wars, prequels sixteen years after jet I a new Star Wars movie would. Blast into theaters worldwide, Lucas would write and direct. It was the second coming anticipation was sky, high and then. It all came tumbling down. May nineteen nineteen ninety nine. Today was the day Lincoln gasping had been waiting for. He had camped here at the front of the line at Mann's Chinese theatre in Hollywood day and night for six weeks, his expensive once in a lifetime trip from Australia to the doorstep of Star Wars had been planned for a year. Can we get a photo like look this way? Please. He had become a celebrity famous for being first in line for a new generations Star Wars. Then. He saw the movie. Lincoln, how was the movie Lincoln digital like it Lincoln? The backlash. Had begun in every corner of the globe splashed across every online platform, the fan boys and fan, girls exacted, their revenge jar jar Binks seriously, excuse me. All this back story about trade and taxes. This is what happens when PBS goes CGI. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. The force is a spiritual thing after all, it's all biochemistry in mid chlorine 's. And as technology improved Lucas continued to tweak as original trilogy. Sometimes changing more than cosmetics Hayden christianson is in return of the jet. I know what do you mean? Great. Oh, shoots on. I hind shoots. First time shoots. I, I first shoes I uses Christ. Come on now on shoots first. George Lucas was overwhelmed in heartbroken. The criticism was relentless in withering. He had been trying to bring to the films division. He always had the one that technology in studio interference head always made impossible. And now the audience the very people who had so embrace Star Wars. They were turning their backs on him. And maybe he was turning his back on them. He kept repeating to himself, align from the classic movie network. You have meddled with the Primeau forces of nature, Mr. Beale. The primal forces of nature. In the United Kingdom, two thousand one census revealed that over three hundred ninety thousand English residents defined the religion as Jedi. Star Wars had become hours. And now it was no longer his. Star Wars is finished. He told friends, there will be no more. I'm done. Well Star Wars was far from finished, but before another chapter another trilogy. George Lucas would have to say the most difficult word in his vocabulary, he would have to say goodbye. From wondering this is a seven part deep. Dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable. Classic movie. This has been part six of inside Star Wars, the center for a new episode every Wednesday, written and narrated by Mark Ramsey audio design and production by Jeff Schmidt, produced by Mark Ramsey media, executive producers, marshal Louis, and Hernan Lopez four. Wondering subscribe on eople podcasts. Spotify Stitcher one dot com or wherever you're listening right now, if you like what you're hearing. We'd love you to give us a five star rating and review us and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe, find a link to subscribe to inside Star Wars and more information on the episode notes just tap or swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors, please support this show by supporting them. Join the conversation on Twitter at wondering media. And at Mark Ramsey media. Use hashtag inside Star Wars on Facebook search inside Star Wars, or follow wondering, dot FM slash inside group. I'll see you there. Desk inside Star Wars is inspired by the stories of the making of this, iconic film, in some cases, we can know exactly what was said, but dialogue and scenes have been reconstructed based on extensive research. You can type this shit yours, but. You're can't say it.

George Lucas George FOX executive Alan Ladd director FOX Steven Spielberg George Harrison Darth Vader Mark Ramsey John Dykstra laddy FOX Ireland Francis Coppola principal John Williams Orson welles James Earl Jones Hollywood
Star Wars Will Be a Bomb

Inside Psycho

28:57 min | 1 year ago

Star Wars Will Be a Bomb

"In the following may contain mature content from wondering I'm Mark Ramsey and this is inside inside star wars part six on July sixteen thousand nine hundred seventy six principals shooting wrapped on Star Wars. George Lucas was twenty days behind schedule and remarkably close to budget thanks to a devalued British pound but over budget is over budget and so Fox did what its contract said he could do. They took part of George. Lucas directorial fee as compensation shooting was us over that chapter was closed but the troubles were far from over. They were just different. Lucas had to crack the whip. I L M everybody attention. Please Country Club. Ours are over. Look I know I know we don't have air conditioning in this building but we can't do all our work at night and no more makeshift pools and water slides and what I saw on my way in today that can never happen again. What he saw was John Dykstra one of our founders in the parking lot at the controls a forklift balanced precariously in the forks a full-size refrigerator yeah no more more of that George you have to understand? We've never worked on anything this complicated before that's okay. That's okay nobody has I L M cranked it up sixteen people to shifts eleven hours a day six days a week. Things were beginning to come together off the rough cut was done and it really was rough. Most of the visual effects were missing. Sound effects were incomplete. The the famous John Williams score was still being written so this cut featured a temporary score of classical music and Darth vader still spoke in the working class English accent of actor David Crouse who had worked as a bodybuilder in bouncer and had torn up phone books under the stage name Jack The ripper before being cast is the villainous vader. Lucas was forlorn. David's Welsh Jackson is just not working and he can't remember his lines aints they call him darth farmer onset. We need a different voice for vader up. How about how about Orson Welles wins going to say hey that's Orson Welles right here I one other idea and that is how George Lucas approached a voice that was born in Mississippi raised in Michigan and was a stutterer the pitch perfect that's so profundity of James Earle Jones it? It was time to show the rough cut to its first audience and perhaps it's toughest. Let's get this show on the road. George was Brian Brian Depalma within a room Lucas's closest filmmaker friends including John Milius and Steven Spielberg all right guys. What do you think that is not a good sign? The opening crawl goes on forever. What is all this shit? What's with Leah's hair? No there's no sound in Outer Space George Ri- where's the blood when they shoot people. The feedback was so noxious. One of Lucas's friends left the room in tears. Only one person in that room had been silent. George looked at him Stephen. What did you think I love it? I love this story. I love the characters I just love it George. I think this could gross fifty. Maybe sixty million dollars. There was one studio executive in the room Gareth Wagon one the few Fox exacts who had supported Lucas and laddy during the ordeal of star wars he left the screening stunned speechless what happened his wife asked him. What did you see why I can just shook his head? Gather the kids around the kitchen table what he said next he would never forget. I want you to remember this day. I have just seen the most extraordinary ordinary thing in my life. That was it. The first time George Lucas had seen as movie accompanied by it's remarkable score. It was over now. Get the moment lingered he had listened and watched his dream. MM unfold on a thirty four foot screen as John Williams conducted the London Symphony Orchestra in a rousing rendition of one of the great movie scores of all time he was moved to tears no matter what star wars had been before this moment it was now something altogether different something better something amazing that nervous Fox executive thumbing his fingers on his desk that was Alan ladd junior. He had staked his own career. You're on George Lucas and what most of his peers at Fox considered this silly space movie. This ridiculous waste of precious company resources a bomb in the making he sat waiting. Waiting for the call there would end his career. The Fox sales team the group tasked with the critical job of booking the film in theaters. They were just finishing a screening of the latest cut of Star Wars. He was waiting in for the bad news with call. He stared at the speakerphone for a long moment. Maybe he shouldn't pick up. He knew what was going to happen. Why endure even more pain what the Hell Ella junior going to be talking about this for months a relieved Alan ladd junior shared the good news with the board at Fox and they didn't believe him? They didn't believe the sales team and they certainly didn't believe George Lucas. They were convinced that Star Wars I could not possibly compete in a competitive summer movie market particularly not when it's up against William Freed Kuenz follow up to the exorcist a thriller called Sorcerer. Some exacts hated the trailer some hated the title Star Wars. It sounds like a cat hat fight between Hollywood starlets. No this was way way too risky Fox would play it safe. They would move the release date earlier to dodge the competition. Maybe then star wars could recoup some of its cost before before being swamped by the big films of the summer and Forgotten Forever Star Wars would be released but not the way George Lucas wanted in all it would debut and fewer than forty theaters nationwide <music> so certain where the suits at Fox that this movie was a flop they would go out of their way to make sure of it on Sunday. May I nineteen seventy seven. It was the premiere of Star Wars at the same theater where American graffiti made its grand debut for years earlier and it was a huge success analysts junior. was there Georgia I have to tell you. I've never experienced that kind of reaction to any movie ever. The applause splashed over us like tidal waves. It never stopped outside the theater. There was one man even more happy than Laddy George Lucas. He was shaking hands with every single person passing through the exit. Thank you thank you thank you thank you so much. Thank you so much for helping out George. The man was beaming glowing. When George was young? This man never thought he would amount to anything he was sure. George would come home failure if he ever came home at all. I'm so glad you like to thank you so much. It's amazing isn't it. It's amazing. George is amazing said George did come home but not as a failure he came home is the man who made star wars and his father George senior was so proud a late night dinner at the Hamburger Hamlet on Hollywood boulevard. George Lucas was still worried. What if that premier was a fluke already? He was getting reports from Fox about executive reactions to the movie. He was told that three execs loved it three liked it to fell asleep and the rest didn't understand it at all and we're fretting about how they'd ever get their money back. The hamburger hamlet was across the street from grauman's Chinese theater he had stepped onto the street and into the middle of a mob scene. Traffic was blocked eight nine ten lines of people were wrapped around the block in all directions watched the limos arrive out from one step hugh hefner and a Bevy of playboy bunnies. Somebody must be premiering a movie. He said himself he was right. In huge letters to words radiated above the theater from the massive marquee two words Star Wars Inside Star Wars brought to you by the best mattress in any galaxy even one far far away. I'm talking about Casper. I've got a hybrid casper mattress. A combination of foam and springs in it is fantastic. I sleep well on it. Keeps me cool at night and it's comfortable. They've also got the original casper the wave and the essential now casper products are cleverly designed to mimic human curves providing support of comfort for all kinds of bodies even the exotic kinds you find an galactic to Cantina and they're affordable because Casper cuts out the middleman and sells directly to you. Look you spend a thirty year life sleeping. You should be comfortable. Come on now. Give yourself and your loved one a gift checkout Casper. You've got nothing to lose and you can be sure of your purchase with Casper's one hundred night risk-free sleep on trial. There's also free shipping and hassle-free returns in the U._S.. In Canada if you're not completely satisfied but I think you will be you can get one hundred dollars towards select mattresses by visiting in Casper Dot com slash iota and using code Yoda at checkout. THAT'S CASPER DOT com slash. Yoda Code Yoda Y.. O. D. A. AT CHECKOUT TERMS and conditions apply. No matter who you are photographer refer restaurant owner burgeoning writer you can manage your website and grow your business all in one place easily with our sponsor Wicks dot com. We're talking total designed freedom and limitless choices for personalization when you build a website with wicks best of all it's free and if you like me and you have trouble narrowing down what you want you also have the option to choose from over five hundred stunning templates everything from video backgrounds to galleries menus form social bars even the email marketing tools. It's all automatically optimized for any device desktop or mobile look. I really use this with wicks building. A beautiful professional website is easy. Just ask the over one hundred forty million people who've already done it get started building a website of your own with wicks today four free and if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code Yoda you'll get ten percent off any premium plan. That's the one I have with wicks premium plans. You get more storage a free domain for a year and much which much more that's Wicks Dot Com Code Yoda Y._O.. D._A.. For ten percent off any premium plan it was eight A._M.. When the line began forming warming in one theater in Los Angeles all one thousand seats were sold out for every show from morning to midnight and then star wars got even more popular people were seeing it three and four times? They would leave the theater and joined the back of the line for the next show all day long day after day. The critics were a few sive magnificent years most razzle dazzle movie. There was even jab at the studio that had made George George. Lucas is life such a living hell for the years he invested in Star Wars. There is no corporate substitute for the creative passion of the individual filmmaker. Not everyone loved it. Gene Siskel grouse that Darth vader looked like a black vinyl coated frog another reviewer complained of desperate boredom not caring what might happen to any of the two dimensional characters and some critics hated to love it. It's a big dumb flick but at least it's a good one director Ridley Scott's saw star wars at grauman's he was he was odd by it. I don't know I don't know what we're doing. This guy's making star wars. I'm not even in the same universes this guy the same censure release Scott would be inspired and would soon make alien in bladerunner a young James Cameron was so overwhelmed. He quit his job as a truck driver. If I'm ever GonNa make movies he told himself I'd better get going star. Wars was a smash after years of toil and struggle pain and punishment. There was only one thing George Lucas wanted to do even now leave town. It was a rainy day in London. When Alec Guinness Finally saw a completed star wars he wasn't he wasn't unprepared for the spectacle of for an actor who had participated in some films greatest ethics? This was something altogether grander. He wrote a friend. It's a staggering film technically brilliant elegant exciting very noisy in warmhearted the battle scenes at the end go on for five minutes too long and some of the dialogue is excruciating when it isn't lost in noise the only really disappointing performances is Anthony Daniels is the robot fidgety and overly elaborate not that any of the cast can stand up to the mechanical things around the George Lucas had earned this vacation. He was in Hawaii with his friend. Steven Spielberg both were basking in their success. Star Wars was already on track to overtake jaws as the highest grossing movie of all time but this was a time for play not work there on that Beach George Lucas and Steven Spielberg scooped shoveled sand to form a cast George now that I'm done with close encounters. I'm GonNa take running James Bond again. Why you want action adventure sure Steve? If that's what you're looking for Ivan ideas even better. Oh yeah tell me it's about a dashing in adventurous college archaeology professor who's also a part time treasure hunter and searching for something searching for why I don't I don't I don't I don't know yet something you know something. Exotic precious important like the arc of the communist the law stark yeah wow I call the main character Indiana Indiana Smith Well Georgia. If you need a director you know where to find me your building sand castles in Hawaii. The success of Star Star Wars finally gave Harrison for the permission he needed to hang up his carpentry tools for good now that star wars was breaking records. Everyone expected his sequel but that sequel would come on different terms. George Lucas sat uncomfortably across the desk from an even more uncomfortable Alan ladd junior seau laddy fox gets sixty percent of the profits from Star Wars my partisan. I get forty percent now. I know what I do for my forty. percent is my blood sweat and tears. Tell me what you do for your sixty. Are there are no crickets in L._A.. In the middle of the day but if there were now's when you hear him well George. We provide the money now you don't you don't you go to a bank with the letter of credit and they provide the money. You're not doing anything. Every Gripe George Lucas ever had about any studio executive was spilling out now at the speed of a rebel fighter so here's how it's GonNa Work Laddy. I will be financing sequel myself using profits from star wars collateral. I get final cut. You get distribution and a whole hell of a lot less money. Deal Fox was stuck like it or not. They were no longer in the Fox business. Now now they were in the George Lucas business deal and because Lucas retained all merchandising rights he almost literally financed the sequels one action action figure at a time toy company Kenner was humming day and night turning out star wars toys by the tens of thousands and it's still wasn't close to satisfying demand off the hottest toys. The ones that kids wanted most wouldn't be ready until after Christmas in nineteen seventy seven so Kenner did the only logical thing it's empty yep his sold an empty box parents would pay for an early bird certificate package basically an I._O._U.. For the first four action figures Luke Laya are two in tobacco. They must've done something right. Kenner would go on to sell forty million star wars figures in nineteen seventy eight alone by the end of nineteen seventy seven star wars officially became the highest grossing film of All Time Toppling Spielberg's legendary shark epic Jaws Version Star Wars would be nominated for ten Oscars this it would win several but it would lose best picture and George Lucas would be shut out of the prizes. For screenplay and director good that was Lucas longtime friend Francis Coppola now George will be back. He won't retire. He likes to win too. Much and win is exactly what he did not only did he win control and independence. He also one rights to the franchise today. Star Wars remains the highest grossing film in the franchise with an adjusted total of one point six billion dollars overall. It's second only to gone with the Wind George Lucas. I never wanted to be a mogul. I never wanted to be rich. I always wanted to be an artist to make my own future and not have to beg borrower steel to make my dreams come true aw for the growing army of fans nothing was hotter than Star Wars. No one was hotter than Joe. The the the empire strikes back probably announced that the final chapter in the trilogy will be called return of the George. Lucas was untouchable. He could do no wrong. He was on top of the world and after three movies in the Star Wars series he was exhausted he would spend twenty years years out of the director's chair twenty years in which he would tinker with his original classics often suffering the IRA fans who preferred their star wars to look the way it did the very first time they saw his friends like Francis. Coppola did not hold back George Star Wars is such a pity research an experimental crazy guy but you got lost in this monster of production if you don't stop now you'll never get out of it. Francis Star Wars is my destiny is what I'm here to do know George No it isn't Lucas brushed him off. He finally had in mind an arc for three Star Wars prequels sixteen years after Jedi a New Star Wars movie would blast into theaters worldwide. Lucas would write indirect it was the second coming anticipation was sky high and then it all came tumbling down may nineteen nineteen ninety nine today was the day Lincoln Gasping had been waiting for he had camped here at the front of the line at Man's Chinese. He's Theater in Hollywood day and night for six weeks. His expensive once in a lifetime trip from Australia to the doorstep of Star Wars had been planned for a year. Can we get a photo lincoln. Look this way please. He had become a celebrity famous for being first in line for a new generations star wars and then he saw the movie Lincoln. How is the movie Lincoln? Did you like it Lincoln. The backlash had begun in every corner of the globe splashed across every online platform. The Fan boys and girls exacted their revenge jour-jour binks seriously isley. Excuse me so this back story about trade and taxes. This is what happens when P._B._S.. Go see wait. Wait wait wait. A force isn't a spiritual thing after all. It's all biochemistry in midday. Chlorine Syrians and as technology improved Lucas continued to tweak his original trilogy sometimes changing more than Cosmetics Wake Hayden Christensen is in return of the jet. I knew what you mean. Garrido shoots on. I hind shoots first on shoots. First Han shoots first high shoes Jesus Christ come on now harm shoots first George. Lucas was overwhelmed in heartbroken. The criticism was relentless in withering he had been trying to bring to the film's division he always had the one that technology and studio interference head always made impossible and now the the audience the very people who had so embrace star wars they were turning their backs on him and maybe he was turning his back on them. He kept repeating to himself align from the classic movie network. You have meddled with the PRIMEAU forces of Nature Mr Bill the primal forces of nature in the United Kingdom. A two thousand one cents is revealed that over over three hundred ninety thousand English residents defined their religion as Djeddai Star Wars had become hours and now it was no longer his the star wars is finished told friends there will be no more. I'm done well. Star Wars was far from finished but before another chapter another trilogy George Lucas would have to say the most difficult word in his vocabulary he would have to say goodbye <music> from wondering this is a seven part deep dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable classic movie. This has been part six of inside star the wars listen for a new episode every Wednesday Britain and narrated by Mark Ramsey audio design and production by Jeff Schmidt produced by Mark Ramsey media executive producers Marshall Louis and Hernan Lopez four wondering subscribe on Apple Podcasts spotify stitcher one dot com or wherever you're listening right now. If you like what you're hearing we'd love you to give us a five star rating in review us and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe find a link to subscribe to inside Star Wars and more information on the episode notes just tap or Swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors. Please support this show by supporting them. Join the conversation on twitter at wondering media and at Mark Ramsey media use hashtag inside star wars on facebook search inside star wars or follow wondering dot F._M.. Slash inside group. I'll see you. They're illegal desk.

George Lucas George George laddy fox executive Francis Star Wars director George Lucas Steven Spielberg Outer Space George Ri John Williams Darth vader Alan ladd John Dykstra Country Club Mark Ramsey Orson Welles Hollywood Leah David Crouse Francis Coppola
Star Wars Will Be a Bomb | E6

Inside The Exorcist

28:57 min | 1 year ago

Star Wars Will Be a Bomb | E6

"In the following may contain mature content from wondering I'm Mark Ramsey and this is inside inside star wars part six on July sixteen one thousand nine hundred seventy six principal shooting wrapped on Star Wars. George Lucas was twenty days behind schedule and remarkably close to budget thanks to a devalued British pound but over budget is over budget and so Fox did what its contract said he could do. They took part of George Lucas. His directorial fee as compensation shooting was is over that chapter was closed but the troubles were far from over. They were just different. Lucas had to crack the whip. I L M everybody attention. Please country club hours are over look. I know I know we don't have air conditioning in this building but we can't do all our work at night and no more make-shift pools and water slides and what I saw on my way in today that can never happen again. What he saw was John Dykstra one of our founders in the parking lot at the controls a forklift balanced precariously in the forks a full size refrigerator yeah no more more of that George you have to understand? We've never worked on anything this complicated before that's okay. That's okay nobody has I L M cranked it up. Sixteen people two shifts eleven hours a day six days a week. Things were beginning to come together off the rough cut was done and it really was rough. Most of the visual effects were missing. Sound effects were incomplete. The the famous John Williams score was still being written so this cut featured a temporary score of classical music and Darth vader still spoke in the working class English accent of actor David Krause who had worked as a bodybuilder in bouncer and had torn up phone books under the stage name Jack The ripper before being cast as the villainous vader Lucas was forlorn. David's Welsh accent is just not working and he can't remember his lines aints. They call him Dorothy farmer onset. We need a different voice for vader up. How about how about Orson Welles wins going to say hey that's Orson Welles right here I one other idea and that is how George Lucas approached a voice that was born in Mississippi raised in Michigan and was a stutterer the pitch perfect that's so profundity of James Earl Jones it? It was time to show the rough cut to its first audience and perhaps it's toughest. Let's get this show on the road George that was Brian Brian Depalma within a room of Lucas's closest filmmaker friends including John Milius and Steven Spielberg all right guys. What do you think that is not a good sign? The opening crawl goes on forever. What is all this shit? What's with Leah's hair? No there's no sound in Outer Space George Ri- where's the blood when they shoot people. The feedback was so noxious. One of Lucas's friends left the room in tears. Only one person in that room had been silent. George looked at him Stephen. What did you think I love it? I love this story. I love the characters I just love it George. I think this could gross fifty. Maybe sixty million dollars. There was one studio executive in the room Gareth Wagon one the few Fox exacts who had supported Lucas and laddy during the ordeal of star wars he left the screening stunned speechless what happened his wife asked him. What did you see why I can just shook his head? Gather the kids around the kitchen table what he said next he would never forget. I want you to remember this day. I have just seen the most extraordinary ordinary thing in my life. That was it. The first time George Lucas had seen as movie accompanied by it's remarkable score. It was over now. Get the moment lingered he had listened and watched his dream. MM unfold on a thirty four foot screen as John Williams conducted the London Symphony Orchestra in a rousing rendition of one of the great movie scores of all time he was moved to tears no matter what star wars had been before this moment it was now something altogether different something better something amazing that nervous Fox executive thumbing his fingers on his desk that was Alan ladd junior. He had staked his own career. We're on George Lucas and what most of his peers at Fox considered this silly space movie. This ridiculous waste of precious company resources a bomb in the making he sat waiting breath waiting for the call there would end his career. The Fox sales team the group tasked with the critical job of booking the film in theaters. They were just finishing a screening of the latest cut of Star Wars. He was waiting in for the bad news with call. He stared at the speaker phone for a long moment. Maybe he shouldn't pick up. He knew what was going to happen. Why endure even more pain <music>? Oh what the Hell Ella junior going to be talking about this for months a relieved Alan ladd junior shared the good news with the board at Fox and they didn't believe him. They didn't believe the sales team and they certainly didn't believe George Lucas. They were convinced that Star Wars I could not possibly compete in a competitive summer movie market particularly not when it's up against William Friedkin follow up to the exorcist a thriller called Sorcerer. Some exacts hated the trailer some hated the title Star Wars. It sounds like a catfight halfway between Hollywood starlets. No this was way way too risky Fox would play it safe. They would move the release date earlier to dodge the competition. Maybe then star wars could recoup some of its cost before before being swamped by the big films of the summer and Forgotten Forever Star Wars would be released but not the way George Lucas wanted in all it would debut and fewer than forty theaters nationwide <music> so certain where the suits at Fox that this movie was a flop they would go out of their way to make sure of it on Sunday. May First Nineteen seventy seven it was the premiere of Star Wars at the same theatre where American graffiti made its grand debut four years earlier and it was a huge success analysts junior. was there Georgia I have to tell you. I've never experienced that kind of reaction to any movie ever. The applause splashed over us like tidal waves. It never stopped outside the theater. There was one. Man Even more happy than Laddy George Lucas. He was shaking hands with every single person passing through the exit. Thank you thank you thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for helping out George. The man was beaming glowing. When George was young? This man never thought he would amount to anything he was sure. George would come home a failure if he ever came home at all. I'm so glad you liked it. Thank you so much. It's amazing isn't it. It's amazing. George is amazing said George did come home but not as a failure he came home is the man who made star wars and his father George senior was so proud a late night dinner at the Hamburger Hamlet on Hollywood boulevard. George Lucas was still worried. What if that premier was a fluke already? He was getting reports from Fox about executive reactions to the movie. He was told that three execs loved it three liked it too fell asleep and the rest didn't understand it at all and we're fretting about how they'd ever get their money back. The hamburger hamlet was across the street from grauman's Chinese theatre he had stepped onto the street and into the middle of a mob scene. Traffic was blocked eight nine. Ten lines of people were wrapped around the block in all directions he watched the limos arrive out from one step hugh hefner and a Bevy of playboy bunnies. Somebody must be premiering a movie. He said to himself he was right. In huge letters to words radiated above the theater from the massive marquee two words Star Wars Inside Star Wars brought to you by the best mattress in any galaxy even one far far away. I'm talking about Casper. I've got a hybrid casper mattress. A combination of foam and springs in it is fantastic. I sleep well on it. Keeps me cool at night and it's comfortable. They've also got the original casper the wave and the essential now casper products are cleverly designed to mimic human curves providing supportive comfort for all kinds of bodies even the exotic kind you find in a galactic Cantina and they're affordable because Casper cuts out the middleman and sells directly to you. Look you spend a thirty year life sleeping. You should be comfortable. Come on now. Give yourself and your loved one a gift checkout Casper. You've got nothing to lose and you can be sure of your purchase with Casper's one hundred nights risk-free sleep on trial. There's also free shipping and hassle-free returns in the U._S. and Canada. If you're not completely satisfied but I think you will be you can get one hundred dollars towards select mattresses by visiting in Casper Dot com slash iota and using code Yoda at checkout. That's Casper Dot com slash Iota Code Yoda Y.. O. D. A. AT CHECKOUT TERMS and conditions apply no matter who you are photographer refer a restaurant owner burgeoning writer you can manage your website and grow your business all in one place easily with our sponsor Wicks dot com. We're talking total designed freedom and limitless choices for personalization when you build a website with wicks best of all it's free and if you're like me and you have trouble narrowing down what you want you also have the option to choose from over five hundred stunning templates everything from video backgrounds to galleries menus form social bars even the email marketing tools. It's all automatically optimized for any device desktop or mobile look. I really use this with wicks building a beautiful professional website as easy just ask the over one hundred forty million people who've already done it get started building a website of your own with wicks today four free and if you go to dot com and use the coupon code Yoda you'll get ten percent off any premium plan. That's the one I have with wicks premium plans. You get more storage free domain for a year and much which much more that's Wicks Dot Com Code Iota Y._O. D._A.. For ten percent off any premium plan it was eight A._M.. When the line began forming warming in one theater in Los Angeles all one thousand seats were sold out for every show from morning to midnight and then star wars got even more popular people were seeing it three and four times? They would leave the theater and joined the back of the line for the next show all day long day after day. The critics were a few sive magnificent years most razzle dazzle movie. There was even a jab at the studio that had made George George. Lucas is life such a living hell for the years he invested in Star Wars. There is no corporate substitute for the creative passion of the individual filmmaker. Not everyone loved it. Gene Siskel grouse that Darth vader looked like a black vinyl coated frog another reviewer complained of desperate boredom not caring what might happen to any of the two dimensional characters and some critics hated to love it. It's a big dumb flick but at least it's a good one director Ridley Scott saw star wars at grauman's he was. He was awed by it. I don't know I don't know what we're doing. This guy's making star wars. I'm not even in the same universe Aski- the same censure release Scott would be inspired and would soon make alien and blade running a young James Cameron was so overwhelmed. He quit his job as a truck driver. If I'm ever GonNa make movies he told himself I better get going. Star Wars was a smash after years of toil and struggle pain and punishment. There was only one thing George Lucas wanted to do even now leave town. It was a rainy day in London. When Alec Guinness Finally saw a completed star wars he wasn't he wasn't unprepared for the spectacle of it for an actor who had participated in some films greatest ethics? This was something altogether grander. He wrote a friend. It's a staggering film technically brilliant valiant exciting very noisy in warmhearted the battle scenes at the end go on for five minutes too long and some of the dialogue is excruciating when it isn't lost in noise the only really disappointing performances is anthony. Daniels is the robot fidgety an overly elaborate not that any of the cast can stand up to the mechanical things around the George. Lucas had earn this vacation. He was in Hawaii with his friend. Steven Spielberg both were basking in their success. Star Wars was already on track to overtake jaws as the highest grossing movie of all time but this was a time for play not work there on that Beach George Lucas and Steven Spielberg scooped shovelled sand to form a cast George now that I'm done with close encounters. I'M GONNA take a run James Bond again. Why you want action adventure sure Steve? If that's what you're looking for Ivan ideas even better. Oh yeah tell me it's about a dashing in adventurous college archaeology professor who's also a part time treasure hunter and searching for something searching for why I don't I don't I don't I don't know yet something you know something. Exotic precious important like the Ark of the Covenant The Lost Ark Yeah Wow I call the the main character Indiana Indiana Smith well George. If you need a director you know where to find me your building sand castles in Hawaii. The success of Star Star Wars finally gave Harrison for the permission he needed to hang up his carpentry tools for good now that star wars was breaking records. Everyone expected his sequel but that sequel would come on different terms. George Lucas sat uncomfortably across the desk from an even more uncomfortable Alan ladd junior so laddy Fox get sixty percent of the profits from Star Wars my partisan. I get forty percent now. I know what I do for my forty percents my blood sweat and tears. Tell me what you do for your sixty. Are there are no crickets in L._A.. In the middle of the day but if there were now's when you hear him well George. We provide the money now you don't you don't you go to a bank with. The letter of credit and they provide the money. You're not doing anything. Every Gripe George Lucas ever had about any studio executive was spilling out now at the speed of a rebel fighter so here's how it's GonNa Work Laddy. I will be financing sequel myself using profits from star wars collateral. I get final cut. You get distribution and a whole hell of a lot less money. Deal Fox was stuck like it or not. They were no longer in the Fox business. Now now they were in the George Lucas business deal and because Lucas retained all merchandising rights he almost literally financed the sequels one action action figure at a time toy company Kenner was humming day and night turning out star wars toys by the tens of thousands and it's still wasn't close to satisfying demand off the hottest toys the ones the kids wanted most wouldn't be ready until after Christmas in nineteen seventy seven so Kenner did the only logical thing it's empty yup his sold an empty box parents would pay for an early bird certificate package basically an I._O._U.. For the first four action figures Luke Leia are two in tobacco. They must've done something right. Kenner would go on to sell forty million star wars figures nineteen seventy-eight alone by the end of nineteen seventy seven star wars officially became the highest grossing film of All Time Toppling Spielberg's legendary shark epic Jaws Version Star Wars would be nominated for ten Oscars this it would win several but it would lose best picture and George Lucas would be shut out of the prizes for screenplay and director good that was Lucas longtime friend Francis Coppola now George will be back. He won't retire. He likes to win too. Much and win is exactly what he did not only did he win. Control and independence. He also won rights to the franchise today. Star Wars remains the highest grossing film in the franchise with an adjusted total of one point six billion dollars overall. It's second only to gone with the Wind George Lucas. I never wanted to be a mogul. I never wanted to be rich. I always wanted to be an artist to make my own future and not have to beg borrow or steal to make my dreams come true aw for the growing army of fans nothing was hotter than Star Wars. No one was hotter than Joe. The the CBO called the empire strikes back probably announced that the final chapter in the trilogy will be called return of the Jedi. George Lucas was untouchable. He could do no wrong. He was on top of the world and after three movies in the Star Wars series he was exhausted he would spend twenty years years out of the director's chair twenty years in which he would tinker with his original classics often suffering the ire of fans who preferred their star wars to look the way it did the very first time they saw his friends like Francis. Coppola did not hold back George Star Wars is such a pity research an experimental crazy guy but you got lost in this monster of a production. If you don't stop now you will never get out of it. Francis Star Wars is my destiny is what I'm here to do. No George No it isn't Lucas brushed him off. He finally had in mind an arc for three Star Wars prequels sixteen years after Jedi a new star wars movie would would blast into theaters worldwide Lucas would write and direct it was the second coming anticipation was sky high and then it all came tumbling down. May Nineteen nineteen ninety nine today was the day Lincoln Gasping had been waiting for he had camped here at the front of the line at Mann's Chinese. He's Theater in Hollywood day and night for six weeks. His expensive once in a lifetime trip from Australia to the doorstep of Star Wars had been planned for a year it. Can we get a photo lincoln. Look this way please. He had become a celebrity famous for being first in line for a new generations star wars and then he saw the movie Lincoln. How was the movie Lincoln? Did you like it Lincoln. The backlash had begun in every corner of the globe splashed across every online platform. The Fan boys and girls exacted their revenge jar jar binks seriously isley. Excuse me so this back story about trade and taxes. This is what happens when P._B._S.. Go see wait. Wait wait wait wait. Force isn't a spiritual thing after all. It's all biochemistry in midday. Chlorine reaons and as technology improved Lucas continued to tweak his original trilogy sometimes changing more than Cosmetics Wake Hayden Christensen is in return of the Jedi what you mean green shoots on. I hind shoots first on shoots. First Han shoots first high shoes Jesus Christ come on now harm shoots first George Lucas was overwhelmed and heartbroken. The criticism was relentless in withering he had been trying to bring to the film's division he always had the one that technology and studio interference head always made impossible and now the the audience the very people who had so embrace star wars they were turning their backs on him and maybe he was turning his back on them. He kept repeating to himself align from the classic movie network. You have meddled with the PRIMEAU forces of Nature Mr Beale the primal forces of nature in the United Kingdom a two thousand one census revealed that over over three hundred ninety thousand English residents defined their religion as Jedi Star Wars had become hours and now it was no longer his star wars is finished. He told friends there will be no more. I'm done well. Star Wars was far from finished but before another chapter another trilogy George Lucas would have to say the most difficult word in his vocabulary he would have to say goodbye <music> from wondering this is a seven part deep dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable classic movie. This has been part six of inside star the wars listen for a new episode every Wednesday written and narrated by Mark Ramsey audio design and production by Jeff Schmidt produced by Mark Ramsey media executive producers Marshal Louis and Hernan Lopez four wondering subscribe on Apple Podcast spotify Stitcher DOT COM or wherever you're listening right now. If you like what you're hearing we'd love you to give us a five star rating and review us and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe find a link to subscribe to inside Star Wars and more information on the episode notes just tap or Swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors. Please support this show by supporting them. Join the conversation on twitter at wondering media and at Mark Ramsey media use hashtag inside star wars on facebook search inside star wars or follow wondering dot F._M.. Slash inside group. I'll see you there the legal desk.

