17 Burst results for "John Dos Passos"

"john dos passos" Discussed on Citations Needed

Citations Needed

05:55 min | 3 hrs ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on Citations Needed

"But it seems like there's a similar ethos like you're allowed to play in the sandbox as long as you don't say anything overly pro soviet because those are the guys with guns. There's not an anarchist libertarian socialists. Military with a bunch of nukes pointed at us. So you're sort of permitted to kind of indulge those kinds of left currents montague in his time at iowa just saw these polish guy like eastern bloc writers who are just so happy to be at iowa and understandably and i think he was very moved by the testimony. People got out of really repressive atmospheres and got to chill for a couple years and he could. He didn't see anything wrong with that. You do right that. There's a certain downside to this when you say that to some extent captured creative writing creative writing programs what is the negative downside of these hardened rules and like you said people do subvert them. It's not enforced by some kind of police. Force with a bayonet but there's a broad repetition of modes and. I want you to talk about what you think. Some of the downsides can be. And then i want you to comment on the extent which they influenced you touched on this earlier. But i want you to expand also and how they influenced four writers and other countries many of which were subject to state department. Nci funding Yes so. My main concern in workshops of empire was the narrowing of the that spectrum for domestic american writers and their many interesting stories to tell beyond. I feel like my deepest research went in that direction and for me. It came out of my own experience as a student of creative writing at iowa. I just didn't see how the atmosphere there would help. Anybody cultivate fictional projects other than alice. Munro were raymond. Carver ask short story. Writing and there will be iowa alums will jump up and say no. No no the anything went. You could do anything you wanted. That's true not you're not gonna get kicked out for writing anything in particular but the overall collective affirmation tended to be in kind of a limited direction and so my own. My own reading before arriving in iowa just included so many kinds of fictional projects. That didn't seem like they could be nurtured in that kind of atmosphere so one example that's germane to the history that were telling simply john does passos's usa trilogy which goes all sorts of places and gives a national panorama and is a left-wing document of the nineteen thirties. Aesthetically really ambitious with no single character that emerges as the person you're supposed to care about or mope with or lament for really just a riveting kind of writing and the discipline and atmosphere of a creative writing workshop. Just didn't seem like something that would know how to hive. Mind such a thing into existence will. Yeah 'cause recently. They had the field of dreams baseball game and iowa a few weeks ago. And i watched the film because i was trying to sort of convey. It's kind of schmaltzy romance about baseball. Huge baseball fan. And i was like i was watching. This movie is so aggressively. It's based on a book by wb can saw. It is so aggressively nostalgic so aggressively anti left. I mean there's there constantly making snarky comments about the radicals of the sixties. And it's just a sort of classic boomer. Hippies turned reagan voter. And i looked it up and i'm like oh it was written from the iowa workshop and not to say that that was it couldn't have been or that was that was deterministic. But you see a very least. This sort of atmospheric nostalgia has a sort of political currency like the whole dulling of radicalism..

iowa montague passos Nci Munro Carver raymond alice baseball usa john wb reagan
"john dos passos" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

Discovered Wordsmiths

03:25 min | Last month

"john dos passos" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

"Or if a put it another way, how does God relentlessly pursue us? How he will not rest until his last lost. Lamb is found. And it's a subject that Thrills me and I wanted to share my passion with that subject because quite a bit of it is, is autobiographical. I was a, an Ardent atheist until I was fifty years. It's something that's deeply. Deeply personal, sound like it. So how much of it, I guess not to pry too much, but how much is fiction and how much is, like, what really has happened to you? Well, you know, I get asked that question a lot, and my answer tends to be about 20% of it is true and the other 80% off is even more. True. Nice. I like that. You put it that way. Okay, I like that. So I take it, you you went through kind of your own personal Journey, your own Discovery through life, why did you decide to write it down and want to help young people through your story and why choose fiction instead of like a memoir? Sure, first time I've I've written for almost my entire life. I was when I was ten years old, my older sister off. For some reason, came into my room at night and read me a passage from the, the author, John Dos, Passos and that changed my life. I was so struck by this writing. This was the first. It was, it was way over my head. It was the first serious writing. I'd heard very lyrical, and I just knew from that point, I wanted to write. I've always written. When I was in my thirties, I quit my job and my my late first wife and I moved to, to Paris dead. We rented a place that was just a few blocks away from where Hemingway had lived when he was in Paris. And I devoted myself to, to writing a novel, which thank God Church did not sell as I'd, I'd be humiliated if looking back on it now, where I took a wrong turn or at least a turn in life, that led me away from focusing, on trying to get published, is that I had, I was my other great interest was music, but it turns out, I had very expensive, tastes and pianos. So, to be able to afford the piano I wanted to play on, I went into business and it turned out, I was really good at business. The immediate ego gratification of succeeding at business was the, was it a lure? So when I, when I found that my first novel didn't sell and of course people, you know, you have to sometimes you have to write Ten novels 29th. Whatever. Before before before they'll be successful. I went back to the to the immediate ego gratification of a variety but what got me finally, to where I devoted myself now for the past eight years or so to writing as my main activity writing was the same thing that took me too long to living in Alaska before moving here to Washington..