George Lucas George George laddy Fox executive Francis Star Wars director George Lucas Steven Spielberg George Outer Space George Ri John Williams Darth vader Alan ladd Mark Ramsey John Dykstra Orson Welles George Hollywood Dorothy farmer Casper Dot
Star Wars Will Be a Bomb | 6

Inside Jaws

28:57 min | 1 year ago

Star Wars Will Be a Bomb | 6

"In the following may contain mature content from wondering I'm Mark Ramsey and this is inside inside star wars part six on July sixteen one thousand nine hundred seventy six principal shooting wrapped on Star Wars. George Lucas was twenty days behind schedule and remarkably close to budget thanks to a devalued British pound but over budget is over budget and so Fox did what its contract said he could do. They took part of George Lucas. His directorial fee as compensation shooting was is over that chapter was closed but the troubles were far from over. They were just different. Lucas had to crack the whip. I L M everybody attention. Please country club hours are over look. I know I know we don't have air conditioning in this building but we can't do all our work at night and no more make-shift pools and water slides and what I saw on my way in today that can never happen again. What he saw was John Dykstra one of our founders in the parking lot at the controls a forklift balanced precariously in the forks a full size refrigerator yeah no more more of that George you have to understand? We've never worked on anything this complicated before that's okay. That's okay nobody has I L M cranked it up. Sixteen people two shifts eleven hours a day six days a week. Things were beginning to come together off the rough cut was done and it really was rough. Most of the visual effects were missing. Sound effects were incomplete. The the famous John Williams score was still being written so this cut featured a temporary score of classical music and Darth vader still spoke in the working class English accent of actor David Krause who had worked as a bodybuilder in bouncer and had torn up phone books under the stage name Jack The ripper before being cast as the villainous vader Lucas was forlorn. David's Welsh accent is just not working and he can't remember his lines aints. They call him Dorothy farmer onset. We need a different voice for vader up. How about how about Orson Welles wins going to say hey that's Orson Welles right here I one other idea and that is how George Lucas approached a voice that was born in Mississippi raised in Michigan and was a stutterer the pitch perfect that's so profundity of James Earl Jones it? It was time to show the rough cut to its first audience and perhaps it's toughest. Let's get this show on the road George that was Brian Brian Depalma within a room of Lucas's closest filmmaker friends including John Milius and Steven Spielberg all right guys. What do you think that is not a good sign? The opening crawl goes on forever. What is all this shit? What's with Leah's hair? No there's no sound in Outer Space George Ri- where's the blood when they shoot people. The feedback was so noxious. One of Lucas's friends left the room in tears. Only one person in that room had been silent. George looked at him Stephen. What did you think I love it? I love this story. I love the characters I just love it George. I think this could gross fifty. Maybe sixty million dollars. There was one studio executive in the room Gareth Wagon one the few Fox exacts who had supported Lucas and laddy during the ordeal of star wars he left the screening stunned speechless what happened his wife asked him. What did you see why I can just shook his head? Gather the kids around the kitchen table what he said next he would never forget. I want you to remember this day. I have just seen the most extraordinary ordinary thing in my life. That was it. The first time George Lucas had seen as movie accompanied by it's remarkable score. It was over now. Get the moment lingered he had listened and watched his dream. MM unfold on a thirty four foot screen as John Williams conducted the London Symphony Orchestra in a rousing rendition of one of the great movie scores of all time he was moved to tears no matter what star wars had been before this moment it was now something altogether different something better something amazing that nervous Fox executive thumbing his fingers on his desk that was Alan ladd junior. He had staked his own career. We're on George Lucas and what most of his peers at Fox considered this silly space movie. This ridiculous waste of precious company resources a bomb in the making he sat waiting breath waiting for the call there would end his career. The Fox sales team the group tasked with the critical job of booking the film in theaters. They were just finishing a screening of the latest cut of Star Wars. He was waiting in for the bad news with call. He stared at the speaker phone for a long moment. Maybe he shouldn't pick up. He knew what was going to happen. Why endure even more pain <music>? Oh what the Hell Ella junior going to be talking about this for months a relieved Alan ladd junior shared the good news with the board at Fox and they didn't believe him. They didn't believe the sales team and they certainly didn't believe George Lucas. They were convinced that Star Wars I could not possibly compete in a competitive summer movie market particularly not when it's up against William Friedkin follow up to the exorcist a thriller called Sorcerer. Some exacts hated the trailer some hated the title Star Wars. It sounds like a catfight halfway between Hollywood starlets. No this was way way too risky Fox would play it safe. They would move the release date earlier to dodge the competition. Maybe then star wars could recoup some of its cost before before being swamped by the big films of the summer and Forgotten Forever Star Wars would be released but not the way George Lucas wanted in all it would debut and fewer than forty theaters nationwide <music> so certain where the suits at Fox that this movie was a flop they would go out of their way to make sure of it on Sunday. May First Nineteen seventy seven it was the premiere of Star Wars at the same theatre where American graffiti made its grand debut four years earlier and it was a huge success analysts junior. was there Georgia I have to tell you. I've never experienced that kind of reaction to any movie ever. The applause splashed over us like tidal waves. It never stopped outside the theater. There was one. Man Even more happy than Laddy George Lucas. He was shaking hands with every single person passing through the exit. Thank you thank you thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for helping out George. The man was beaming glowing. When George was young? This man never thought he would amount to anything he was sure. George would come home a failure if he ever came home at all. I'm so glad you liked it. Thank you so much. It's amazing isn't it. It's amazing. George is amazing said George did come home but not as a failure he came home is the man who made star wars and his father George senior was so proud a late night dinner at the Hamburger Hamlet on Hollywood boulevard. George Lucas was still worried. What if that premier was a fluke already? He was getting reports from Fox about executive reactions to the movie. He was told that three execs loved it three liked it too fell asleep and the rest didn't understand it at all and we're fretting about how they'd ever get their money back. The hamburger hamlet was across the street from grauman's Chinese theatre he had stepped onto the street and into the middle of a mob scene. Traffic was blocked eight nine. Ten lines of people were wrapped around the block in all directions he watched the limos arrive out from one step hugh hefner and a Bevy of playboy bunnies. Somebody must be premiering a movie. He said to himself he was right. In huge letters to words radiated above the theater from the massive marquee two words Star Wars Inside Star Wars brought to you by the best mattress in any galaxy even one far far away. I'm talking about Casper. I've got a hybrid casper mattress. A combination of foam and springs in it is fantastic. I sleep well on it. Keeps me cool at night and it's comfortable. They've also got the original casper the wave and the essential now casper products are cleverly designed to mimic human curves providing supportive comfort for all kinds of bodies even the exotic kind you find in a galactic Cantina and they're affordable because Casper cuts out the middleman and sells directly to you. Look you spend a thirty year life sleeping. You should be comfortable. Come on now. Give yourself and your loved one a gift checkout Casper. You've got nothing to lose and you can be sure of your purchase with Casper's one hundred nights risk-free sleep on trial. There's also free shipping and hassle-free returns in the U._S. and Canada. If you're not completely satisfied but I think you will be you can get one hundred dollars towards select mattresses by visiting in Casper Dot com slash iota and using code Yoda at checkout. That's Casper Dot com slash Iota Code Yoda Y.. O. D. A. AT CHECKOUT TERMS and conditions apply no matter who you are photographer refer a restaurant owner burgeoning writer you can manage your website and grow your business all in one place easily with our sponsor Wicks dot com. We're talking total designed freedom and limitless choices for personalization when you build a website with wicks best of all it's free and if you're like me and you have trouble narrowing down what you want you also have the option to choose from over five hundred stunning templates everything from video backgrounds to galleries menus form social bars even the email marketing tools. It's all automatically optimized for any device desktop or mobile look. I really use this with wicks building a beautiful professional website as easy just ask the over one hundred forty million people who've already done it get started building a website of your own with wicks today four free and if you go to dot com and use the coupon code Yoda you'll get ten percent off any premium plan. That's the one I have with wicks premium plans. You get more storage free domain for a year and much which much more that's Wicks Dot Com Code Iota Y._O. D._A.. For ten percent off any premium plan it was eight A._M.. When the line began forming warming in one theater in Los Angeles all one thousand seats were sold out for every show from morning to midnight and then star wars got even more popular people were seeing it three and four times? They would leave the theater and joined the back of the line for the next show all day long day after day. The critics were a few sive magnificent years most razzle dazzle movie. There was even a jab at the studio that had made George George. Lucas is life such a living hell for the years he invested in Star Wars. There is no corporate substitute for the creative passion of the individual filmmaker. Not everyone loved it. Gene Siskel grouse that Darth vader looked like a black vinyl coated frog another reviewer complained of desperate boredom not caring what might happen to any of the two dimensional characters and some critics hated to love it. It's a big dumb flick but at least it's a good one director Ridley Scott saw star wars at grauman's he was. He was awed by it. I don't know I don't know what we're doing. This guy's making star wars. I'm not even in the same universe Aski- the same censure release Scott would be inspired and would soon make alien and blade running a young James Cameron was so overwhelmed. He quit his job as a truck driver. If I'm ever GonNa make movies he told himself I better get going. Star Wars was a smash after years of toil and struggle pain and punishment. There was only one thing George Lucas wanted to do even now leave town. It was a rainy day in London. When Alec Guinness Finally saw a completed star wars he wasn't he wasn't unprepared for the spectacle of it for an actor who had participated in some films greatest ethics? This was something altogether grander. He wrote a friend. It's a staggering film technically brilliant valiant exciting very noisy in warmhearted the battle scenes at the end go on for five minutes too long and some of the dialogue is excruciating when it isn't lost in noise the only really disappointing performances is anthony. Daniels is the robot fidgety an overly elaborate not that any of the cast can stand up to the mechanical things around the George. Lucas had earn this vacation. He was in Hawaii with his friend. Steven Spielberg both were basking in their success. Star Wars was already on track to overtake jaws as the highest grossing movie of all time but this was a time for play not work there on that Beach George Lucas and Steven Spielberg scooped shovelled sand to form a cast George now that I'm done with close encounters. I'M GONNA take a run James Bond again. Why you want action adventure sure Steve? If that's what you're looking for Ivan ideas even better. Oh yeah tell me it's about a dashing in adventurous college archaeology professor who's also a part time treasure hunter and searching for something searching for why I don't I don't I don't I don't know yet something you know something. Exotic precious important like the Ark of the Covenant The Lost Ark Yeah Wow I call the the main character Indiana Indiana Smith well George. If you need a director you know where to find me your building sand castles in Hawaii. The success of Star Star Wars finally gave Harrison for the permission he needed to hang up his carpentry tools for good now that star wars was breaking records. Everyone expected his sequel but that sequel would come on different terms. George Lucas sat uncomfortably across the desk from an even more uncomfortable Alan ladd junior so laddy Fox get sixty percent of the profits from Star Wars my partisan. I get forty percent now. I know what I do for my forty percents my blood sweat and tears. Tell me what you do for your sixty. Are there are no crickets in L._A.. In the middle of the day but if there were now's when you hear him well George. We provide the money now you don't you don't you go to a bank with. The letter of credit and they provide the money. You're not doing anything. Every Gripe George Lucas ever had about any studio executive was spilling out now at the speed of a rebel fighter so here's how it's GonNa Work Laddy. I will be financing sequel myself using profits from star wars collateral. I get final cut. You get distribution and a whole hell of a lot less money. Deal Fox was stuck like it or not. They were no longer in the Fox business. Now now they were in the George Lucas business deal and because Lucas retained all merchandising rights he almost literally financed the sequels one action action figure at a time toy company Kenner was humming day and night turning out star wars toys by the tens of thousands and it's still wasn't close to satisfying demand off the hottest toys the ones the kids wanted most wouldn't be ready until after Christmas in nineteen seventy seven so Kenner did the only logical thing it's empty yup his sold an empty box parents would pay for an early bird certificate package basically an I._O._U.. For the first four action figures Luke Leia are two in tobacco. They must've done something right. Kenner would go on to sell forty million star wars figures nineteen seventy-eight alone by the end of nineteen seventy seven star wars officially became the highest grossing film of All Time Toppling Spielberg's legendary shark epic Jaws Version Star Wars would be nominated for ten Oscars this it would win several but it would lose best picture and George Lucas would be shut out of the prizes for screenplay and director good that was Lucas longtime friend Francis Coppola now George will be back. He won't retire. He likes to win too. Much and win is exactly what he did not only did he win. Control and independence. He also won rights to the franchise today. Star Wars remains the highest grossing film in the franchise with an adjusted total of one point six billion dollars overall. It's second only to gone with the Wind George Lucas. I never wanted to be a mogul. I never wanted to be rich. I always wanted to be an artist to make my own future and not have to beg borrow or steal to make my dreams come true aw for the growing army of fans nothing was hotter than Star Wars. No one was hotter than Joe. The the CBO called the empire strikes back probably announced that the final chapter in the trilogy will be called return of the Jedi. George Lucas was untouchable. He could do no wrong. He was on top of the world and after three movies in the Star Wars series he was exhausted he would spend twenty years years out of the director's chair twenty years in which he would tinker with his original classics often suffering the ire of fans who preferred their star wars to look the way it did the very first time they saw his friends like Francis. Coppola did not hold back George Star Wars is such a pity research an experimental crazy guy but you got lost in this monster of a production. If you don't stop now you will never get out of it. Francis Star Wars is my destiny is what I'm here to do. No George No it isn't Lucas brushed him off. He finally had in mind an arc for three Star Wars prequels sixteen years after Jedi a new star wars movie would would blast into theaters worldwide Lucas would write and direct it was the second coming anticipation was sky high and then it all came tumbling down. May Nineteen nineteen ninety nine today was the day Lincoln Gasping had been waiting for he had camped here at the front of the line at Mann's Chinese. He's Theater in Hollywood day and night for six weeks. His expensive once in a lifetime trip from Australia to the doorstep of Star Wars had been planned for a year it. Can we get a photo lincoln. Look this way please. He had become a celebrity famous for being first in line for a new generations star wars and then he saw the movie Lincoln. How was the movie Lincoln? Did you like it Lincoln. The backlash had begun in every corner of the globe splashed across every online platform. The Fan boys and girls exacted their revenge jar jar binks seriously isley. Excuse me so this back story about trade and taxes. This is what happens when P._B._S.. Go see wait. Wait wait wait wait. Force isn't a spiritual thing after all. It's all biochemistry in midday. Chlorine reaons and as technology improved Lucas continued to tweak his original trilogy sometimes changing more than Cosmetics Wake Hayden Christensen is in return of the Jedi what you mean green shoots on. I hind shoots first on shoots. First Han shoots first high shoes Jesus Christ come on now harm shoots first George Lucas was overwhelmed and heartbroken. The criticism was relentless in withering he had been trying to bring to the film's division he always had the one that technology and studio interference head always made impossible and now the the audience the very people who had so embrace star wars they were turning their backs on him and maybe he was turning his back on them. He kept repeating to himself align from the classic movie network. You have meddled with the PRIMEAU forces of Nature Mr Beale the primal forces of nature in the United Kingdom a two thousand one census revealed that over over three hundred ninety thousand English residents defined their religion as Jedi Star Wars had become hours and now it was no longer his star wars is finished. He told friends there will be no more. I'm done well. Star Wars was far from finished but before another chapter another trilogy George Lucas would have to say the most difficult word in his vocabulary he would have to say goodbye <music> from wondering this is a seven part deep dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable classic movie. This has been part six of inside star the wars listen for a new episode every Wednesday written and narrated by Mark Ramsey audio design and production by Jeff Schmidt produced by Mark Ramsey media executive producers Marshal Louis and Hernan Lopez four wondering subscribe on Apple Podcast spotify Stitcher DOT COM or wherever you're listening right now. If you like what you're hearing we'd love you to give us a five star rating and review us and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe find a link to subscribe to inside Star Wars and more information on the episode notes just tap or Swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors. Please support this show by supporting them. Join the conversation on twitter at wondering media and at Mark Ramsey media use hashtag inside star wars on facebook search inside star wars or follow wondering dot F._M.. Slash inside group. I'll see you there the legal desk.

George Lucas George George laddy Fox executive Francis Star Wars director George Lucas Steven Spielberg George Outer Space George Ri John Williams Darth vader Alan ladd Mark Ramsey John Dykstra Orson Welles George Hollywood Dorothy farmer Casper Dot
Special Effects: A Short History

Stuff You Should Know

58:05 min | 1 year ago

Special Effects: A Short History

"They say that starbucks Nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts and road trips and grand romantic gestures. Does it sound too good to be true well. I guess you'll just have to try for yourself. STARBUCKS nitro cold brew. It's cold coffee that subtly sweet lush velvety smooth only at starbucks. Hello stuff. You should know listeners. If you WANNA come see us live. You've only got a couple more cities this year. That's still have tickets and that is Orlando and New Orleans wins yet. WE'LL BE IN ORLANDO on October ninth at the Plaza Live and we'll be in New Orleans at the Civic Theatre. The following night October tenth and friends like Chuck said. Did you better go get your tickets go to S. Y. S. K. Live Dot com for Info and tickets links and everything. You need to come see us. Welcome to step. You should know production of iheartradio's. How stuff works welcome to the podcast Josh Clark there's Charles W Chuck Bryant Wearing Stone Temple pilots at and there's Jerry over there. She's our in any hats has got really cool hair stone temple pilots to I've seen the soon temple pilots hats before and that's what it is S. t. p. because I bought got to head to autozone yesterday. I have a champion spark plug yeah. They have good hats and you really do getting a battery and I was like I want these two hats. It was a good year Akron Ohio Goodyear hat nice which is where Emily's from sure I wanted that and then I saw this S. t. p. Hat Stone Temple pilots but I would get a champion spark plug at to those hazard. It's great okay. I'll let you borrow mine anytime you want just got to give it back if I've ever seen you in a baseball cap it's a weird jam. Is it now would do. You want to see a senior in shorts like twice in twelve years. I keep the legs covered and I think one of them was when you came over to borrow my lawn mower. I remember that yeah like nine years ago. I've got to mow the lawn. Sometimes now things have changed. You can buy a lawnmower yeah. We're right now we can afford. LAWNMOWER can wear shorts to actually have one of those plugging lawnmowers. I have a battery powered. Lamar do look stupid liberal hippies well. Mine's mine's is battery powered to but you have to plug it in charge it. Oh yeah yeah which what kind do you have. I had the green one yeah. I think they're all green now. There's a blue one. Oh I've got the agreement to the son Joe now but I have a son Joe Pressure Washer. Do you really know you plug that in that was going to sail betty just goes like tinkle's out water but they do make a plug in lawnmowers like it's not a battery just right have a cord that you walk around with your. I guess they're called electric sure but yeah I got the bedroom because I have so little grass now and we may be done period with grass zero escaping while we're definitely doing the front but the back I just got smaller and smaller and now my last lot more broke so it was painful to come cut. It was like why am I paying this guy to cut to do a seven minute Mo-. There's just that one crass. He's a lot more coming but then I went and got the battery because lawyers are terrible for the environment yeah. That's why I got it. They're one of the worst polluters yeah we're both also aware that we are charging battery powered lawn mowers with coal fired power yes we we understand that we know about exhaust fumes. Irony even need one. I live in a Condo but I'm so dissatisfied with the landscapers that take care of the Condo that yes. I bought a lawn mower. Just do a little patch out in front of our buildings poor. Momo doesn't get long grass against your junk when she's party is a great way to start this episode so we're talking. Special Effects Obvious is been lawn talk. We're talking special effects chuck. Yes movie special effects which boy I mean. We could do tin parts on this. This is kind of a big summation because movie special effects can be everything from the movie that you walk out of saying. Oh that movie had no special effects when in fact it did wrong yeah just tiny little things that you may not even notice to things that are almost whole cloth special effects like sky captain in the world of tomorrow Sin City Yeah like both of those yes. Did you know city every single bit of the set was. CGI Yeah that and that sky captain did it first year before Yep every bit of that was it was a green screen movie. I never saw so it was it was interesting like the look of it was amazing and very much ahead of its time like real art deco right yeah for sure. I call a black and white but it wasn't it was just this really really washed out color yeah but it looked awesome and was not bad. Nice ought to check it out and I think the dudes that made that kind of equipment and movies after that. It's very unique story. Have you ever seen this has nothing to do anything. But have you seen the changeling. God the due to see that yes and and I have to tell you. I don't think I've ever gotten chills more frequently from a movie that I did with that. One change genuinely. It's genuinely knewingly scary ghost story yeah like it is wonderful yeah. I'M IN STORE CHEESE SCOTT TOO yeah. He's a good actor and I don't remember who that billy. The KOMO lead was in there but she was great to It's been a while. I haven't seen it and many many years so anyway special effects. Let's try this thing. Yes get derailed like every five. That's effects are divided and this is by the grab story helped us out with this adds a big movie. Guy And horror movie Scifi church sure so he probably enjoyed writing this went up they are divided into three general categories and this all has to do with where the effect is happening right it can be practical Michael which is in front of the camera and that means. It's a physical thing that's happening. I think that's what most people think of when they think special effects you think sure okay by most people I mean me in camera effects that happen inside the camera and then post production effects and many times you're using one or all three of these right right right so with like practical effects things like like makeup and prosthetics like ed uses the example of David Lynch's the elephant man like the the prosthetic makeup that was used to turn John hurt or John Heard which one hurt into Joseph Merrick yes that's a special effect in explosion onset. It's a special effect a blood packet to make it look like somebody just got shot in the chest the squibb that's a special effect. All three of those are practical effects. They're actually happening in the physical world in front front of you. Onset being captured on film. That's a practical special yeah and the other one. I wanted to mention there that you might not think of his stuff like if there is a fire like a fireplace in a scene and then you flip the camera around to show the people and see that fire shimmering on the wall. That's a the practical effect to little things like that but it's lighting is a lighting effect yeah or it's a fire like you know. Those aren't real fires. I mean it's real fire. Somebody should put that out but it's it's not like someone lights a bunch of would they put fake would and they have these fire bars that it's like what you have under your grill basically right hide hide those and then that's your fire sure because that's what perfect he can't just chance somebody not being able to start a fire looking wonky. That's why movie fires Look Perfect Yeah Yeah. They're fake dreamy so in camera effects is just basically messing with the way the film is being being produced inside the camera. What not what's going on in reality the film's capturing but how the film is actually capturing the stuff yes slow motion is a special effect in camera special effect or fast motion to which is ten times more hilarious than like where would the munsters be without fast motion yeah yeah or Benny Hill for God's sake that lived and breathed on fast motion What else can you do there. You can and we'll we'll see this. some of the early special effects like stopping the film changing something starting it again like bewitched appearing out of nowhere yeah. Let's especially in camera special effect yeah one thing that struck me about all this from researching. This is how the the basis the foundation for special effects was laid laid immediately upon like motion pictures being like created like the the whole industry not even the industry before the industry existed but basically after the invention of motion pictures and that it stayed virtually the same until the ninety s yeah people refined it and got better at it and and techniques gap more the same general crafts yeah. We're used very much which is why craft service is called Craft Service. Oh yeah because each department has their own craft. Oh I didn't know they're there to serve them. Pizza Rolls Man or whatever you can put on some weight filming something I'll tell you that you can. Oh My god God so Stop Motion Animation. That is an in camera effect. You're moving a little clay figure or whatever doll or a King Kong of raising one California -Fornia Raisin One frame time twenty four frames per second. Can you imagine didn't you do that with your brother with Ti Joe. I did and then years later I did a little star wars thing when gotTa Outta High Eight Video Camera and spent like three days working on something they ended up being nine seconds long and I said I'm done. What's funny is you're going to get a cease and desist letter from Lucasfilm after talking about this in the pocket night and then we have post production effects and that is I think that's what a lot of people think of a special effects these days really because that's all the CGI stuff that you will see is all happens in postproduction. Okay all right yes these days. I gotcha all like almost all special. Special Effects Happens impost these as right well no they still combine some of the old crafts as well but the yeah surely a lot of CGI. I mean computers can do some amazing stuff stuff again. I mean stuff that used to take months to do a computer can do an hour now and do it a million times better yeah so depending depending on your taste. I should say that's right so those are the big three practical in camera in post production and like I was saying like the the basis of special effects was founded like in the nineteenth century and there were some people who I had kind of followed in a tradition of still photography still photographers by that time had already figured out some cool stuff that you could do messing around with cameras something like like double exposure. We take a picture of one thing and then take a picture of another thing with the previously exposed film and all of a sudden. It looks like there's a ghost looming behind us right stuff like that so out of the gate when motion pictures were beat started to become a little widespread and people could afford them and try messing around with them. They had a basis of of of trickery to begin with but there's a lot of stuff you can do with motion picture. Cameras that you can't do is still photo cameras and they figured this out right away. The first guy who's credited as the first special effect is Alfred Clark and in. They don't have the year exactly right. It's either ninety three you. That's eight hundred ninety three or eighteen ninety five he made a short film called the execution of Mary Queen of Scots and he did that little stop trick like I was saying you shoot something something you stop the camera you replace it or you remove something and then you start the camera and in real time when you go to play it back it's seamless right right and in his case. Did you look at it. Did you need to do that one. It's he's a a stop trick with Mary getting beheaded and right when the axe wchs is going to follow you know he switches her out for a dummy then starts the camera backup and he chops dummy set off right and it's. It looks pretty good like you can't. There's no big weird. Jump trump he did for eighteen ninety three did a really good job yeah and the key to that is just making sure that no one touches the camera or even breathes on it don't move and then getting getting the dummy in those same position as the the actor yeah in fact as we'll talk about later with matte paintings. It's so crucial that the camera not moved one technique was as to bury the camera tripod like a couple of feet into the earth just to make sure like no dumb dumb. PA Bunsen do it. Ami Tammy so Alfred Clark is credited with the first special effects but a guy named George may lease today get it. Maybe we should go as Casey Peckham. Oh yeah he would know. I think it's a way Oh nice. I think you just nailed it. George midday at any rate. This guy is known as the father of special effects. He was very early on doing stuff off that no one else is doing you know granted. There were very few people working in this field and none of the five people did but he was an illusionist and he said Oh oh man I can really do some amazing tricks with this camera and he really put it to good use a very early like I mean turn of the last century yeah he actually stumbled upon that little stop trick by accident when he was shooting a street traffic seen in Paris eighteen ninety six the camera jams while I think a bus was coming across frame. He's like mad fixes the camera can we say that all right. We don't have any French people sitting the end. That's true starts came right back up and of course there's different things happening and then when he went back to look at it it's he kind of stumbled upon this weird weird little substitution splice that became part filmmaking because by the time the the camera had started up again the bus was replaced by. I saw it looked like when he went back and watched it the bus suddenly transformed into a hearse and he said wait till they get a Lotta bewitched seventy something years from now yeah so no I guess what was that in the fifties cities sixty sixty all right so you may not recognize yours Meli as God at that time name but you probably probably afraid of his work like a trip to the moon yeah what's very widely cited like one of the first actual movies I think it was in the twenty something minute range but it was about so explorers in the Victorian era getting in a rocket and traveling to the moon and the rocket lands in the man in the moon's. I yeah everybody's seeing that I don't care who you when you say you. Haven't you have this was the guy who made that and this is a very early movies from nineteen o two but he was doing all all sorts of amazing stuff. Here's using extensive costuming masks all sorts of in camera techniques his painting on film frames. Yeah Yeah and this is nine hundred ninety two and like I was saying this stuff was refine but the was the basis of special effects for the next century to come so we take a quick break all right. Let's take a quick break and we will talk a little bit about the Matt Technique right after this. I'm actually pretty psyched about uh-huh. Hey My friend how you doing. I'm doing great chuck. You know they say that starbucks. Nitro does for cold coffee what the Aurora Borealis Bory Alice does for the night sky. I'm listening and what tidalwaves do for the Pacific Ocean go on what the Grand Canyon does well. You know you get the the idea I do. Chuck and you may be asking yourself. Friends are Josh and Chuck Really Comparing starbucks Nitro cold brew to the planet's Greatest Natural Wonders. Yes yes we are sound too good to be true. Guess you'll just have to try it for yourself. STARBUCKS nitro cold brew. It's cold coffee that subtly sweet lush rush and velvety smooth also available with sweet cream and cascal cold foam only at starbucks Ra Chuck as I said I'm very psyched about the Matt. Yeah so this isn't this is a little confusing the way it's laid out here okay because what what Ed's talking about here with Norman Don this called original negative painting. Okay if you hear of a matte painting that is a piece of glass where you have. I am going to talk about the most common way you might see it employed as you take a big piece of glass and you paint like cityscape on it right like really realistic and then you put that in a scene and shoot it so it's instead of having someone in front of city and this was pre blue screen and green screen technology you would just put Kurt Russell and escape from New York in a field and there's a matte painting of New York City behind him and it looks great in James James Cameron painted in escape from New York. He was a map painter. Oh I didn't know that that was like his first job. It's neat like if you if you even if you do know chuck talking about go to the Internet and just look up like great map paintings to mazing. There's a lot of really wonderful ones one. You've seen before one. You haven't but basically anytime you've seen a movie movie pre nineteen ninety-three. Maybe nineteen ninety where somebody walks into the enormous place or this amazingly the elaborate future city or something like that what you're actually looking at as an expertly painted painting that has been messed with impose production or using an in camera technique technique to make it look like it's alive or actually you know bustling or energetic or there but it's really a it's a painting. It's a painting that amazing human being painted by hand yeah and we should point out. They still do this today. They just do it. Digitally and digital matte painters are super talented as well sure but it's kind of neat to think about that old craft and James Cameron painting a piece of glass an sticking that behind Kurt Russell and I mean it was used in everything like I for my money money. Matte painting is the single most important and widespread special effect ever. Maybe hard to argue that thank you like it was in Mary poppins when Mary poppins is coming into the city of London floating a matte painting when Superman walks into the Where's where's the what's the name of the place where he's from the the Crystal Cave were fortress of solitude. Yes there were talks with them with Marlon Brando. We know his dad yeah. I think so okay that's a matte painting and I think the fortress of solitude are the remnants of Krypton okay. I'm boy superman people some enemy right. Now people still thought everybody was on the marvel train. Now people love Superman comics. Okay 'cause I was. I was GONNA say I mean you've seen what they've done. Superman lately right and Bam in yeah so that's the map painting and what that is. It's called set extension so that basically means if you're just sort of extending the real life set to make something bigger and more opulent Gotcha or maybe number of just bigger and more right but here's the thing relying on that Matt Painter and having the glass there and glass can break and it can you know onset with lighting can be weird so that's all can get a little Hanky so that's why this technique called original negative matte painting was developed by Norman Don and that is when nabbed as he'll use. What's called the Matt Box. which is literally like black? I don't think it's cardboard these days but whatever they make of cardboard thing thing that you put over the Lens to block out whatever you want to block out back in the day they would paint cardboard in hold it in front of the Lens or they would actually paint the Lens and what essentially doing is painting away. It was early green screen. You're painting away what you don't want in the frame or what you want in the future and then adding that later on right in because it's black or because it's covered. There's light is not hitting that part of the film that part part of the film the actual film strip itself that you're you're recording onto her filming onto. That's unexposed all that gets exposed is the part word of the Lens or the camera that is not covered that has say you're actor doing the herky-jerky dance right and then so what you do after that is you take that film. That has your actor doing the herky-jerky dance projected onto a screen so you see where the actor is yes and on the screen you literally paint the background background that you want then you film the whole thing a second time and now you have your actor in the set. They originally wanted right the the only difference there which is something that wasn't quite right here as they don't like project it they just develop a frames of it okay and project like a slide. Gotcha so it's not like the camera the film moving through on the wall right right because in the article here says and then you just stop it and what happens if you do that as the Bulb Burns the film okay so you can't just stop a Birdie projector produced like a slide of project that and then paint in the castle or the the mountain or the whatever you want want and then you go back and expose it again pretty neat open your trench coat and the big innovator with the original negative matte painting Norman Dawn and he really like really led the way but I mean again most of the stuff that that that does this now is done by computers in post but this is like the links people were going to to make movies at the time and you watch them today and you're like God it looks it's terrible but if you stop and think about the effort that they were going to there were inventing it yeah. It's just mind boggling that they managed to get it. You know to this point yeah. Norman Dion try to patent that technique as well but they said No. You did not invent this you popularized. It and you can't patent something something that you made super-popular. There's some other stuff to those like rear projection in front projection which is basically like projecting the background moving background onto onto a screen behind the actors yeah basically you know hokey driving scene yeah the person's great the card being rocked or whatever the road behind him that's front or rear projection rejection yeah the and people still will use that as oh my gosh like in pulp fiction very famously. Bruce Willis or I guess not yeah when Bruce Willis gets in the cab after the fight and if it looks old fashioned this because cutie used rear screen projection for that yeah and there's also technique this not in here that I just remembered bird so I'm actually having to look up. It's called when you're in a car scene but you're not doing a rear screen projection so what happens. He's here is you're. You're sitting in a car still car on the set but they're not projecting anything behind you. Okay what you've got is to people shaking the car right a frame. What are they grips. yeah usually grip but I've I've shaken cars and trains before okay. That's because I'm just a body on the set. I got to get in there. Shake that thing in fact one job I was on there was a fake subway train and the hydraulics broke early on and they're like bring out the pe- as you're gonNA shake this train for twelve hours here like you got rhythm. Get in there yeah. Oh we can have too to much rhythm because we got yelled at for that because it looked to rhythmic. Gotcha so we're like I don't I don't know how to do this. Who are you working for commercial director catching that said that our our movement of the train look to rhythmic and not believable so anyway this fruit of looms commercials totally unbelievable. you sit in the car. You're acting like you're driving. There's someone else shaking the car. There might be someone else off. Camera like flashing a light through the car you're going by streetlight or headlight goes across their face and there may be fake rain in the background and this is sometimes like six seven eight people working in concert to make it look like you're driving at night in the rain or something right so there's really an obvious background. TREASA rotor. Whatever maybe there's headlights coming up behind us this dark yeah but there are people with the spotlight yeah. It's really really cool old fashioned but people still use that stuff yeah. I wish I could remember the full name of that technique. The the shaken Shimmy it's I'm GonNa be so mad later on was called the shake and Shimmy okay. That's right so you talked about green screen. That's actually super old too. There's a really convoluted explanation about how originally Green Screen Employed Sodium Vapor lights which would actually mess with the yellow exposure on Pan chromatic film MHM and my brain. I started bleeding out in my ear you how many times I read descriptions about. This can't quite get it so suffice is to say that that was one technique for green screen. What really kind of changed the industry is when they figured out that again if you if you the film in Black the the film is not going to be exposed so anything you go and re expose it to do it will cover over that stuff so like it's transparent so for example in the invisible man from I think nineteen thirty thirty three a Claude rains wore black bodysuit suit and the background was black it was a black screen like a black green screen and but he wore clothes and everything in bandages riches and sunglasses and I think he smoked a cigarette or whatever but when he took the bandages off we took his sunglasses and close off there was nothing there it was a black bodysuit in a black background so when they filmed the background later on all you could see was the background in the clothes and the bandages. It looked like there was nothing there because as far as the film was concerned when they were filming it. There wasn't anything there so the film wasn't exposed in those sections on each frame. That's right that's called the Williams Liam's process and a key part of the Williams processes the optical printer and that is a projector that actually prints an image directly onto the film that runs through the camera wow that printer and camera sinked up yes so this is to me the optical printers the second most widespread and useful special effect technique in the history of film. You just wait. You're suddenly had an Ascott number a on yeah hard to argue that too but all this stuff was just just precursor to what was blue screen early on Chroma key blue and then later became a chroma key green right. I'm not sure why they made the switch actually other than maybe maybe the green less prevalent or less use. I think so probably maybe the blue was because you know what you don't want anything close to that color right will disappear appear against the green screen anyone who's ever done the weather on the newscasts and tell you that there have been there are blooper reels of whether people disappearing yeah when they wear like a green jacket etc right it looks like the weather's going on through their body same thing so. I WANNA see when we're thinking about obstacle printers another little bit about sure so what you have is a projector projecting film on to screen and you. You have a camera recording. What's being projected right. That's right. That's the optical printer and you can do all sorts of stuff with that so let's say you have a shot where you have one man in the foreground and live actor and then another. Matt and the background background that has a bunch of different people in it or something or stormtroopers three okay so you've got three different elements to that shot what you would do is using the same film film each thing so you go film that like the The actor the live action actor. You've got the film and you project that and you take film where you're filming the Matt in you project that in film that I just totally screwed this up. Oh my God this is just like Oh No. It's worse than that was it. false false positives You remember that time where I was like. I took a pretty simple thing and just completely walk the dog with it. Que did that again everyone. I want you to go look up. Obstacle printers read a little bit about and then you'll say oh yeah this tough stuff. It is essentially you're filming projection and you can do that multiple times with the same in film and adds up to where you have the shot you wanted where it makes. It look like all these things that you filmed three separate times or all happening together in in one space. Yes you are marrying separate images together onto a single piece of film right. You couldn't do that with before optical printers which is a projector and camera working working together. That's right okay. I think I knew that we should mention briefly motion controlled cameras This is a system that allows. It's basically taking the the person out of the equation. There is not a person pushing Dali. There's not a person moving the camera it is a machine that is programmed to move camera through space very very precisely in exactly the same every single time yes you can do the exact same motion over and over again over and over and a lot of time she'll appear on TV. Commercial is boring is that is you will see stuff like this for like a food shoot because food food shoots are notoriously tricky because everything super close up and has to be perfect and you can't be off a little bit with the camera because you'll sub in stuff later in post and that's the the whole reason for emotion control is to replicate moves with exact precision so I was reading about industrial light magic confusing this to really great effect with the First Star Wars which is episode four right the new hope. That's the first one right right. I'm not confirming or denying anything. I'm just going to let that stand for is the first star wars movie they ever came out correct. The Star Wars a new hope is the the first episode okay. I ever saw a movie theater because it's the first one ever came out anyway when they were making this you know. Is it a star destroyer the big big daddy ships okay. Maybe we're going to get murdered. everything all of the ships in Star Wars remodels yes fairly small models. Actually they were okay. I think it was upset for I'm almost positive okay so those models. We're not moving in the shots in these enormous like huge judge panoramic shots where like there's tie fighters flying around shooting everything and x wing fighter shooting the tie fighters. None of those models were moving. I think what happened was they figured out how to use motion control cameras so that the camera would go through the shot and around the model and make it look like the model was moving and plus it was moving the shot through space right right the thing is let's say you have five different ships. You film those five ships separately but does five ships are all going to be in the same shot so you have to film that same shot the exact same way right five different times then run it through an optical printer so that you can get all of them all five shots under the same strip of film but that's one of the one one of the ways that motion motion control cameras were really put to good use and it was extremely groundbreaking because not one of those ships were moving in in reality when they were filming. Star Wars. Can you name five-star worships tie fighter x wing fighter you already said one tie fighter to the deuces what the people in the know call it sure the already said start a story. You should star destroyer. It was right yeah. There's a star destroyer. Okay you made a face like I was totally. you can make the case that indoor was a ship even those planet there was the The the Forest Speeder Huh the the pod Racer Eh and doctors as that's right. He's the final ship uh-huh oh boy they're calf. Muscles just popped right out of the back to their. Ali fries like hyperventilating somewhere the office. She doesn't know why so as as I said earlier it's it's usually a combination of these different techniques to create one overall special effect easing these different crafts and a great example as Jurassic Park in the in the scene with a blosser raptors in the kitchen at great great sequence when it was playing cat and mouse with those children there were puppets. There were actors in costumes. There were animatronic raptor heads and there were full full. Cgi Raptors and you throw this all and a hat mix it all up and it comes out to be like a really believable. Looking scene comes out as an Oscar yeah. I'm sure they went on scares right they had to have. I don't know but there's just no way it was groundbreaking. I remember being just gobsmacked in the movie theater yeah when I first saw dinosaurs walking across the screen and that was nineteen ninety-three I believe for the first drastic park right Jurassic Park new hope the first one that came out so but that was five years after the first Oscar had been awarded for Special Effects Vex as far as I know really I believe that the abyss was the first one to win an Oscar for special effects maybe or they're no. I'm sorry sorry I'm way off way off the abyss was the first movie to win a special effect for CGI effect. Okay remember the water. You're still looks pretty good. It looks amazing in this one thousand nine hundred seven. We're talking about wow was that when that came out yeah. I was surprised to see that too because I thought it was. It's a good movie. I really like that movie. How do you not like Ed Harris. what did you not like like like is an actor. I think a lot of people people might have problems with Ed Harris Person. He's notoriously cantankerous. I I've never heard that I believe it sure looks like he could yell somebody down. Didn't he sure but he also keeps a cool head when he's an actor is a seventies sixties. NASA guy. Hey I love it Harris all right. Let's take another break. Okay okay. We're GONNA come back and talk a little bit about Star Wars episode. Whatever right after this here's a stat for you people over age thirty five sixty six percent of men start to lose their hair by that age? Did you know that Charles I did and you know what the bad news is. Once you've noticed what is that it might be too late. Yeah well the best way to prevent more hair losses to do something about it while you still have some and the thing that you can do about it is to go through four hymns dot com a one stop shop for not just hair loss but also skincare and sexual wellness for men. That's right and we're not telling you about snake oil pills or a gas gas station counter supplements gross. 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You supposed to not but yes or if you're Charlotte's thrown in Mad Max fury road gotTa Get rid of that arm or if you're enforce comfy gotta get rid of Lieutenant Dan's legs and that was amazing. That was the first first time anybody's ever done really something like that throughout yeah. I had my problems with that movie for sure one of them is I think he way over he. He's like a kidney candy store and way overdid the like and now forces in the White House and using archival footage and sticking forced in it yeah that whole like half hour dialogue L. Augie has with Peter Cushing Ghost who is uncanny but I get it. I get why these filmmakers get excited excited. These really technical wizards get a new technique and they just hammered the guy from industrial light magic when they made the first star wars call it what you will his name was. I think John Dykstra and this motion controlled camera assembly that they created was called Dykstra flex super super groundbreaking and they really did amazing stuff with that well. He's like a legend in this industry now and I saw an interview with them recently and he was like I'm so tired of seeing just whole cities leveled in like just the most amazing stuff. You can possibly think of being done just because we can do it right a a he. He put it really really well. I think it's an embarrassment of riches. You know totally like it can be done so it's being done everybody's doing it's just you know like and it makes it less amazing. not necessarily because it looks bad it just keeps looking better and better every time yeah like if you if you look at Charlie's there and it's prosthetic arm or missing arm yeah compared with Lieutenant. Dan's missing leg looks radically different it does so it's getting better There's just too much of it. I think is the point just to be all Ed Harris the on this no I have long predicted a return to practical effects really starting to happen a little bit more and more yeah I could see starting with indie filmmakers yeah for sure which is funny because finally computer generated effects have trickled down enough yeah like you or I could walk out of the studio and probably get on any one of those Max out there news stuff that ten fifteen years ago yes five five hundred thousand dollars to set up a rig like that yeah and that's how some young filmmakers have got noticed is by making these short films with like zero money on their computer pewter that get a lot of action on Youtube because it looks so amazing and the studio B like sign that person up yeah. I can't remember the guy's name but that's happened a couple the times in recent years the Ed Harris we should talk about a few of the groundbreaking people over the years. Oh yes and we'll go through these little quicker than what we have in front of us. I think we should mention Lon Chaney sure one of the original superstars the film in the silent era the man of a thousand faces he was he was very talented doing his own makeup and changing space That's why it's called the man but thousand faces. He's like here's nine hundred ninety seven. What about Willis O'Brien. He was one of the pioneers of stop motion photography again if feerick California raisins fan you have a lot to thank Willis O'Brien for yeah. He also too stuffy. Did I mean if you look back. He did King Kong in the nineteen thirty-three King Kong yeah and if you look back at this you're like this is this is cool but if you research what was done to create this yes. You're just blown away by it yeah again. Many processes coming together to create that nineteen thirty three version of King Kong and that fight looks excludes still realistic consider the year it looks awesome it does in it's about three three and a half minutes long. King Kong fighting TARANTULAS REX but it took seven weeks to film yeah because there's twenty four frames shot per second in a film that's right and for every frame. They moved the models a little bit here there yeah so that's why it took seven weeks just for that fight scene. I think it was fifty five weeks for all all of the Stop motion photography that was done in that movie. Yeah that's impressive. It really is impressive especially when you realize the trouble they went to when you go back and watch your like this is is pretty nuts yeah ray Harry House and continued the work of Willis O'Brien and very famously in like the fifties and sixties movies like Jason and the argonauts and clash of the Titans Indiaia. Never Medusa sure scary lady yeah that had to be toward the end of his career. I guess 'cause I was in the eighties. Yeah I think like eighty one. Maybe matter the miniature to demand that was cool movie. That was a big movie for me as a kid yeah and I was like when L. A. Law came along. I was like I know that guy. That's right. There's the titans this guy we should shout out millicent Patrick. This is a very interesting story. She was one of the only well first and only women working in special effects back in the day right and she created the very famous mask of the Gill man from creature from the Black Lagoon in the mid nineteen fifties and was unceremoniously fired not just fired stricken from the credits yeah this guy named Bud West more he assisted her and then basically we had her fired rather than give her the credit for the mask which he would take credit for Kazoo think he was the supervisor in charge of effects or costume or something. Oh I thought I guess he assisted assisted her but he was her boss. Yeah Okay but like she very clearly on her own came up with the Gilman for yet the creature and this is only come out in the last like few years they've kind of dug up the original stuff and yeah sexism just basically pushed her out of the industry altogether very sad she starting to get her do now. Though which is good yeah that is very good. There's Dick Smith is amazing. He created the Squibb. Oh really yeah he's. He's a he's a very famous makeup artist. He's really good at making people look aged yeah. He made forty-seven year old. Marlon Brando look much five than the Godfather. Oh yeah yeah he was on. He was a year younger than me Brando. I never thought about that nuts. He really is he also did death becomes her which is one of the all-time time great movie yeah yeah for sure and the Exorcist Yup and scanners and you're seeing ghost story from nineteen eighty-one. Yeah Yeah Very scary movie the old dudes he did he did that what else very famously aged. Dustin Hoffman and little big man by many many years and then in the last like twenty five thirty years Rick Baker and Stan Winston Stan Winston's. He's got my vote yeah. Yeah I mean these two guys were both just creative leaders in the industry and Trail Blazers in the industry and as Ed it says here like a mentor to a generation of special effects employees employees creators artists all three of those Lourdes gig workers Rick Baker American Werewolf in London in Nineteen eighty-one which still holds up the thriller video in Nineteen Ninety-three Star Wars Maas is Louie Cantina. He made all those yeah. Did you know that about the Mas Eisley Cantina chair. I didn't know that he was sing almost single handedly responsible for all of them and then Stan Winston you gotta talk about movies like the thing in Predator in Terminator and they both have set up foundations in schools and things like that Stan Winston also did in the makeup for what I think is maybe the best slash film of all time Friday. The thirteenth part to yeah to was when Jason comes along right. Yes it's Jason before. He got his mask. He gets his mask and three. I think the Friday thirteenth franchises as good as it gets horror movies. I dropped off at a certain point. Did you see see all those no. No I still haven't seen all of them but even just putting like the first five or six up yeah I think it's like watching him again as an adult. I'm like these are really good. Yeah Scherzer films even better than I remember being a kid and the reason Stan Winston filled in for five thirteenth part two is because the guy who did Friday thirteenth the first one. Tom Savini was unavailable. He was off doing creepshow. I believe the Viennese another legend. I think they're redoing creepshow show. Are they okay. I'd watch that different stories. Oh even better I think not mistaken. Bs Savini is well known for being sort of a godfather of Gore he did maniac gives that yeah that was an offshoot rocker movie and then these days there are companies unease Im and and Weta island industrial light magic is Lucas's company and they're cool because they invented this stuff off because Lucas needed stuff to be done that couldn't be done right and he's like go figure out how to do it and they did they really did and then what is Peter Peter Jackson's company. Okay and he's the one that has really pioneered the Mo cap the motion capture techniques where a person's wearing like a suit and the suit it has a bunch of different kennel almost ping pong balls all over it yeah joints in crucial places where the body moves and the actor stunt person in her dancer. Whoever wearing the suit goes through the motions and then it is going through the motions sure and that that those motions that what's captured fed into into a computer and the computer generates a character doing all those same motions creating the performance but it's a computer generated character yeah I don't think he was the first but the the gallon character turn those Lord of the Rings Movies was really one of the first really terrific looking fully. CGI character yeah I found from what I can tell the first full. CGI character ever in a movie you WanNa guess you'll never guess well. I mean it's touted as Indiana Jones and the last crusade crusade wrong really what is it going to be. It's another Spielberg movie. Okay it's young. Sherlock Holmes stained glass night. It comes to life and tries to slash one of them with his sword first full. CGI character in a movie will why I don't know but that's what I could find in nineteen eighty-five well. It says maybe there's it's in the nit picky language because in the last crusade when Walter Donovan's face melts and turns to dust when he drinks from the jealous that's in that's in raiders of the lost. Ark Isn't it. Oh no you're right right. You're saying okay yeah it says here it was the first ever digital composite of a full screen live action image. There's something in a language because what it was a little screen or something this was the Gotcha this is the first CGI but it wasn't the first CGI image. This is the first moving CGI images the first CG. I'm image was in looker. Remember that movie. I totally saw looker yeah. That was a big. HBO's Movie For me for sure same here is is looker runaway. NAH crawl runaways. Tom selleck yeah and Gene Simmons. Yeah that's right. That's all kroll a lot to look looker head Albert Finney Right. If I remember correctly Albert Finney and Susan Dey Susan Dey and Michael Crichton I think that was the first full body three d human but I did not move at static yeah and the very first computer generated effects period funny enough were used to replicate computer under screen so whenever you would see a computer screen in like Westworld or aliens or star wars and they're like what is the Computer GonNa look like you know not now that that was the first time they use computer generated imaging list of yeah make a fake computer screen and the first full. CGI seen ever ever done was in the wrath of Khan which I believe came out in nineteen eighty two but there's a genesis like earth being you know like cooling and turning into ah the earth and there's this amazing shots around it that's all CGI and that was the first one and Tron. I thought for sure tron would have been among the first apparently most of that was animated by humans not computer. That's right the like all the glowing lines all that stuff animated which makes it nuts. What's that they were able to create that yeah. now the big thing. Is the aging technique that they're getting better and better yeah. They really are. Yes so the new Scorsese pick the Irishman I think D- ages in has taken a long time to get out because the de aging didn't look good enough for Scorsese so they have d age Deniro and then I saw this new ang-lee movie Jimmy Man where Will Smith of now plays an assassin and he has to go kill his younger self looper. SORTA like looper. I guess but this gym and I'm in script has been in development for twenty five years with various people attached but they can never do it because of the technology was yeah. It's finally here but here's the thing I didn't know like I've seen this trailer and I'm like man. That aging looks great. They didn't age it is a fully. CGI Will Smith when it looks that really the younger version is wow sounds like man. They're getting so good at the that's amazing so he mo capped his whole performance formats motion captured yeah and they just used fresh prince photos and they just basically deep fake them sort of Prince. Have you seen the bill L. Hater depict. That's going around now. That's pretty cool because he goes from hater to Tom. Cruise thrown back to Tom Cruise. It's like what kind of all over the place it's really well done and then you know like we said they use. CGI for so many movies little mistakes that can be corrected little things that it's just much cheaper to add digitally later on it could be a movie that like I said looks like it has no. CGI whatsoever and it's cheaper to put a played food in the background digitally then cook the food right and put it on set. Just that's a bad example. or you can color great a movie. You completely change the the movie. Oh brother where art thou has that Yellow Hue for everything yeah. All that stuff is green. You know they're in the deep south in the summertime. They used to have to like film summit at some weird exposure and then projected at another exposure with some filter and then record the whole thing optical negative yeah now they can the Stewart all with a computer easy peasy. It's great thing on a kind of looking around but this one eighth of this topic yeah hopefully made you appreciate movies more. Yeah you specifically me. I Know You love the movie sure if you WANNA know more about movies goes into Chuck's podcast movie crush. You'll love it. Thanks and since I said movie crushes time for listening to me and actually since you said movie crush were about to release an episode on the Matrix hadn't seen that movie. It's been twenty years since it came out. You've never seen the matrix now. I hadn't seen it in a long time but I didn't realize this is the twenty year anniversary watched it last night. Still totally holds up really looks great fun. Yeah well elected by most of the CAST members who didn't act what Oh you know. Kenny Williams gets picked on. I love that Guy I know Kung Fu. He's perfect in that role though as great. I can't imagine anybody else. It'd be too just too serious. I think like Imagine Tom Cruise in that in the Matrix attorney you're right. He adds a little like something light. Doesn't he makes it a little more every man almost a little more believable in a weird way. You seen those John Wayne movies breath. I've seen some of it. It's just like a little to video gaming for me but I mean it's fine. I respect that people like it sure here. We go is about three Three D. It's about solar panels well. They are intrigued. I guess okay I got movies on the brain. Hey guys being a roofer my entire life. I never thought I'd have much input until now it's my time to shine. one thing that wasn't mentioned in the solar panel episode is that people really need to consider the age of their existing roof before installing solar a new residential shingle roof should last about thirty years but at the roof isn't nearly new. I would not suggest installing solar panels indefinitely. Don't install it if the roof. The roof roof is on fire once the panels are installed roof repairs or replacement is very difficult and much more expensive that the life of the roof ends for the solar panels die you can easily add fifty to seventy five percent or more to to the cost of the reroofing due to the added labor costs to remove and reinstall the panels law that so you should align it ideally with your new roof sure do mostly commercial roofing can't tell you the number of customer so I talked to had solar panels on an old roof and are now paying through the nose for repairs or replacement but reputable solar panel specialists should have this roof conversation with a potential customer before installing the panels from afraid of Dodson always happen then or customers underestimate the added reroofing costs once they're installed. This is a great. PSA It is thanks again for what you guys do. I'm in my truck a lot driving to different job sites. It's always easier on Tuesday through Thursday. Have a new stuff you should know and that is from Owen Cincinnati doc great name first and last love the name Stephen King's Kid's name one king. Thanks thanks a lot Owen. We appreciate that big time. That was a great email. I never thought about that and he didn't even send his business to be plugged so just google his name and roofing and he happens to live near you use them. That's how dedicated this guy. He sounds honest well. If you WANNA be a cool person like Oh and you can get in touch with us. You can go into stuff. We should know dot com and check out our social links. You can also send us an email to stuff podcast iheartradio dot com stuff stuff. You should know is production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more podcasts my radio. I heart radio APP apple podcasts. Wherever you listen to your favorite shows my name is Danny Shapiro and I'm the host of family secrets a podcast about the secrets kept from US secrets. We keep from others and the secrets we keep from ourselves. Family secrets is a show where you can hear powerful stories of heartbreak great healing and hope wasn't a season to a family secrets apple podcasts the iheartradio APP or ever you get your podcasts