John Dos Passos Lamb Paris Hemingway Alaska Washington
"john dos passos" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:27 min | 2 months ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Madison Hemings. His recollections. John Dos Passos is a novelist who was also a Jefferson kind of buff person as well, Uh, found this and brought it to the attention of Jefferson Scholars. Madison Hemings. His recollections. And so it kind of gets a new life. They didn't talk about it explicitly in their books, But it gets a new life in the seventies, when Fawn Brodie Wrote about it in her biography of Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson, an intimate history and she put the recollections in the back of her book. Madison Hemings was the man who said in 18 73 that he was the son of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings. And so That recollection Now, once it wasn't sort of in the public, that's the first time I I read it when I was about 14 years old, and that was the first time I had ever seen. Narrative by a former enslaved person and it really interested me to think about someone in that kind of predicament. I mean, I knew that, uh, slave owners head Um you know, Children that slave owners in the slave women that there were. There were Children born of of connections between these people rate in most instances and other kinds of connections. I knew that But To have it talking about a person, an individual whom I have been interested in before. This is like a new twist on on the story. How widespread are the descendants of Jefferson and Sally Hemings? Well, very widespread. I mean, Madison Hemings had himself about 12 12 kids. I don't think his sons had Children. Many had Children, but his daughters had lots of kids. So there are lots of people around the country who are descended from Who are Hemings descendants and You know, it's I haven't I met a good number of them and corresponded with a good number of them. I've been to a family reunion with them and including some people from Jefferson's legal family. But it's very widespread. They had lots of kids in those days once you those generations, and then it just kind of becomes exponential at some point, So there are lots of them and that they've been officially recognized the Hemings side of the family, you know, I don't think so. I don't think so. The Monticello Association, which is the, uh, the association of Jefferson's descendants to his wife. I don't believe they have. But you know, I don't. I'm pretty almost certain they would have because I think that probably would have been the news. I would have heard something about it. But I don't really know how many of them are actually Seeking that recognition because they have their family story, and that's their family story as far as from the people that I've talked to that that's their pretty much their attitude about it. Author Annette Gordon Reed, also Harvard University professor on Book TVs in depth on July 4th. Moderator is C Span's Peter Slim. Well, the C SPAN presidential historian survey just came out. We do this every four years after an election and two presidents you've written about extensively Thomas Jefferson. He came in at number seven again. He's been consistently at number seven. The other president that you have written about Andrew Johnson. Came in second to last right above James Buchanan. Do you think those are pretty accurate ratings? Yeah, I would say so. I mean, when my book about Johnson came out, I think he That was the one year he was listed as the worst. There's always usually just above you, Can it That's pretty much I think that's about right. Uh, he was Not a good president. He was a terrible person. To follow Lincoln. Well, the thing about Buchanan, um and, uh, Johnson. I mean, they've got Lincoln there, and it's kind of a tough comparison. But both, but they both did things that merit being at the bottom of the list of President. This is the re air. She spread radio programming from Monday double U. C S ph from Washington. So and Jefferson. It should be in the top 10. The seven is probably about right. But why is that in your view? Well, because probably because of Louisiana. I think, um, doubling the size of the country that something like that happened at during his presidency, and it was it was his doing now there. That is a controversial thing because people talk think about What That meant for the extension of slavery and what it meant for, uh and you should indigenous people in that area. But, you know, it is the beginning of the United States, the continental United States, and it was a momentous thing. You know, when I feel those surveys out, I mean, I don't Think about Necessarily about how I feel about a particular action or particular president and their policies. I think about how they exercised power in the office and what they did that things that were momentous that helped change the country. And so I think, certainly that was a Claim to fame for him and his first his first. Inaugural address. His first term was a successful term. The second one There were there was the embargo and all kinds of issues. Second terms are always perilous for president. Uh, but I think he definitely belongs to the top, 10 and and I suppose. Because of the declaration because of the day we're Talking about. We're speaking on. Uh, he gets points for that as well, but that that's even though he's not president, then I think it sort of accumulative cumulative score for him. But I would say, Louisiana and some of the things he did his first term and setting a tone. Had this idea about the people as the sovereign and rulers. Jeffersonian ISM, which definitely continues. Even after he's president and his acolytes. You know Madison and Monroe, uh, take their place after him. And even Jackson, whom he didn't think very much of you, Skip over. You know John Quincy, but Uh, Jackson saw himself as a Jefferson. He admired Jefferson, even though Jefferson didn't Admire him. So it's a the influence of Jefferson. There is an age of Jefferson that you know that we think of and that's part of of his presidency. Were you asked to write the Andrew Johnson biography by the American President Series, Or did you volunteer for? I was asked to write Arthur Schlessinger Jr. Who was on We're on the board of it. We were on the board of Advisors of the papers of Thomas Jefferson out of Princeton that are being edited at Princeton. And I knew him from that. And the other editor, uh, Paul Gallop. Had been the editor on the book I did with Vernon Jordan. So between the two of them asking me to do this, some of that both of them. I knew and liked, And it was only 40,000 words. I said. Sure, it was not something that whatever have just out of the blue thought of doing. But once I started doing it and started looking into it, I realized that even though Johnson is not a terribly pleasant person, which shouldn't be a part of consideration, but but it always is. If you want to spend time with someone you know, writing about them, Uh, he was.

Sally Hemings John Dos Passos Annette Gordon Reed Paul Gallop James Buchanan Vernon Jordan Andrew Johnson Madison Hemings Lincoln John Quincy July 4th Fawn Brodie Peter Slim Monday 18 73 Johnson Washington Jackson 40,000 words Arthur Schlessinger Jr.
"john dos passos" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