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Episode IV: Dreams Have Limits

Blockbuster

29:03 min | 1 year ago

Episode IV: Dreams Have Limits

"The following is a true story about the making of an empire and to visionary world builders who made it possible. This is blockbuster. Episode four. Summer nineteen Seventy-six London FOX continues to increase the budget of the Star Wars now past the ten million dollar Mark enough. Georgia's stress level continued to rise and talking to Marcia back in L A seemed to help. But now, George was breaking bad news trying to explain why he'd put much of their personal savings into the struggling film hundred grand, George our money we needed for the special effects. Never get that back. Marcia had a point movies flop all the time. But George didn't have time to think it over. He was all in FOX won't pay for it. Okay. George like, his friend, Steven Spielberg on jaws, George was still rewriting parts of the script as they were shooting scenes sky Volker Luke star killer is now Luke Skywalker and Georgia's been wrestling with a major plot twist killing off a major character. Come in. Alec. Thank you for making time. Of course, George, sir. Alec Guinness was the only established actor in the cast. He's had opinions on OBI one story arc and is frustrated at what he sees as Georgia's indecisiveness. So what do you think? Well, we think Darth Vader should kill off Lovie one in the death star. Alec couldn't believe his ears. The decision should have been made months ago. So the actors could prepare and give the right performances he's been late for such decisions. It was actually Marsha who suggested OB one's death. It would make the revenge of blowing up the death star even more satisfying in the end George saw Alex temperature rising. I'm not doing this. Actually, I don't have to do this at all Alica. I know it's frustrating frustrating limits plane, let me explain so in in the last half of the movie OBI one doesn't really have anything to do while saves the galaxy. Maybe it was Georgia's patience to explain the new story arc maybe it was the fifteen thousand dollars a week. Maybe the two percent of the entire films profits Alec had been promised who if it would amount to much anymore. But something about George gave him reassurance. Even as things on said. We're about to get much worse. I expected to find you holding his leash. I recognized your foul stench when I was brought on board. Cut. Can we do it? Again, faster. More intense. George was an idea person, not an especially warm and friendly one to strangers. And this union crew didn't seem to trust him. George always expected them to work until he got the perfect shot. But he was constantly interrupted by hard union mandated breaks at least four of them every day. Fifteen lunch. Everyone. PM? What? Each break required. A reset and Jordan wasn't getting the shots. He needed. George. I don't know about this line that was Harrison Ford. He often found his dialogue clunky unnatural he'd improvise where he could. But sometimes his lines were a mouthful that seem to slow the scene down you can type this shit. But you can't say, okay, we'll rewrite that's a day. Everyone pressure was building. Fox had lost faith George kept asking for more money and time for his new scenes the studio suggested bringing another director to take over. But Georgia's producer, Gary Kurtz, held them off. You're putting your getting paid about a buck ten in our tell me about it. I'm stretched too thin the movies too. Big a big film at fewer things George could do himself and with hundreds of crew members everyone needed his input. He knew he'd never finished with a union crew that quit at five thirty each day sometimes hours away from the shots needed dairy. I'm going to ask the union for vote. The vote would ask the union to waive their breaks. You'll win look terrible of doesn't work. George new the vote would be tight, but he just needed a majority. Some of the crew clearly thought the film was ridiculous. But by forcing vote if he won the crew would have to unite behind him, just like Alec Guinness. Did he could make up lost time and save his movie? That was Gary calling with the results of the vote. Shortage. We. Didn't get the votes we lost. It wasn't even close George the crew at United. Alright United against this goofy American kids movie, who's director was always asking for more. Now. No one believed in him. George had lost the goodwill and trust of his entire crew. Mobile alabama. An incredible summer storm, the kind you only get in the American South cracks of lightning split the sky. Inside the air force hangar. The coup is trying to shoot despite the incredible around the ground rumbles with each crack louder and louder it made it difficult for Stevens crew to hear anything. Okay, everyone. We're not getting anything done today. We'll pick it up tomorrow. Then a boom. A flash of life. The south side of the hanging ripped open the hanger wall hundred feet tall began to buckle. And the rain began to pound Stevens elaborate set and props through the opening. Take the cameras out of the way, hangers gonna Bucko gonna take. Luckily, no one was hurt. But the storm had blown open one end of the hangar, which they'd been using to shoot nights scenes during the day and the rain had damaged parts of the set. It would be expensive. They'd have to put shooting on hold until crews could repair the damage. George. It's summer nineteen seventy six London. Alan Ladd junior was the only executive left at FOX still believed in George. Not good for us. I know I know distress had finally done George in his health had turned. He developed a fever a hacking cough, and it hurt to speak nearly four months into production. It was clear the film wouldn't make it's Christmas release date. It would have to move six months later to summer of next year. The board at FOX felt the production was starting to jeopardize their bottom line. And even Allen new their time was up. I wouldn't be calling. If it wasn't dying giving an ultimatum what what do you mean? And also made them. To finish. They're gonna shut you down. They'll pay for a second third unit. But I can't go into the next board meeting and tell them we're still shooting gonna pull the plug. George had no choice, his friend. Steven Spielberg had offered to fly into run the second unit with the close encounter set still under repair, but George was embarrassed ashamed. He couldn't let Stephen know how bad things were. How badly he'd screwed things up. What was Stephen think of him? Georgia. Gary would find their second unit. Elsewhere. For the final week of production. George sprinted from stage to stage between multiple crews filming at the same time. Hey, this needs to be close up. Shortly says a why these tried to prioritize most important shots before his time ran out. He also decided on a title change, the Star Wars sounded so pretentious, and his movie clearly wasn't going to be what he had planned now it was just Star Wars with shooting done. He turned his attention to editing on a film that had long overstayed. Its welcome. For weeks. Georgia been unhappy with the early edits of his movie the studio had recommended a British editor John Jemson who'd assembled footage shot each day onset, George cringed as he watched the edits nothing felt right? It was boring wide shot after wide shot. It was like looking at a series of still images splice throughout we're notes for the effects being created back in LA explosion goes here spaceship here. Lasers fire here. This was not the same movie Georgia envisioned the characters had no chemistry together Star Wars had no heart. This is Marsha. Hey, babe. Listen, I have a question for you. We we need a new edit from from scratch, it would be Marcia Lucas who had just finished editing a film with Martin Scorsese who would come in to re edit Star Wars as it turned out. She would be the film's secret weapon over the next few months sorting through more than three hundred forty thousand feet of film to find the passion in each character. And storyline. July eighteenth nineteen seventy six mobile Alabama on his way back from London. George made plans to visit Stephen on the set of close encounters. They were meeting at a motel that it'd become Stevens. Unofficial office is Steve here buddy, the two were happy to see each other. But both surprised at how the other at age in just a few months time. That you get Stephen had been asking to see footage of Georgia's ambitious movie for months, oh here before George left London. He'd made a booklet of glossy photos to share just filmmaker to filmmaker. Towards this is some of the greatest stuff I've ever seen look at that detail on the millennium. Falcon that's incredible Stephen saw Georgia's anxiety. He understood completely unbelievable. The to flip through the pages together as if kids again, turning the pages of a comic book took us four weeks to build that background. You can't even see it. On solo look at Harrison with each image. Stephen lavished praise George mentioned, the bad lighting or all the camera. Operator had missed the shot. It's not really what I thought. It'd be George was clearly depressed. But Steven wasn't sure. Why george? This looks in credible. It'll be a miracle of close encounters looks have this good there. Two movies. We're now slated for release within a month of each other both summer of nineteen seventy seven both expensive big budget. Sifi adventures FOX and Columbia saw them as rivals. Stephen shared some of his own work with George from inside the air force hangar. We were shooting night scenes in there during the day, but says the side off we can only shoot at night. Most of the crew is nocturnal. That's genius. Oh, check this out. I got a letter from NASA NASA, they think the film is likely to cause a panic. I guess what? People saying you Vos wrote all that. Yeah. Twenty pages of it. It's pretty boring. Actually, I was hoping they had the Elliot's all wrong. Your your movie is going to make so much money. And John did the thing we shot to it. He mailed us a tape. So we could play it onset. That's incredible. He's amazing George just wait till you what he comes up with Star Wars. Both George Stephen had more faith in each other than in themselves. I'll tell you what George I'll trade points with you two and a half percent swale give you two and a half percent of Star Wars for two and a half percent and close encounters gamble with that. Okay. Let's do it. They seal it with a handshake a handshake that neither of them had any idea would be worth over forty million dollars. We'll see what happens. Fall nineteen Seventy-six Hollywood. John Williams has been writing themes for Star Wars for some time enjoying the rich tapestry of characters and worlds all blending into one story. That's it. Johny George so good to see you with. Georgia's Lionel Newman ahead of music for FOX. Johnny. George what a marvellous adventure? You've created George look depressed. He hadn't seen Johnson Star Wars was still just a concept. Now, you could see all it's flaws visited Stephen in mobile. I did you see the production? He's running at me working on a few things you can see over there in that stack. It's interesting all based on five notes. But if I may direct your attention to the big table over here. This is your music for Star Wars against the wall was a long wooden table. And a neat. Spread of loose paper sheet music, sketchbooks and brightly colored dividers. That's that's all for me. It was organized. So they could quickly jump into any scene in the film. I think you might like Luke stock healers theme in particular. Excuse me Skywalker now, right? Yeah. Luke skywalker. I liked that a lot better to where shall we begin? Let's start the beginning. Very good Lionel deer. Would you flip the? Rich for me. Of course. John and George walk over to the piano. So right as the first frame comes in. Something like. George. What's wrong Chilin? It's it's beautiful. Oh, you had me concerned. No. It's it's the most beautiful thing. I've ever heard it really is Johnny. Here's the BC. Conclude with? George could barely believe it for two hours. They made their way through the film. John playing his music at the piano, even the place holders for special effect. Shots seemed somehow to all work with John's music. Tony this all incredible. Really? So glad to hear that George the last thing. I question for you, John if we can pull up the the Cantina scene George had been approved to do some re-shoots one of those with the Cantina scene. It was the scene where Luke first meets Hans solo sort of the beginning of their adventure. Together. You thinking original score here or more source music. No, not a score. Will there's a band playing in the Cantina. I was thinking we should be hearing some kind of a bizarre of western country, primitive rock music. Something may be jazzy. It's a Cantina band. Maybe a Benny Goodman quality to it. Yes. Yes. I like that. But like like a people thousand years in the future founded under a rock, and they're trying to interpret it, and it sounds a little strange that description it self was strange. Lionel smile knowingly eager to hear what John would improvise amid off bounds. Yeah. John turned back to the piano and began to rockets shoulders side to side as if dancing to terrible upbeat jazz music, then he began to play. It's perfect John. You're a master George had lost track of time. He was due with the special effects warehouse in van Nuys to review the shots created while he was away filming Trump, fantastic work. I'm looking forward to the recording session in London the London Symphony Orchestra. In fact, they can't wait to record. Then is California. It's the warehouse of industrial light. And magic the company George it started to create cutting edge special effects for as movie. Hey, Mr. Lucas, John Dykstra. John Dykstra ran the day to day all around him. George could see bits and pieces of miniature sets lights camera rigs the death star and part of his millennium. Falcon John was getting George up to speed on their progress. We're behind we're building our own electron IX here, not just the miniatures. The camera moves have to be smooth and letting us to match far behind. I thought you're doing months ago, we were, but it's a lot we have here we have three hundred sixty shots in the script. And we're gonna need more time or more help to get it done. How far along are. We. Not very far halfway third of the way. It's you know, it's complicated. John we have three hundred sixty shots. How many are done three three? And and they look great. They do. George felt something was it rage. He tried to fight back. The news nearly knocked the wind out of him. He took deep breaths. In months Haya limb had completed just three of the three hundred sixty shots. They needed. They weren't even one percent of the way there. It was a nightmare worse than a nightmare for the first time the panic fully set in without these shots. His movement could never be finished George tried to regain his composure in his car when he felt a jump in his chest. Then again, his heart was pounding. He was sure this was a heart attack. He only had a few minutes to get to the hospital. He tried to slow his heart rate by breathing slowly, but it wasn't working the hospital wasn't far any new we had to try his car ripped around the corner and into the emergency room roundabout. Leaving his car door open and rushing in through the sliding doors. I think I'm having a hard to take it help. All right. Doctors had rushed George to Abed Marcia had now joined him at the hospital. Mr lucas. Yes. Well, the good news is you didn't have a heart attack. I reviewed your vitals, and medical history. And I think this may have been anxiety related if you've been under a lot of stress that's one way to put it. What I think this is is extreme stress exacerbating, hypertension, sometimes referred to as it does require immediate attention. So it's good that you came in. So what does that mean? It means you're at risk of it happening again. So I highly recommend that you make efforts to reduce that immediately. It can potentially trigger a heart attack. George stared straight ahead as he listened Marsha held his hand reduces stress level if he left for even a day the whole thing would fall apart. I'm I'm directing a movie for FOX. I I don't know if I can possibly reduce my stress level. Well, Mr. Lucas, I recommend you find a way depression sunk in is the doctor walked away just hours after arguing over special effects. George sat in a hospital gown contemplating his life a sobering reminder that even dreams have their limits. George would have to choose between Star Wars and his life. He and Marshall looked at each other. They both knew the decision was already made. On the next episode of blockbuster. We had it they know where the aliens fusion forces delays for close encounters dream that bad Georgia's closest allies lose hope, I don't mean to sound harsh, but what is this shit, and a my stroke conjures up the musical spirit that will save Star Wars. If we're ready, shall we begin? That's coming up on episode five of blockbuster. If you enjoy listening to blockbuster without ads, it's because we structured it that way, we're thrilled to share blockbuster in its purest form instead of ads interrupting the story, but it's also an expensive production. And if you enjoyed hearing it like this, please consider a small donation on our website get blockbuster dot com as our thank you for your donation of ten dollars or more you'll receive a link to the complete series digitally mastered in the highest quality available. So you can be truly immersed in the story. You'll also receive exclusive tracks from the original score by composers Ryan Tabart and Benjamin Botkin, and we'll also put your name in the credits on our website as a friend of the show, and you'll be the first to hear about bonus features interviews and anything else we release in the future. Help us pay the bills that allowed blockbuster to be shared with you, and please consider a small donation at get blockbuster dot com blockbuster is written and narrated by Matt Schrader sound design by Pierre Bobbitt's original score. Four by Ryan Tabor and Benjamin Botkin produced by Elena, Bobby. It's a production of epoch left media. This is Peter, Bobby. It's lead sound designer and editor of blockbuster say tuned for short conversation about how we made this episode. But I would you please to a quick moment to give us a five star review and share us with a friend and for extras and exclusives. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram or support us at get blockbuster dot com. I'm Peter Bobby the sound designer and editor of blockbuster, and I match raider creator and narrator of the series and welcome to this behind the scenes conversation. Peter we're here again about this episode. You just heard maybe are our most intense episode yet and each week, we're discussing a little piece of the creative process. And I'm here in the studio of Peter, Bobby. It's where all of this sound design and mixing or a lot of at least happened that emergency room scene at the end of the episode. We just heard I remember we were sitting right here in your studio at one point back back in the fall and going through the episodes early on might have been the table reads, and your eyes lit up, and you said, let's do all sound design. Let's do a montage here. Well, we knew that Ryan Ben are going to provide us with incredible score. From the beginning. We've worked with Ryan before on actually score the film music documentary. So. Where I was the mixer, and you know, we we knew that they're going to provide some terrific material. So I kind of felt immediately from the start that that scene, and there were certain scenes that it would be great not to have any music on them. But instead established that there is actually some kind of sound language to the entire series and very early on. When I think when we were actually doing the table reads, I was in the studio while everyone was reading, and I was just taking notes to myself like this is a nice moment for music, and this is a nice moment for sound design. Yeah. To actually, and that's what we we've achieved because we tried to have what at least one segment one section where it was just driven by sound. Right. Can you talk about how you were able to collect all of these sounds because we have one hundred eighty tracks. That were we were using the one thing that it's base. It's surprising because we thought going into it. We knew it's going to be big. But as a podcast like I didn't expect. To go to to attract count equal to like, a I dunno. Indie feature. You know what? Indie features will have they'll have like two hundred tracks or so of audio on a final makes. And here we are doing a podcast at has so many tracks, and we're like, well, we kind of need them. It's an overkill it's like we really need because we've got a lot of categories. We've got all the dialogue all the loop groups, although although archival stuff, we've got all the design elements all the fully all the background. So it was like a lot of material and that just together makes one one big one big podcast. I hope how much of that was were materials. You were sounds. You were able to find somewhere versus sounds that were recorded because obviously all the dialogue is things that we did a lot of the Sound's. Also, though are sounds that you or I or someone else recorded at some point. Yeah. I mean as a sound person, I wherever I go. I always go with my microphones are kind of my right? And and like microphone is always. With me. So it's like I have my own library, which I've been creating over the years of working in the film industry of everything all the way from insects and Malibu two wins in the Grand Canyon. And you actually can hear some of that stuff in the podcast a lot of is just from sound effects, libraries, and and a lot of it was recorded for this podcast where we were like, okay. This is what we're going to do. I actually think actually one of my favorite sounds that. I recorded that's in the series. I was gonna ask you this next. You know, which one I think so well, I don't wanna spoil that because I'm going to probably say shitty. I'm actually curious we're going to cut this out. But what do you think it was was it the moon, the stargazing sound, oh, the vortex vortex reverse the one of my favorite sounds actually that I recorded accidentally once although not accidentally because I knew they happen in as a kid. I've heard them is. If you go. Oh. At an airport about a mile under maybe less than a mile half a mile under the flight path, the landing path of an airplane about a minute after the plane passes over your head and. You hear the air vortex? The wave of air crashing back at each other which was before pushed away by the airplane and just creates this really interesting. Sound which would not expect after seven four seven because it's so tender, and that's something we used in the stargazing scene. And it's something that reported in seeing the the meteor shower I recorded this last year, I spent an entire day eating out burger in the car. Yeah. On Tari airport just microphone on the roof. And I was just sitting there. DHL FedEx airplanes landing all day long. Peter bothered sound designer and editor of blockbuster. Thanks for this chat. It's absolutely a pleasure. Thank you so much, please. Remember to subscribe and leave us a five star review to get all episodes of blockbuster. Follow blockbuster on social media for extra content and read are behind the scenes blog or visit our store at get blockbuster dot com.