07:58 min | 5 months ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"There is a pbs. Special six part special produced by ken burns. That is airing right now. And you can also get it on if you're an. Hbo subscriber by the way. When i give you a movie recommendation just assume. i don't know if it's on netflix. Hbo our amazon or just go to youtube and search three or four of them. Because i never know and and it's kind of a waste of everybody's time if you email me and asked me which one and i don't know there's only a couple of platforms i use and you know what they are now. So kim burns did an exhaustive study of Ernest hemingway's life ernest. Hemingway was the most popular american writer of his day in. We're talking about nineteen twenty eight or so. He is at the peak of his game. he is just killing it and he starting in the early thirties. He's bored life is going well. He's living in key west. Depression is full on key. West has been chosen by the roosevelt administration as a city That will be That will be a tourist city. The city it's it's one of the poorest communities in in america at the time but they build they do these government projects and they basically will it into being a caribbean city on the american mainland are well Him away gets bored and he has a passion for spain and he was passionate about the bullfights in these sorts of things so he goes to spain to observe the civil war. that has broken out. Now i you have to understand who the participants are in the civil war. The spanish government duly elected is socialist. The spanish people have always tended towards socialism a cradle to grave socialism and. That was different under that administration. Hitler begins sort of a proxy practice. War for what would be world war. Two there is a group. They're known as the fascists but there is a group of industrialists who want to fight back against this government and so they begin mounting an offensive against it they reach out to hitler and hitler provides training through his military. He provides planes and in the early days. He provides the pilots but then he trains spanish pilots to carry out the mission so he can keep his fingerprints off this he enlists Mussalini and mussalini since eighty thousand italian troops and italian tanks so you have now effectively and an alliance of military prowess from multiple countries. They put out the word for For for folks to come joined their hiring mercenaries out of work world. War one mercenaries. It still have one good battle left in them and they began slowly but surely marching on madrid and this becomes a celebrated civil war. Stalin celebrated by the literati. So you've got a john dos passos in you've got of course ernest. Hemingway and you've got other errol flynn. The actor takes up residence there. And there in the middle of this and hemingway's writing dispatches back home about what's going on and and he's alive in his. His stock is going up. So the spanish government reaches out to stalin who is a communist not just a socialist but stalin steps in and begins assisting spanish government. And when he does he sends his spies in these are brutal spies and he sends them in to infiltrate the spanish government and basically to take over the spanish government at the levels of the intelligence agencies in the security agencies. Well during this time. So you've got hymning way. Who prior to. That would not get involved. In the big labor. Disputes american labor was was marching. they were demanding. They were very violent. Had union labor and you had a sort of populist union movement sweeping the globe and in the united states the intellectuals were on the side of the proletariat movement that had been in europe now it was in the united states. They wanted hemingway to join them and hymning way said no. I don't wanna be a part of that. Not a political writer and he said the only thing i care about in politics is less government. Not more. I don't worship the state i don't love the government. I don't trust the government. They tax money and the only thing that matters to me is liberty. So that's hemingway's position. Well the reviewers stop giving him the good reviews he stops getting the kind treatment in the media and that starts wearing on him and he writes a few pieces when he was back home in key. West that are not his best work and now he started writing in first person and the guy who's fiction was considered the greatest of in the in the english language since mark twain is now being panned as sort of this blustery bluffing impotent man. Who's going on bear hunting and fishing and writing about it. As if he's a hero. So hemingway goes to spain and he's trying to rehabilitate his image so he takes up and he does have a passion for spain and spain is being shellacked. It's being bombed daily by these german bombers which hitler is building a practice for what will eventually be his attacks during world war two. He's trying out his bombs so there is a loyalist a person associated with the spanish government. Who is murdered. By one of stalin's top guys remember stalin supposed to be helping the spanish government but he's actually taking some of their top people out in in putting his people in there. That man is very close. Friends with earnings hemingway's dear friend. The writer john dos passos. Hemingway wants to tell the story that a major figure in the spanish government was murdered by stalin. Who's supposed to be their ally and he was told by several of the major american. Literati that you can't do that. Because doing that will help hitler and mussolini and that side and it will hurt the spanish government and it will hurt the communists and it'll hurt our workers movement and hymning way made the decision to bury the story and told his own friend who was best friends with the man who had been murdered. Bury the story. Don't tell the story the media will come after.

Hitler Ernest hemingway america mark twain amazon errol flynn europe Hemingway john dos passos three hemingway six part mussolini kim burns youtube netflix Stalin Mussalini four world war two
"john dos passos" Discussed on Dear Hank & John

Dear Hank & John

05:08 min | 8 months ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on Dear Hank & John

"You don't have epigraph for either of your books too. You know. I did. Not maybe god. I don't think you do think i do. I didn't have one for looking. For alaska or an abundance of catherine's. I had one for turtles all the way down. Then i had the made up one for four stars. I had one for turtles all the way down because just one of the beginning as that. Yeah just one of the beginning men men can do what he wills. But he cannot will what he wills. Which is a schopenhauer quote. Which is you know pretentious philosophy. But i wanted to have it because i didn't know how else to say. This is a book that never mentions the phrase free will that is about free will right. I didn't know how to say that. Unlike maybe if the book is good enough it can do that on. Its own. But i think it's i wanted to establish at the outset like for me and for this book. The problem is not the question of of will. It's the question of being able to will what you will th. There's a turtles all the way down. Element to free will that i was also trying to explore alongside of like you know obsessive nissen recurring right and so that was like a super useful quote for me in thinking as i was writing the book so i decided to put it in the book but i have often worried like oh boy it does. It does set a bit of a pretentious tone. Yeah the there is an element of pretension and like. I didn't really get why until i wrote Novels but now. When i read books that have epigraph. I'm like are used bragging that you've like like read. A bunch of cool books put. It feels like that you like read it a sophisticated way that you like even know about this. How do you know about this. And sometimes a mike you deserve you deserve and like you know. Oftentimes nautilus sar english professors or professors of writing at universities. And so like they do a lot of reading so it makes sense that they would have this big backlog of amazing thoughtful quotes. But like. I don't have that. So if i needed a bunch of an epigraph before every chapter i beyond like quota pedia or whatever every day type in death and to see what good death quotes there are. Just you don't have. You don't have like a like a google doc or a notebook you keep that you love that of lines from it now john. All of my notebooks are full of like meetings from budget presentations. In the antecedent reviewed book is probably ninety. Five percent me taking that google doc and turn it into a book. Yeah god it's just a stitch together of of quotes that i i love. Interspersed with a memoir. We're so we're so. We have such similar paths but such different minds. Yeah also. I will say that one thing. I like about your writing. Hank that i try to emulate in my own. Is that even though you are pretentious. There's no question about it. You're a little bit pretentious as writer. Of course you are also self aware like you. You understand what you're doing well enough to be able to make a little bit of fun of it and thing i find. Most unbearable about writers is when they. They can't make fun of themselves. Like it's so cringing to me to hear. And i name names but like there are some very famous writers who genuinely think that they are geniuses. And it's so uncomfortable and just like it tells a story to readers. That isn't true. It tells a story of like this. You know yeah i. I am a famous writer because of my incredible talent and because the muse whispers into my ear each morning the great love stories of our time. And i want to be like. No you know your regular person the mean all of it you come to understand is narrative building and so they want to build a story of that people will understand as they're reading the book about the greatness of the author and lots of authors. Do that and like. I think that it can deepen your enjoyment of a book if you believe it but we are kind of. We've moved out of that part of our history especially with is certainly could. Never make that case because you see youtube videos of me. Humping an elk statue. Like i could never have pulled that off. I'm in the same boat. You have to be a little bit self-aware because he know that people are like no. I know that guy. He's an idiot. You've seen by tiktok. Yeah yeah thank. This all reminds me of a great story about william faulkner. So william faulkner in america. I don't even know what the story is true. But i'm going to tell okay. William faulkner is like bird hunting with the famous american actor. I don't even know who carded gable. And they're talking about there with a couple other people in they're talking about writing and clark gable says mr faulkner who are your favorite authors and faulkner says well i suppose John dos passos and myself and car cable says oh mr faulkner you right and says yeah mr gable..

william faulkner John dos passos clark gable gable youtube america four stars William faulkner ninety faulkner tiktok Hank each morning alaska google doc Five percent english american one john
"john dos passos" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