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Episode V: The Music Calls

Blockbuster

25:38 min | 1 year ago

Episode V: The Music Calls

"The following is a true story about the making of an empire and to visionary world builders who made it possible. This is blockbuster. Episode five. Spring nineteen sixty three Modesto California. George Lucas is in his second year at Modesto junior college studying anthropology and literature. You come in George. She bet Georgia's taken an interest in art house films. You couldn't see those Modesto. So he and his friends would drive up to San Francisco for screenings is lifelong friend. John Plummer has also encouraged him to apply to the world renowned film school at the university of southern California in the mail was an official looking envelope from USC, John, look, it is you open it or what? Hi pleased to announce your admission to the university of southern California. God I got in cat. It was a private university George needed. His father's help to pay the tuition. He'd get the money on one condition that he'd treat a studies like a fulltime job, but his dad's still wasn't sure if there'd be a career for a son in film. I'm gonna place for you at the store, George that. I don't wanna run a company I'm never coming back. George held up his end of the bargain that USC he'd worked night and day on his studies and student films to with friends like John Milius who would later become a writer and director Walter merchant would become a legendary sound designer and a beautiful girl named Marsha Griffin. The wanted to become an editor did you do the five or six I keep up tell you so many. Many photos USC was an incubator of budding filmmakers, and though George didn't know it yet. He was already making his way to the top is next film was about a futuristic too Stoep in world. It would become his calling card for decades. THX one one three eight. Spring nineteen seventy seven Hollywood George Lucas is thirty two years old doctors have given a death sentence either for him or for Star Wars George was defiant. Well, that's gotta go. No, no, no. That's gotta go. He's in his office. Slashing apart the script for Star Wars shot by shot that one stays that. One was the millennium falcons jump to hyperspace that one was crucial to the film. George began spending two days a week in limb. Trying to make up lost time and hiring help to oversee them when he couldn't be there. He became overbearing and strict if they weren't going to get all the shots done. They've at least get the important ones. Cannon going boom, boom, boom. Explosion. In wall panel. John Dykstra had run the place like a free spirited collective. That's why he and George had always gotten along creativity came first. But now they were out of time. I need to shut done today. George put his foot down. He felt like a jerk. These were as friends, and he was treating them like employees. They were employee's his creative vision had become a business in some ways. He felt coal just like his dad, but a Star Wars continued to unravel. There was no other way. Gary, George, please, please give me good news in slashing scenes from the film. George had added. A few new lines of dialogue those required some re-shoots. But FOX wasn't making it easy. Again, twenty thousand I can't shoot for twenty thousand over budget. George you tapped out the re-shoot problem got even worse after actor. Mark Hamill broke his nose and cheek in a car accident. It made his reshoot impossible. All George would get is a few days in the California desert. He knew that was it he'd have to make it work. Meanwhile, Steven Spielberg is also in LA doing test screenings for his first cut of close encounters of the third kind. The reaction is lukewarm at best buy wait. How did they know where the aliens the nerve gas hopeful all supposed to be a dream? Stephen was feeling the pressure. Once more this time, he had a film with structural problems. Now mechanical ones like jaws he needed rewrites re-shoots and money to do. It Columbia Pictures saw parallels to the troubled Star Wars picture at FOX which would become a bit of a rival project. Stephen would. Get his re-shoots, but the film's release would push back from summer to November that year Star Wars would get a six month headstart and Stephen worried by then there might be no audience left for close encounters. Nineteen seventy seven Ryan could see George look at that screen, George and Marcia have invited their friends over to watch the film. Stephen. Of course, he did. Brian Jude on Marshall's advice, the new cut of the film includes a completely new version of Luke's trench run on the death star at the end of the film and Han solo swooping in with the millennium. Falcon to save the day. If people didn't cheer that the movie wouldn't work they were about to find out, by the way, Mari apologizes. He can't be here. He was excited to see it. It was a reunion of the movie brats. Martin Scorsese wouldn't make it and Francis Ford Coppola was in Manila shooting Apocalypse Now. But Stephen Brian depalma, John Milius writer, Gloria Katz and a couple of executives from FOX, including laddy wouldn't miss it for the world. Hey popcorn. This is what I'm talking about. It's all about the experience. Hey, let's go ahead was real one. So I should mention we're still missing the special effects. So I put in some World War Two dogfight footage in there. Instead also Johnny's doing this great score for the film. But. That's not in there. Either. How about the photography shot? Anything yet? George at Brian shut up. Ryan the film opened with shaky. Text a primitive long winded version of what would become the conic yellow opening crawl. And the first pictures of the film itself were handwritten notes that said huge space cruiser here. When it so is all that text just a placeholder where was this big expensive movie? No, it's more background for the story. It was just the start of what would be a nightmare screening, the longest two hours of Georgia's life. So this this part will be different. With the music. This sequence is going to be a lot more intense. Remember a jet. I can peel the false flowing through him most scenes required explanation to make sense. To ten Marsha was relieved. The trench run seen got a cheer from Stephen for when they got to the film's final scene the throne room. There was total silence. No music. No sound a strange boring ending for an adventure movie. When the end credits rolled no-one applauded or spoke the silent Sankt George deep into his chair. It was clearer now than ever Star Wars was terrible. Marsha broke into tears. Not even Steven new to say. I don't mean to sound harsh. But what is this shit? Marsha leaned over doer friend, Gloria sitting next door. People studio here the love of sci-fi at long last love was a musical starring Frank Sinatra widely considered one of the worst films of all time. Martius heart broke for George who is bright red with embarrassment slumped down in his chair. He tried to save the moment. Well, at least for the FOX executives in the room. It is a kids movie. Of course, you know, Walt Disney kind of thing it's going to do eight ten million. I it's it's a kids movie. You know, it's a kids movie, Brian what the special effects and music. Hey, I can see a really fun movie. It was laddy whose opinion really mattered. And he'd been the only person that FOX still believed in the movie I for a moment. Now, it wasn't so clear. I think it's good George very entertaining kids movie. It was the polite way of saying the movie wasn't what it was supposed to be. I'm going to take off George. Thanks again. As the executives from FOX left. The movie brats followed tradition and went to dinner Chinese food. George was silent in the car silent at the restaurant more than an hour passed before he worked up the courage to speak again. All right. What do you guys really think? George had a notepad. He sat at the table piled high with empty dishes yet to be cleared and begged his peers for help this persistence had saved him before. But his friends knew it wouldn't this time. Well, George it was Brian. Okay. The first act where are we who are the fuzzy guys who's this? Tin men from the wizard of Oz. What kind of movie is this? We have no idea. What's going on? You've left the audience out. Brian was relentless several times. George Stephen tried to defend the story, but Brian continued, and what's all this the four shit. It sounds like farts may the farts be with you George was still bright red and humiliated, and you've got to drop the jet I shit. Nobody's going to know what you're talking about. He made notes on his notepad. He saw the only way out was to figure out what he'd messed up so badly. Don't george. It's definitely rough. But I don't know that I agree with Brian. This story is great come on. Steve. Honestly, this thing could make one hundred million dollars. I'm serious. It has harp. People like that you get those shots. Put in Johnny's music in there. You can have. Hit by the end of the night, George had his list of plot holes and problems and after Stephen show of support Brian offered to help fix the film and rewrite what would become the iconic opening crawl? And will. Studios. England, a few miles away from London. Was a recording stage for music used by some of the celebrated composers of the last decade Bernard Hermann for vertigo. Jerry Goldsmith for the omen, the walls of this great big room had history and John Williams was about to record with the London Symphony Orchestra for the first time. George was in a smaller room, the control room separated by soundproof glass in front of him an enormous mixing board and his sound crew, George how was the flight that was Lionel Newman, the head of music for FOX he made the trip from Los Angeles along with George, and of course, John Williams, they could see standing at the podium on the other side of the glass. We didn't have a score in American graffiti, I'm not sure what to expect are you in for a treat. John were a black turtleneck and reading glasses carefully scanning the sheet music before they begin recording with the orchestra. On the wall of this enormous stage is a projected image of Luke Skywalker. Thirty four feet across in front of the screen is a semi circle of fine, wood and brass instruments all lined up facing John at the podium. If we're ready, shall we begin? It was John over the intercom. Levels who said George? The force be with us. John grasped the baton and held it up vertically as if casting a musical spell over the orchestra. It's the greatest music anyone in that control room has ever heard. They can't believe the only thing between them and the magic being played by the London Symphony Orchestra is just a pain of glass. Stephen. George fumbles to dial out to Steven in Los Angeles. Can you Stephen on the phone? It's urgent. George what do you think, Johnny brilliant? It's already the best part of the movie, ladies and gentlemen of the London Symphony Orchestra. Welcome to Star Wars as John conducted. George watched the film play on the screen above. It was dazzling the images sparkled with life more vibrant than they've ever been before. George. I've got Stephen on wine. Steve you're right about Johnny. Listen to this George holds up the phone Stephen can hear them use it. This man is a genius Stephen. Stephen listened for half an hour, an international long distance call that would cost the studio nearly six hundred dollars. John's baton held an astonishing command the orchestra for a recording. That would be considered among the greatest musical works of all time. The cast who were still in London had heard the buzz about John score. They had to hear this. Many of them had come in. Now huddled cramped control room with George. Carrie, Fisher was moved to tears. They all held their breath as John conducted, the final cute. Walked out to give a big hug to his composer. Who is now visibly weary from hours of emotional conducting Jonah, oh it took. John by surprise was it. All right, Johnny. It was. I'm speechless. It was the only thing that had gone, right? And boy was it right? Stephen would later admit he was worried never hear something so wonderful as that music. George had brought up the very best of John Williams to save Star Wars. George left London on top of the world. On the flight to Los Angeles. He fantasized about the future of Star Wars. Could it still make the splash jaws did after all this trouble a thousand movie theaters lines around the block, he'd have twelve hours on a plane to think about it and was still worried the music might come too late? George was back in the warm, California sun. As he rushed his teams to finish the special effects shots in the sound mix. You got a note from Alan Ladd junior at FOX what's this? He just said to call him back when you have a minute. A lot of local theaters on sure about the Phil. We're not getting the numbers we thought we'd get. Do we have? How many? Thirty. Laddy could almost feel Georgia's dismay through the phone. We're going to keep working on a George, but we had an idea the movie comes out on Memorial Day weekend. They're thinking we might be able to get a little word of mouth. If we release it a few days early on Wednesday. It was unusual. But a move laddy said might help the opening weekend numbers. The specialty for a limited release. That look desperate. George feeders had no interest in Star Wars. They thought it looked silly and wouldn't make money. In fact, the title was so unpopular that FOX had threatened to withhold another movie later that summer there was more anticipated the other side of midnight theaters. Wouldn't get that one unless they also showed Star Wars. Twentieth Century Fox feared a flop. Mr. Spielberg's office. George I still weeks from release Georgia's lost. All hope he sees the writing on the wall. The epoch fi adventures FOX has been touting for two years is no more than a mediocre kids movie, buddy. I know you're doing some rewrites, but I'm thinking about going to Hawaii opening weekend. You wanna come? Memorial Day weekend. Yeah. Just get away from the press, you know. It'll be good. Just relax a couple of days. Great great. There's a good hotel on the big island. It's perfect. Hey, George what if the press is good George couldn't find a way to tell Stephen Star Wars only getting a limited release. I'm not sure it will be. The book thirteen minutes when Star Wars arrived they plan to be in a galaxy far far away. In the final episode of blockbuster. We ought to do something less complicated for the next project. You know, George and Stephen escaped the press on opening weekend always wanted to do JAMES BOND picture where they forged a partnership that will change everything. You don't have a story better than James Barth, really and word of mouth creates a new hope for FOX and Star Wars movie. What is that? That's your that's coming up on the finale episode six of blockbuster. If you enjoy listening to blockbuster without ads, it's because we structured it that way, we're thrilled to share blockbuster in its purest form instead of ad interrupting the story, but it's also an expensive production. And if you enjoyed hearing it like this, please consider a small donation on our website get blockbuster dot com as our thank you for your donation of ten dollars or more you'll receive a link to the complete series digitally mastered in the highest quality available. So you can be truly immersed in the story. You'll also receive exclusive tracks from the original score by composers Ryan Tabart and Benjamin Botkin, and we'll also put your name in the credits on our website as a friend of the show, and you'll be the first to hear about bonus features interviews and anything else we release in the future. Help us pay the bills that allowed blockbuster to be shared with you. And please consider a small donation at blockbuster dot com. Blockbuster is written and narrated by match raider sound design by Peter Bobbitt's. Original score by Ryan Tabor and Benjamin Botkin produced by Elena Bobbitt's, a production of epoch left media. Hey, this is Ryan Talbert one of the composers of blockbuster. Stay tuned for short conversation about making this episode of. I would you please take a quick moment to give us a five star review and share this series with a friend and for extras and exclusive follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram or visit get blockbuster dot com. Thanks for listening to blockbuster. This is Ryan Tauber one of the composers of blockbusters, original music and this match Schrader creator and narrator of blockbuster each week. We are discussing a little piece of the creative process of making each episode end today talking about a topic that's close to my incredible original score from Ryan Tabart and Benjamin Botkin and Ryan is here. And Ryan when we met making score film music documentary, you came on as the composer of that film. And I remember you saying oh, great. So I have to write music to follow up the greatest hits of Hans Zimmer. What did you think when I asked you if you'd score a series Williams that has to be one of maybe one of the most intimidating imitating things that projects composer can agree to? Yeah. I mean, the best I guess at the end of the day just figured well. You know, I can only do my best a very musical episode and one of the things about John Williams music, specifically, there's so many themes and motifs that are layered a lot of character themes, a lot of that was something that we talked about early on kind of having a motif driven approach a theme driven approach where each character had a theme for me just started with understanding their story understanding a little bit about their personalities. You know, just had said down with the piano, and I tried to I guess walk in the shoes of the characters or get into their personalities, the George Lucas theme. I wanted to go with something that felt something that almost has child like since fantasy in a way, but. But also guest an element of sophistication a tons. I just start with kind of humming something in my head. And if it's easy to home than I soon that it will be easy to orchestrate and sound good with the orchestra. You are one of the two composers who created the musical heartbeat here and Benjamin Botkin the other composer really helped tap into the John Williams sound for me. It's a feeling there's almost a certain bouncing to the orchestration. There's a softer touch to certain things as opposed to going full rock and roll with the orchestra every musician. Feels like they're doing something important. They get to have their voice on certain moments rather than just kind of blending in the whole time. That's really interesting. Yeah. Yeah. In the creates a certain feeling if feels like, yeah. Every musician is playing something apart that feels important. It for them and important to the whole peace. Now Benjamin's based in Nashville, you're based here in Los Angeles. What was the working relationship like it was very back and forth? It requires a lot of work to get that kind of sound. And he would I would stuff his way he would change a few things around. Then he would send it back. I would change a few things around. Yeah. Until two it sounded like something that suited the project in sounded convincing Ryan composer of blockbuster. Thanks for sitting down to check. Thank you know, problem, please remember to subscribe and leave us a five star review to get all episodes of blockbuster. Follow blockbuster on social media for extra content and read are behind the scenes blog or visit our store at get blockbuster dot com.

Sankt George Stephen George Lucas Blockbuster George FOX George Stephen Steven Spielberg Los Angeles John Williams John Georgia FOX FOX Brian Jude Johnny brilliant Ryan London John Milius London Symphony Orchestra
Episode V: The Music Calls

Blockbuster

25:36 min | 1 year ago

Episode V: The Music Calls

"The following is a true story about the making of an empire and to visionary, world builders who made it possible. This is blockbuster. Episode five. Spring, nineteen sixty three Modesto California. George Lucas is in his second year at Modesto junior college studying anthropology and literature, you come in George, she bet Georgia's taken an interest in art house films. You couldn't see those Modesto. So he and his friends would drive up to San Francisco for screenings is lifelong friend. John Plummer has also encouraged him to apply to the world renowned film school at the university of southern California in the mail was an official looking envelope from USC. John look, it is you open it or what? Hi, pleased to announce your admission to the university of southern California. God, I got in cat, it was a private university, George needed. His father's help to pay the tuition, he'd get the money on one condition that he'd treat his studies like a fulltime job. But his dad's still wasn't sure if there'd be a career for a son in film. I'm gonna place for you at the store, George that I don't wanna run a company. I'm never coming back, George held up his end of the bargain at USC. He'd worked night and day on his studies and student films to with friends like John Milius, who would later become a writer and director, Walter merchant would become a legendary sound designer and a beautiful girl named Marsha Griffin. The wanted to become an editor. Did you do? I take so many photos, USC was an incubator of budding filmmakers and the George didn't know it yet. He was already making his way to the top is next tudent film was about a futuristic distortion world. It would become his calling card for decades. THX one one three eight. Spring, nineteen seventy seven Hollywood George Lucas is thirty two years old. Doctors have given a death sentence either for him or for Star Wars. George was defiant. Well, that's gotta go. No, no, no. That's gotta go. He's in his office. Slashing apart the script for Star Wars shot by shot that one stays that one was the millennium falcons jump to hyperspace, that one was crucial to the film. George began spending two days a week in Ireland trying to make up lost time and hiring help to oversee them when he couldn't be there. He became overbearing and strict, if they weren't going to get all the shots done. They've at least get the important ones cannon going boom boom, boom. Explosion. In wall panel. John Dykstra had run the place like a free spirited collective. That's why he and George had always gotten along creativity came first. But now they were out of time I need to shut done today, George put his foot down. He felt like a jerk these were as friends and he was treating them like employees. They were employee's. His creative vision had become a business in some ways he felt coal, but a Star Wars continued to unravel there was no other way. Gary, george. Please, please. Give me good news in slashing scenes from the film, George had added a few new lines of dialogue those required some re-shoots, but FOX wasn't making it easy. Again, twenty thousand I can't shoot for twenty thousand. The reshoot problem got even worse after actor. Mark Hamill broke his nose and cheek in a car accident. It made his reshoot impossible. All George would get is a few days in the California desert. He knew that was it. He'd have to make it work. Meanwhile, Steven Spielberg is also in LA doing test screenings for his first cut of close encounters of the third kind, the reaction is lukewarm at best buy. Wait. How did they know where the aliens, the nerve gas hopeful all supposed to be a dream? Stephen was feeling the pressure. Once more this time he had a film, with structural problems now mechanical ones like on jaws. He needed rewrites re-shoots and money to do it Columbia, Pictures, sought parallels to the troubled Star Wars picture at FOX, which should become a bit of a rival project, Stephen would get his re-shoots, but the film's release would push back from summer to November that year Star Wars would get a six month headstart, and Stephen worried by then there might be no audience left for close encounters. Bring nineteen seventy seven. George look at that screen George and Marcia have invited their friends over to watch the film. Stephen, of course, he did Brian. Marshes advice, the new cut of the film includes a completely new version of Luke's. Trench run on the death star at the end of the film, and Han solo swooping in with the millennium falcon to save the day, if people didn't cheer that the movie wouldn't work. They were about to find out by the way, Marty apologizes. He can't be here. He was excited to see it. It was a reunion of the movie brats, Martin, Scorsese, wouldn't make it and Francis Ford Coppola was in Manila shooting Apocalypse Now. But Stephen Brian depalma John Milius writer, Gloria Katz and a couple of executives from FOX, including laddy, wouldn't miss it for the world. Hey, yeah. Popcorn what I'm talking about. It's all about the experience. Hey, let's go ahead was real one. So I should mention we're still missing the special effects. So I put in some World War, Two dogfight footage in there. Instead also Johnny's doing this great score for the film, but. That's not in there either. How about the photography shot? Anything yet George at Brian shut up Ryan, the film opened with shaky text. A primitive, long winded version of what would become the conic yellow opening crawl. And the first pictures of the film itself were handwritten notes that said, huge space cruiser here. Wait. So is all that text just a placeholder where was this big expensive movie. No, it's more background for the story. It was just the start of what would be a nightmare screening. The longest two hours of Georgia's life. So this, this part will be different. With the music this sequence is going to be a lot more intense. Member a jet. I can peel the false lowing through him. Most scenes required explanation to make sense. Marsha was relieved the trench run seen got a cheer from Stephen for when they got to the film's final scene. The throne room, there was total. Silence. No music, no sound a strange boring ending for an adventure movie. When the end credits rolled no-one applauded or spoke, the silent Sankt, George deep into his chair. It was clearer now than ever Star Wars was terrible. Marsha broke into tears. Not even Steven new to say. I don't mean to sound harsh. But. What is this shit? Marsha? Leaned over doer friend, Gloria sitting next door. People from the studio here, the love of scifi at long last love was a musical widely considered one of the worst films of all time. Marshes heart broke for George who was bright red with embarrassment slumped down in his chair. He tried to save the moment. Well. At least for the FOX executives in the room. It is a kids movie. Of course, you know, Walt Disney kind of thing it's going to do eight ten million. I it's, it's a kids movie. You know, it's a kids movie, Brian, what the special effects and music. Hey, I can see a really fun movie. It was laddy, whose opinion really mattered. And he'd been the only person at FOX that still believed in the movie I for a moment. Now it wasn't so clear. I think it's good. George very entertaining, kids movie, it was the polite way of saying the movie wasn't what it was supposed to be. I'm going to take off George. Thanks again. As the executives from FOX left, the movie brats, followed tradition, and went to dinner Chinese food. George was silent in the car silent at the restaurant more than an hour passed before he worked up the courage to speak again. All right. What do you guys really think George had a notepad? He sat at the table piled high with empty dishes, yet to be cleared and begged his peers for help. This persistence has saved him before, but his friends knew it wouldn't this time. Well, George, it was Brian okay? The first act. Where are we who the fuzzy guys who's this tin men from the wizard of Oz? What kind of movie is this? We have no idea what's going on. You've left the audience out. Brian was relentless several times Georgian Stephen tried to defend the story, but Brian continued, and what's all this, the Fourche shit? It sounds like farts may the farts be with you. George was still bright, red, and humiliated. And you gotta drop the jet I shit nobody's going to know what you're talking about. He made notes on his notepad. He saw the only way out was to figure out what he'd messed up so badly. You don't George. It's definitely rough. But I don't know that I agree with Brian. This story is great. Come on Steve, honestly, this thing could make a hundred million dollars. I'm serious. It has harp people like that you get the shots put in Johnny's music in there, you're gonna have a hit by the end of the night. George had his list of plot holes and problems. And after Stephen show of support Brian offered to help fix the film and re write what would become the iconic opening crawl. Studios England a few miles away from London. It is recording stage for music used by some of the celebrated composers of the last decade, Bernard Hermann for vertigo Jerry Goldsmith, for the Allman, the walls of this great big room had history. And John Williams was about to record with the London Symphony Orchestra. For the first time. George was in a smaller room control room separated by soundproof glass in front of him. An enormous mixing board and his sound crew George. How was the flight? That was Lionel Newman, the head of music for FOX. He made the trip from Los Angeles along with George, and of course, John Williams who they could see standing at the podium on the other side of the glass. We, we didn't have score in American graffiti, I'm not sure what to expect. Are you in for a treat? John were a black turtleneck and reading glasses carefully. Scanning the sheet music before they begin recording with the orchestra. On the wall of this enormous stage is a projected image of Luke Skywalker. Thirty four feet across in front of the screen is a semicircle of fine wood and brass instruments all lined up facing John at the podium. If we're ready, shall we begin John over the intercom? Levels of said, George may the force be with us. John grasped the baton and held it up vertically as if casting a musical spell over the orchestra. It's the greatest music anyone in that control room has ever heard. They can't believe the only thing between them and the magic being played by the London. Symphony Orchestra is just a pane of glass. George fumbles to dial out to Steven in Los Angeles. Can you Stephen on the phone? It's urgent. George. What do you think? Johnny brilliant. It's already the best part of the movie, ladies and gentlemen of the London Symphony Orchestra. Welcome to Star Wars as John conducted. George watched the film play on the screen above. It was dazzling the images sparkled with life, more vibrant than they've ever been before. George. I've got Stephen on wine. Steve, you're right about Johnny. Listen to this George holds up the phones of Stephen can hear them using. This man is a genius. Stephen. Stephen listened for half an hour. An international long distance call that would cost the studio nearly six hundred dollars. John's baton held in a stunning command over the orchestra for a recording. That would be considered among the greatest musical works of all time. The cast who were still in London. Had heard the buzz about John score. They had to hear this. Many of them had come in now huddled in a cramped control room with George. Carrie Fisher was moved to tears. They all held their breath as John conducted, the final q. Walked out to give a big hug to his composer, who is now visibly weary from hours of emotional, conducting Johnny. Oh, it took John by surprise was it? All right. Johnny. It was. I'm speechless. It was the only thing that had gone. Right. And boy, was it right. Stephen would later admit he was worried he'd never hear something so wonderful as that music, George had brought up the very best of John Williams to save Star Wars. George left London on top of the world. On the flight to Los Angeles. He fantasized about the future of Star Wars could still make the splash jaws did after all this trouble, a thousand movie, theaters lines around the block. He'd have twelve hours on a plane to think about it and was still worried. The music might have come too late. George was back in the warm California sun. As he rushed his teams to finish the special effects shots in the sound mix. He got a note from Alan Ladd junior at FOX. What's this? He just said to call him back when you have a minute. A lot of local theaters on sure about the Phil we're not getting the numbers we thought we'd get. Do we have? Not letting how many. Laddy could almost feel Georgia's dismay through the phone. Okay. We're going to keep working on a George, but we had an idea the movie comes out on Memorial Day weekend. They're thinking we might be able to get a little word of mouth. If we release it a few days early on Wednesday. It was unusual. But a move laddy said, might help the opening weekend numbers the specially for a limited release. That look desperate. Well, George theaters had no interest in Star Wars. They thought it looked silly and wouldn't make money. In fact, the title was so unpopular that FOX had to threaten to withhold another movie later that summer, there was more anticipated. The other side of midnight theaters, wouldn't get that one unless they also showed Star Wars Twentieth Century Fox feared a flop. Mr. Spielberg's office. I still weeks from release Georgia's lost. All hope. He sees the writing on the wall. The epoch SCI adventures. Fox has been touting for two years is no more than a mediocre kids movie buddy. I know you're doing some rewrites, but I'm thinking about going to Hawaii opening weekend. You wanna come Memorial Day weekend. Get away from the press, you know. It'll be good just to relax couple days. Great great. There's a good hotel on the big island. It's perfect. Hey, george. What if the press is good? George couldn't find a way to tell Stephen Star Wars is only getting a limited release. I'm not sure it will be. The book third tickets when Star Wars arrived, they plan to be in a galaxy far far away. In the final episode of blockbuster. We ought to do something less complicated for the next project. You know, George and Stephen escaped the press on opening weekend, always wanted to do a JAMES BOND picture where they forged a partnership that will change everything, you know, I have a story better than James Barth. Really? And word of mouth creates a new hope for FOX and Star Wars movie. That's coming up on the finale episode six of blockbuster. If you enjoy listening to blockbuster without ads, it's because we structured it that way. We're thrilled to share blockbuster in its purest form instead of ads interrupting the story, but it's also an expensive production. And if you enjoyed hearing it like this. Please consider a small donation on our website, get blockbuster dot com as our thank you for your donation of ten dollars or more. You'll receive a link to the complete series digitally mastered in the highest quality available so you can be truly immersed in the story. You'll also receive exclusive tracks from the original score by composers Ryan Tabart, and Benjamin Botkin, and we'll also put your name in the credits on our website as a friend of the show, and you'll be the first to hear about bonus features interviews and anything else. We release in the future. Help us pay the bills that allowed blockbuster to be shared with you and please consider a small donation at get blockbuster dot com. Blockbuster is written and narrated by match raider sound design by Peter Bobbitt's original score by Ryan Tibert, and Benjamin Botkin produced by Elena, Bobby. It's a production of epoch left media. Hey, this is Ryan Talbert, one of the composers of blockbuster. Stay tuned for short conversation about making this episode of I would you? Please take a quick moment to give us a five star review and share this series with a friend and for extras and exclusive follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram or visit get blockbuster dot com. Thanks for listening to blockbuster. This is Ryan Talbert, one of the composers of blockbusters original music, and this match Schrader creator and narrator of blockbuster. Each week. We are discussing a little piece of the creative process of making each episode. End today, talking about a topic that's close to my heart incredible original score from Ryan Tabart, and Benjamin Botkin and Ryan is here, and Ryan when we met, making score film music documentary you came on as composer of that film. And I remember you saying, oh, great. So I have to write music to follow up the greatest hits of Hants immer. What did you think when I asked you, if you'd score a series Williams, that has to be one of maybe one of the most timid timid eating things that projects composer can agree to? Yeah. I mean, the best, I guess, at the end of the day, I just figured. Well, you know, I can only do my best, a very musical episode. And one of the things about John Williams music, specifically is there's so many themes and motifs that are layered, a lot of character themes, a lot of that was something that we talked about early on kind of having a motif driven approach theme driven approach, where each character had a theme for me, just started with understanding their story understanding a little bit about their personalities you know, just had said down with Pia. No. And I tried to, I guess, walk in the shoes of the characters or get into their personalities the George Lucas theme. I wanted to go with something that felt something that almost has child light since fantasy in a way. But, but also guest element of sophistication, Ella tons. I just start with humming something in my head. If it's easy to home than soon that will be easy to orchestrate and sound good with the orchestra, you are one of the two composers, who created the musical heartbeat here and Benjamin. Botkin. The other composer, really helped tap into the John Williams sound for me. It's a feeling there's almost certain bounciness to the orchestration. There's a softer touch to certain things as opposed to going full rock and roll with the. Orchestra every musician fills like they're doing something important. They get to have their voice on certain moments rather than just kind of blending in the whole time. That's really interesting. Yeah, yeah, I in the creates a certain feeling it feels like every musician is playing something apart that feels important for them and important to the whole peace, Benjamin's based in Nashville, you're based here in Los Angeles. What was the working relationship like it was very back and forth? It requires a lot of work to get that kind of sound. And he would I would send stuff his way he would change a few things around, then he would send it back. I would change a few things around. Yeah. Until two it sounded like something that suited the project in sounded convincing composer of blockbuster. Thanks for sitting down to chat. Thank you. No problem. Please remember to subscribe, and leave us a five star review to get all. Episodes of blockbuster follow blockbuster on social media for extra content and read are behind the scenes blog or visit our store at get blockbuster dot com.

George Lucas Georgian Stephen Blockbuster Stephen Brian depalma John Williams FOX Johnny Steven Spielberg John FOX Marsha Griffin Los Angeles London John Milius Georgia London Symphony Orchestra John Plummer California USC Modesto
Hollywood, Circa 1969, Through A Lens

The Frame

25:55 min | 1 year ago

Hollywood, Circa 1969, Through A Lens

"The from the Broadcast Center at K._p._C._C. This is the frame. I'm John Horn. Today's show a Syrian filmmaker documented five years of her life in the midst of civil war and made a film as a love letter to her daughter. Then cinematographer Robert Richardson Brings Nineteen Sixty Nine L._A.. To the screen and once upon a time in Hollywood how does he find compromise with his longtime collaborator Director Quentin Tarantino well there actually is no the Middle Ground Quentin Tarantino Quentin or it is not and Michael McDonald sang lead the Doobie brothers and a whole lot of other gigs doing background vocals all that coming up on the frame this is Laurie mantle join me for our next film week screening fogy nights nineteen seventies L._A.'s porn industry in Transition Saturday night July twenty seven at the theater at Ace hotel tickets at K._p._c._C. Dot org slash inperson Wad Alkatiri started filming everything at the start of serious civil war in two thousand twelve her courtship and marriage to her husband comes up the devastation and carnage caused by bombings and her pregnancy and birth of her daughter. SOMMA WAD WAD worked with fellow director Edward Watts to make the documentary for some on both directors and wads husband Homs on joined us in studio and we started by talking about what it was like to be a refugee and leave home a moment that Wa taped and her beloved garden dirty. I can't believe that I could incident newer notes scribe feeling now to forced to flee. You should know that every refugee has a story. Every story is bring a lot of memories about a lot of life a lot of dreams when we were like sixteen seventeen. We've never dreamed that we would need. We Wanna be fishy and another country or our dreams were was about Syria and in Syria <hes> still until now every person around the world living new life we are very grateful about dislike of course because it safe but also or our dreams every night when we see everything it's all about Syria at all about how we can be bacteria and how will you want to be there. Nobody has like dreamed or plant for this to happen and like people who in the West can't imagine the horror that that happened in in Syria and they just like can compare it with like like natural disaster and like now it's finished you can go back with no. It's not finished not like something happened and it's done the hurt still happening. Dictators are still there and we want to build our countries want to be there but also needs to be safe to get back back wide. You directed this film with ever Watts Edward. When did you come into the project? And how would you describe your partnership in putting this film together. <hes> any got involved in the project off to these guys have been forced to flee from Aleppo and I met wet for the first time in London I'm only after she left that people realized that she'd gathered this extraordinary archive over five years and it was just hundreds of hours of footage and I guess everyone felt that it would be good for her to team with someone made dachshund the past who also really cared had about Syria because pretty much since the revolution started I've been talking about Syria and so really I saw my role as just someone who would support what an Hamza to tell their story in the best way possible in a way that was completely true in authentic to them but that would also allow a Western audience that I didn't know anything about Syria or was tired of hearing about Syria but the woods grab them emotionally and and engage them with these guys amazing story one of the things that is true about what's what's happened in Syria is more than half a million people have lost their lives. I think for a lot of people around the world it's impossible to understand the scope of that kind of carnage and yet when it becomes specific when it becomes about one person and a child I think it becomes more relatable. So is it a specific decision on your part to try to tell this story through your daughter's is and how does that make the story more relatable. Do you think during shooting the firm I was normal mom as anymore around the world. I have that specific on private minutes when I was speaking tomorrow chart when I find out that I'm pregnant <hes> I was speaking to hair when she was inside me or this movement has made me feel that this is kind of things where the fan could be possible for others mums and parents around the world to feel more in this situation and in two two thirds of the process of doing the fan with Edward Edward <hes> in that two years later we were thinking about how we can make people more engaged with the story and really <hes> reached every house around the world every parents we're talking with Wad and Homs Al-Khatib and Edward Watts who with Wad is the director of four Somma Edward. I'm going to ask you about some of the footage we see in the hospital. A lot of it is incredibly difficult to watch. It's children who have been killed. They are missing limbs. You were there some things that you felt. You couldn't show but they were two competing. Imposes one was when we first sat together. Where did I one of the things that we agreed on? One of our core points was the we had responsibility to include some of the horror A._B._C. in the film because I think in our societies people often shielded from those images in the news and I think that means that they have a sort of disconnect. What is this war yet? What does war actually looked like what is the effect on human beings? We knew that we had to include some of those images is but equally we didn't want to alienate our audience or overwhelmed them and we we try to pick images very specifically that would capture the horror but not be too gruesome or too graphic and I can tell you there were things that I saw in her footage. Footage I will never forget that burned into my mind and it's just unbelievable to me that these guys saw them with their own is why there's a moment late in the film when you were filming and there's a mother who I believe has lost child. She basically tells you keep telling them. This is a moment that is unthinkable. She's lost the child and she's telling you don't look away. Look at me and look at what's happening. It's just about responsibility that you feel that time that these people appreciate what as what you are doing as one person appreciate that the camera the only thing they feel that it could survive them because people outside when they will see this footage the government's the other residents they will do something for them. This people still believe that people outside will not let them down. It's never too late for accountability. Maybe not this year maybe after whatever time but it's never too late for bringing justice to those victims what Katiba Edward Edward Watts or the directors of the documentary for Somma Homs Alkatiri watts husband is a subject in the documentaries well why Homs Edward thanks so much for coming in for Somma is in theaters starting today coming up on the frame Quentin Tarantino's cinematographer Robert Richardson Discusses Shooting once upon a time in Hollywood Quentin Tarantino's was new film once upon a time in Hollywood stars Leonardo DiCaprio Brad Pitt and Margot Robbie as the title suggests the movie feels like a love letter to Los Angeles iconic locations sun-drenched cars and at least a couple of visits visits to a studio backlot all set in nineteen sixty nine and captured on 35-millimeter. The film was shot by Longtime Tarantino Collaborator Robert Richardson when Richardson Join me he I took a few seconds to try his hand as a radio host <hes> today in the studio with me I have Leo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt who are starring at the moment in one of the best films the year so far. I'd say once upon a time in Hollywood so Lille. Why don't you aw I how are you doing very well thank you I want to ask you about shooting your two leading men Leonardo Dicaprio and Brad Pitt you shortly before in the aviator and in Django unchained you shot Brad before as well including Glorious Bastards Margot Robbie? I don't think you'd photograph before and all three of them are playing people who work in Hollywood. They're actors or their stuntman. Does that change the way that you shoot them. Because in the story they're kind of used to being photographed. They're supposed to look good in other words shooting them. I am only trying to capture them at the at the best level in which I am supporting however they're going to act and lenzing in the lighting being is to support that performance of either one of them or either of any that you've mentioned so far so my goal is to well in essence as I said I'm supporter <hes> performance. That's that's what I have to do. Leonardo DiCaprio aprio plays a character who is an actor and there's a moment in the film where he is struggling in his acting. He's having trouble remembering his lies. He doesn't think he's any good and I'm wondering in that scene in particular how much of that really kind of spoke okay to you about what you've seen onset when an actor is really struggling with his or her performance and kind of starting to have this almost existential crisis about their value. It's a difficult place to be an cinematographic dessert for myself. I look to the Lens and when I I I don't like the operating the monitors which is happening a lot today with <hes> digital. I'm prefer even with digital when I do shoot digital look through an eye pieces often as I possibly can because because the proximity to an actor and the is and the way they perform is vital in terms of not only what I can do in terms of showing support towards them at all times but also I can speak more readily and with greater accuracy accuracy to a director. I believe that sequence is exactly what actors will go back and do in a trailer of course maybe not to the level but <hes> certainly that was a think extraordinarily <hes> accurate representation what Leo must have been feeling when when he blew the lines there are a lot of shots in this film involving cars and often those cars are traveling down highways and streets like the Hollywood freeway in Hollywood boulevard that have to be dressed or at least we need feel as if they're in nineteen sixty nine so what were those sequences like and how much of the streets are actually dressed and how do you make sure that people don't pick up something. That doesn't look period well. We have waited everything that wasn't period even Hollywood boulevard and how can you actually have a movie by the way that is in southern California if you're not driving because we're always driving drive everywhere yeah you guys are moving faster and this movie then you move today but yes yes exactly right traffic in nineteen sixty. I mean you got the Hollywood freeway and what's happening eighty cars on it. We shut down L.. A. Allowed us to shutdown that <hes> freeway for ten minutes segments and did four or three takes which was unheard of. I'm sure that L._A.. Was Pondering why did we say yes and <HES> L._A.. was extraordinarily <hes> come. I don't know if there were comfortable but they were extremely generous in what they did force. We're talking with Robert Richardson the cinematographer on once upon a time in Hollywood. I WANNA play a bit of audio from Quentin. He's talking about his relationship with you and how you guys work and your special fondness for shooting things on cranes from Django unchained on. We pretty much never leave the crane. We use the crane like other people use a steady cam. We use the crane the way other people use Dali's. We use the crane to shoot. An insert of a spoon is absolutely accurate. I mean what you've taken the wall out. Why I I can think of a couple of really spectacular crane shots and once upon a time in Hollywood especially a shot where the camera kind of travels over the back of a drive in movie theater marquee? What is it about cranes that you guys like and what does we give you a storyteller? <hes> in this film well we like to solidity of the crane and we look to solidity of Adali move versus what often happens with a steady cam sometimes that not possible because obviously obviously location doesn't allow for <hes> that that particular crane shot the year referencing <hes> with then is <hes> drive. Him is actually part real. <hes> the opening is a crane move moves past the car pulls laughed in front one of the Van Nuys and we begin to boom up but it was actually finished <hes> all in a a miniature world by John Dykstra so it looks very real and the cars are very real because they're all miniature cars as well so anytime that Quinn has an idea he wants to do an overhead shot or whatever it might be that requires crane. It's in the truck which is obviously to his advantage be able to choose any time 'cause he comes in usually on the day was sixteen seventeen twenty shots or whatever it is he wants to accomplish. We don't often no in advance <hes> what he wants to do on a particular scene until that moment when he's hands over the shortlist. How would you describe the collaboration 'cause Quentin obviously spends a lot of time on screen plays but he also has a very specific visual language so how much of what you're shooting on a given day is what Quentin imagined it to be and how much of it is what you imagine it to be? And how do you find a middle ground about how you're gonNA pull it off well. There actually is no middle ground with Quentin Tarantino. It is Quinton or it is not. He always sets the shots. He tells me what he wants to civically knows as angles he thought about he said the script for five years. It's in his head so when he shows up there is no me trying to convince him try to find a middle place because amaury on his side and I'm tempting only to accomplish what he wants. Every shot is on the script that I'm handed when we began shooting every shot when you should a movie over as long period as this film was shot. I think it was close to one hundred days of hundred hundred days of principal photography. How do you make sure that when you are putting it all together that it all looks the same? There's continuity in light in camera. Is that a big challenge. How how mindful do you have to be that? Even though you're shooting over three months it all has to look like it happens in a relatively narrow sequence of real time that actually was in my greatest challenge and my greatest fear initially when it read the script like how am I gonNa keep this in that narrow window look alike and have all the light feel now with nighttime. You don't have to necessarily worry so much about it but there was so much daytime in the film <hes> <hes> I struggled with that but fortunately it weaves three major stories together or three major characters together which are Brad Leo and Margo and then also as a fourth we've I would say the team of Leo and Brad together so some in in some ways that allowed me a freedom because we weren't always following one character the whole time but also I would say one of the elements which goes along with that as a character for me would be soundtrack of Cage J. Batman and Robin with exclusive news for Cage J. Listeners that phone secret number contests presented by boss Radio. There's a terrific was a remarkable soundtrack and also kept you embedded in nineteen sixty nine due to its being played every single vehicle. You're driving in any time <hes> so I found at that helped my consistency as well because it kept your mind in another place Quentin seems to be particularly interested in feet and shoes and booths and this movie almost to the point that I was wondering if he had some sort what a fetish he was trying to work out but what were your conversations about shooting people's feet and what they were wearing on their feet. I didn't actually have a conversation about that. We're we're all quite accustomed to his foot. Fetish Rush. <hes> there is a love you can see it in kill bill you can see it and hateful any filming between you're going to see the same sort of movement with feet down low <hes> so the fetish hasn't been worked out yet. We're going to have to let them go on with it. It's part of Clinton's vocabulary. Let me ask you this last question. Quentin is obviously a very particular filmmaker who has very strong ideas about pretty much everything that happens in his film. What do you enjoy most about being a creative partner partner in his movies? I enjoy his passion. <hes> his passion for cinema is monumental on the very finest directors. I've worked with how the same fire in their belly and in particular. I'm going to say Oliver in Stone Martin Scorsese and Quinn Tarantino to great gift that I was given an opportunity. I feel extremely fortunate <hes> in that in that matter Robert Thank you so much for sharing your time with us and again. If you don't WanNa do cinematography radio beckons I will be there and thank you for having me on this show today. Once upon a time in Hollywood is in theaters now next on the frame. What's the Michael Go McDonald background sound? The King of blue eyed soul explains Michael. McDonald's voice is perhaps. Is One of the most recognizable in pop music could be due to his DOOBIE. Brothers could also be related to the hip hop artist who sample his records but frame producer Jonathan Shift has another theory since the mid nineteen seventies MacDonald it has performed background vocals on hundreds of recordings by other artists see if you recognize him in this bit from steely Dan move back to you hello. This is Michael McDonald. You know that was a kind of an elite group in L._A.. Area that I really always felt very proud to be a part of I got to sing with some pretty great singers hours you it <hes> James James Ingram Luther Vandross Michael Jackson and I always kind of felt like that was a real feather in my cap to be able to step up to the Mike with those guys and it was also great way for me to get in the studio in here stuff before it was actually released police. It's kind of like being a fly on the wall background singer back. That's that's how I got. The job was working at casuals with some of the guys who were actually playing rhythm section on the records and <hes> and singing backgrounds for those guys selling on other records that they were doing. I did Kinda get used to hearing me sing with myself and I realized that there's something to that when the same singers things all the parts there's a certain Bob Sykes sibling harmony. You're probably tighter with yourself anyone else on the planet it's going to be you know which is what Donald and Walter with me for the steely Dan track bed sneakers. You suddenly realize all that's kind of a sound that you probably wouldn't get any other way but to use the same person singing all the parts and then doubling all the parts so that was really one of the first times I became keenly aware of that sound which some people think of as the Michael McConnell Donald background so but then on subsequent records where people were saying. How did you get that sound? I I could say well you know I I did all the parts myself. Double Them Go. Let's do that we can talk about all those recordings that you run for a long time but I I just wanted to fast forward a little bit to some of the more recent collaborations that you've done sure that sounds like grizzly bear to me a very unique band <hes> grizzly bear and I really came out of the blue they contacted me and I had not heard the van but they sent me a track and it just was so fresh and different and seemingly a band that was really trying to exercise a a certain kind of musicality abner Amanda Johnny Swim just did that record not that long ago seemingly house and Santa Barbara where they had kind of camped set up camp in Amanda her mom was Donna Summer and I met Amanda which is about ten years old was first first time I met her and you know all these years later a signal record twitter aw as my friend Steve Brunner Aka thunder cat a great experience. I have to give credit to Kenny loggins on that one Kenny's son had heard Steve in an an interview kind of mentioned myself in Kenny is a couple of his influences. His son you know was a big fan of thunder cat as was my daughter at the time and so his son contacted Kenney said dad you gotta call this guy and maybe write something with them. You know so Kenny kind of reached out to Steve Steve got back to us and we all got together studio in Ojai California and listened to a bunch of music together which was great fun and and then we decided to write that tuned together with something Steve had already started and so we added are two cents and Steve went and mixed in general question. What are you looking for if anything in these kinds of collaborations I think just a chance to find something that strikes match for me and I I look in every direction in for that? You know not just new artists in new collaborations with contemporary artists. I still look to the past for a lot of my inspiration late on the bus last night my headphones on listening to hours of Curtis Mayfield fuel. Some of those groups are just so infectious and so wonderful his lyrics of course we just so stream of consciousness and so poignant you know much like the guys like Steve Brunner Anderson Park and Kendrick driven more those guys of today just kind of breaking new ground and he was definitely unique voice for modern soul one or two Michael McDonald performs at the Hollywood bowl on July thirty first and that's it for this week. The frame is produced by the mighty team of Oscar Garza Darby Maloney Jonathan Shifted Julia Pass it and Robert Carava our news clerk.

Director Quentin Tarantino Hollywood Syria director Robert Richardson Michael McDonald Homs Katiba Edward Edward Watts Wad Alkatiri Broadcast Center Brad Leo Leo DiCaprio West Quinn Tarantino Watts Edward John Horn Steve Steve Brad
Lifeforce (1985) | Tobe Hooper

Around the World in 80s Movies

20:43 min | 1 year ago

Lifeforce (1985) | Tobe Hooper

"Hi welcome to around the world in eighties movies. My name is vince leo i am the author of the film review website quick stir dot net and check out over four thousand of my written reviews from either anytime quick stir dot net is where to go key w. I p. s. t. e. r. dot net why they're doing judy check out. My podcast is a link to it at the site. It's called the quickstart film review podcast where i look at brand new movies either out and feeders zombie o._d. Streaming services what have you you can check that out at quick stir dot net today. We're going to get into a new three part. Series of films of the nineteen eighties we just covered god three teenage vampire movies and this one is also going to be a vampire movie of a sort that quite the vampires that we traditionally no oh although it kind of qualifies as a teenage vampire movie too because the woman who plays a vampire in this film was nineteen at the time that she portrayed trade the name vampire. The film i'm talking about is called lifeforce film from nine hundred eighty five. This film is going to be kicking up a three part series in which we look at aliens that are encountered and then end up killing just about everybody on board a spaceship. You know an alien killing machine essentially really so. You can probably anticipate where i'm going to go after this one. I'm sure tobe. Hooper is the director of life force. It also stars steve rails else back. Peter firth frank finlay mathilda may patrick stewart in one of his more crazy roles michael gothard nicholas ball aubrey morris. The screenplay credited to dan o'bannon and don jacoby. It's based on a novel by colin wilson called the space vampires. It's an r. rated film. It does have nudity and boy. Does it have nudity or sexual content in here gore violence and language. The run time is well. It depends on which cut you watch. The one that i watched was an hour hour and fifty six minutes. That's the international cut by the way the american cut ran actually quite a bit shorter and i'll get into the reasons why during the course of this review not toby hooper is the director here. This is a very ambitious downright strange effort for him. It was made for the cannon group and life is based off of a deliberately love crafty rafting nineteen seventy-six novel from colin wilson as i mentioned the space vampires and that had a reputation of being just as weird as this film although narrative. We probably really made a little bit more sense. The controlling shareholders in the cannon group golan globus had been wanting to make the space vampires for several years into a film form. I mean starting back in nineteen eighty. They had plans to put this out into theaters but things never quite added up. They didn't have the elements in place to do it now. As far as the plot goes here we find a space shuttle mission. That's being co funded by american and british space agencies. They're traveling to explore haley's comet up close and why other up there they soon make a discovery that there is this strange structure this alien ship that's hiding in the comet's coma so they go on board this ship to investigate thinking. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity. They're not gonna wait for haley's comet to come again seventy five years from now because they're all be dead by then so seizing the opportunity while they can they go on on board and then they find desiccated bat like creatures and eventually they find three naked. Human beings are humanoid beings. I should say there's there's a woman and two men. They're seemingly in this perpetual state of sleep of cryogenic sleep of some sort even though it's not quite accurate to call it that they're all encased in case in these individual glass sarcophagus like pods they bring those pods and those humanoids onboard to study but things end up going awry in ways that we don't quite learn about until the pods are brought down to the european space research center in london on earth. The shuttle mission soul human survivor man men named colonel. Tom carlson play by steve rails back yellow makes his way to earth and he spins his tale about what happened on board the spaceship churchill bill and he ends up trying to help with this mission to track down the space vampires who make their escape and begin to wreck havoc on an unsuspecting london and potentially the rest of the planet now forces. I mentioned was adapted to the screen by dan o'bannon and don. Jacoby abandoned sounds familiar to you. If you're a science fiction fan he certainly no stranger especially to john. Nra sub-genre space mission gone awry. I mean he penned the screenplay for a very playful film back back in the seventies called darkstar as well as a hit space chiller that would become an all time classic nineteen seventy-nine alien abandoned had worked with jacoby on on three films during the mid nineteen hundred s the middle one. The others were nineteen eighty. Three's blue thunder very underrated action gem from the one thousand nine hundred eighty s and the follow up film from toby hooper after this one nineteen eighty-six is remake of invaders from mars invaders from mars was the second of three picture deal between hooper and cannon films because he was very successful coming off poltergeists. They wanted to offer him a three picture deal with them because they thought that he was going to be the director that was going to give them inroads to bigger commercial success. I mean they had him slated as one of that three picture deal to film spiderman that never quite manifested tested because of financial troubles for cannon films for a variety of reasons and that will be a recurring theme as i talk about ken and films throughout the course of this podcast asked the actual end of that three picture deal is the directors long awaited sequel to the film that i put him on everyone's radar texas chainsaw massacre two now despite right hooper's success in the horror genre. He wasn't cannons first choice for life force. The original intent was to give the reins over to michael winner. Michael winner was mostly known for is lucrative charles bronson films he did with cannon including the death wish series which by the way screenwriter don jacoby had just written the screenplay for death wish three just the year before for with her but he wasn't credited as that he was credited as michael edmonds. He changed his name because he was objecting to the extensive rewrites that were done on his film. After the fact <unk> michael winner had been trying to option the film from golden globe is to make with the delaware intas group but the asking price to take it over from golan globus was just way too high. They i decided to partner up instead but then it took a little too long. Mike winner would eventually grow disinterested and so did della rentis eventually so golden globe has had to go it alone alone. They really still working on making this film now. Some have compared what happens in the film of life force to an old hammer horror film called quartermasters. The pit came out in the late nineteen sixties. It was released in the united states as five million years to earth may know it as that title indeed it was toby hooper's intention all along. He was a huge fan of the quartermaster that were told on television and films from the nineteen fifties and sixties. He grew up on these things so he really gave that. He was given the green light to make the film anyway he saw fit. He wanted wanted to use lifeforce to pay mosh to these old hammer horror films he was inspired by the british production team and the actors he shot it in england for the first time in his career at famed l street studios no less where it took up several massive sound stages and they had to compete for space at that time with the likes of other big films like release scott's legend and return to is toby huber ordered additional screenwriters to be brought in to make a few changes to the adaptation including changing the asteroid belt from the the novel to haley's comet. He felt that healy's comment was much more topical to the news that was going on in the world. Everyone was eagerly. Anticipating haley comet's arrival in nineteen eighty-six six. That's the first time in seventy five years he also wanted it to be set in nineteen eighty-six instead of the novel's mid twenty-first-century sitting because he felt that setting the film too far in the future sure put a lot of emphasis on the house and wise of life in the mid twentieth century and he felt that that was going to eventually distance the audience from the nature of the more immediately personal and the horrific relationships at the heart of the story he felt horror needs immediacy. Science fiction has more distance so he felt he wanted to develop those horror elements much much more to the story the novel's author colin wilson he detested all of these changes in fact there was a quote from him in his autobiography. John fowles had once told me the film of the magazine was the worst movie ever made after seeing lifeforce. I sent a postcard telling him. I had gone one better now. Wilson in particularly heated the chopping out of the entire buildup of the film he thought that if you jump into the middle of the story there's really nowhere interesting that you're going to be able to go from there. He felt the build up was definitely definitely necessary and by almost taking it completely out they were doing the story a big disservice now because tobe hooper was over schedule and cannon was running out of money his odd onset behavior became a highlight those very notorious a lot of people speculated the was coked out or drunk or what have you. He was approachable double. I mean patrick stewart said that he was his favourite of directors he had worked with at least up to that point. He never got to shoot all of the scenes he wanted for this film though because that money that time was completely ticking down that resulted in a number of compromises to the story that were intended to be put into the overall story never did get to be made aid because cannon was very anti for him to wrap it up. It was going on six months of a shoot here who did manage to put together. Something he felt was going going to be workable enough to produce a one hundred twenty eight minute cut of the film despite cooper having the green light for the entire shoot that greenlight did not carry over into into the post production decisions especially when the distributor tristar pictures saw the final product tristar felt that hooper's cut was just too long. They especially thought it took too along to get going to the good parts of the film. The ordered several big cuts to the mostly dialogue free scenes aboard the space shuttle at the beginning of the film to give the story up better pace that they felt felt would avoid those early lulls take people out of the story and nevertheless due to these decisions. Some of these scenes would have to be re dubbed. They had to be re scored. Some of the actors yeah no longer available they had their voices dubbed by obvious other voice actors and that gave life force the b-movie field cannon have been trying to avoid the the whole time because they wanted this to be an alien movie. The international cut would end up running about one hundred and sixty minutes about twelve minutes were cut out of toby. Huber's originally intended intended cut the us version was even worse they cut fifteen more minutes from that international cut and it gave it a run time of one hundred one minutes. Although the international cut was unavailable unavailable on video for a long time especially in the united states the international cut is now the choice that you will go to if you purchase the blu ray or see streaming oftentimes. James is the international cut life was not the original title of the film it was written in the screenplay forum under the same title as the book the space vampires kenneth films though who already had a reputation for producing low budget b movies thought that people are going to assume that it was the same kind of low budget movie the trashy movies that they tended ended to put out. They didn't want it to be associated with that. It was going to be an entirely new type of film. They were gonna rope their way into becoming a big studio and they were betting big on this film becoming that tent pole release that they had been hoping for may put in twenty five million dollars of their money into shooting budget that made it the most expensive film that he had ever produced adduced really they decided that lifers had a better and more prestigious ring to it hooper though argued against it he thought it sounded pretentious overly serious not at all the kind of movie that he i was trying to make here cannon wanted more epic feel also to the score for the american release the injected some last minute song cues by michael came in to replace some of the tonal sounds than those rhythms that had been already done by henry mancini henry mancini was asked but was unavailable to restore the scenes as they were chopped down so they brought him michael came in to try to high hi up as much as you could anyway the henry mancini score and to put his own overlay over it with a lot of different rhythms and different beats that gave it that space feel john dykstra extra he had a big claim to fame he provided the effects work for star wars and star trek the motion picture and the battle star galactica tv series he delivers here some pretty impressive individuals especially in a lot of smoke effects delighting the neon. Look the umbrella like alien craft some really truly intense body transformations between the human actors in their desiccated counterparts. All of that was done through the use of a variety of face and body cast work over four hundred total artists worked on lifeforce tenth that amount just worked on the prosthetic pieces alone so this was a very big undertaking but it looks really good in certain parts other parts of a pretty schlocky indeed it in a way in fact you know a lot of this was a rush job unfortunately so they didn't quite get the look and the sound as good as they could have done under normal circumstances stances now despite having only seven minutes of total screen time. If you remember anything about life force as film at all is likely going to be the nude performance from the then nineteen year old french ballerina turned actress mathilda may but until the may not know english at the time she had the speaker lines phonetically and then and she ended up getting dubbed over on top of that she plays the siren like space girl. She's building the credits as spice girl. She's actually called groom in the novel. No space girls not naturally human she took on this shape and adopted the english language by taking it because she read the mind of colonel carlson and used his imagination imagination and is notions of the perfect woman to be what was presented to him and his crew and to this end it has led some to study this film more about the male attraction to the female form but also their fear of it. The men into story finds speaks girl to be irresistible. She controls their minds without allure. Even though they awful well at the time that she is actually using their lustful urges to draw them to her and eventually drain them of their energy of their essence of their body fluids. It's in what could be called an obvious metaphor for sexual intercourse and in this exploration of both the attraction worrisome qualities that men have toward unrestrained female expression of sexuality not that ties in especially as relevant t._v. London location london society was especially in upheaval losing their traditionally reserved nature to find londoners feeding off of each other for restoration of their own life force and that included expression of those urges tord those even of the same sex which was fairly novel for a big mainstream release in the mid nineteen eighties nevertheless given that there was an aids epidemic patrick that was running rampant. There was all over the media in the mid. Nineteen eighty s the story of how the succumbing of one's lustful nature to have rampant sexual relations with anyone and anything around you even if it impacts others with this fast moving and debilitating disease. Maybe they hit a little too close to home for some to see the entertainment in this material so because of this and many other factors lifeforce would be met at the time of its release with mostly negative reviews in fact almost all negative reviews when it was released in june of nineteen eighty-five although with ended up debuted at number four at the box office in its initial release unfortunately it was going head-to-head ahead with what would end up being the number one film that week the more positive minded sifi effort that had some similarities but definitely was much more going in the other direction cocoon all total life would garner eleven point six million dollars in the united states that was not even half of that twenty five million dollars production budget and some of its failures can be chopped up to these bad reviews but to a large extent it can also be seen as a shift in attitudes in the mid nineteen eighties following the success of steven spielberg films steven spielberg hooper had great success with for poltergeist but steven spielberg had really changed the way that we look at aliens the end alien creatures. They were not destroyer of worlds anymore. They are our friends in films like close encounters of the third kind e t the extraterrestrial you know all kinds of knockoffs knockoffs were getting put into theaters with aliens that were our buddies our friends our savior's all these filled the theaters in the two or three years that led up to light. I forces release. I mean not even film. That's well regarded today like john. Carpenter's the thing you know that was a much more negative portrayal of aliens however even though it's considered today as this all out genre classic you go back to the nineteen eighty s that film didn't even get twenty million dollars at the box office in the wake of those more family friendly only space adventures and carpenter's film didn't even have the additional issue of that erotic tone of tobe hooper story to try to contend with now despite its failures at the box office at the time lifeforce would eventually of course like all these movies that i talk about here on this show they would it would eventually find audience the audience that really appreciates it because it's weird because it's sometimes inspired in its choices and has garnered that considerable cult following over the years among critics and fans alike more our modern critics tend to enjoy toby hoops risk taking with the story as well as hoopers commitment to the material especially in how he tries to mesh the tone of the science fiction of yesteryear from on the fifties and sixties into the more contemporary notions of morbid sex in shocking violence that really took hold in the genre of horror in the nineteen eighties and despite despite tobe hooper's emphasis on trying to find immediacy in his film lifeforce ironically seems much better the more it is distance by the time and place in cinema emma in which it was released into the world and for me. I think that makes it a three star out of four movie three stars on my scale means. I do think that it is recommended for people ooh this kind of movie. If you like your weird movies kind of little bit campy little bit offbeat definitely high-concept and all kinds of crazy it really is this mix of high budget b movie. I mean in its totality. I think you're going to enjoy life force if you haven't seen it already. I don't think that this is like upper-echelon. Nineteen eighties film however. I think you know if you give it a shot. If you're open to this kind of movie if what i've said sounds of appeal to you i definitely do recommend at the very least you'll have a good time even if you don't think it's a very good movie because honestly it really is not a very good movie when you put all the pieces together but there's just something about it. Maybe it's mathilda. May i don't know but it's definitely really very watchable and enjoyable film on a certain level so three stars out of four is what i'm giving life force so as i mentioned this three part series that i'm talking talking about. It's going to be looking at the human beings encountering an alien and taking it aboard their spaceship or whatnot and that alien ends up killing everyone on board of course this one film comes to mind. I think above all others when you think about this film that film did not come out in the nineteen eighty s though it came out in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine with just missing however however it's sequel did come out in the nineteen eighties and it's one. I want to talk about so i'm going to incorporate it. Into this nineteen eighty s show. I'm going to start off with ridley scott's nineteen seventy-nine all-time genre classic alien for the next review of course that will lead up to aliens the following week excel checkout alien and aliens for the next two weeks and you're going to be able to keep up with reviews as they come out so alien. I'm really looking forward to valid probably seen it about twenty times. I probably don't need to watch it again but i enjoy watching it so much. Of course i will do it for the review for next week so definitely looking forward to that figure everyone for listening. If the of your own thoughts on anything i talked about today about life for us or anything else or whether you want the show to go eventually you can find my contact information on my website at quip stir dot net key w. i._p. S. t. e. r. dot net until then thank you so much for listening and joining me on this trip around the world in eighty s movies <hes> <hes> <music>.

toby hooper colin wilson don jacoby director united states cannon london michael dan o'bannon haley patrick stewart the cannon group toby huber ridley scott vince leo judy Nra Tom carlson Peter firth the cannon group golan globus
I am Princess Leia!  | 4

Inside Star Wars

32:06 min | 1 year ago

I am Princess Leia! | 4

"The. The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars part four. Next casting days are never fun for anyone hundreds of starry eyed actors struggling for that one. Big great, come on and sit down. For the filmmaker hours of running lines. Mostly forgettable, always, exhausting, name Kerry, Kerry Fisher in front of Kerry to desks at one, the director of American graffiti, who is now casting Star Wars at the other. Filmmaker Brian depalma, who was simultaneously casting for the Stephen King horror movie, Kerry to casting sessions at once great way to kill two birds with one stone or more like five hundred actors with one stone diploma did all the talking. Carrie Fisher aren't you Debbie Reynolds daughter as always carry him to pause with the answer to that question, make this audition easier or harder? What the fuck did it matter. It was what it was. No, it's more. Like Debbie Reynolds, is my mother. She used that line before, and it works. Carey was always great at dialogue. So you just worked with Warren Beatty. Right. Did you enjoy that? Yes. I did. He was. Oh holy shit now. What Kerry had committed the cardinal sin. Preoccupation chitchat never begin. A sentence whose ending you haven't rehearsed I, he helped me a lot. He he helped my work in the other screenwriter. They really they really, they really made my, my work better inside Carrie Fisher was suffering a nuclear core meltdown. Her container vessel was breached in toxic gibberish was escaping into the atmosphere. Oh, please. Let God in his infinite wisdom. Hit pause and rewind on his celestial tape deck before it's too late. Really carry HUD. They do that. They make your work better. Well, we had to do the scene over and over with, with, with food. I had to offer warrant a baked apple. And then I asked him if he's making it with my mother, you know, sleeping with her. Yeah. We know what making it means Kerry, if you could hear inside carries mind, all you hear shit shit shit shit shit shit shit. So what have you done since shampoo? I went to drama school in England. I I'm still there actually I mean, I'm not there, I'm here. But you you know what I mean? Wait, you're in school. So what would you do? If you've got one of these jobs, either carrier, Star Wars. I mean, it would depend on the on the part. I guess I'd leave. I would, I guess, powerful and merciful, Lord help me now share, we know what you mean Kerry. Well, it's nice to meet you stop at the desk outside for your sides. Mr dapa. Mr lucas. Thank you. Thank you. That's chance carry last chance for something anything before you step out that door. You know, it just occurred to me, the idea of casting Kerry as Carey in a movie called Kerry. Really? A dictionary. Full awards, those ones, I pick any in that order Kerry would've banged her head against the wall of a casting assistant wasn't at that very moment between her in that wall and pressing papers into her hand. Ms Fisher here. You sides, two doors down, you'll read on video. Carey. Carrie fisher? Are you ready after that performance in that room with those two up and coming? Filmmakers, Carrie Fisher was certain of one thing, of course, she was not ready her. Pulse was pounding everywhere. Pulse can get to. She was sweating. And sweating was not her thing. Her eyes were swimming. She was about to pass out. She was not ready. She would never be ready again. Sure, let's do this thing. Witness the rise of a hero marvel studios presents captain marvel an all new adventure from a previously unseen period in the history of the marvel cinematic universe in this action packed story, the MC you introduces its first standalone female franchise, title character. Carol danvers, aka captain, marvel said in the nineteen nineties, captain marvel sidesteps, the traditional origin, story template with Carol danvers already. Possessing her superhero powers, leaving her earthly life behind. She joins an intergalactic elite military team called star force. But after Denver's is trained and become a valued member of star force, she finds herself back on earth with new questions about her past. She quickly lands on the radar of Nick fury and the Paramus, worked together against a formidable enemy in the form of the scrolls who are planning an invasion of earth. Get marvel studios captain marvel now on digital and. Movies anywhere. Blu. Ray in four K ultra HD. Days later, Carrie Fisher was home doing what actors do waiting. Hello. It was a raging. And have you ever had one of those moments one of those hold your breath, moments those split seconds that seem to drag on for hours? Breathe breathe. They do. Who doesn't I run your wars? It didn't rain in LA, and it was raining in LA Carrie Fisher, was standing in the middle of the street in the downpour. The heavy drops of water were bouncing off her as she held up her arms and shouted to everyone. And no one. Frincis. Leah Leah layup. I am Princess Leia. The cars kept driving, one pedestrian look sure way and shook his head, this was not the first time in actor ran into the streets of LA and proclaimed to the heavens that they adjust one apart. It would not be the last carry knew that, and she didn't care, this was her moment to save her, and she would save her every last drop of it. Laya. They would pay your next to nothing. They would flyer to the set economy class, but none of that mattered. Because now and forever, she would be, what no one else could be what no one else would ever be. She was. Princess leia. This was going to be tricky. Somebody had to have the job of creating the sounds of Star Wars every grunting grown every wine and whistle every Zappin zoom every swish in Swoosh, and that somebody was Ben Burtt, the instructions from George Lucas were clear, then I want you to collect weird. Strange sounds go to the zoo collect all the animal. Sounds go to transportation places find some, some weird zaps in Craxton snaps. Not a lot of direction. But Ben Burtt got the point he would build a world of sound everything in Star Wars, had a new sound all its own. It's a few weeks work birth thought building that sound library and twenty nine years and ten months later, it was finally complete Burt had collected sounds all his life as a kid, he'd HotWired drive in audio. So he could record the sound. But this, this was something different. He was here at the zoo to record animals, real animals in the real world birds, elephants, camels lions seals walrus and bears. You had to get close. Anyway, you could today's task record that bear for what Lucas described as a giant teddy bear like a big dog something he called Lookie here. We'll here we'll, we'll Wookey. Ben Burtt would bang on Kinchen cables, and record vibrating film, projectors. He would speak into a synthesizer to distort his voice, he cou he beep, you'd whistle that became the vocabulary of our, to detour. He borrowed a scuba. Mouthpiece in huffed into it. That became the signature breathing sound of Darth Vader on one of his regular audio scouting sessions. He was in Sears in past an old fashioned cathode Ray TV and stunk. He pointed a microphone at the TV and waved in left and right up and down. The employee's stared on disbelief. Is there something wrong with him? Don't get too close that became the iconic sound. Of a lightsaber. Another day of casting for Star Wars was about to begin. But first, George Lucas had to get around the construction. He was here to meet with legendary casting agent. Fred Reuss, George, I'm getting a new door. Put in. I can see that as going Harrison, fine, Fred fine. Hi, George Harrison. You building doors. Now. We got a new baby on the way George and we like to eat. George different. I know I know you don't want to cast in from graffiti and Star Wars. But I really want you to take another look at Harris Fred, Fred Fred, you know how I feel. I know I know I know look, if he's here all this week, working on that door take some week to make a door. Just just have him run lines with the other actors. That's it just, just heaven run lines Harrison Ford putting adore. All this week, how can be just coincidence. Right, fred. Yes. Just a coincidence, George Harrison. Yeah. Just a fucking coincidence. All right, Fred, but Christopher Walken is going to be a tough act to beat the actors came one after the last, and then they left, John Travolta, Nick Nolte. Tommy Lee Jones Jodie Foster, Al Pacino, Kurt Russell dozens more hundreds more. All came all went and running lines with many of them, Harrison Ford, Kurt Russell. Hey, George Kurt. Meet Harrison Ford, high high. So Kurt the stories about a farm boy sent off to the big city gets involved in this adventure Harrison. You wanna add anything, don't ask me, George, you can right this ship. That doesn't mean anybody can read it after a while a funny thing happened Harrison Ford never became Hudd solo, but more and more hunt solo was becoming Harrison Ford. Making a robot a droid wasn't easy in those days it Kenny while over here and show George. Kenny Baker was three foot eight inches tall from stem to stern, and he was sandwiched inside a wooden mockup of our two D two. What do you think George? Can can you move in that thing? Kenny barely. Yeah, Kenny, wait, about seventy pounds are to Wade, another eighty feel in there. Quite lovely. Actually, george. Not so much. Really Kenny was strapped into an uncomfortable harness. There were screws going through the robot's head that occasionally. Penetrated KENNY'S, head to and in the blistering desert sun, the temperature inside the shell would soar dear from a few yards away that gleaming golden droid. C three P O was teetering. Hold him up. Hold them up. Thank you, gentlemen. Anthony Daniels had never been a fan of science fiction. He walked out of Kubrick's, two thousand one and being encased in C, three PO was doing nothing to change his mind. Daniels was raised on the stage proper Shakespearean roles in a spate of English gentlemen. And now this. Bringing C three PO to life was like being inside a rubik's cube. Daniel said with people on the outside arguing over the instructions. Tony, you look great like a golden God, really. So the love affair would wear off once the crew got used to the man in the golden suit. They tended to forget, there was a man in that suit it was lonely. He said you end up being treated like a toaster. And no one says good morning to a toaster. While C three PO and are two D two were almost inseparable throughout a series of Star Wars movies things were more complicated for the men behind the masks. Good morning Tony. Kenny can't you see them having a conversation? He told me when the movie's over what do you think about touring our characters, we can make some good money. I don't do many of these conventions go away. Little man. Tony the best part about playing adroit with you as that. I can't see or hear you. Kenny are to can't even speak, you might as well be bucket. Piss off. Wanker. In two thousand eight Baker and Daniels were invited to a cast reunion. When Baker was asked whether he show up. He said it depends, if you invite his lordship the one with the golden balls. I'm out. Lunch at Chasen's a famous LA eatery. This was not George Lucas kind of place, but he was putting on a show today. Can I help you sir? Yes. Lucas reservation for two. Oh, yes, sir. Mr. Guinness already here waiting. Oh, I don't think he likes waiting, Mr. Lucas Bulos. This classic LA celebrity lunch seen always made Lucas uncomfortable. Hopefully he gets light in outta here without being noticed. Mostly Chasen's was all about being noticed Alfred Hitchcock and Bruce stern over here. William freakin in Orson wells over there, but Lucas was focused on one table, only, and one particular lunch guest, Mr. Guinness. I'm George Lucas. Do you know Mr. Lucas, that there is not one decent Cup of tea in this entire country? Well, nice to meet you, too, on a Guinness was in LA, finishing the Neil Simon movie murder by death, and he was already. Annoyed. You know, Mr. Lucas, your people delivered a script to my dressing room. Yes, I know. I don't like scripts delivered to my dressing room. Oh, I'm sorry. And you know what? I like even less than that. No. What science fiction? This wasn't going great. But George Lucas was passionate and he was sincere to qualities than impressed Guinness. Alec Guinness was about to produce a play in London, and he needed money Star Wars might be fanciful distasteful. Maybe even disgraceful. But it was a paycheck, Guinness described Lucas, as a small young man with a black beard, tiny Welsh shaped, hands poor rish teeth, glasses and not much sense of humor, touch, boring, but otherwise likable, to a friend, he wrote, I may accept if they come up with proper money science fiction gives me pause fairy tale. Rubbish big part, though, and from the director of American graffiti. Paul lukas. They finish lunch and shook hands. The famed British thespian in the man who would be Paul Lukas. This was going to work this had to work, please God, let this work. Looking for something to give you dad or celebrate a recent grad get him? The coolest gadget in the galaxy and electric toothbrush from quip. All right. All right now, it's not quite as cool as a lightsaber. I get it. But at least it shaped the same way and this sleek little toothbrush really packs, a punch quips built in two minute timer makes sticking to good habits. Simple. It's got a multi use cover. You can use it as a stand, you can mounted on your mirror, and when it's time to hit the road, you quipped toothbrush automatically becomes a travel toothbrush. I take mine everywhere. Best of all, new brush heads of delivered to your door on a dentist recommended schedule every three months for just five dollars. Those are just some of the reasons why I love quip in why over one million happy healthy mounds, due to quip starts at just twenty five dollars. And if you go to get quip dot com slash Yoda right now you can get your first refill pack for free that your I refill pack free at G E. T Q, U I, P dot com. Tom slash. Y. O. DA. Inside Star Wars is sponsored by wicks dot com. 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That's the one I have with wicks premium plants, you get more storage, a free domain for year and a whole lot more. That's wicks dot com code. Y. O. D A for ten percent off any premium plan. During the day, Lucas continued to grind away at the script. It was time to figure a budget, and one of the core ingredients would be special effects, Lucas set with John Dykstra, a special effects. Wiz, whose job would be to make the impossible real. So what do you think John George? You have five hundred fifty effect, shots, right and two years to do it, right. You, you do know that Kubrick's thousand one had that long to execute half that many shots for a lot more money and they barely did it in time, right? Yep. I, I know that, but you can do it can't you. Texters is got wide everyone around him. Do anything about this business told him this was impossible naive, even many wouldn't touch this project is career was flashing before his eyes. But if he was to go down in flames what an exhilarating way to go. You can't do it right. John. I can do a church. This happens thousand times every day in LA an actor gets home from an audition. It went fine. But not find enough later. It'll be time to sit by the phone. Wait for the call that probably won't come. That's later. Now it's time to wake up the guest on your couch and stop his infernal snoring, Mark. Oh, sorry. Robert, I. I must have fall asleep Mark, dude. It's eleven in the morning. Lebanon them. Our name. What's your dish in additions over man? It's an audition, Mark. I don't know. You're have a beer I opener. Thanks need it. Needed. Addition was for Apocalypse Now. Right. So what was Coppola like, well, went out for the surfer role, and he tells me, I'm too old for too old, too young, too tall too short male to female. Yeah, I know. So he tells me to go across the hall because George Lucas is auditioning for his new movie. Oh, that, that star thing. Yeah, yeah, yeah. The star the star thing so what the hell right? I addition for the role of Han solo. Wait. What, what's a Han solo? Exactly outta co too old too young to tall to shore. Right. Right. Right. You know, Mark, there's a pardon Star Wars is perfect for you. Seven and it just did the pilot for a TV series. Eight is enough. Eight is enough. Mark, really wanna be dick van patents bitch. Hey, hey, it's TV. Robert. It's steady. Mark manner with you. This is a movie in its George Lucas in the part, the part is perfect for you. What's the role Ernest teenage farm? Boy in outer space. Hey, it's a job practice your mid western accent. Mark Hamill did practices mid western accent, and it didn't take him long to realize he wouldn't need it. But first, he had an audition to make he cleaned himself up in combed his hair. He straightened the pillows on his hosts couch, the only decent piece of furniture and Robert small living room, the Mark break your leg. It was the best vice one actor could offer another and the good fortune would not be Mark, hamels alone because a few years later, hamels host, Robert Wood nail an audition of his own. It was the title role in west Craven's nightmare on elm street, and Robert Englund would become. Freddie. Krueger. Come on in. Mark Hamill, right? Yes, sir. George Lucas, Mark. Meet Harrison Ford. He's reading hunt solo in you're reading Luke got it. Okay. Four pages George, but see how far we get. Hey, hurson. Yeah, what's, what's with this dialogue, who talks like this. I don't know. Kid just read it. Okay, go Mark. We can't turn around fear is their greatest weapon. I doubt if the actual security, there is any greater than it wasn't aquiline, or sell us in what there is, is most likely directed towards large scale assault. Okay, good. Thank you. Was that good? Was it awful? Who knew Mark Hamill understood not a word of this dialogue. He left the audition secure in one thought this part, it would never be his. George Lucas needed to create a science fiction universe, and construct real pieces of that universe. He turned to junk George I need your okay on this expenditure. You wanna you wanna buy thousands of pounds of junk. Yes. See the comm link will be this faucet. The lightsaber handle will be this old photo flash unit for the blasters. We're gonna take a part of bunch of World War, Two machine guns and put them together wrong and, and, and that will work. Sure. We'll just we'll just repaint everything and put weird writing on. What about the glowing light savers? You know, those are plasma blades, powered by Khyber crystal, I don't know what those words mean George they'll be wooden. Swords coated with reflective material. That looks eliminated when photograph through I have silver mirror. I don't know what those words knee. Okay. Go. It was just another day at work at a London hospital for Peter Mayhew, Peter misses badly room to thirty four needs to be walked to the loop is Sarah be right there, sir. Mayhew was seven foot three and the gentlest of giants. This was his day job. He was deputy head porter at King's College hospital. He was an orderly Peter. We need some jello in room one fourteen right now. Jehlum one fourteen Reddaway, sir Mayhew came to the attention of Lucas, and company. When they spotted an article about people with big feet, and few people had feet bigger than Peter Mayhew's. Here's your jello. Mr. Campbell have a wonderful day, may he would spend most as invalid in yak, Harris, Han Solo's trustee. Copilot Chewbacca Peter. But when he wasn't on the call sheet, he was always on call at the hospital. I'll be right there, sir. When shooting ended so did Peter's acting career temporarily at least he went back to his job at the hospital. As badly. My name is Peter and I'm here to take you to the loop. Pre-production was buzzing along, but there was big trouble brewing and no matter how little time Lucas had for sleep. He couldn't sleep if he tried. Fox still hadn't given the production of green light. They were still dragging their feet. No green light means. No budget. No budget means he couldn't complete sets droids costumes, anything it was all up in the air. Snowy live. More than two years had passed since the agreement memo with FOX Lucas had not seen a dime since the original ten thousand dollars for the first draft of the script. No winks no nods. No contract. No, nothing. He had sunk nearly half a million dollars of his own money into the film every penny. He had made from graffiti was put back into Star Wars. His friends were losing faith. Francis, Coppola warned George. He might lose everything on this picture. Nobody in this town risks their own money. He told him every week every day, Lucas was bleeding cash. Meanwhile, FOX was one Titanic flop away from pulling the plug. And then it happened. A world class fiasco was unleashed on movie, goers, nationwide. It was an expensive bomb. Starring Gene Hackman LIZA Minelli in Burt Reynolds, lucky lady was the title, and it was anything but lucky for George Lucas. George lucas. When the head of production calls with that tone in his voice. It's not good news. More as renewing Star Wars, or manning, a couple of months until then we have to show you. Fucks withdrawing its support after stringing Lucas along for more than two years. What nerve Lucas was distraught? An angry and desperate and depressed in heartbroken. All at once he would start shopping the project elsewhere again United Artists again. Universal again in Lucas old nemesis. Ned. Tannin. Franklin's. No faint, and your Belet input off. Lucas was dejected humiliated. These two months came and went. George lucas. Orange ascension as per se, one Star Wars, but the budget will make up seven point five million. Laddy. You're asking me to make a fifteen million dollar movie for half price. Lucas was near the breaking point. He had spent more than two years on this project. And every penny of his own money, all on the promise of a yes. From FOX in a budget big enough to make that. Yes. Real. He would have to cut deep into the muscle of this movie to make this work. He would have to scrimp and save compromise and sacrifice. He would have to cut necessary scenes trim FX eliminate characters and subplots. He would have to make a version of his movie that fell short of his dream. This was exactly why he hated the studio's exactly why he would always insist on control. There were never be enough money. There were never be enough time anxiety would skyrocket morale would tank, all thanks to the business decisions of FOX. Something. I know. I don't know. Larry I don't I don't I don't know if I could do it. I just I just don't know of one thing he was. Absolutely. Sure, in the end, if it did get made, nobody would ever make any money from Star Wars. From one day. This is a seven part deep. Dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable. Classic movie. This has been part four of inside Star Wars. Listen for a new episode every Wednesday, written narrated by Mark Ramsey audio design, and production by Jeff Schmidt produced by Mark Ramsey media, executive producers, marshal Louis and Hernan Lopez for wondering subscribe on eople podcasts Spotify. Iheartradio wondering dot com or wherever you are listening right now. If you like what you're hearing. We'd love you to give us a five star rating in review ass-, and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe, find a link to subscribe to inside Star Wars and more information on the notes just tap or swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors, please support this show by supporting them join the conversation on Twitter at wondering media and at Mark Ramsey. Media. Use hashtag inside Star Wars on Facebook. Search inside Star Wars, or follow wondering, dot FM slash inside group. See there. Star Wars is inspired by the stories of the making of this iconic film, in some cases, we can't know exactly what was said, but dialogue scenes have been reconstructed based on extensive research, from Allah, Guinness, come from his biography, positively final appearance and or from his biography. Alec Guinness authorized biography by piers. Paul read. You can take this shit yours, but you sure can't say it.