07:57 min | 10 months ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Get out of it how we would change it without catastrophe. Those are hard things to imagine in any plausible way so we say it's hard to imagine the end of capitalism and also questions of human nature. Come up because it begins to seem like Capitalist humanity is is simply humanity and older examples of humanity are not currently existing in very big numbers anywhere on the planet. So it's like saying we would have to change human nature and that of course gets into the question of what really is human nature. Isn't it historical. And if we had a different momento a different political economy wouldn't human nature itself also change in so all these questions come in at once and the mind kind of collapses under the under the strain of all of that speculation and piled together from different areas of our lives. It was such a striking object lesson for me reading the book. And i want you to know. The book had a really profound impact on me. In the way. I've been thinking since reading but one of the things that was saddening to me reading. It was the parts that were about disaster. The parts of were imagining catastrophe. Work really easy for me to live in. It just made total sense. Of course that is what is going to happen and the parts that were imagining the way we would respond the way the world get better. It was striking to me. How hard it was for me to put myself in the reality of that moment and yet of course humanity is an adoptive system. Of course we will change. of course we will respond to things. of course. giant levels of catastrophe will change society's just as they have all the times before. But i'm curious if it felt that way to you was it. Was it harder to imagine humanity responding positively to climate crisis into imagine climate crisis itself or was it just my experience of it. Well i would say it was hard and certainly some of this comes down to how novels work and how narrative works so that if you say i'm going to tell you the story of the day where everything went to hell because it got so hot that people die even in the shade. Well you can narrate that. Everybody's used to those conventions of narration. It's like telling your life. It's like what i did in the book very often like i witness accounts. Eyewitness accounts are compelling. Were used to them and their dramatic and people are only asked to give an eyewitness account for something that happened that you have eyewitnesses so then the other story well there are many millions of scientists in technocrats and bureaucrats who are go to work every day to add one increment which or maybe they'll lose increment that day over the next five years will have made the world one one thousandth of a percents better because they manage to figure out this detail of how insects depend on frogs and so on and so forth there why the universe began the way began this massive integrated or even un-integrate did work and really the novel written as accounts in narrative are never good at describing work so When you try to tell a story about even an individual's work life say in a novel. This is famous. absence in. Novels is the ability to come to grips with someone's work life and yet at central all of it so novels there about personal life or when things go wrong so when you try to talk about the social work of insci- technocracy bureaucracy government and all the rest of the things we do. Well you you lose your grip on the ability to tell that story. So i but i want to anyway so you can see when you read the book. The variety of modes that. I pulled in and tried to orchestrate so it became kind of chorus of voices in something or custody might say rather than solo so very. Many novels are in first person kind of solo performance. And i love them myself but this particular novel is kind of orchestrated chorus of lots of different kinds of voices in lots of different modes to see if i could call up in the mind of the reader a sense of that broad kind of on narrative work that gets done that if you want to imagine the world getting better or getting through this century without a mass extinction event the amount of work and things going right that has to happen is is vast and complicated and really. It's not a good topic for a novel. But if once you decided to give it a try than the novel is a very capacious form. And sometimes there are formal experiments in novels that try to make structures that evoked the totality. Like that i would say john dos passos in his usa trilogy of the nineteen twenties was one of these attempts in. It's been a big inspiration to me. So that's what. I was trying to do there and yet it's hard but it's interesting and it does allow you to try something different and at this point in my career trying something different is is one of the crucial parts for me is what makes it interesting to me. What was striking to me about the effect that that strategy had was that it. I don't even know if i can explain. This quickly. ended up presenting or creating a picture of humanity as a system and it struck me as a novel about systems in relationship to each other the biosphere system the like by physical system. You have parts where you married from the perspective of carbon atom and humanity and what was helpful for me as somebody who thinks about political systems was the novel simply seemed to me to be built on a very obvious premise. When you think backwards from it which is at when things happen. The human system is going to change response and different kinds of reactions are going to come forward if it happens to a particular country like india at the beginning of the novel. India will react in a very different way than any country is right now because they will have gone through this terrible event and that in response that will change how others react. And i'd like to talk about this in general because it's through a couple of your recent books. I think a lot of climate literature and a lot of rhetoric portrays climate change is potential and unchecked combat changes like an unlivable planet. The end of humanity. And your novels very much about a doubt tation now that we will manage to avert unchecked climate change. But when it comes we will begin to adapt in ways that are good and bad and not just technologically but but socially to what is your model of humanity and and and how do you think about when you try to imagine how human beings would adapt what forms the basis for your for the mental experiment. You run there. Wow well i guess you would say that. I used a lot of tools. Out of what might be called. Eco marxism and also tools out of what you might call socio biology. If you're getting to these deepest fundamental questions which is really what you're talking about here. I tried to think about what the social sciences have told us of bow civilization also.

john dos passos un usa india India
"john dos passos" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