George Lucas John George LA Kerry Fisher Carrie Fisher George Harrison Lucas Alec Guinness Mark Mr. Lucas Bulos KENNY'S Mark Ramsey Paul lukas Kenny Baker Carey George Kurt Warren Beatty Tony PO Anthony Daniels
I am Princess Leia! | E4

Inside The Exorcist

31:06 min | 1 year ago

I am Princess Leia! | E4

"The following may contain mature content from wondering i'm mike ramsey in this is inside star wars parts that casting days per never fun for anyone hundreds of starry eyed actors struggling for that one big break come in sit down for the filmmaker hours of running lines mostly forgettable always exhausting name kerry carrie fisher in front of kerry to to desks at one the director of american graffiti who is now casting star wars at these other filmmaker brian depalma who is simultaneously casting the stephen king horror movie kerry to casting sessions at once great way to kill two birds with one stone were more like five hundred actors with one stone depalma did all the talking carrie fisher aren't you debbie reynolds daughter has always kerry had a pause with he answered that question make this so dishing easier or harder and a what the fuck did it matter it was what it was no it's more like debbie reynolds is my mother and she used that line before it works in kerry was always great it dialogue so you just worked with warren beatty right did you enjoy that yes i did he was a oh holy shit now watch kerry had committed the cardinal sin pre audition chitchat never begin a sentence who is ending you have unrehearsed hearst first he helped me a lot he he helped my working together screenwriter they really they really they really made my my work better inside carrie fisher was suffering a nuclear core meltdown her container vessel was breached in toxic gibberish she was escaping into the atmosphere oh please let god in is infinite wisdom hit pause and rewind on his celestial tape deck before it's too late really kerry how they do that how they make it work better well we did do a the seen over and over with with with food i had to offer warren baked apple and then i asked if he's making it with my mother you know sleeping with her yeah we know what making it means kerry if you could hear inside carey's mind all you hear shit shit shit shit shit shit shit so what have you done since shampoo i went to drama school in england i i i'm still there actually i mean i'm not there i'm here but you you know when you're in school so what would you do if you've got one of these jobs other carriers star wars i mean it would depend on the on the part i i guess i leave i would guess powerful and merciful lord help me now share we know what you mean kari oh well it's nice to meet you stop at a desk outside sides mr depalma easter lucas thank you thank you that's chance kerry less transfer something anything before you step out that door you know it just occurred to me be idea of casting terry as kerry in a movie called kerry honor those really is a dictionary word those ones i pick any in that order kerry would've banged her head against the wall of the casting assistant wasn't at that very moment between her and that wall impressing papers into her hand ms a fisher sides two doors down you'll rate on video kerry a carrie fisher are you ready after that performance in that room with those two up and coming filmmakers carrie fisher was certain of one thing of course she was not ready her pulse was punting everywhere pulse can get to she was sweating in sweating was not her thing her eyes were swimming she was about to pass out she was not ready she would never be ready again sure let's do this thing days later carrie fisher was home doing what actors do waiting hello it was raging aunt have you ever had one of those moments one of those hold your breath moments those split seconds did seem dragged on for hours brief brief they do who doesn't it didn't rain in elway and it was raining you know like carrie fisher was standing in the middle of the street in the downpour downpour the heavy drops of water were bouncing off her is she held up her arms and showed it to everyone in no one i am princess leo leo i am the cars kept driving one pedestrian looks away and shook his head this was not the first time and actor ran into the streets the valet and proclaim to the heavens they adjust one apart it would not be the last kerry knew that she she didn't care this was her moment to savor and she would save every last drop of but i am prince they would pay you're next to nothing they would fire to the set economy class but none of that mattered because now and forever she would be what no one else could be what no one else would ever be she was princess laya this was going to be tricky somebody had had the job of creating the sounds of star wars every grunting grown every wine in whistle every zapping zoom every swish in swoop in that somebody but he was ben burtt instructions from george lucas were clear then i want you to collect weird strange sounds go to the zoo collect all animal sounds good at transportation places find some some weird zaps and cracks and snaps not a lot of direction ben burtt got the point he would build a world of sound everything in star wars had a new sound all its own it's a few weeks work or thought building that sound library in twenty nine years and ten months later it was finally complete burt had collected sounds all his life as a kid he's hot wire drive in audio so he could record the south but this this was something different he was here at the zoo record animals real animals in the real world birds elephant camels lion steals a wall russ and bears you had to get close anyway you could today's task record that bear for what lucas described as a giant teddy bear like a big dog something he called lookie here what you're working working working and then birchwood bang on tension cables and record vibrating film projectors and you would speak into a synthesizer to distort is voicing coup whistle that became the vocabulary larry of opportunity to he borrowed a scuba mouthpiece and that became the signature breathing sound of darth vader on one of his regular audio scouting sessions he wasn't sears and passed an old fashioned cathode ray tv in stumped he pointed a microphone at the td and waved and left and right on down and they employees dared on in disbelief and there's something wrong with him i dunno don't get to cloud that became he iconic sound of a lightsaber another day of casting for star wars was about to begin but first george lucas had to get around the construction who is here to meet with legendary casting agent fred bruce much step george i'm getting a new door put in i concede see that how's it going harrison fine fred find hi george harrison you're building doors now we've got a new baby on the way george and we like to eat george different i know i know you don't wanna cast anyone from proceeding be in star wars but i i really want you to take another look at harrison fred fred fred you know how i feel i know i know i know look like he's here all this week working on that door takes a moment to make a door just just having run lines with each other actors that's it just just having run line harrison ford putting in a door all this week how convenient just a coincidence right fred yes just a coincidence george harrison yeah just a fucking coincidence alright fred but christopher walken gonna be a tough act to beat these actors came one after the last and then they left john travolta nick nalty tommy lee jones jodie foster alpa chino kurt russell dozens more hundreds more all came all went in running lines with many of them harrison ford kurt russell hey george kurt he's a harrison ford high high so kurt the stories about a farm boy sent off to the big city gets involved in this adventure harrison you wanna add anything don't ask me george you could write this shift that doesn't mean anybody can read it after a while a funny thing happened harrison ford never became han solo but more and more han solo is becoming harrison ford in making a robot android wasn't easy in those days kenny while over here and show george kenny baker was three foot eight inches tall from stem to stern and he was sandwiched inside a would mockup of r two d to what do you think george kim kun you moving kenny up there early yeah kenny wait about seventy pounds are to wade another eighty does it feel in there quite lovely actually george not so much really kenny was strapped strapped into and uncomfortable harness there were screws going through the robots head that occasionally penetrated kenny's had to end in the blistering desert sun the temperature inside the shell would soar oh dear firm a few yards away that gleaming golden droid see three pl was teetering oldham up holding thank you gentlemen anthony daniels had never been a fan of science fiction he walked out of coober x two thousand one and being in case in c three pl was doing nothing to change his mind daniels was raised on the stage proper shakespearean roles in a spate of english gentleman and now this bringing seats repealed a life was like being inside a rubik's cube daniel set with people any outside arguing over the instructions donate you look great like a golden god really the love affair would wear off once the crew got used to the men in the golden suit they tend to forget there was a man in that suit it was lonely he said you end up being treated like a toaster and no one says good morning to a toaster well see three peo in order to detour almost inseparable a series of star wars movies things were more complicated for the men behind the masks good morning tony kenny catch you see i'm having a conversation tony when the movies over what do you think about touring his character's we could make some good money i don't do many of these conventions go away little man tony the best part about playing android with you is that i can't see or hear you kenny are to can't even speak you might as well be fucking pissed off winker in two thousand eight baker and daniels were invited do a cast reunion when baker was asked whether he'd show up he said it depends if you invite his lordship the one with the golden balls i'm out to lunch at chase in his famous ellie eatery this is not george lucas kind of place but he was putting on a show today can i help you sir yes 'em lucas reservation per to oh yes service begins is already here waiting oh i don't think he likes waiting mr lucas views this classic l a's celebrity lunch seen always made lucas uncomfortable hopefully he could slide in and out of here without being noticed mostly jason's was all about being noticed alfred hitchcock and bruce dern over here william freakin in orson welles over there but lucas was focused on one table only in one particular lunch guest is the guinness i'm george lucas do you know mr lucas but there is not one decent cup of tea in the entire country well nice to meet you too alec guinness wasn't outlay finishing the neil simon movie murder by death and he was already annoyed you know mr look as you're people delivered a script to my dressing room yes i know i don't like scripts delivered to my dressing room oh i'm sorry and you know what i like even lesson that a know what science fiction this wasn't going great but george lucas was passionate and he was sincere to qualities then impressed guinness alec in this was about to produce a play in london in he needed money star wars might be fanciful so full distasteful and maybe even disgraceful but it was a paycheck guinness describe lucas as a small young man with a black beard tiny well shaped hands porridge teeth glasses and not much sense the humor a touch boring but otherwise likable to a friend he wrote i may except if they come up with proper money science fiction gives me pause fairy tale rubbish big part though in from the director of american graffiti paul lucas they finish launch in shook hands the famed british that's been in the man who would be paul lucas this what's going to work this had to work please god let this work looking for something to give you dad or celebrator recent grad getting the coolest gathered in the galaxy an electric toothbrush from quipped all all right now it's not quite as cool as the lightsaber i get it but at least the shape the same way in this league little toothbrush really packs a punch quips built in two minute timer make sticking to good habits simple it's got a multi use cover you could use it as a stand you mounted on you're mirror and when it's time to hit the road you're quip toothbrush automatically becomes a travel toothbrush i take mine everywhere festival new brush heads of delivered to your door on a dentist recommended schedule every three months for just five dollars those are just some of the reasons why i love quip and why over one million happy healthy mouths due to quip starts at just twenty five dollars and if you go to get quip dot com slash yoda right now you can get your first refill pack for free free that's your first refill pack free at g e t q u i p dot com slash y o d f inside star wars is sponsored by wicks dot com you can get started building your very own professional website with wicks for free today by choosing from over five hundred stunning templates or you could start from scratch and build it yourself from there it's easy to change customize at anything you want everything is automatically optimized for any device vice desktop or mobile awake sites include built in seo tools so it's easy for people to find you online and in search engines like google and being and now you could even build your website with the help of artificial intelligence to make their site infinitely infinitely more personalized features like voice recognition capability chat bots it's it's really amazing stuff you have to check it out with wicks building a professional website his easy just asked me over one hundred forty million people who have already done it build a website of you're wrong with wicks today for free and if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code yoda you'll get ten percent off any premium plan that's the one i have with wicks premium plans you get more storage a free domain for year and whole lot more that's wicks dot com code why owed ea for ten percent off any premium plan during the day lucas continue to grind away at the script it was time to figure a budget in one of the core ingredients would be special effects lucas sat with john dykstra a special effects wiz whose job would be to make be impossible real so what do you think john george george you have five hundred fifty affects shots right end two years to do it right you you do know that cooper's two thousand one had that long to execute have that many shots for a lot more money and they barely did it in time right yeah i i know that but you can't do it can't you exercise got wide everyone around him who knew anything about this business told him this was impossible naive even many wouldn't touch this project is career was flashing before his eyes a but if he will go down in flames wasn't exhilarating way to go you can do right john i can do a george this happens a thousand times everyday anneli an actor gets home from an audition went fine but not find enough later it'll be time to sit by the phone wait for the called it probably won't come that's later now it's time to wake up the guest on your couch and stop his infernal snoring mark oh sorry robert i i must have fallen asleep mark dude it's eleven in the morning lebanon earning a which i'm sure addition additions over man nail it's an audition mark i don't know there have a beer i opener thanks nita additions ferrara apocalypse now right so what was a couple of like well 'em i went off of the surfer role and he tells me i'm too old for too old too young to tall too short to male to female yeah i know so he tells me to go across the hall because george lucas says auditioning for his new movie oh that a that star thing yeah yeah yeah the star star thing so what the hell right i auditioned for the role of han solo wait what what's the han solo exactly how'd it go to all too young to tall to shore right right right you know mark there's a pardon star wars is perfect for you a said man i just did the pilot for a tv series eight is enough aid is enough mark you really wanna be defend patents bitch hey hey it's tv robert steady mark meadows eighteen this is a movie innis george lucas in the part the part is perfect for you what's the role ernest teenaged farm boy in outer space hey it's a job practice you mid western accident mark hamill did practices midwestern accident and it didn't take long to realize he wouldn't need it but first he had an audition and make it clean himself up income and his hair you straighten the pillows on his hosts couch they only decent piece of furniture in robert small living room it mark bringing leg who's the best advice one actor could offer another in the good fortune would not be mark hamels alone because a few years later hamels host robert wood nailing audition of his own it was the title role in west craven's nightmare on elm street and robert england would become freddy krueger coming in mark hamill right george lucas mark meet a harrison ford he's reading han solo in you're reading look got it okay a a four pages george let's see how far we got hey a person yeah what's what's what this dialogue who talks like this a kid just redid okay go mark we can't turn around fear is the greatest weapon i doubt if he actual security there is any greater then it wasn't apple liars sell us in what there is is most likely directed towards large scale assault okay good thank you what's that good was at all fall who knew mark hamill understood not a word of this dialogue he lefty audition secure in one thought this part it never be his george lucas needed to create a science fiction universe and a construct real pieces of that universe he turned to junk a george chinese you're okay on this expenditure a you wanna you wanna buy thousands of pounds of junk yeah see the common link will be discussing the lightsaber handle will be this old photo flash unit for the blasters were take apart a bunch of world war two machine guns and put them together wrong in in in that'll work sure will just will just repaint everything and put weird riding on what about the glowing lightsabres you know those are plasma blades power by khyber crystal i don't know what those words mean george there'll be wouldn't swords coated with reflective material that looks illuminated when photograph through i have silver mirror i don't know what those words mean okay go it was just another day at work at a london hospital for peter mayhew heater misses badly room to thirty four needs to be walked to the new is sir i'll be right there sir may he was seven foot three and the gentlest of giants this was his day job he was deputy head porter at king's college hospital he wasn't orderly bitter we need some jello in room one fourteen right now jhelum one fourteen right away sir may who came to the attention of lucas and company when they spotted an article about people with big feet in few people ed feet bigger and peter may here's here's you're jello mr campbell have a wonderful day may who would spend most days in developed in yak harris han solo's trustee copilot chewbacca theater but when he wasn't on the call sheet he was always on call at the hospital i'll be right there sir when shooting ended soda peter's acting career temporarily at least you went back to his job at the hospital is badly my name is peter and i'm here to take you to the lose pre production was buzzing along but there were big trouble brewing in no matter how little time lucas adverse sleep he couldn't sleep if he tried fox still hadn't given the production a green light there were still dragging their feet no green light means no budget no budget means he couldn't complete sets droids costumes anything it was all up in there and we don't laugh more than two years have passed since they agreement memo with fox lucas had not seen a dime cynthia original ten thousand dollars with the first draft of the script no winks and nods no contract no nothing she had some nearly half a million dollars of his own money into the film every penny he had made from graffiti was put back into star wars his friends were losing saint francis coppola worn george he might lose everything on this picture nobody in this town risks their own money he told every week everyday lucas was bleeding cash meanwhile fox says one titanic flop away from pulling the plug and then it happened a world class fiasco was unleashed on movie goers nationwide it wasn't expensive bomb starring gene hackman lies manelli in burt reynolds lucky lady was the title and it was anything but lucky for george lucas george lucas charge when the head of production calls what that tone in his voice it's not good news josh allen star wars on that shut down here was fox withdrawing its support after stringing lucas along for more than two years what nerve lucas was distraught an angry in desperate and depressed and heartbroken all at once he would start shopping the project elsewhere again united artists again orange orange dancers universal again in lucas is old nemesis nick cannon at my house and apple lucas was dejected humiliated these two months came and went george lucas orange percent one star wars at one i now have a bloody you're you're asking me to make a fifteen million dollar movie for half price and charge lucas was near the breaking point he had spent more than two years on this project in every penny of his own money all and the promise of a yes from fox in a budget big enough to make that yes real he would have to cut deep in the muscle of this movie to make this work he would have scrimp and save compromise and sacrifice he would after cutting necessary scenes trim fx eliminate characters and subplots he would have to make a version of his movie that fell short of his dream this was exactly why he hated the studios exactly why she would always incest on control there would never be enough money there were never be enough time anxiety would skyrocket morale would tank all thanks to the business decisions a fox charge i don't know i don't know i don't i don't i don't know if i could do it i just i just don't know of one thing she was absolutely sure indian if it did get made nobody would ever make any money from star wars from laundry this is a seven part deep dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable classic movie this has been part for of inside star wars listen for new episodes every wednesday written in narrated by mark ramsey audio design and production by jeff smith produced by mark ramsey media executive producers producers marshall louis in hernan lopez for wondering subscribe on apple podcasts spotify iheartradio wondering dot com or wherever you are listening right now if you like what you're hearing we'd love you to give us a five star rating and review and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe fighter linked to subscribe to inside star wars and more information on the episode notes just tapper swipe over the cover art you'll also see some offers from our sponsors please support the show by supporting them join the conversation on twitter at one brea media and that mark ramsey media use hashtag inside star wars on facebook's search inside star wars or follow wondering dot fm slash inside group see their illegals that inside star wars is inspired by the stories on the making of this iconic snow in some cases we can't know exactly what was said for dialogue and things and then reconstructed based on extensive research firm alec guinness comes

mike ramsey kerry carrie fisher director brian depalma stephen king debbie reynolds two years ten percent one stone fifteen million dollar ten thousand dollars twenty five dollars twenty nine years million dollars seventy pounds eight inches five dollars three months seven foot ten months
I am Princess Leia!

Inside Psycho

31:06 min | 1 year ago

I am Princess Leia!

"In the following may contain mature content from wondering I'm Mark Ramsey and this is inside star our wars part for next casting days are never fun for anyone. Hundreds of starry eyed actors struggling. I'm for that one big break. Come on and sit down for the filmmaker hours of running lines mostly forgettable always exhausting name Kerry Carrie Fisher in front of carry two who desks at one the director of American graffiti who is now casting star wars at the other filmmaker Brian Depalma who was simultaneously casting for the Stephen King Horror Movie Kerry to casting sessions at once. It's great way to kill two birds with one stone or more like five hundred actors with one stone diploma. Did all the Talking Carrie Fisher aren't you Debbie Reynolds daughter as always carry him to pause with the answer to that question. Make this auditions easier or harder. <hes> what the fuck did it matter. It was what was no. It's more like Debbie. Reynolds is my mother. She used that line before and it works. Carey was always great it dialogue so you just worked with Warren Beatty Right. Did you enjoy that yes I did. He was <hes> Oh holy shit now. What Carrie had committed the cardinal sin of pre audition Chitchat never begin a sentence whose ending you haven't rehearsed i? He helped me a lot. He he helped my work in the other screenwriter they really they really they really made my my work. Better Inside Carrie Fisher was suffering a nuclear core meltdown her container vessel was breached and toxic gibberish rush was escaping into the atmosphere. Oh please let God in his infinite wisdom hit pause and rewind on his celestial tape deck before it's too late really carry. How'd they do that? They make your work better well. We had to do <hes> the scene over turnover with with with food. I had to offer warrant a baked apple and then I asked him if he's making it with my mother sleeping with her yeah we know what making it means carry. If you could hear inside carries mind all you hear Shit Shit Shit Shit Pichit so <hes>. What have you done since shampoo? I went to drama school in England. I I'm still there. Actually I mean I'm not there. I'm here but you wait. You're in school. So what would you do. If you've got one of these jobs knobs either carrier Star Wars. I mean it would depend on the on the part I I guess I'd leave I would I guess powerful and merciful Lord Help me now share. We know what you mean Kari well. It's nice to meet you. Stop at the desk outside for your sides. It's Mr Mr Lucas. Thank you thank you. That's chance carry last chance for something anything before you step out that door you know it just occurred to me. The idea of casting Kerry as Carey in a movie called Kerry a dictionary full awards those ones I pick any in that order carry would've banged her head against the wall of a casting assistant wasn't at that very moment between her in that wall and pressing papers into her hand Ms <hes> a fissure here your sides two doors down. You'll read on Video Kerry <hes> Carrie Fisher. Are you ready after that performance in that room with those two up and coming Filmmakers Carrie Fisher was certain of one thing of course she was not ready. Her pulse was pounding everywhere pulse can get to she was sweating and sweating was not her thing. Her eyes were swimming. She was about to pass out she. It was not ready. She would never be ready again. Sure let's do this thing days later. Carrie Fisher was home. Doing what actors do waiting. Hello it was a raging and have you ever had one of those moments. It's one of those hold your breath moments. Those split seconds that seem to drag on for hours breathe breathe they do who doesn't a half. It didn't rain in L._A.. And it was raining in L._A.. Carrie Fisher was standing in the middle of the street in the downpour. Downpour the heavy drops of water were bouncing offer as she held up her arms and shouted to everyone and no one. I am Princess Leia Layup. I am Princess Leia in the cars kept driving one pedestrian looked away and shook his head. This was not the first time in actor ran into the streets of L. A. and proclaimed to the heavens that they adjust one apart it would not be the last carry knew that and she she didn't care this was her moment to save her and she would save her every last drop of it Princess Laya they would pay your next to nothing they would flyer to the said economy class but none of that mattered mattered because now and forever she would be what no one else could be what no one else would ever be. She was Princess Leia. This was going to be tricky. Somebody had to have the job of creating the sounds of star wars every grunting grown every wine and whistle every Zappin zoom every swoosh swoosh and that somebody nobody was Ben Burtt the instructions from George Lucas were clear then I want you to collect weird. Strange sounds go to the zoo collect. All the animal sounds go to transportation places find some some weird third zaps and Craxton snaps not a lot of direction. Ben Burtt got the point he would build a world of sound. Everything in Star Wars had a new sound all its own. It's a few weeks work. Birth Thought Building that sound on library in twenty nine years and ten months later it was finally complete burt had collected sounds all his life as a kid. He'd hotwired drive in audio so he could record the sound but this this was something different he was here at the zoo to record animals real animals in the real world birds elephants camels Lions Seals Walrus and bears. You had to get close in any way you could. Today's task record that bear for what Lucas described as a giant teddy bear like a big dog something he called rookie here wookey Wookey here rookie rookie rookie <music> Ben BURTT would bang on tension cables and record vibrating film projectors he would speak into a synthesizer to distort his voice he cou he beep he'd whistle that became the vocabulary February of R. Two D. Two he borrowed a scuba mouthpiece in huffed into that became the signature breathing sound of Darth vader on one of his regular audio scouting sessions he was in sears past an old fashioned Cathode Ray T._v. and stopped. He pointed a microphone at the T._v.. And waved in left and right up and down the employees stared on disbelief. Is there something wrong with him. Don't get too close that became the iconic sound of a lightsaber. Another Day of casting for Star Wars was about to begin but first George Lucas had to get around the construction he was here to meet with legendary casting agent Fred Reuss Steph George. I'm getting a new door. Put in I can see that has gone harrison fine fred fine hi George Harrison you building doors now. We got a new baby on the way George and we like to eat George Different. I know I know you don't want to cast in one from graffiti Indian star wars but I really wanted to take another look at Harris Fred Fred Fred. You know how I feel. I know I know I know look if he's here all this week working on that door. It takes them a week to make a door. Just just have him run lines with the other actors. That's it just just having run lines Harrison Ford putting in a door all this week how can be just coincidence right fred. Yes just a coincidence George Harrison yeah just a fucking coincidence all right fred but Christopher Walken is going to be a tough act to beat the actors came one after the last and then they left John Travolta Nick Nolte Tommy Lee Jones jodie Eddie Foster Al Pacino Kurt Russell dozens more hundreds more all came all went and running lines with many of them Harrison Ford Kurt Russell. Hey George Kurt Harrison Ford high high so kurt. The stories about a farm boy sent off to the big city gets involved in this adventure Harrison. You want to add anything. Don't ask me George you can right this ship. That doesn't mean anybody can read it after a while. A funny thing happened. Harrison Ford never became Han Solo but more and more Han Solo was becoming Harrison Ford making a robot. A droid wasn't easy in those days it Kenny while over we're here in show George Kenny Baker was three foot eight inches tall from stem to stern and he was sandwiched inside a wooden mockup of R. Two D. Two. What do you think George can? Can you move in nothing. Kenny <hes> barely yeah Kenny weighed about seventy pounds are to wade another eighty feel in their quite lovely actually George not so much really Kenny was strapped strapped into an uncomfortable harness. There were screws going through the robot's head that occasionally penetrated Kenny's head to and in the blistering desert sun the temperature inside the shell would sore oh dear from a few yards away that ED gleaming Golden Droid C. Three P._o.. was teetering hold him up. Hold them up. Thank you gentlemen. Anthony Daniels had never been a fan of science fiction. He walked out of Kubrick's two thousand one and being encased in C. Three P._o.. was doing nothing to change his mind. ooh Daniels was raised on the stage proper Shakespearean roles in a spate of English gentlemen and now this bringing C. Three P._o.. To life was like being being inside a Rubik's Cube Daniel said with people on the outside arguing over the instructions Tony you look great like a Golden God really thick so the love affair would wear off once the crew got used to the man and the golden suit they tend to forget there was a man in that suit it was lonely. He said you end up being treated like a toaster and no one says good morning to a toaster while C. Three P._o.. In our two D. two were almost inseparable with a series of star wars movies. Things were more complicated for the men behind the masks good morning Tony Kenny. Can't you see them having a conversation he tony when the movie's over what do you think about touring characters we can make some good money. I don't do many of these conventions options. Go Away Little Man Tony. The best part about playing a droid with you is that I can't see or hear you Kenny are to can't even speak you might as well be a bucket piss off wanker in two thousand eight Baker and Daniels were invited added to a cast reunion when Baker was asked whether he'd show up he said it depends if you invite his lordship the one with the golden balls. I'm out lunch at Jason's a famous L._A.. Eatery this was not George. Lucas has kind of place but he was putting on a show today. Can I help you sir. Yes <hes> Lucas reservation for two. Oh yes Michigan is already here waiting Oh. I don't think he likes waiting. Mr Lucas Fabulous this classic L._A.. Celebrity lunch seen always made Lucas uncomfortable. Hopefully he gets light in and Outta here without being noticed. Mostly Chasen's was all about being noticed Alfred Hitchcock and Bruce Stern over here William Friedkin and Orson Wells over there but Lucas was focused on one table only and one particular lunch she guest Mr Guinness. I'm George Lucas. Do you know Mr Lucas that there is not one decent cup of tea in this entire country. Well Nice to meet you too on a Guinness was in L._A.. Finishing the Neil Simon movie murder by death and he was already annoyed. You know Mr Lucas. Your people delivered a script to my dressing room. Yes I know I don't like scripts delivered to my dressing room. Oh I'm sorry and you know what I like even less than that <hes> no what science it's fiction. This wasn't going great but George Lucas was passionate and he was sincere to qualities than impressed Guinness Alec Guinness was about to produce a play in London and he needed money star wars might be fanciful fanciful distasteful. Maybe even disgraceful but it was a paycheck Guinness described Lucas as a small young man with a black beard tiny well shaped hands poorest teeth glasses and not much sense of humor a touch boring but otherwise likable to a friend he wrote. I may accept if they come up with proper money. Science fiction gives me pause fairy tale rubbish big part though and from the Director of American Graffiti Paul Lukas they've finished lunch and shook hands the famed British Thespian and the man who would be Paul Lukas this was going to work this had to work. Please God let this work. Looking for something to give you dad or celebrate a recent Grad get him the coolest gadget in the galaxy and electric toothbrush from quip all right right now. It's not quite as cool as lightsaber. I get it but at least it's shaped the same way and this sleek little toothbrush really packs. A punch quips built in two minute timer make sticking to good habits simple. It's got a multi use cover. You can use it as a stand you can Monday on your mirror and when it's time to hit the road equipped toothbrush automatically becomes a travel toothbrush. I take mine everywhere best of all new brush heads of delivered to your door on a dentist recommended schedule every three months for just five dollars. Those are just some of the reasons why I love quick and why over one million happy healthy mounds due to quip starts at just twenty five dollars and if you go to get quip dot com slash Yoda right now you can get your first refill pack for free free. That's your first refill pack free at G. E. T. Q. U.. I. P. Dot Com Slash Y. O. D._A.. Inside Star Wars is sponsored by WICKS DOT com. You can get started building your very own unprofessional website with wicks for free today by choosing from over five hundred stunning templates or you can start from scratch and build it yourself from there. It's easy to change customize at anything you want. Everything is automatically optimized for any device vice desktop or mobile always excites include built in S._E._O.. Tools so it's easy for people to find you online and in search engines like Google and bing and now you can even build your site with the help of artificial intelligence to make your site infinitely infinitely more personalized features like voice recognition capability chat bots. It's it's really amazing stuff. You have to check it out with wicks building. A professional website is easy. Just ask the over one hundred forty million people who have already done it build a website of your own with wicks today for free and if you go to dot com and use the coupon code Yoda you'll get ten percent off any premium plan. That's the one I have with wicks premium plants. You get more storage a free domain for year and a whole lot more. That's WICKS DOT COM code why O._D._A.. For ten percent off any premium plan during the day Lucas continued to grind away at the script it was it's time to figure a budget and one of the core ingredients would be special effects Lucas that with John Dykstra a special effects wizard whose job would be to make the impossible real. So what do you think John George George. You have five hundred fifty effect shots right and two years to do it right you. You do know that Kubrick's two thousand one had that long to execute half that many shots for a lot more money and they barely did an in time right YEP I. I know that but you can do it can't you. texters eyes got wide. Everyone around him knew anything about this business told him this was impossible. Naive even many wouldn't touch this project is career was flashing before his eyes <hes> but if he was to go down in flames what an exhilarating way to go you can't do what right John I can do a church. This happens a thousand times every day in L. A.. An actor gets home from an audition. It went fine but not fine enough later. It'll be time to sit by the phone and wait for the call. That probably won't come. That's later now. It's time to wake up the guests on your couch and stop his infernal snoring mark. Oh Sorry Robert I. I must've fall asleep mark dude. It's eleven in the morning Lebanon Them Our Name. What time's your audition auditions over man? Did you nail Ella. It's an audition mark. I don't know there have a beer eye opener. Thanks needed edition was for apocalypse now right so what was <hes> Coppola like well. <hes> I went out for the surfer role and he tells me I'm too old for too old too young too tall too short to male to female yeah I know so he tells me to go across the hall because George Lucas is auditioning for his new movie. Oh that <hes> that star thing yeah yeah the star the Star thing so what the hell right I auditioned for the role of Han Solo. Wait what what's a Han Solo exactly outta co too old too young too tall to shore. Right right right right you know mark. There's a pardon star wars is perfect for you. <hes> said man. I just did the pilot for a TV series. Asia's enough eight is enough mark. You Really WanNa be Dick van Patents Bitch Hey hey it's T._v.. Robert it steady mark matter with you. This is a movie in his George Lucas in the part. The part is perfect for you once a role Ernest teenage farm boy in outer space <music>. Hey It's a job practice your mid Western accent Mark Hamill did practices midwestern accent and it didn't take him long to realize he wouldn't need it but first he had an audition to make he cleaned himself up in combed his hair he straightened the pillows on his hosts couch the only decent piece of furniture and Roberts small living room mark break your leg. It was the best advice one actor could offer or another and the good fortune would not be Mark Hamill's alone because a few years later Hamill's host Robert Wood nail an audition of his own. It was the title role in Wes Craven's nightmare on Elm Street and Robert Englund would become <music> Freddie Krueger. Come on in Mark Hamill right yes Sir George Lucas mark meet Harrison Ford. He's reading Han Solo in. You're reading luke got it. Okay <hes> four pages George. Let's see how far we get. Hey Harrison yeah. What's what's with this dialogue? WHO talks like this? I don't know kids just read it. Okay go mark. We can't turn around. Fear is their greatest weapon. I doubt if the actual security there is any greater than it was an aquiline or sell us and what there is is most likely directed towards large-scale assault. Okay good. Thank you was that good. Was it awful who knew Mark Hamill understood not a word of this dialogue. He left the audition secure in one thought this part it would never be his George. Lucas needed to create a science fiction universe and to construct real pieces of that universe he turned to junk George Georgina Jerome K on this expenditure. <hes> you WanNa you WANNA buy thousands of pounds of junk. Yes see the comm link will be this faucet. The lightsaber handle will be this old photo flash unit for the BLASTERS. We're GONNA take apart a bunch of world war two machine guns and put them together wrong and and that will work sure we'll just we'll just retain everything and put weird writing on what about the glowing light sabers you know those are plasma blades powered by a Khyber Crystal. I don't know what those words mean George. They'll be wooden swords coated with reflective material. That looks illuminated when photograph through I have Silver Mirror. I don't know what those words mean. Okay Go. It was just another day at work at a London hospital for Peter. Mayhew Peter Misses badly room to thirty four needs to be walked to loop is Sarah. I'll be right there. Sir May he was seven foot three and the gentlest of giants. This was his day job. He was deputy head porter at King's College Hospital. He was an orderly Peter. We need some Jello in room. One fourteen right now jehlum one fourteen right away sir mayhew came to the attention of Lucas and company when they spotted an article about people with big feet and few people had feet bigger than Peter. Mayhew's here's Your Jell O.. Mr Campbell have a wonderful day man who would spend most days enveloped in Yak Harris Han Solo's trustee copilot Chewbacca Peter but when he wasn't on the call sheet he was always on call at the hospital. I'll be right there. Sir when shooting eating ended so did Peter's acting career temporarily at least he went back to his job at the hospital as badly my name is Peter and I'm here to take you to the loop. pre-production was buzzing along but there was big trouble brewing and no matter how little time Lucas had for sleep. He couldn't sleep if he tried Fox still hadn't given the production of green light. They were still dragging their feet. No green light means no budget no budget means. He couldn't complete sets droids costumes anything it was all. It up in the air snowy. Don't live more than two years had passed since the agreement memo with Fox. Lucas had not seen a dime since the original ten thousand dollars for the first draft of the script no winks no nods no contract no nothing he had sunk nearly half a million dollars of his own money into the film every penny he had made from graffiti was put back into star wars his friends. We're losing faith. Francis Coppola warned George. He might lose everything on this picture. Nobody in this town risks their own money. He told him every week every day. Lucas was bleeding cash. Meanwhile Fox one titanic flop away from pulling the plug and then it happened a world class fiasco was unleashed on movie goers nationwide. It was an expensive bomb. Starring Gene Hackman Liza Minelli in Burt Reynolds lucky lady was the title and it was anything but lucky for George Lucas George Lucas when the head of production calls with that tone in his voice. It's not good news knowing star wars or manning in a couple of months until man and you know here was Fox withdrawing its support after stringing Lucas along for more than two years what nerve Lucas was distraught and angry and desperate and depressed and heartbroken all at once he would start shopping the project elsewhere again united artists. It's again no universal again in Lucas's old nemesis ned ten planes Melania pull it off. Look was dejected humiliated. These two months came and went George Lucas Dr Larry Arnn One star wars but a woman cab and <music> having point five million laddy. You're asking me to make a fifteen million dollar movie for half price George. Tom Lucas was near the breaking point he had spent more than two years on this project and every penny of his own money all on the promise of a Yes from Fox in a budget big enough to make that yes real he would have to cut deep into the muscle of this movie to make this work he would have to scrimp and save compromise and sacrifice he would have to cut necessary scenes trim F._X.. Eliminate characters and subplots he would have to make a version of his movie that fell short of his dream. This was exactly why he hated the studio's exactly why he would always insist on control. There would never be enough money. There were never be enough time anxiety he would skyrocket morale would tank all thanks to the business decisions of Fox. I don't know I don't know laddy I don't I don't I don't know if I could do it. I just I just don't know of one thing he was absolutely sure in the end. If it did get made nobody would ever make any money from star the wars from wondering this is a seven part deep dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable classic movie movie. This has been part four of inside Star Wars listen for a new episode every Wednesday written and narrated by Mark Ramsey audio design and production by Jeff Schmidt produced by Mark Ramsey media executive producers producers Marshal Louis and Hernan Lopez for wondering subscribe on Apple Podcasts spotify iheartradio wondering dot Com or wherever you are listening right now. If you like what you're hearing we'd love you to give us a five star rating and review the U._S. and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe find a link to subscribe to inside Star Wars and more information on the episode notes just tap or Swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors. Please support this show. Oh by supporting them join the conversation on twitter at one three media and at Mark Ramsey media use hashtag inside star wars on facebook search inside star wars or follow wondering dot F._M.. Slash Inside Group C you there from the legal deaths inside Star Wars inspired by the stories of the making of this iconic film in some cases. We can't know exactly what was said but dialogue it seems have been reconstructed based on extensive research from Alec Guinness Come.