15:31 min | 1 year ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"Then candidate and shown leadership unfortunately for all of US I. He's failed to do that. So and what are the repercussions of that that we're seeing right now? While in in nineteen eighteen it was panic and chaos right now. We don't have panic this viruses not nearly as lethal as nineteen eighteen. I wouldn't say we had chaos but we certainly have less than an ordered society that is trying to conform to public health guidelines for the duration during which trump and Fox were downplaying. The pandemic that was communicated that this wasn't a big deal as a result. I think there was a whole group of people who were reluctant to take social distancing and asks and so forth seriously or even an Wasi then we add the behavior of of people who kill a security guard wants them to wear a mask because the store requires them to wear a mask. It's pretty chaotic. Although obviously that's an extreme example but you have people demonstrating in streets without adhering is social distancing and so forth. I WANNA bring my colleague. Steve Morrison in just a second. But before we do. I want to ask you if Americans were to really hunker down. I suppose you think that we have a much better chance of getting rid of this but would we be able to get rid of it completely if we did. Now tell me about that while it's a highly transmissible virus with reservoirs and the animal kingdom. So it's impossible to get rid of bringing it. So what are we left to do if our leadership right now can't compel us to stay home. Wash our hands social distance. There's a a real cried re open right now. There's going to be for the foreseeable future. We've got so many things in front of us that they do need to reopen our economy. What do you see happening? You know in the near term to America. I think we still have some control over the virus and our own destinies. You know. We'd certainly blunted which had at one point the highest growth rate in the world. And we've now going twenty eight. Straight days of decline in New Orleans is going to reopen tomorrow. Saturday may sixteen in a careful phased way berry intelligently. Run even in the places where there has not been raked compliance certainly the doubling time has slowed enormously so we have achieved something and if we continue to Social Distance Masks handwashing. Things like that. You know we're not going to get rid of it no matter what we do unless there is really incredibly been pag sane which is not totally possible but we can certainly make it manageable and in the meantime wait for therapeutic drugs and a vaccine. We don't have to have over a million. I think when we imposed the lockdown when most states acted There were roughly ten or twelve thousand deaths in the doubling rate was less than a week. If that had continued without interruption we would have half a million deaths today with no end in sight. So we've actually achieved quite a bit. Eighty seven thousand deaths as of last night. It's a lot but it's a lot better than happen. Million with no end in sight so it comes down to discipline and following public health guidelines. John I want to come back to that point in a moment about. How do we move ahead in this period? But I I like to come back to your work. The great influenza one hundred years later it seems like most Americans don't have much knowledge of what happened in that nineteen eighteen Spanish flu. It's not even a an important common historical reference point by our own leadership. It's a strange point of Amnesia. It's a sort of blank spot in our culture in our history and as you point out in your work. It was of colossal significance but people. Afterwards were quiet. They were feeling shame there were. There was only one memorial to the victims in entire country. Can you just talk a little bit about this phenomenon? And what does this mean? How do you explain this kind of blank spot this Amnesia? I can't explain it. I mean I'd say question. People ask me all the time in terms of historians until I can only speculate reasonably on that until relatively recently maybe twenty five thirty years ago. When historian started writing environmental history historians tended to look at what people did to people and they didn't really care what nature did to people With the exception of the plague in the fourteenth century out about which much of course has been reading but other than that there is not a lot of scholarship on really any natural disaster whether it's a was influenza or or anything else in terms of fiction that's really difficult to explain John Dos Passos. As one of my favorite writers. He got influence on a troopship which they were like floating coffins and his entire body. Work there about two sentences about the disease so I can't really explain that you know there is some work on it but not what you would expect. Somebody actually did tell me. The other day that in terms of pulp fiction there was a tremendous amount of work on it low-quality novels and so forth in science fiction based on that lasted through the twenties. So that was very interesting to me. It clearly registered in people's minds. When I told my aunt that I was working on this book she was I guess about ten during the pandemic she essentially grabbed her chest. And you know it was very much struck and said that It was the only time she ever saw her father cry and that was because a couple across the street died leaving several orphans so registered emotionally honor in the book. I mentioned this for Issue Woods Berlin stories and he compared the Nazi Movement Tune Infectious Disease. And when they entered. Berlin nineteen thirty three he wrote. You could feel it like influenza in your bones so that sense of dread and expected his readers to recognize and I'm sure that they did and that's fifteen years after the endemic so it was out there but again. I don't have a satisfactory explanation. I wonder myself. Thank you when we come back to the question of where are we right now? What lies ahead back. In the two thousand fourteen fifteen period when the Bola was a raging in west African we had the introduction of some cases here and there was a lot of hysteria and drama. In the United States stemming from just a few cases it was only after we got through the elections in early November that the temperature came down and congress was able to sort of focus on this and we got out of this very partisan and rancorous kind of situation. Here we are right now. We've got one point. Four million cases in the United States Eighty seven thousand fatalities Anna persists. It's a persistent outbreak. We've had these gains that you point to but we're not out of the woods we're at high risk of premature reopening that could create some rebounds and we've had a super politicization of this because of how deeply divided we are tribally in terms of party affiliations and the like and it looks like a very murky situation in which the signals on what we should be doing are just quite confusing and quite contradictory between continuing to be very disciplined versus relaxing. And that's a dangerous and unstable kind of situation but we are in. This overheated moment and you participated in writing the Sid. Wrap paper that looked at the three scenarios. You're working with Mike. Ulster Home University of Minnesota and elsewhere that piece that you put out the end of April got a lot of play a lot of very good coverage and the like and trying to imagine what might lie ahead. Tell us a little bit more. What you think lies ahead with a special focus on our own political cycle and what's unfolding here in terms of the partisan divisions and cultural divisions for one thing I personally and I guess Mike and the authors of that paper don't think summer it's going to provide as much relief as some people are hoping I may sad on nine hundred eighteen. They base it at. I guess more on simple numbers epidemic whilst the same thing really The second wave of nineteen eighteen began in July and Switzerland. Summer it ended in January in Australia is delayed in Australia. 'cause they actually had a very effective quarantine on ships which finally leaked in. January and forty percent of the Australian population. Estimated got sick in summer so I think. Susceptibility of the population is more important than seasonality. I mean it is likely we know for a fact that the influenza virus and a lot of other respiratory viruses don't survive as well outside in heat as they do in cold. That's probably the case with this virus although we don't actually know it for a fact but let's assume that it is a case expected to be the case but you still have as of now probably about ninety. Five percent of the population is not been exposed to the virus is highly transmissible much more so even than in of and given that fact. I think transmissibility inseparability is more important than seasonality. So I don't think the Temperatures increase will provide as much relief. As I said it will tamp down some compared to what it might. Otherwise be but it's going to be hard to abstract that from everything else is the public health measures and inheritance or nine adherence to them. I think are going to be most important. In determining whether we have a York Times op ed I called it. Undulating swells as opposed to a wave. Which if we do it right in a best case we get undulating swells. And you know in a in a worst-case we could reopen too. Soon I think a lot of places probably Ari reopening twosome. But they're they're doing nothing no way to stop it at this point. And if we don't have the testing and the tracing and so forth in place and particularly people you know sort of steel freed from the public health guidelines and stop social distancing. Stop Mass Stop handwashing. Then I think we're we're in for it and we will get what we interrupted. We didn't really have a first way. Because lockdown stopped it but we will get a combination first and second wave and it will be too much to handle overwhelm. It'll make much of the healthcare system getaway side to worst-case so John. You wrote in that New York Times op-ed in the paper with your colleagues at Harvard in Minnesota in Minnesota that you fully expect that if we don't continue to social distance in lockdown we're going to have a severe second wave that could put us in a worse position than we are now. Well if we don't continue to social distance you know we might prematurely. Stopped the lockdown with you know. Obviously people are hurting. And you know you can kill people through a lot of ways. Besides the corona virus. We have to come out. I think most places are coming out a little bit too soon but we do have to come out of that. You know so. It's conceivable to me that we can keep this somewhat in check with the public. Health measures even outside lockdown conceivable. But we have to really enforce social distance the mass the handwashing otherwise it would get wildly out of control. And I don't know what's going to happen. You know if people think it's a political statement not to socially distance and not to wear a mask. They're exercising their freedom by not doing either then. I think we could be facing a worst-case or close to a worst case. We also have to think about whether we're getting at the local level the testing the isolation exactly right and a contact tracing in place. There are very few places that have that right now very few. There's a big rush to try and do this in many places and whether we're going to see in the fall the arrival of any kind of improved testing technology. That may be lighter more reliable faster cheaper something that can be administered locally or in one's home right but what we're what we're talking about now though is we're all worried and John you're teaching into lane the situations this though with unit colleges and universities and with sports so you know something you and I both share a love of football little known fact. You know my son's all went to go to Sidwell friends school. My my sons play football there. John Actually coached a season at Sidwell friends back in the day. So we're all looking at like what's going to happen in the fall with causes universities opening. What's going to happen with football season? What's GonNa happen with so many things that we as Americans look forward to expect to do in the fall?.

John football Wasi United States influenza Steve Morrison Sidwell friends school US Mike New Orleans John Actually Australia John Dos Passos Issue Woods Berlin Fox America Switzerland Ulster Home University of Minn Berlin
"john dos passos" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

14:18 min | 1 year ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Free. So as rebound met Hemingway by chance at Sylvia's Sylvia Beach's bookshop Shakespeare and company in Nineteen twenty two and the tour to Italy and nine hundred twenty three and lived on the same street in nineteen twenty four. So they were very close in. Hemingway recognized and fostered young talent Pound unfortunately introduced hemingway to James. Joyce with whom? Hemingway frequently embarked on alcoholics sprees. So if you said named to is in Hundred Twenty. Two got to insufferable male writers who've gotten together in the twenties and just got hammered together. I would absolutely have guessed hemingway and James. Joyce you would have gotten one absolutely and it's true they did they would just just absolutely get hammered together. So I mean woody. Nato however during his first twenty months in Paris he filed eighty-eight stories for the Toronto Star newspaper so yeah very productive. He covered the greco-turkish war which he witnessed the burning of SMYRNA and wrote travel pieces such as tuna fishing in Spain and trout fishing all across Europe Colon. Spain has the best then Germany so he wasn't just covering conflicts. He was getting them to pay for his like leisure activities. Yes exactly he wasn't stupid. Also oh here's another thing. I mean. He filed eight eight stories in twenty months. He wrote so fast and they'll be more like about how quickly he wrote. But I think this had a lot to do with like how he had a you know just a a base knowledge and journalism and it was just used to filing stories very quickly but his books are not long and they are. They were written so fast. Like I can't imagine writing that fast even with like a computer like just like physically writing that quickly anyway Also during this time he described the retreat of the Greek army with civilians from east th race so hemingway was devastated at this point on learning that Hadley had lost a suitcase filled with his manuscripts at the Guardia. Leon as she was travelling to Geneva to meet him in December nineteen twenty two. Yeah the following September. The couple returned to Toronto where their son John Hedley? Nick was born on October tenth nineteen twenty-three during their absence Hemingway's first book. Three stories and ten poems was published To the stories that contained were all that remained after the loss of the suitcase and the third had been written early the previous year in Italy within months a second volume which was called in our time it had no capitals little lower case. Everything in our time That was published a small volume included. Six vignettes in a dozen stories. Hemingway had written the previous summer during his first visit to Spain where he discovered the thrill of bullfighting. He missed yeah. He really loved bullfighting. That's nothing he missed. Paris consider Toronto Boring and wanted to return to the life of a writer rather than live the life of a journalist. Hemingway Hadley and their son who was nicknamed Bambi returned to Paris in January. Nineteen twenty four and move into a new apartment Hemingway helped Ford Maddox Ford at at the transatlantic review which published works by pound John Dos. Passos Baroness Elsa von. Freytag lowering. Hoven which you may remember from my episode on Surrealism Yeah Like News writer And also Gertrude. Stein as well as some some of Hemingway's own early stories such as Indian Camp Indian camp received considerable praise. Ford Maddox Ford Saad. As an important early story by a young writer and critics in the United States praised Hemingway for reinvigorating the short story genre with his crisp. Steel and use of declarative sentences Six months earlier hemingway had f Scott Fitzgerald and the pair formed a friendship of admiration and hostility Fitzgerald had published the Great Gatsby the same year. Hemingway read it liked it and decided that his next work had to be a novel so with his wife. Hadley Hemingway I visited the festival of San Fermin in Pamplona Spain in nineteen twenty-three where he became fascinated by bullfighting. As I mentioned before it is at this time that he began to be referred to as Papa even by much older friends. Okay Hadley would later recall that. Hemingway had his own nicknames for everybody in that he often did things for his friends She suggested that he likes to be looked up to. She didn't remember precisely how the nickname came into being. However it definitely stock. He called himself. Papa everybody called Him Papa. Whatever a few days after the fiesta ended on his birthday July twenty first he began to write the draft of what would become the sun also rises finishing eight weeks later a few. Yeah a few months later. In December nineteen twenty five Hemingway's left to spend the winter insurance Austria where Hemingway began revising the manuscript extensively. Pauline pfeiffer a friend of the family and a journalist herself join them in January and against Headley's advice urged hemingway to sign a contract with scrivener's scrivener's was an American publisher. Baked Bagel New York City at actually still exists in a certain way it later merged into Macmillan and then it turned into on a Simon and Schuster bought Macmillan and so it's part of China Simon and Schuster He left Austria for a quick trip to New York to meet with publishers and on his return during a stop in Paris. He began an affair with pauline pfeiffer. I Know Papa. He's incorrigible so let's talk a little bit about The Sun also rises so I just hit a button wrong and here okay Okay so the sun also rises epitomized. The Post were ex Patriot generation. It received good reviews. It's recognized as hemingway's greatest work to some Hemingway later A- Wrote to his editor. Max Perkins that the point of the book was not so much about a generation being lost but that the earth abides forever He believed that the characters in the sun also rises may have been battered but not lost so the plot is basically about thinly-veiled hemingway protagonist. His name is Jake Barnes He's an American journalist. Ex Pat who falls in love with a promiscuous Englishwoman. Whose name is lady Brett Ashley during a visit to Spain amongst bullfighting jealousies etc etc. There are lots of other characters who are basically as friends at the time and they all have affairs with or are in love with Brett. It's like pain and suffering and love and joy and you know like the darkness of being young and not being home and all this stuff. So that's the sun also rises Jake Barnes Lady Brett Ashley. Bullfighting bullfighting Spain. So back to hemingway his marriage to Headley surprisingly deteriorated as he was working on. The Sun also