George Lucas George Lucas John George George Kerry Carrie Fisher George Kurt Harrison Ford Alec Guinness Tony Kenny Harrison Ford George Kenny Baker Mark Hamill George George Harrison Mark Ramsey Mr Lucas L._A Lucas Tom Lucas Fox Carey Burt Reynolds Francis Coppola
I am Princess Leia! | 4

Inside Jaws

31:06 min | 1 year ago

I am Princess Leia! | 4

"The following may contain mature content from wondering i'm mike ramsey in this is inside star wars parts that casting days per never fun for anyone hundreds of starry eyed actors struggling for that one big break come in sit down for the filmmaker hours of running lines mostly forgettable always exhausting name kerry carrie fisher in front of kerry to to desks at one the director of american graffiti who is now casting star wars at these other filmmaker brian depalma who is simultaneously casting the stephen king horror movie kerry to casting sessions at once great way to kill two birds with one stone were more like five hundred actors with one stone depalma did all the talking carrie fisher aren't you debbie reynolds daughter has always kerry had a pause with he answered that question make this so dishing easier or harder and a what the fuck did it matter it was what it was no it's more like debbie reynolds is my mother and she used that line before it works in kerry was always great it dialogue so you just worked with warren beatty right did you enjoy that yes i did he was a oh holy shit now watch kerry had committed the cardinal sin pre audition chitchat never begin a sentence who is ending you have unrehearsed hearst first he helped me a lot he he helped my working together screenwriter they really they really they really made my my work better inside carrie fisher was suffering a nuclear core meltdown her container vessel was breached in toxic gibberish she was escaping into the atmosphere oh please let god in is infinite wisdom hit pause and rewind on his celestial tape deck before it's too late really kerry how they do that how they make it work better well we did do a the seen over and over with with with food i had to offer warren baked apple and then i asked if he's making it with my mother you know sleeping with her yeah we know what making it means kerry if you could hear inside carey's mind all you hear shit shit shit shit shit shit shit so what have you done since shampoo i went to drama school in england i i i'm still there actually i mean i'm not there i'm here but you you know when you're in school so what would you do if you've got one of these jobs other carriers star wars i mean it would depend on the on the part i i guess i leave i would guess powerful and merciful lord help me now share we know what you mean kari oh well it's nice to meet you stop at a desk outside sides mr depalma easter lucas thank you thank you that's chance kerry less transfer something anything before you step out that door you know it just occurred to me be idea of casting terry as kerry in a movie called kerry honor those really is a dictionary word those ones i pick any in that order kerry would've banged her head against the wall of the casting assistant wasn't at that very moment between her and that wall impressing papers into her hand ms a fisher sides two doors down you'll rate on video kerry a carrie fisher are you ready after that performance in that room with those two up and coming filmmakers carrie fisher was certain of one thing of course she was not ready her pulse was punting everywhere pulse can get to she was sweating in sweating was not her thing her eyes were swimming she was about to pass out she was not ready she would never be ready again sure let's do this thing days later carrie fisher was home doing what actors do waiting hello it was raging aunt have you ever had one of those moments one of those hold your breath moments those split seconds did seem dragged on for hours brief brief they do who doesn't it didn't rain in elway and it was raining you know like carrie fisher was standing in the middle of the street in the downpour downpour the heavy drops of water were bouncing off her is she held up her arms and showed it to everyone in no one i am princess leo leo i am the cars kept driving one pedestrian looks away and shook his head this was not the first time and actor ran into the streets the valet and proclaim to the heavens they adjust one apart it would not be the last kerry knew that she she didn't care this was her moment to savor and she would save every last drop of but i am prince they would pay you're next to nothing they would fire to the set economy class but none of that mattered because now and forever she would be what no one else could be what no one else would ever be she was princess laya this was going to be tricky somebody had had the job of creating the sounds of star wars every grunting grown every wine in whistle every zapping zoom every swish in swoop in that somebody but he was ben burtt instructions from george lucas were clear then i want you to collect weird strange sounds go to the zoo collect all animal sounds good at transportation places find some some weird zaps and cracks and snaps not a lot of direction ben burtt got the point he would build a world of sound everything in star wars had a new sound all its own it's a few weeks work or thought building that sound library in twenty nine years and ten months later it was finally complete burt had collected sounds all his life as a kid he's hot wire drive in audio so he could record the south but this this was something different he was here at the zoo record animals real animals in the real world birds elephant camels lion steals a wall russ and bears you had to get close anyway you could today's task record that bear for what lucas described as a giant teddy bear like a big dog something he called lookie here what you're working working working and then birchwood bang on tension cables and record vibrating film projectors and you would speak into a synthesizer to distort is voicing coup whistle that became the vocabulary larry of opportunity to he borrowed a scuba mouthpiece and that became the signature breathing sound of darth vader on one of his regular audio scouting sessions he wasn't sears and passed an old fashioned cathode ray tv in stumped he pointed a microphone at the td and waved and left and right on down and they employees dared on in disbelief and there's something wrong with him i dunno don't get to cloud that became he iconic sound of a lightsaber another day of casting for star wars was about to begin but first george lucas had to get around the construction who is here to meet with legendary casting agent fred bruce much step george i'm getting a new door put in i concede see that how's it going harrison fine fred find hi george harrison you're building doors now we've got a new baby on the way george and we like to eat george different i know i know you don't wanna cast anyone from proceeding be in star wars but i i really want you to take another look at harrison fred fred fred you know how i feel i know i know i know look like he's here all this week working on that door takes a moment to make a door just just having run lines with each other actors that's it just just having run line harrison ford putting in a door all this week how convenient just a coincidence right fred yes just a coincidence george harrison yeah just a fucking coincidence alright fred but christopher walken gonna be a tough act to beat these actors came one after the last and then they left john travolta nick nalty tommy lee jones jodie foster alpa chino kurt russell dozens more hundreds more all came all went in running lines with many of them harrison ford kurt russell hey george kurt he's a harrison ford high high so kurt the stories about a farm boy sent off to the big city gets involved in this adventure harrison you wanna add anything don't ask me george you could write this shift that doesn't mean anybody can read it after a while a funny thing happened harrison ford never became han solo but more and more han solo is becoming harrison ford in making a robot android wasn't easy in those days kenny while over here and show george kenny baker was three foot eight inches tall from stem to stern and he was sandwiched inside a would mockup of r two d to what do you think george kim kun you moving kenny up there early yeah kenny wait about seventy pounds are to wade another eighty does it feel in there quite lovely actually george not so much really kenny was strapped strapped into and uncomfortable harness there were screws going through the robots head that occasionally penetrated kenny's had to end in the blistering desert sun the temperature inside the shell would soar oh dear firm a few yards away that gleaming golden droid see three pl was teetering oldham up holding thank you gentlemen anthony daniels had never been a fan of science fiction he walked out of coober x two thousand one and being in case in c three pl was doing nothing to change his mind daniels was raised on the stage proper shakespearean roles in a spate of english gentleman and now this bringing seats repealed a life was like being inside a rubik's cube daniel set with people any outside arguing over the instructions donate you look great like a golden god really the love affair would wear off once the crew got used to the men in the golden suit they tend to forget there was a man in that suit it was lonely he said you end up being treated like a toaster and no one says good morning to a toaster well see three peo in order to detour almost inseparable a series of star wars movies things were more complicated for the men behind the masks good morning tony kenny catch you see i'm having a conversation tony when the movies over what do you think about touring his character's we could make some good money i don't do many of these conventions go away little man tony the best part about playing android with you is that i can't see or hear you kenny are to can't even speak you might as well be fucking pissed off winker in two thousand eight baker and daniels were invited do a cast reunion when baker was asked whether he'd show up he said it depends if you invite his lordship the one with the golden balls i'm out to lunch at chase in his famous ellie eatery this is not george lucas kind of place but he was putting on a show today can i help you sir yes 'em lucas reservation per to oh yes service begins is already here waiting oh i don't think he likes waiting mr lucas views this classic l a's celebrity lunch seen always made lucas uncomfortable hopefully he could slide in and out of here without being noticed mostly jason's was all about being noticed alfred hitchcock and bruce dern over here william freakin in orson welles over there but lucas was focused on one table only in one particular lunch guest is the guinness i'm george lucas do you know mr lucas but there is not one decent cup of tea in the entire country well nice to meet you too alec guinness wasn't outlay finishing the neil simon movie murder by death and he was already annoyed you know mr look as you're people delivered a script to my dressing room yes i know i don't like scripts delivered to my dressing room oh i'm sorry and you know what i like even lesson that a know what science fiction this wasn't going great but george lucas was passionate and he was sincere to qualities then impressed guinness alec in this was about to produce a play in london in he needed money star wars might be fanciful so full distasteful and maybe even disgraceful but it was a paycheck guinness describe lucas as a small young man with a black beard tiny well shaped hands porridge teeth glasses and not much sense the humor a touch boring but otherwise likable to a friend he wrote i may except if they come up with proper money science fiction gives me pause fairy tale rubbish big part though in from the director of american graffiti paul lucas they finish launch in shook hands the famed british that's been in the man who would be paul lucas this what's going to work this had to work please god let this work looking for something to give you dad or celebrator recent grad getting the coolest gathered in the galaxy an electric toothbrush from quipped all all right now it's not quite as cool as the lightsaber i get it but at least the shape the same way in this league little toothbrush really packs a punch quips built in two minute timer make sticking to good habits simple it's got a multi use cover you could use it as a stand you mounted on you're mirror and when it's time to hit the road you're quip toothbrush automatically becomes a travel toothbrush i take mine everywhere festival new brush heads of delivered to your door on a dentist recommended schedule every three months for just five dollars those are just some of the reasons why i love quip and why over one million happy healthy mouths due to quip starts at just twenty five dollars and if you go to get quip dot com slash yoda right now you can get your first refill pack for free free that's your first refill pack free at g e t q u i p dot com slash y o d f inside star wars is sponsored by wicks dot com you can get started building your very own professional website with wicks for free today by choosing from over five hundred stunning templates or you could start from scratch and build it yourself from there it's easy to change customize at anything you want everything is automatically optimized for any device vice desktop or mobile awake sites include built in seo tools so it's easy for people to find you online and in search engines like google and being and now you could even build your website with the help of artificial intelligence to make their site infinitely infinitely more personalized features like voice recognition capability chat bots it's it's really amazing stuff you have to check it out with wicks building a professional website his easy just asked me over one hundred forty million people who have already done it build a website of you're wrong with wicks today for free and if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code yoda you'll get ten percent off any premium plan that's the one i have with wicks premium plans you get more storage a free domain for year and whole lot more that's wicks dot com code why owed ea for ten percent off any premium plan during the day lucas continue to grind away at the script it was time to figure a budget in one of the core ingredients would be special effects lucas sat with john dykstra a special effects wiz whose job would be to make be impossible real so what do you think john george george you have five hundred fifty affects shots right end two years to do it right you you do know that cooper's two thousand one had that long to execute have that many shots for a lot more money and they barely did it in time right yeah i i know that but you can't do it can't you exercise got wide everyone around him who knew anything about this business told him this was impossible naive even many wouldn't touch this project is career was flashing before his eyes a but if he will go down in flames wasn't exhilarating way to go you can do right john i can do a george this happens a thousand times everyday anneli an actor gets home from an audition went fine but not find enough later it'll be time to sit by the phone wait for the called it probably won't come that's later now it's time to wake up the guest on your couch and stop his infernal snoring mark oh sorry robert i i must have fallen asleep mark dude it's eleven in the morning lebanon earning a which i'm sure addition additions over man nail it's an audition mark i don't know there have a beer i opener thanks nita additions ferrara apocalypse now right so what was a couple of like well 'em i went off of the surfer role and he tells me i'm too old for too old too young to tall too short to male to female yeah i know so he tells me to go across the hall because george lucas says auditioning for his new movie oh that a that star thing yeah yeah yeah the star star thing so what the hell right i auditioned for the role of han solo wait what what's the han solo exactly how'd it go to all too young to tall to shore right right right you know mark there's a pardon star wars is perfect for you a said man i just did the pilot for a tv series eight is enough aid is enough mark you really wanna be defend patents bitch hey hey it's tv robert steady mark meadows eighteen this is a movie innis george lucas in the part the part is perfect for you what's the role ernest teenaged farm boy in outer space hey it's a job practice you mid western accident mark hamill did practices midwestern accident and it didn't take long to realize he wouldn't need it but first he had an audition and make it clean himself up income and his hair you straighten the pillows on his hosts couch they only decent piece of furniture in robert small living room it mark bringing leg who's the best advice one actor could offer another in the good fortune would not be mark hamels alone because a few years later hamels host robert wood nailing audition of his own it was the title role in west craven's nightmare on elm street and robert england would become freddy krueger coming in mark hamill right george lucas mark meet a harrison ford he's reading han solo in you're reading look got it okay a a four pages george let's see how far we got hey a person yeah what's what's what this dialogue who talks like this a kid just redid okay go mark we can't turn around fear is the greatest weapon i doubt if he actual security there is any greater then it wasn't apple liars sell us in what there is is most likely directed towards large scale assault okay good thank you what's that good was at all fall who knew mark hamill understood not a word of this dialogue he lefty audition secure in one thought this part it never be his george lucas needed to create a science fiction universe and a construct real pieces of that universe he turned to junk a george chinese you're okay on this expenditure a you wanna you wanna buy thousands of pounds of junk yeah see the common link will be discussing the lightsaber handle will be this old photo flash unit for the blasters were take apart a bunch of world war two machine guns and put them together wrong in in in that'll work sure will just will just repaint everything and put weird riding on what about the glowing lightsabres you know those are plasma blades power by khyber crystal i don't know what those words mean george there'll be wouldn't swords coated with reflective material that looks illuminated when photograph through i have silver mirror i don't know what those words mean okay go it was just another day at work at a london hospital for peter mayhew heater misses badly room to thirty four needs to be walked to the new is sir i'll be right there sir may he was seven foot three and the gentlest of giants this was his day job he was deputy head porter at king's college hospital he wasn't orderly bitter we need some jello in room one fourteen right now jhelum one fourteen right away sir may who came to the attention of lucas and company when they spotted an article about people with big feet in few people ed feet bigger and peter may here's here's you're jello mr campbell have a wonderful day may who would spend most days in developed in yak harris han solo's trustee copilot chewbacca theater but when he wasn't on the call sheet he was always on call at the hospital i'll be right there sir when shooting ended soda peter's acting career temporarily at least you went back to his job at the hospital is badly my name is peter and i'm here to take you to the lose pre production was buzzing along but there were big trouble brewing in no matter how little time lucas adverse sleep he couldn't sleep if he tried fox still hadn't given the production a green light there were still dragging their feet no green light means no budget no budget means he couldn't complete sets droids costumes anything it was all up in there and we don't laugh more than two years have passed since they agreement memo with fox lucas had not seen a dime cynthia original ten thousand dollars with the first draft of the script no winks and nods no contract no nothing she had some nearly half a million dollars of his own money into the film every penny he had made from graffiti was put back into star wars his friends were losing saint francis coppola worn george he might lose everything on this picture nobody in this town risks their own money he told every week everyday lucas was bleeding cash meanwhile fox says one titanic flop away from pulling the plug and then it happened a world class fiasco was unleashed on movie goers nationwide it wasn't expensive bomb starring gene hackman lies manelli in burt reynolds lucky lady was the title and it was anything but lucky for george lucas george lucas charge when the head of production calls what that tone in his voice it's not good news josh allen star wars on that shut down here was fox withdrawing its support after stringing lucas along for more than two years what nerve lucas was distraught an angry in desperate and depressed and heartbroken all at once he would start shopping the project elsewhere again united artists again orange orange dancers universal again in lucas is old nemesis nick cannon at my house and apple lucas was dejected humiliated these two months came and went george lucas orange percent one star wars at one i now have a bloody you're you're asking me to make a fifteen million dollar movie for half price and charge lucas was near the breaking point he had spent more than two years on this project in every penny of his own money all and the promise of a yes from fox in a budget big enough to make that yes real he would have to cut deep in the muscle of this movie to make this work he would have scrimp and save compromise and sacrifice he would after cutting necessary scenes trim fx eliminate characters and subplots he would have to make a version of his movie that fell short of his dream this was exactly why he hated the studios exactly why she would always incest on control there would never be enough money there were never be enough time anxiety would skyrocket morale would tank all thanks to the business decisions a fox charge i don't know i don't know i don't i don't i don't know if i could do it i just i just don't know of one thing she was absolutely sure indian if it did get made nobody would ever make any money from star wars from laundry this is a seven part deep dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable classic movie this has been part for of inside star wars listen for new episodes every wednesday written in narrated by mark ramsey audio design and production by jeff smith produced by mark ramsey media executive producers producers marshall louis in hernan lopez for wondering subscribe on apple podcasts spotify iheartradio wondering dot com or wherever you are listening right now if you like what you're hearing we'd love you to give us a five star rating and review and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe fighter linked to subscribe to inside star wars and more information on the episode notes just tapper swipe over the cover art you'll also see some offers from our sponsors please support the show by supporting them join the conversation on twitter at one brea media and that mark ramsey media use hashtag inside star wars on facebook's search inside star wars or follow wondering dot fm slash inside group see their illegals that inside star wars is inspired by the stories on the making of this iconic snow in some cases we can't know exactly what was said for dialogue and things and then reconstructed based on extensive research firm alec guinness comes

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OK To Go - Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project - 5/26/20

Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

38:12 min | 4 months ago

OK To Go - Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project - 5/26/20

"Welcome to still entitled. The Adams had project. I'm well I'm Adam and I'm normal. Hey everybody hello guys. Happy Memorial Day. Yes we for making the time. I was technically a day off here all day. I know I know they're days off in the in the in the Corentin and the in the zone I saw off. Yeah I know. A lot of companies are encouraging people. Take a break because everyone in the line. Distinguishing work and home is completely blurred now and so this is an occasion of course to take a break spend time with their family but it's also encouraging people to go outside because everyone else listening this is but in the bay area. It's really nice out and slipping outside. It's re everyone is outside. We went out yes to Saturday to get a friend of ours was like hey we have been making bread and I made too much. Do you want to come get some bread and it was. I guess I would totally get some bread. She's like I can give you some of our sour dough starter if you want and and we picked up sourdot started at the same time and a incredible over Brad. But be we've got the first batch of sour dough about ready to go in the oven and Gina's been working on that all day so I'm very excited. About what. What. What prospects evening holds in terms of loading up on carbs a big old our no Brad Nice? Yeah but there were tons of people out there so many people driving are people at the beach. There were people driving on the streets yet. Traffic is traffic is back. We've got to live for a couple of months without traffic and now it seems like it's just back. Yeah yeah this past weekend will and I And our partners. We played some video games over. I guess just voice communication together but like we take doing this podcast almost for granted. Because it's such a nice way to to virtually see you but I always forget that you know Danika and the House never gets opportunity. You know aside from our neighbors and phone calls to family and stuff but doesn't have type of rig on an action in so when we got to spend an hour just hearing each other's voices that was really fun. Indeed it's I'm always surprised. I mean the number of family and friends zoom calls. I've had dwindled a bit but a couple of weeks ago we We got together zoom with some friends of ours in Colorado and we talked for almost two hours just Sharon what was going on with us and there was at one point. Julian iron the couch in our living room and they're on the couch in their living room. And at one point we were talking back and forth and something was funny and all four of us kind of lost it and started laugh bad moment to computers and the distance disappeared and it felt real like they were there in the room it was fleeting and it wasn't enough but boy it came close. That was exactly how we felt. We were playing a game. A game called heave-ho PGA where else it is but the basically the each each person plays just ahead with two arms and your goal is to traverse the these obstacle courses by grabbing on grabbing with one hand and then swinging and grabbing on the other. And you can grab onto each other to you can make these big long ridiculous chains and it's like it's just physics problems but it's funds goofy. Vr No this normal video game video game. Yeah Right. Cooperation required the communication acquired. A you fall very very easily into that and you create you. Know the shorthand for these calls and I was literally doing this setup with the Augusta next to me sharing this microphone both of us with headphones and there are moments where we were just cracking up and losing our shit and like said. I don't like those while fleeting it felt like being the same with someone. Yeah Yeah Yeah We. We've actually we We've gotten together with some of our closest friends in our garage where we put a table at one end and we sit at the other and this weekend I moved. So I think three carloads of stuff out of the garage in order to clear it so that we could we? It's nicer and I put up Christmas lights. We were really you know if this is the normal for a while. Then like to feel a little more cosy It's funny I. You said that the people standing at opposite ends of the table and I couldn't. I just immediately pictured with Michael Keaton and Kim Basinger and Batman where he's on the date yes soup and at the end of these long table. That's that's that's what a dinner party is now. You need up forty foot table and you put a couple every ten feet and you're you you can have a dinner party fervent. Everybody brings her own food Hey we were down near you over the weekend. Will we just did a loop down to Down to half Moon Bay and then up and over Saratoga back up to eighty but I came across a place. I'm going to visit hold on picture of IT Saratoga the one down by Peschiera or is that good firewood farms on San Mateo Road. Oh I don't know that one and it turns out it's a woodworker places. I was going by. I saw these big who like just milled. Slabs of logs and I think I'm going to head over there this week to get some would for woodworking. Oh that's awesome. They sell raw like is it. Is it cured nature and so I do not know I have now called them. I was planning on doing that tomorrow. Morning Cool will let me know how it goes. I'd ride down with you but you know Probably not I know. There's a ton of really neat farms that grow. I mean there's there's a lot of Brussels sprouts and stuff like that things that grow in this part of the country but when you get further down between here and Pescadora there's all sorts of neat farms that grow really weird like there's a mushroom farm down there that they went on a field trip to this year because the school did. That's really neat. I Love Northern California. That's awesome Adam. Giovanni place in the Bay area that you recommend to buy like a big slab of butcherblock wider than your standard kitchen island to make a work surface. It's something we've been looking for for a long time protested. Oh no just Danika over you guys for making stuff. The ones I use on my tables here. I by grisly grisly grisly dot com a wonderful tool manufacturer and yet. I've been buying from Grizzly for deck for a couple of decades and they sell these bowling alley talks. These are like what is that shoe. Inches thick twenty four inches But they sell them in all these different sizes and really custom sized a probably. Cut It for you. So when my parents built their new house they mom had had bought one. She bought a couple of blocks from bakery. That was going out of business. They're three inches thick. She got him on Ebay. They were real. It was more expensive to ship them than it was to get them from where she was getting and when she got them they had to be stripped all the way down because they had forty years of flour. Grounded the into the service so they had to sand on the top but they are absolutely gorgeous and Were really reasonably priced. If if you want something so I would I would hit Ebay to you'd be it was not. It was way less expensive than I expected it to be on Oetzi and Ebay and craigslist these as the top two things. I'm sure string four for a home. Improvement projects are butcherblock top and flat file and flat files. I cannot find a good one a good price. Let One craigslist craigslist. Okay they pop up any real fast. Yeah they do real fast. I went looking for one recently and then I decided I didn't want one really. We're not I don't have the square footage for such a big fat. You know like it's a for me. I would use that for a whole host of like I have a whole drawer just drafting tools at have a whole drawer of rulers might like that kind of stuff. I would love to do that but I just don't think I've got the space here. It would have to fit under something because they are very square right. You're talking about minimum forty seven inches by thirty something inches. And so they basically have to be either. You know coffee tables or they become Ben Services for you to put things on top of and never take off and you sit back and stack and stack. It would be perfect to put like two of those at the height stack up to the high you want. And then put the on top of that to have your workspace. Is that what you're thinking? Norm definitely taking out a book on top of one small coffee table sized flat file the Hamilton ones. The old ones from time to those are gorgeous. So I made a We get a one day bill which will go up. But I'M GONNA tease it for a second rue little preview here for people listening to audio Adams Rolling in a Sinha a red chest with many drawer and I went with the machinist toolbox of using runners inside and yeah slots milled in the side of these. It's not perfect but this is this is stores now all my late tooling all. The carbide bits and all the cutters and inserts insert holders. And this is like A. I've been trying to figure out how to solve this problem for months and I built it last week and it was really happy with what was civic problem. You wanted to solve and why like other type of storage cabinet wouldn't be able to service that need so I have. When I'm interested in a thing I start gathering some stuff around that thing and sometimes I gather stuff that use for a long time until I reach a level of proficiency. And that's the case with the lathe I had a whole bunch of lay cooling but for the most almost all my leaving with like four tools and then as I've gotten more advanced in like you know I did some thread cutting this weekend And I start to really need to use and by definition find locate and utilize. Some of these pieces I had three separate locations around the shop or all. The laid toiling wasn't a problem with it is it's heavy. This weighs probably sixty pounds loaded. God yeah and this is like pulling stuff out of a thing and looking through three boxes for everything I needed and that made me crazy and I was like you know what there's some real estate on the right side of my toolbox on the right side of my lathe and then Oh man was this Friday yeah Friday. I came in and I broke a lightbulb on the front of my laid and in trying to just like get it to a state where I could eventually replace it. I shorted out of fuse at my laid and lost ninety minutes moving tile puzzle of CRAP ERRATIC. Get to the fusebox on my late. June that you open up the space to then find a place for this I did. I did the the amount of dirt we actually. It'll be in the one day build. I 'cause I I. It's a two day build and I came in that morning and I was like well. I just lost ninety minutes in the shop was every table was in the wrong place. Oh No it's. It's funny that that bit drawer is way bigger than the one for your mill. Bits because you have that is the same one. The dark wooden. Yeah Yeah I. It's an old Gerstner machinist toolbox. The kind of what you can find all over the place. I'm now considering making a master machinist spock's for all of my stuff a single box and literally I'm digging of it being like you know five fetal and three feet wide with you know a crack on of drawers would way at ton though. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah My friend Ben EADIE was like you're going to need some scooping wheels for that thing and I'm like Oh something new to obsess over. I'd give it six wheels and make you realize outriggers out there so it doesn't tip over if there's an earth. Oh Yeah it's GonNa need a lot of engineering but this was a lot of fun and the finish. I love the paint. Yeah it's so. I don't know if you could see it but you can actually see the wood grain. It's a little translucent. This this is a machinists marking fluid. It's a clear transparent red lacquer while what you would use for your eyes. Lucien of Aluminum Spray. On Top. Of the yeah. That's what a machinist with us to be able to screen. Take their scribe out and start to mark where they're gonna right there Hudson stuff benefit because it's lacquer at drives like this. This finish was done in about ten minutes. Doesn't isn't a blue version of that. What goes on like an to dome or the Arts. It is an incorrect but very close Blue for dome the official R. Two D. Two color is a weird purple. Metallic overlaid with can be clear blue that they can't totally candy. Yeah did prequels my friend Don Bees. They lost a formula for our two blue. So done vs made this like master of all these undercoat's and all these overcoats and made something like sixty four colored chits and handed it to Georgian Georgia's like that one too male hd backing speaking of Star Wars. Did you guys watch the fourth episode of Gallery? Yes first one but norm you. I think he texted me and said that one is amazing. Good the ball you one all about the volume John Knoll and about you know. And so we've talked extensively about the technology that we've read about what the using the volume the real lighting that gets put in and it's combinations interesting of not just the real time rendering for in order the hammer is or background but the behind the scenes video you get to see how the background ships and interesting. They don't have higher world shift. All they need. Schiff is what the cameras seeing and so the seams don't can be in perfect and they can be in the rendering so that when the camera is framed for this focal length this subject matter in the foreground. That virtual background you know. The background dynamics in IT'S SURREAL. The watch it why it always knows where the camera is the cameras. So so the thing. It was interesting because favreau talked about jungle book and Zero Zero Zero through straight. Yeah sorry no that Thera Xetra. It's look it's Jumanji to the one between the one with Robin Williams in the one with the rock so they he talked. It was fascinating like you. Forget that five rows really technical like you like you think of me. I always kind of think of is that guy from swingers. He was talking about like he was getting into the things that they did with jungle book. They shot a lot of that in green screen. But they've built props and then they did a bunch of light and shadow work to make the things that you can't easily fake look real on the live action stops then it would match the composite later but it put him in a situation where when they WANNA make changes on the on the day the shoot they'd see the light was working in something and they want to move stuff around ended up like all the previous and all the work they were doing to set up. The lighting stuff went down the drain. They couldn't be as nimble on the day right so then then they were like. Hey what if we just did screens instead of doing all this kind of stuff around it and and I didn't the thing that this gave that I hadn't seen before in the wired article or any of the other places that I've seen seen them talk about. The technology is how much overhead screen there is. Yeah there's a boatload of overhead screen and how like it must be easier to remove the seams between the screens than it is to do like to fake obvious. It's easier to designate reflections on the Lori Armor. Right what what I think is really interesting about it is a federal is has always been one of the directors who loves practical effects. I mean all directors I think love practical effects rather do it in camera febres one of the few who's had the budgets big enough to actually use practical effects. And when you know the first time we met I talked about how much I appreciated the degree to which used them. After is rampant within camera. Wonderful Live live stuff. Any lit up like a Christmas tree and we talked for an hour about the stuff and it takes that kind of hands on director who really understands and embraces that technology and the Computing Power of the very pinnacle of CG to put stuff back as in camera shots right. Because when it's in camera it just always looks better than how we look back now at at the rear projection like Ripley and Bishop. Sorry Ripley in those guys running from the drop ship crash yes just. It just doesn't quite work right and there will be a look to this just like you know cars in front projection screens old sixties films have a look. I think these led volume style. Productions will also have a love. Because you can't poll super wide right. You can cramped certain types it. Same time there's a veracity to them. That feels really new and exciting. Well I so he talks about this too is is one of the things that he found important. In one of the reasons I think iron man holds up really well even though we're talking about like thirteen fourteen year old technology now. Is that really aware of what works? And what doesn't and what they can fake reliably with. Cg and what what is always looks. Kinda Janke right and because he took the time to understand that technology so like the the thing that norms talking about the the tenor of this of this new medium of this new tool is that you'll see a lot of like backlit seeds because it's not good at you. You can't do a lot of can't do massive lighting from the volume You're getting you're getting highlights and shadows and stuff like that off of it and reflections. But you're not GonNa light the characters with that because it's going to look weird. They're GONNA look like they're standing in front of a giant TV scrape in the show. Yeah you see that other show. And because they picked the like the Pastiche of the Western and the and the and the Star Wars it gave them the opportunity to replicate a lot of those shots from classic. Westerns are that style shots as is really be watching sunrises an small technical aspect you know the mandatory the characters completely reflective make. Leinen that whereas traditional blue screener green screen. You WanNa avoid reflectively at all times because you have to mass that out and paint that out and posts but like one step back from this it all goes back to George Lucas and star wars. In past weeks. We talked about how amazing to see how involve Lucas was as a guiding force and as a leader for these new storytellers of but they called volume like John Dykstra to build the first motion. Control cameras okay. So speaking of jumping off the tension of doing it for real versus doing it in CG human beings are about to do something for real this coming tomorrow. Hopefully yes when people listen to this. Wednesday is the big deal. The ritual plan. You're GONNA be there. I was going to be add. All at Kennedy. Yeah on I'm I'm participating in discoveries. Three hour broadcast of the launch of the Dragon Tool Dragon two capsule to bring two Americans to the space station. And it's the first time in. Is it eleven years that. Us oil from American soil. Yeah right and it's not a the mission. This is the mission right like this. Is that proof of concept tests to NASA astronauts are going to spend three months they are of course. Make good use of that time. But this is the proof of concept for private spaceflight built in America to fly from from Kennedy and hopefully open a new door to space exploration. And it's really exciting. I would wager right now. There are a whole bunch of engineers and scientists at SPACEX and NASA with their butts clenched. Man It is clutch and like I am sure. There are thousands of people running through mental checklists. To make sure that what they have been contracted to do as been buttoned-down. It is an intense thing. I I am here gathering together my space props. I've got my I've been pulling out all the suits in the helmets and this is my hero. My Hero ACIS helmet which I made for come kind a few years ago. Nice and you have a whole setup there because like you said you'll be part of discoveries coverage on this. I think that billions if on Pacific time eleven. Am The launch currently scheduled for about one thirty Pacific four thirty three eastern So we're all hoping that is gonNa stay on track and we'll see something spectacular that they have a very precise launch window which they don't make it gotta do it again a few days later. That's crazy I mean that's there's a sense of wonder here and I hope public because we're all home working right that we'll have a shared online Experience of watching these live streams Just like when you saw the spacex you know when when when you almost sent his car right and and then popped open and you had bowie play right. That was a nice unifying moment. And we haven't had those in. Americans face explosion for longtime Mars missions. I mean the last time. We launched a new spacecraft was the shuttle in nineteen eighty one when criminal and young the first test flight of the Columbia. So it's been a lifetime for me. I was six. I remember I remember. It's funny that is one of. That's a really early memory. I remember parents giving us up. We sat around gathered around the TV. You know a a fourteen inch. Crt in the living room and watched it on the on the news they broke into whatever was on TV over. The years and tracking capital is so aesthetically different that it's tapping into all our you know. Sifi proclivities and our our our imaginations because it is. It looks so different right. What the the the the flight suits the astronauts will be wearing the and you know from a technical standpoint. It's really interesting to see how they operate this. Because it's not the shuttle. It's not a so us Something new models. Are they only flying to people today because it's test flight or tomorrow because okay? Yeah Yeah they're flying to UPTAKE UP INSTINCT NEXT MONTH. Cool by deposits now. Exactly you know I. It's it's really exciting and it. There's been a lot of as I've been tweeting about this and I've been reading online discussion. There's of course a lot of people saying is this really what we should be spending our effort and money and attention on. How is this helping the terrible situation on earth right now and you might love him or you might hate them but Elon. Musk is brilliant storyteller. And he's joined forces with NASA which is told some of the most compelling stories about human ingenuity that we've ever seen and I think this is a totally important story. That is a story about what we can do when we when we joined together. It's really inspiring to me and at the same time it costs almost nothing in the scheme of the nation's budget right like millions of dollars hundreds of millions of dollars to you and me but not so much to the three trillion dollars we spend every year whatever it is. Yeah Yeah I'M GONNA go back to science fiction the making because I watched a documentary over the weekend that I'm GonNa recommend you guys watch. It's the galaxy quest documentary. I've been a lovely. It is so. I'm very skeptical of this kind of stuff because as I'm sure you guys are. We grew up on behind the scenes featuring on. Dvd's film school. That was Lord of the Rings Beatriz. And so there's a very high bar for the behind the scenes when they're created by filmmakers themselves as they're making the film as often are these days and as we've been a part of and telling those stories then you got a lot of cool access but there's also this crop documentaries. That's kind of like like you know Joe Fodder right they get interesting people and we can't what it means to you. It's an share experience. But you're not necessarily learning ton about the making of this documentary is full access. It's all the actors of course minus Alan Rickman Recipes but I the directors the writer the producers at dreamworks a everyone including the fans and what they mean to them. I mean when we were at Silicon Valley comic con four years ago. When we're doing the the cost payroll and one of our favorite memories. Is You know people in cosby would be coming up to us. And and to Thurmond's 'cause player. Thermes came up there in the documentary. They filmed part of this out. That convey an interval awesome and what it means to them and they got to go to an Alamo draft house anniversary screening and meet the actors like so many things didn't know about galaxy quest. I I know I didn't know about the whole held. Ramos originally was he was tapped to direct it and wanted you know. Didn't want him Allen. In which is why they split creatively. I can't imagine anyone but Tim Allen in that role But they originally thought maybe. Alec Baldwin you've Martin so what's funny when you're at the point at which that film was beginning. Its pre production was right around the time Ramos. I think God into a scrap with Bilberg over or with the over the casting of a Tim Allen and the New York Times just before that the New York Times did an article in which Herald Ramos and Spielberg were having a meeting and held. Ramos's holding visible picture of the the enemy spaceship from galaxy quest and there was on the front page of the New York Times or on the magazine section. And the is is that that picture was something that we were working from an. Im and it was such a locked down. I pay for this. Didn't even say what the movie was working on. But here's the Central Avenue. The enemy spaceship being seen on the New York. Times and Bill Sheriff's the The the villain vessel right in and also the protector Those are some of the last big ships at. Im I remember like the last enterprise. Did they cover the various models of the protector? That I am built. They covered the fact that it was the The the designation for the protector was not enterprise right it was called that specific a US enterprise and not any aid protector or something so it was so they could say this is not the enterprise and they had legal battles or they lawyers involved to make sure. The ship design was far enough away from the enterprise designs. They wouldn't be sued so there. There was a really cool thing that they did in the island model shop. Which was there were two protector models and one was built for the TV show and it was built shit. Oli Oh my God. That's so good. In order to look correct and then the other one was one of the more beautiful paint jobs I've ever seen on a ship with spectacular highlighting an interlude Windows Hunt. Imahara designed these beautiful engine. The cells that were led driven that he could animate one frame at a time. So the led's were practical onset for the motion control shots. Wow really light ingenuity in there. That's like a six foot model. It's still hanging. I believe. In the presidio. At M above the staircases. That's one of the surviving ones. A museum But I mean in the documentary wil Wheaton and Damon Lindelof for both in their interview or ease and they both have great stories about what it means to them. I think you could see we all talk about. Gouge quest being the best star Trek Film. Right yeah and and Brent spiner says When they saw when the cast next generation sought they were pissed because it was the film they felt they should have made like. They promised opportunity for them to play themselves. You know caricatures of themselves be those roles because the their scenes you know after the convention were the like calling each other a scorn weavers calling Alan Rickman and like that is exactly what they do. They have phone calls because their family after being on the show for seven years in the Damon Lindelof obviously with bad robot making the two thousand nine star Trek though scenes star trek of them leaving. Enterprise and Sulu failing. And that's one hundred callback to galaxy quest and screeching the ship outside of the drydock while. Yeah a win has a great line. He says you know it's it's obviously a movie not only about film making but about fandom and new show. It's Phantom isn't about what you love it's about how you show that love and the film is all about that too Interesting that's nice. Yeah sounds great. Amazon norm on Amazon prime. So if you have a prime subscription it's free There's so many awesome stories for me. Really filled that hole of you know not going to wonder con not not going to comecon this year and you got the warm same warm fuzzy feelings of fellow fans. We haven't really talked about like you. You guys would normally be deep like this last week. Was when maker. Faire traditionally would have happened. I was lined up to do. I think nine constance year. The most. I've ever done so you did see to each you write. That already happened. I still figuring it out. Everything else has been pushed and yet. It's very strange it's I. I haven't built a costume months. Oh No I. I think the organizers are all we'll figuring it out whether it's from Tech Conference to Pop Culture Ca Conference and you know next year will be the I mean this year. I think everyone's understanding you know. Be Safe is priority but next year will will probably a lot of interesting implementations of conventions mixture of. What's new. Yeah what part of it. What do you guys like? I know when I left tested and stopped going to cons every year. I miss. It's always nice to go get the INFL- infusion of pop culture but the thing. I really missed his the friends that I kind of only see it cons. That's that's absolutely that's the best part. The second best part is hanging out in the green room and chatting with the seat to eat too. I heard teasers about season. Two of the boys it make the first season. Sound like a hallmark movie. It's summer camp it's you. It's a three sixty twenty four seven experience and its surrounds. You right in the happy accidents all even even the bad convention food the long waiting in lines but like you the confluence of all these people and interesting things. All coming together allows for happy. Accidents allows her. Discovery allows for connection. And that's I think that's what we're missing the most. Yeah I think this is good. A place as any to rapid. We're going to figure it out. We're going to figure it out but it out whereas spacesuit to every convention and. I won't take it off go by by Con EXE- that's not one didn't age well boy It's good to see you guys as always on the sire. We'll have a couple Monday builds as always this week This one is not the miniature tool you've been obsessing over but the first miniature Adam that you worked on Over a month ago. That videos coming out. Yes you will. Yes yes What something that's neat about the 'cause we're watching the evolution of you filming yourself. Also you know hardcore. You'RE GONNA do ten thousand hours of this at some point right and become a master of it so it was watching. It was watching the the lego cut good during email. Because when I screw up the measurement I was wondering how it was gonna cut and I watched the watched him zoom in and I was like how is he zooming in bloom in zoom in from having fine also exists all four K. Make most of those pixels such a great moment. And it's already. It's already been singled out as I died inside again. And you know you're using fixed Tripod right. Normally we would be hand held over the show of moving around lots of movement. Lingering on you for certain shot but you have a fixed. Tripod Sean. So you're working. You're working and a lot of times you walk off. Frame and back in frame was having fun with the walk out immediately. Walked back in but sometimes you pick up the TRIPOD and move without. Turn THE CAMERA OFF. It freaks me out. It's like the first time you see a camera mounted the site of a car. It's one of those shots like White House the camera moving and you're describing it and moving around now speaking of this have you have. We must have talked about the behind the scenes of how they did one thousand nine hundred nineteen and some of the insane on camera handle okay. It has been so much fun filming here and by the way actually I check read at Siri. I checked Meta filter every day and the lego build made it to Meta filter. Nice where I read the comments matter filter friendly comments usually right relatively friendly. I looked a little too thin and not fit skinny else. Immediately in my defense said well he was pretty squishy during myth. Buster days now. It just looks like a normal person. I don't know if that's helpful. That's not that's that's that's unkind on. They're going to be judgy about the Lego sorting strategies. Things that upset about them everyone opinion. Look you can sort of however you want. Just don't call them the LEGOS. I language man if you know what I mean then you know what I mean you wrapping up so yeah. We'll shut any things you want to call out what's happening on your tech pod this week on the tech pod Brad. I what the hell did we do on the POD? This week? This was Oh man. This is great. I recorded three days ago. It's already gone. I don't know we talked about something. It was probably interesting. Find out information at tech pod dot content dot town. I think if that galaxy quest documentaries live on Amazon prime twitched. Just open it up so you can watch with your stream. Anything that's on Amazon prime and I might do a watch party of that this week. Not Fund other tweet. It and I'll join okay. We'll do. I'll let you know what I'm GonNa do. It norm very cool People should watch the discovery. Live coverage of the SPACEX dragon crew capsule launching. It's Wednesday again. A sorts of eleven. Am Pacific coverage starts then and the launch scheduled for one thirty Pacific four thirty eastern if they missile window. It'll be like it's like a thirty minute window or something right so yeah and if they missed at it'll be Saturday I think okay and the sub round that we're not doing a livestream. This week will be back next week. Livestream we'll be back to for that But otherwise it's great to see both of you know on Wednesday Adam. Yeah very leg very much I will. I will see you guys are assume all right bye bye.