rises in early. Nineteen twenty. Six Hadley became aware of his affair with Pfeiffer who came to Pamplona with them that July so he invited him invited her to come with him and his family like NBD. Like don't even worry about it. Like HEAVILY BE COOL. Police coming to whatever like it's happening so on their return to Paris Headley asked for a separation in November. She formally requested a divorce and they split their possessions while Hedley accepted Hemingway's offer of the proceeds from the sun also rises. She got the proceeds for it. All right They were divorced in January. Nineteen twenty seven and Hemingway married Pfeiffer in May so he took no. He didn't wait on that. So Pauline pfeiffer. She was from a wealthy Catholic Arkansas family. She had moved to Paris to work for Vogue magazine. She was a writer. He seemed to have a thing for since after. Headley seemed to have a thing for like lady. Journalists and writers. Shield him I don't think so I think she was. She was around his age appropriate. Age Appropriate Lady So before their marriage hemingway converted to Catholicism for her and they honeymooned on Legrand Roy which he where he contracted anthrax so what. Here's the thing about Ernest Hemingway that you're catch. You're going to catch this. He is probably the most accident prone gentlemen of the Early Twentieth Century. That you will ever hear up. He gets beat up so much. It's crazy so he contracted anthrax which is just like what so he gets anthrax in France and then he was planning his next collection of short stories which was called men without women surprise surprise that was published in October. Nineteen twenty seven that included his boxing story which is called fifty grand Cosmopolitan magazine editor in chief. Ray Long praised fifty grand calling it one of the best short stories that ever came into my hands. The best price fight story. I ever read a remarkable piece of realism by the end of the year. Pauline who was pregnant wanted to move back to America and John Dos Passos. Their friend recommended key West so they left Paris in March. Nineteen twenty eight. Hemingway suffered a severe injury in their Paris bathroom when he pulled a skylight down on his head thinking he was pulling on a toilet chain. Yeah how hammered WASI super hammered. He had to be This apparently left him with a prominent forehead scar which he carried for the rest of his life when a knife fight known from Ole fighting. Not a more MAC himself in the head with a window when he was drunk Was obviously when he was asked about the scar. He was reluctant to answer. Like just make like just make a belie clearly. You have plenty of terrible things that are happening to you. So after his departure from Paris. Hemingway lived in a big city so hemingway in pauline travel to Kansas City. Where THEIR SON? Patrick was born on June twenty eighth nineteen twenty eight In the winter when he was in New York with Bambi about to board a train to Florida he received a cable telling him that his father had killed himself Hemingway was devastated having earlier into his father telling him not to worry about financial difficulties and the letter arrived minutes after his suicide. It's awful so he killed himself over money. Yeah so. Hemingway realized how badly must have felt ever her own father suicide in ninety-three three and he commented quote. I'll probably go the same way. Yeah it's crazy. So upon his return to key West in December hemingway worked on the draft of a farewell to arms before leaving for France in January. The completed novel was published in September. Nineteen twenty nine in Spain. Mid Nineteen twenty nine. Hemingway research is next work which was called death in the afternoon. He wanted to write a comprehensive treatise on bullfighting explaining with glossaries appendices because he believed bullfighting was of great tragic interests being literally of life and death so a wealth arms big one is basically the story of Ernest love affair for Agnes von Kurowski except in the book they do get together and she gets pregnant and they fleet of Switzerland only for her both she and the baby to die in childbirth and then the last scene is like ernest is like walking through. The rainy. Streets of Switzerland goes back to his hotel room. So farewell to arms is basically about Agnes and Ernest There was a movie made with Sandra Bullock called in love and war which is basically like a weird combination of a farewell to arms and Ernest. Hemingway's like story of Agnes. It did not do out. That was like two thousand two so during the early nineteen thirty S. Hemingway spent his winters in. Key West Summers in Wyoming where he found the most beautiful country he had seen in the American west and hunted deer elk and Grizzly bear. He was a big hunter. He was joined there by does Passos and in November nineteen thirty after bringing those passes to the train station in billings Montana. Hemingway broke his arm. In a car accident The surgeon tended the compound spiral fracture and bound the bone with kangaroo tendon He was kangaroo. I don't know it's it's you know. It's the West Montana. People probably had like a kangaroo farm you know. I don't know. He was hospitalized for seven weeks with pauline tending to him. The nerves in his writing hand took as long as a year to heal during which time he suffered intense pain because they put an animal tendency now right so his third child Named Gregory handcock. Hemingway was born a year later on November Twelfth. Nineteen thirty one in Kansas City. Interesting Story About Gregory Hemingway. So Gregory was a was a trans woman who lived there. I'm going to refer to them as they They live their life as a man and a woman Calling themselves Gloria when they lived woman and actually had gender confirmation surgery in nineteen ninety-five allow but it seemed that they had a lot of conflict with that Towards the end of their life they presented themselves as Gregory as male and in interviews and things was presented as male Even after they had had the gender confirmation surgery so it seemed that they had had like a real struggle with that throughout their life and it was kind of a scandal sort of in the eighty s and ninety s But they died a believe in the early two thousands From a heart attack or something like that But yeah that was an interesting story because they lived as a man for most of their life but definitely had some conflicting gender issues. So that was interesting. Pauline's uncle bought the couple of house in key west with a carriage house the second floor of which was converted into a writing studio and while in. Key West Hemingway frequented the local bar sloppy joes. I've been there. It's a dive. That's kind of their thing. Sloppy joes like this is. We're heading. We hung out and drank a ton of booze And it's a cool place and also sloppy. Joes has a live cam where you can go to their website and just like look at the bar and see people like hanging out also there's an ernest..