Adam Amazon director Ebay Danika Herald Ramos SPACEX NASA Brad Nice Alan Rickman craigslist Tim Allen New York Times Damon Lindelof George Lucas Saratoga Ripley Corentin
Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) | Robert Wise

Around the World in 80s Movies

34:45 min | 9 months ago

Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) | Robert Wise

"Hi Welcome to around the world in eighties movies. Luby's my name is Vince. Leo I am the author of the Film Review Website quits dot net. I checked over four thousand of my written reviews. There anytime quips. Dot Net is where to go to W. IP S. T. E. R. Dot net. While you're there encourage you to check out my other podcast. It covers brand new movies. That are out in theaters. VOD You're streaming services usually new movies you you can check that out. It's called the Bill Review podcast and you can find the link to that at my website. Quip stirred dot net today. We're going to be starting off a whole new. I would say trilogy but I think I'm GonNa go beyond just the first three films where I end. I'm not quite sure yet but it is more than a trilogy for sure. In fact still still kind of going on today. It's been off the last trilogy where I looked at films that were based on old. TV shows in this certainly qualifies although it does not have the bumbling protagonist at that previous trilogy. Did I'm going to be going for. Maybe one of the most well known of the film spinoffs from television. The Star Trek series series. And I'm going to start off with the film. That's not quite from the nineteen eighties. In fact it came out just the month before the nineteen eighty s in December of nineteen. seventy-nine I'm talking about Star Trek the Motion Picture Star Trek here. Bringing back. William Shatner Leonard Nimoy deforest Kelley James Doohan George Decay Walter Canaan the initial Nichols from the TV show and newcomers purchase. Kumba and Stephen Collins Robert Wise is the director Herald Livingston gets the sole screenplay credit even uh-huh so many people did actually work on the screenplay at one point or another it did get a very generous G. rating for the theatrical. Release the director's edition. Talk about toward the end of this show garnered a PG rating I would probably rate this PG because of some brief violence and some disturbing content. The run time before theatrical release is two hours and twelve minutes now star Trek. The motion picture is a continuation of the television series that ran on NBC from the years. Nineteen sixty six to nineteen sixty nine now. That series suffered abysmal ratings when it was initially run and then paramount sold the show. Go to syndication and there. It developed a very strongly devoted audience in many markets. Not only in the United States but in many other countries around the world by nineteen seventy-two there started to become talks between the series Creator Gene Roddenberry and NBC on resurrecting the property but but as a TV movie they wanted an option to release that TV movie into theaters in foreign markets. Now paramount who had the rights to the Star Trek property. They ended up mixing. Nixing the idea because of the costs of rebuilding sets or costumes and props for a one off movie. NBC declined to buy the four for STAR TREK TV movies. That paramount required for them to get involved so paramount did not make a counteroffer when it was declined they were making a killing in syndication. This New Star Trek series was seen as just costly competition for its own audience. So side negotiations sometime later. Found roddenberry Eh and film Asian they would relaunch Star Trek into this animated series in nineteen seventy-three actually was an emmy award. Winning animated series. The original cast asked provided the voices for their cartoon counterparts and it was a modest hit at that time although a lot of people considered it a little bit too stiff compared to the original show by by Nineteen seventy-four though Star Trek was so in demand that paramount ended up taking Roddenbury's idea of continuing the series as a movie except one one four theaters. According to Gene Roddenberry. There was an initial desire by the studio to replace the cast with more well known actors. He convinced him to go with the established. Cast of fans already knew and loved. And without bankable stars though paramount would only budget that film at a modest two million dollars additional star power would be provided through celebrity cameos meals. They had in mind they would recreate the sets for a one off movie that was still pricey but they deemed that it could be worth it. If the sets were reused for a return of the series on television or in future theatrical sequels so Roddenbury set to work on the screenplay for this movie has first draft was completed in nineteen seventy five he he titled it the God thing in the Gothic the crew of the enterprise encounters God but by the end of it it turns out to be an alien being with God like powers. Paramount ended ended up rejecting that idea. They thought maybe there was some anti religious overtones that would be a bit controversial so roddenberry ended up seeking to publish that story as a novel. He never quite finished it. But the idea for that if you've seen star trek five you know that that's kind of incorporated into that film. Paramount ended up going beyond roddenberry. At this point. They hired other science fiction writers to come up with their own ideas and and those authors included such major talent like Ray Bradbury. Harlan Ellison Theodore Sturgeon Robert Robert Silverberg and many others paramount rejected them all though they claim that the ideas that they were given. We're fine for TV. But they weren't quite worthy of a motion picture sure roddenberry's surmised that paramount brass really could not comprehend that science fiction would grab traditional movie goers and so this became a conundrum for writers of Star Trek Movie. They were expected to give audiences everything that the enjoyed about the TV show but they didn't want it to seem like the TV show. So in Nineteen seventy-six six paramount ended up hiring the london-based writing team of Alan Scott in Kris Bryant for this all new screenplay that would come to be known by its title of Star Trek Planet of the Titans where the enterprise crew goes back in time to this technologically advanced planets prehistoric days. Becoming something akin to the titans in Greek mythology. Or something like that. At the ending involves spot showing primitives about fire. Gave these aliens. Elite Ford Toward Civilization William Shatner's contract with paramount at that time had expired tired so it was unknown whether he would return and Kirk was written to be missing for the story purpose they're paramount rejected the screenplay here though they thought it was pretentious. Something that the public would not come out to see Phil. Kaufman ended up being brought in as a director. It was going to be an eight million dollar picture by that point. And they revised these Scott Bryant script to include Kirk because William Shatner ended up signing onto the project. Kaufman had a lot of big ideas of what he wanted to do with this film. He wanted to have kirk die at the beginning ending of the film and then got brought back to life at the end probably because he didn't want to rewrite the entire script. And that would leave. Spock as the central protagonist of this story Kaufman. Also so envisioned this as an epic with a lot of psychological underpinnings. He wanted to assure Mooney the great Japanese actor as the leader of the Klingons in this film and production design ahead actually begun even though they had not completely approved the script they brought in Ken. Adam who is known for his work on the James Bond films for preliminaries that would go on for several months in London hidden. Paramount ended up canceling. Kaufman's revision. After eight months working on this they soured on actually making a film altogether. It seemed to be counterintuitive Hewitt of star. Wars was on the verge of coming out. You would think that they would want to ride this while his but paramount kind of misread this. At the time they thought that whether Star Wars was successful or or a failure it would be bad for star trek either way a failure which show that science fiction based films really did not have mainstream appeal. A success by Star Wars would steal star Trek's theatrical thunder. They thought they had a fans with jumped. Ship and Star Trek would seem like leftovers. They concluded that the Star Trek concepts actually worked better on television vision than they would as a big screen blockbuster so they ended up scrapping. The film in order to launch this all new TV series with as many of the original crew that would want to return and plus some new characters to fill in the blanks star trek to which is what it was kind of called at the time not to be confused with the wrath of Khan. This would be the flagship series for e proposed used fourth network every Saturday. That would be a new episode of Star. Trek followed by an original movie and paramount would expand the shows to other nights as the audience began to grow for or their programming. One problem though Leonard. Nimoy did hold out. He was Leery of the grind of doing a weekly TV show again. He wanted to progress beyond what he was doing. He was amenable amenable to appear in the movie. Would add phil. Kaufman was doing because he respected. Kaufman's vision especially given that spock was going to be in the main role Leonard. Nimoy I starring in his own motion pictures so to speak when it did fall apart. Nemo kind of jumped ship. In a way he appeared in Phil. Kaufman's nineteen seventy eight film. The invasion of the body body snatchers remake. Now some interpreted name-wise reticence as dissatisfaction with playing spock altogether in fact. His nineteen seventy five autobiography goofy was entitled. I am not spock in that fueled the feeling that Nimoy was done with the spot roll. Nimoy actually do not feel like he was done with the role but he happen to be in a feud with paramount over merchandising with his image without compensation and he wanted that addressed. He was also committed at that time. To his starring appearance in Equa coolest on Broadway in that made him unavailable anyway. Paramount did offer Nimoy the chance to have a small appearance in the two hour pilot for the show and then a recurring part art as time permitted in a limited number of episodes but he ended up declining. It is not really worth his while. Rothbury did want to move on. He felt that Star Trek was is more than just about spock. They could outlive that and really he couldn't stand actors calling the shots on where things were going to go with Star Trek so he was going to introduce this nouveau level can character and called Lieutenant Zahn and he would be developed in played by David Got Tro and they would also introduce a new female crew member. A delton play by remodel in one thousand. Nine hundred five's Miss India purses combat. There would also be a first officer named Willard Decker. Who would be cast with someone with lead star potential? Well if things did not work out with William Shatner for instance if he asked for more money for season two and if needed roddenberry really had ideas for phasing out all of the original star Trek series actors for younger in cheaper talent. Should they demand more money now. roddenberry said he wanted more nuanced storylines for this new TV series they wanted to depict the characters private private lives in their relationships. Something you didn't see on the original television show this new TV series under the complete control of series creator. Gene roddenberry would carry the title title of Star Trek Phase. Two it would premiere with a two hour pilot episode chosen among the thirteenth scripts. They commissioned for season one of the scripts they opted to flesh flesh out the episode that was scripted by Alan Dean Foster. It was entitled in Thi- Image and they wanted to go with this one as the debut because it had the novelty of the enterprise screw being on a future earth which is something that the original show really did not depict so in the image it was an adaptation of a script concept called robots. What's return that was written by gene? roddenberry himself for Genesis. Two which was Failed attempt by Roddenberry at another TV series in nineteen seventy-three it never got produced is beyond its pilot. Robots return involved sophisticated computers that were left on one of Jupiter's moons to ended up evolving into this robotic life form traveled back to Earth searching for the so-called. God that gave it life Allen. Dean foster would change this to a satellite searching for its creator NASA for or the purpose of this script Herald Livingston. He became the creative producer for star trek piece to despite never having seen the original show which was kind of curious but he was known as a good writer. He helped develop the scripts. He did like the idea for Allen Dean Foster story but he felt that fosters writing was not up to his standards and due to time Straits in him having difficulty hiring writers that he actually wanted to take on the script. Livingston developed fosters treatment into a feature length pilot himself now with sets that were built in the script that were written it looked like full steam ahead for Star Trek these two at this point. Unfortunately the paramount network idea began to lose traction member stations. Advertisers started to express disinterest cable. TV was coming up. They had a lot of competition there. It seemed like you know. Maybe this was the wrong time. I'm to really start. Paramount at this point decided. Well if that's not gonNA work. They could sell this as a movie pilot to one of the existing networks and they hope that it could get picked up once again as a series on one of those networks but those networks started to resist paramount. They were a little bit mad at them. For trying to launch a rival network. They would have to sit this one out so paramount ended up going back to the drawing board somewhat. They reconsidered making star Trek into a feature film. That would be the best path moving forward at least at this point with the television series seeming like it was dead. The notion to return to feature film also resulted from the success of close encounters of the third kind that came came out in November in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven. It proved that science fiction interested. The public beyond just star wars paramount now felt that they had the best property pretty to be the next potential blockbuster with star trek they had a built in fan base and they were ready to go in image. It happened to be the only feature links grip that had paramount's approval at that time so it was quickly greenland as the screenplay going forward for what would be entitled Star Trek but then it got retitled to Star Trek the movie and ended up becoming Star Trek the motion picture because it was deemed as a little bit more serious than your typical movie. Paramount wanted a director with big screen experience to come in for this theatrical film among the names that he saw on the shortlist gene roddenberry preferred two time Oscar winning best director Robert Wise One of the reasons why he wanted sounded wise not only for his talent but he also met him before he they had good report after appearing together on a panel at a Scifi fantasy film festival several years back back in so he thought they could work together very easily. The trouble though is wise was pretty much. Unfamiliar With these Star Trek Show and he would have to get up to speed he procured some old video radio-cassettes that had older episodes and he likes some of it other aspects He deemed mediocre but he saw the potential there for making a movie now wise wanted tightening of the the character relationships and clearer motivations for their actions for the movie rather than the kind of thing that you would see on the TV show wise's daughter and son-in-law they happen to be Big Star Trek Rick fans they were ecstatic that he was taking this on and they told him though. That spock is essential for the success of the Star Trek property and it would suffer without him. So wise had executive producer. Jeffrey Katzenberg meet with Leonard. Nimoy who is performing still equis on Broadway between seasons hosting his new syndicated television series called in search of Canton Berg Convinced Nimoy of Wise's vision and also the importance of not letting anyone else takeover the enterprises Volkan role. That would probably keep him from being able to return so Nimoy ended up signing up partly because of his respect for rubber wise as a filmmaker and partly because of his affection for spot. But I think make most importantly paramount agreed at that time to financial compensation for his merchandising. They reportedly gave him a sum of two point. Five million dollars that would include lewd the salary for him appearing in the film. Unfortunately Roddenbury's latest revision of the script had already removed spock altogether and that would make it a challenge. Challenge to put in spock without a complete overhaul of the script in Roddenbury's next revisions would end up appearing but it was only at the beginning of the film. He would return to his home. Planet Vulcan to remove all traces of human emotion. And he would end up going mad from the pressure. Nimoy here felt that no one would want to see this happen into the character and he privately told Robert Wise that he did not want to be in the movie at all if his character didn't have anything to contribute paramount viewed gene roddenberry's new script as Clunky contrite and they were not willing to work with it so responsibility to incorporate spock went once again to Herald Livingston Livingston really detested. Gene Roddenberry's varies ideas and his writing. He thought he was a terrible writer. He jettisoned all of these ideas until he received sole screenplay credit yet again. The spark solution that they came up with both involved the prologue on plateau can very similar to what roddenberry hit suggested. Spock feels colon are this ritual purging of emotions. And then the Vulcan character that was hired on to replace him on the Enterprise. Lieutenant Commander Sonic would die just like they did in the original script but spock would still end up resume. His duties as the science officer of the enterprise price wants things didn't work out on planet folk in and he would complete the role that was originally written for Lieutenant Zahn because Zahn role was not integral to the main plot a lot of the star trek the motion picture plot. There would be additional things for response to do. They would be an additional spacewalk. Seeing that was added for the climax to give of him more prominence. It wasn't really much Nimoy had hoped for but it was acceptable because roddenberry continued to be a bit intrusive to the rewriting of the film. Tom He had to sign a new contract. Barred him from interfering with revisions in. He ended up ignoring this very often. He butted heads repeatedly with Harold Livingston. In in this way roddenberry could be seen as emulating Admiral Kirk. He was unwilling to accept being kicked upstairs to his executive role and he would push his way into captaining his old ship now Nimoy ended up mediating the script revisions. He met with Livingston after hours to hammer out. The changes revisions still seem to come by the hour. Because Ron Perry you cannot sit idly by they required timestamps so the actors and crew would know which one they were supposed to utilize at any given moment. The situation ended up growing intolerable for everybody. Everybody involved and Livingston ended up quitting in December of nineteen seventy seven but paramount still did not want to go with roddenberry alone. Dennis Lynton Clark was has brought in to handle revisions. They wanted to get spock INC Clark along with Roddenberry even worse than Livingston. They started off on the wrong foot because roddenberry's on berries penchant for playing practical jokes on his crew in his actors. The one that roddenberry played on Clark which was replacing his secretary for this actress that became completely incompetent and obnoxious it resulted in Clark having a meltdown and there was a lot of resentment from which he never recovered after three tenths months of not really getting along. I'm Clark was out Livingston. Return to complete the script which he claims had been rewritten several times. Obviously and none for the better he would get the script back into shape. If only roddenberry was kept away for good now. Roddenberry continued intervening even though he was not being monitored he ended up replacing script pages. That Livingston would submit with his his own revisions pretty sneaky there. Livingston quit Multiple Times. Due to Roddenberry's continued meddling higher ups would still interject. They convinced Livingston to Hugh Return. They gave him a syringe and more money to get him to come back. The two writers though ceased to be on speaking terms by that point and Rod Mira was finally banned I'm from further disruptions but he kinda got revenge in a way he ended up signing on with publishing companies Simon and Shuster the happened to be owned by the same parent company as paramount Gulf and Western. He was going to write the novelization of Star Trek the motion picture. Much to Livingston's consternation. Now this story went through so many revisions that I hesitated it to give you the plot so this is the final plot of the film. I won't go into spoilers though now. Fast approaching Earth is this cloud like alien entity that destroys all that approaches visit with it's nebulous forum. The Not quite fully refitted. Enterprise is the closed vessel available in this space. Clouds approach toward earth. Admiral Kirk pushes his way to take over the mission over the man that he picked as his successor as the captain. Willard Decker Kirk makes every attempt to reason with this living entity who goes by the moniker or a Vija Vija up abducting the enterprises navigator. I- Leah who ends up returning any mechanical form. Giving voice to this entity in the bad news is wants to rid earth of all of the carbon based lifeforms effectively ending life as we know it for everyone on the planet unless Kirk Company can see the day now. The plot does way more complicated to that. But that's kind of the backbone of it now. Production of Star Trek. The motion picture began in August of nineteen. Seventy eight they brought that many of the contributors from the original show. They did have a new costume designer though. His name is Bob Fletcher and he replaced the TV shows uniforms. He brought in Pastel colored new agey versions that he felt was in in keeping with the cerebral nature of this new story. The cast hated the design. They call them space pajamas. They hated the design fiercely. You know they outfitted the crew as if they we're expected to cost play at both a star trek convention and a Renaissance Fair. That's how they kind of look the skin-tight costumes made it difficult for the actress to sit and and they really couldn't use the restroom without accompaniment from someone in the Costume Department because the Zipper that existed for these wardrobes only existed in the back further compounding founding problems beyond the costumes was the Special Effects Team Advertisement Specialist Robert Abel and associates were hired to do the special effects for the film now able estimated that the budget for special effects was going to be about four to six million dollars as they started though they felt that the filmmakers started asking them to make visual the facts that were laughably preposterous so the opted for designs that they felt would work better. They were constructing this on the side. Paramount approved them doing the a new designs despite extending the budget with further delays. But Red flags ended up getting race sometime into the production when Abel's later estimates approached sixteen eighteen million dollars not just six million dollars so paramount was very wary of what was going on there. They brought in special effects adviser. Douglas Trumbull who worked with Robert Wise is on the andromeda strain to oversee Abel's work and they also added John Dykstra who did star Wars Battle Star Galactica to support him. It turns out that Abel able spent much of the initial six million dollars that they were given on a fancy new studio and a lot of new equipment that they used for some of their side work. That paramount was not getting any money on on so they ended up looking at. What actually had me for the movie? And they discovered that they really had not made anything that they consider to be usable so able as fired trumbull would end up having to deliver the visual effects from scratch along with his own crew in a very short time frame which meant very long hours a lot. More money another ten million dollars to fix was broken now as was going on there was also tension developing between paramount and the composer Jerry. Goldsmith paramount wanted the score to emulate more like a John on Williams sound to extend its appeal to what was popular at the time. Roddenberry also made some suggestions to push to incorporate the. TV's shows music into the score much more more. He felt. That fans would be disappointed if they didn't hear Alexander. Courage is legendary theme now. Goldsmith did incorporate that theme whenever the captain's log comes into play but Goldsmith found all of these demands absurd and he ended up walking off. The set. Paramount was under great pressure to complete the picture on time though so the ended up calling Goldsmith back. Acne promised that he would be able to do things his way. After all. And despite all of the quibbling there over what they wanted Goldsmith score to sound like his score with ended up becoming very very iconic in the world of Star Trek in fact it was used as the theme to the television series in one thousand nine hundred seven for Star Trek the next generation in fact there was also brought back for Star Trek. Eric five as well. Now time constraints ended up becoming a really big problem so paramount ended up having to remove a lot of the budget constraints. They started running twenty four hour shifts chiefs. They wanted to deliver the film by the hard deadline of December seventh and that was because they wanted to avoid having to pay back thirty million dollars in guarantees to its exhibitors. His expenses at that point ended up skyrocketing to a massive forty six million dollars overall. That was four times the cost of Star Wars and that put star Trek. The motion picture just is behind Cleopatra most expensive Hollywood production of all time all the signs seemed to be pointing toward impending disaster. Here the last minute completion meant that they had no time time for sneak previews to try to generate the buzz that they normally did and this all for a film based on a cancel. TV show that had no box office stars. This was extremely risky at this point so paramount needed to put something out there. They feel the nine million dollar budget for advertisement but the had to curb national campaigns. There were anti blind bidding laws that prevented the film from being exhibited until December twenty first in fifteen states that had those laws because Star Trek was not quite complete league yet so they didn't get to view the film that they were purchasing as the law required so despite all of these quibbles was bad press at the time fans nevertheless were not dissuaded from seeing what would be the first live action star Trek in ten years they were eagerly anticipating that enough to amass eleven million dollars in its opening weekend. That would break the record that was set by superman just the year before when it ended up opening those fifteen new states on December twenty first the the third weekend for its released went even higher than that it boasted a twelve million dollar weekend and all told the film would garner over eighty two million dollars in the United States and other countries added another fifty seven million dollars for a grand total of one hundred and thirty nine million dollars so of all the star trek films featuring the original cast asked and this is including all of its sequels star trek the motion picture. Believe it or not. It's sold the most tickets overall. And it stayed the highest grossing in the franchise if you adjust for for inflation and all of that money did not include the merchandise. That was highly selling because it was released during the Christmas season. It was a hot commodity at the time. Now Star Trek pick the motion picture unfortunately received mixed reviews upon its release. I think the worst knock on the film was that it is boring. You know a lot of dazzling visuals and music. But it fell short of what Star Wars was excitement and it started to wander too close to the ponderous in sterile nature of two thousand one space odyssey but it was kind of a a unflattering comparison because it wasn't quite as noble as that film lengthy effect sequences offered very little action for a lot of this film and that included this endurance. Testing five minutes sequence. That shows kirks approach to the enterprise which on a people started rolling their eyes at seeing the film would end up earning a lot of unflattering nicknames teams Star Trek the slow Motion Picture Star Trek. The motionless picture and a lot of others. A lot of the action consists merely of members of the enterprise crew staring with their mouths. How's agape at what they're seeing on the screen of the bridge as the enterprise passes through the massive spaceship until reaching features? Inner Sanctum now. In their defense the producers loosers felt that they had spent so much on the visual effects that they needed to show what they paid for. Even if the pacing of the film heavily suffered as a result. The story still has that two thousand awesome one space Odyssey feel humans fighting this rogue artificial intelligence. It lacks the immediacy of a lot of the conflicts in the other star trek movies. So discovery here is propelling. This story in the trades action sequences for lengthy moments of the crew staring in awe at this large nebulous structure that comprises features strange architecture sure contrivances are injected in the film. In a way that does dumb the story down makes it a little bit more palatable. I guess to more mainstream audiences especially during the crucial climax of the film it starts to feel a little bit rushed in a little bit. hokey there some fans actually. Don't like the film even though they're hardcore trekkers they don't like the film's derivative. Ns to several episodes of the TV show. The plot specifically resembles an episode called the changeling where a space probe originally launched from Earth begins to threaten all life life. There are also elements that come from episode called the Doomsday Machine which is about a machine out to destroy planets. There's also an episode of the animated series called one of our planets. It's as missing which has a giant space cloud that eats planets and it requires the enterprise to intercept before it kills millions. You know there are a lot of similar plots in other episodes of the Star Trek. Show you know. Many of the ideas and star trek are often cannibalised and the crew of the enterprise frequently finding God or a God and then they realized that they're dealing with either an alien a robot or a powerful child or the sentient computer. The motion picture seems to be of this mold. That is very familiar to star Trek fans now star Trek. The motion picture picture. I think is neither as bad as its reputation nor do I think it's as mind blowing as the creators tried to make it. I think if all the star trek films it's probably the one that's closest closest to pure science fiction whatever that means and it also means that it is least accessible for those who are looking to star Trek for action or thrills Robert. Wise's wise's methodical approach does separate it in tone and tempo and the themes from the rest of the sequels that came after this it uses a lot of older film textures. Some epic film film tropes has an overture to begin the film. There's a classical editing style employed here some Ghazi lighting effects some anachronistic reverence for Al Things Outer Space. It really does feel like a film that would have been made years before star wars would have come out in the viewers of this series often treat star trek the motion picture despite being the first film in the series series as a standalone effort. It's not really in keeping with the overall series that followed this. Some people choose to ignore it others have come to admire it because of its distinction from its follow follow ups so for that I would say for those people with only a passing interest in Star Trek. You might want to start with the follow up to this the wrath of Khan and maybe only look back give you really are hooked but for diehard fans. I would say you need to start here. It's the one with the original crew that most resembles the television series in that way. So it's kind of a bridge between the Star Trek. TV show and the movies that would follow and like the carbon based crew of the enterprise it is imperfect it comes close to disaster but in the end. I do think it's exceeds needs at the job. It was intended to do for that. I will give the theatrical version. Three stars out of four three stars on my skill means. I do think that it is recommended for those people who like this kind of movie. If you're a star Trek Fan you definitely will probably most likely find enough here to entertain you for the two plus hours if you're not a star Trek Fan. I don't think that this is going to give you anything you haven't seen before other than better special effects. The theatrical release is like an episode of the TV show but filled with with a lot of filler. So you probably won't come around thinking that it's particularly good but I happen to like it enough to give it three stars out of four now. There is an exception here and I WANNA get into the reason. Why is because Star Trek the motion picture? The theatrical release is not the only version. I alluded to this when I started this show. The film film actually exists in three different forms. Obviously the theatrical release there's also an extended version that features about twelve minutes of previously excise scenes. It was created to fill a three hour time slot when he appeared on. ABC In one thousand nine hundred eighty three and they ended up releasing version on VHS on on on laserdisc in nineteen eighty three as well. You could probably find that. It's harder to find these days because in two thousand one. There was a director's edition that was released on DVD. It's basically a re editing star trek the motion picture using some of those excised scenes from the ABC cut. But it's not just a reediting. Rubber wise claimed that the theatrical release was more of a rough cut it was rushed out to make the premier date he feels that the directors addition is diversion. He would have made if he had had the time to work on it. It features more character development. They actually went back and Redid a lot of the special effects so the work here actually looks much cleaner and much. More eye-popping hopping there's a new sound mix involved in order to give it a much more up to date. Sound design and there is tighter pacing because they ended up cutting out a lot of the slack in the ended up injecting a lot more of the character development. It is a much better. Take that version. I give three and a half stars too. I do think that that is a good film and definitely only if you're going to see a version of this film I would recommend the two thousand one director's edition to people who are seeing this for the first time if you've already come to. No one loved the original theatrical version. Obviously you're probably GONNA end up watching the old version or maybe both versions. But if you're new to this if you haven't seen it before the director's edition I think it's a much more representative take of where this film should have gone. And it reduces a lot of the lulls of the original story so three and a half stars for the director's edition and now the problem here with the director's vision for people who are doing it nowadays if you have a high Def television the director's edition is not available on. Blu Ray is not available to stream in in high definition. VPI version is still the one that they go with so as of this recording still does not exist in high definition format. So you'll have to go with the theatrical version if you want high def but if you don't mind watching it in standard definition the DVD. I still think is the way to go. So thank you everyone for listening. I hope that you enjoy this review. Obviously I'm GonNa Follow Star Trek the motion picture up with with its one thousand nine hundred eighty two follow up star trek to the wrath of Khan sometimes just call Star Trek the wrath of Khan for some people many people consider it the best of the Star Trek films as far as whether I think that or not. I guess that waits to be seen so if you haven't checked it out already. I definitely do recommend watching that movie. Star Trek to the wrath of Khan's co-starring. Oh starring Ricardo Montalban probably his best film role in his most memorable and a film. I'm really looking forward to visiting for the next episode. If you have any thoughts on Star Star Trek the motion picture or any of the subsequent films that you WanNa talk about. You can find my contact information on my website. That's a quick stir dot net. WIP S. T. E. R. DOT net. You can find links to my email now. My twitter feed my facebook page instagram. Any of those ways are adequate to get in touch with me until next time. Thanks everyone so much for joining me on this trip around around the world where no one has gone before. Well it's for millions of people. I suppose in eighties movies.

Paramount Gene Roddenberry Leonard Nimoy Livingston Livingston director Robert Wise Willard Decker Kirk spock William Shatner Khan Kaufman NBC United States Roddenbury Phil Dot Net Goldsmith Film Review Robert Robert Silverberg officer