Hadley Hemingway Hemingway Hadley pauline pfeiffer Gregory Hemingway Paris Paris Headley Spain Schuster He Italy writer John Hedley John Dos Passos Hundred Twenty France Joyce New York City Toronto Star Kansas City
"john dos passos" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Number three. The whole thing happened so fast you really talk about period weeks in any given community number four it was out there it was part of the psyche. You know it may have contributed. You know who knows how much to the roaring twenties. The idea you know party on its to cares about tomorrow or You Know Fitzgerald may have contributed to what Fitzgerald When he said all God's dead all wars fought all face a man shaken when BANACCI's what You know took over the march into Berlin in nineteen thirty three. Christopher issued road was writing Berlin stories. the guy. I mean that Bruin Stories became the movie cabaret one of my favorite movies. And if you haven't seen it something to stream it's really amazing anyway. Isherwood wrote when the Nazis entered quote. You could feel it like influenza in your bones unquote so this is fifteen years. After the fact and he expected any of his readers to know exactly what he meant so it was in the back of. Everyone's mind but you're right. There's incredible lack of literature on it. There's a little bit aspirin poor. But John Dos Passos one of my favorite writers. He got influence on a troop ship. Which is one of the worst places you could possibly get it at As we're seeing right now in fact I mean yeah exactly and yet. He never wrote about two sentences in his entire body work about it. You know I can't explain why that is. What do you think about this moment? That in that context. I mean I'm sitting here. I'm I'm in a closet in a house in which my kids are home schooling in which were were around each other all day. Our lives are completely change. Their totally disrupted. It's it's the polar opposite of of what happened in one thousand eighteen where the government said go about your business fine and people's lives disintegrated or didn't then it was gone and it was horrible trauma and death. We've up ended our lives correctly to try to stave off the worst case scenario. And I wonder what you think of the what that what how we will make cultural meaning of. I guess I'm asking you to predict something that you can't but how we will make meaning of this why I don't know how make meaning of it. That's too deep for me. Maybe but I. This is not going to be forgotten. This is going to be written about analyzed. It's also going to have much more profound effect nineteen eighteen. I think probably did affect people's thinking I do think it was in the back of their minds. But this is in the front of People's minds for a long term visits people using zoom that they won't go back to say the meetings whether even affects architects. Or if people don't need office buildings The best thing about this virus of a good thing as at least as compared to nineteen aiding. It's much less. Lethal the worst thing it lasts lots going to last a lot longer. Differences incubation period incubation period period influences. Want FOUR DAYS. Most people get sick after forty eight hours incubation for this period to to fourteen days people even longer than fourteen days so as at time delays cycles through instead of passing through community. And it's short is six weeks and then being gone having burned through the available fuel infected. Everybody who's vulnerable and coming back later but still go on this thing is going to drag on it. It's GonNa have much longer duration and You know that is GonNa be a problem with getting people to comply you. Don't sustain that compliance. Your you know what we're doing. Now we will lose benefits You Know I. We don't have time probably to get into how we get back. There are ways to get back to get the economy moving at least in pieces Safely while also pursuing public health measures that makes sense there are ways to do it and bows dusting. Antibodies rapid tests right had a disease and so forth. And so on. I'm sure you've you know you've had. Yes Don probably talking about that You know but we. We need to plan. We don't have a plan The failure of the federal government in in this is incomprehensible. It really is John. Berry is the author of the fantastic book. The great influenza was published in two thousand and four. But if you're like me and you're sort of craving deeper understanding of the moment we're in I I can't recommend enough. It's very well written. It's it's got tons of fascinating insights about a whole different sort of spectrum of issues. The History Medical Education and war propaganda. You could also see the article he wrote back in March seventeenth the single most important lesson from the GM. John Great thanks. I really really had a really enjoyed this. Thank you once again. My great thanks John Berry. That was a fascinating conversation. I hope you found it as engaging as I did. You can tweet us the Hashtag with pod email with potty mail dot com. We'd love your feedback. Particularly as Tiffany is sort of work out all the kinks here of this crazy. New World of of closet PODCASTING AND CORONA VIRUS.

Isherwood John Berry Fitzgerald John Dos Passos Berlin Christopher aspirin BANACCI John Great Tiffany John History Medical Education Don GM
"john dos passos" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

12:54 min | 1 year ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"It is powerful statement. By the same token there is very little that was written about it. John Dos Passos. One of my favorite writers got influence on a troopship was pretty bad place to get it and he hardly mentioned it in any of his novels. There's just not that much written about it. And it was a puzzlement. Not only me. But a lot of other people in two thousand nine when h one n one was coming. I'm guessing your phone is ringing a lot. Yes what was the fundamental difference from virology standpoint between the two thousand nine h? One and one swine flu and let's just think about the second wave version of that same virus while the reality said two thousand is very very strange because it was almost entirely different diseases. The overwhelming majority of people who got sick had relatively mild case of influenza. But for those who were seriously ill. It was nineteen eighteen that virus a twenty one while nine thousand nine hundred twenty nine one buyers also but the two thousand nine virus could bind directly to cells deepen the lung what was the genetic similarity between those two. Do we know well. I write about signs but I'm not a scientist. I know that it's referred to as you probably know triple reassortment of viruses meaning that there were three different influenza viruses that were involved in making up the genome of the two thousand nine virus. Some of it probably went back. Then I did go back to nineteen eighteen but most viruses circuit that all of the human viruses circulating today have some of nineteen eighteen floating around in them. So I can't really answer your question to clearly. Add have been a lot of cross protection from other circulating viruses. He think the vaccination or the frequency with which people had influenza vaccines and continued exposure to influenza and perhaps crater medical care. I think it was simply the virus primarily one thing that's also interesting about two thousand nine the peak deaths. The age of the dead was very similar to nineteen eighteen. I've got the exact number whether it was twenty. Seven Twenty eight or twenty nine or thirty but the average age of the people that did die was very very young much different from ordinary influenza in very similar in nineteen eighteen though most of them did have. Komar better these. Let's forward now to where we are two different type virus. It's corona virus not an influenza virus. They have things that are common. They have things that are different. What have been your observations so far. I'm sure you have assimilated a great deal of information men though you're not a virologist you're obviously incredibly area date with respect to your understanding of not just the the biology of these things but also the epidemiology of them in the role that governments media etcetera play. Let's just start with biology? Let's say it's kind of you to say I don't know how much I it's dicey to say that I appreciate that. I hope what I say is correct. I know I believe it. I do sort of cross reference my thoughts with other people who are very involved in democ preparedness vaccine production so forth became friendly with back in the Bush administration since then Obama administration as well so if I have an idea I will send them in email and ask them if I'm gone barris myself if I say but they aren't to your question as I said earlier. Garage virus like one thousand nine hundred nineteen can bind directly to long cells in one. Obviously it's different binding sites but still stephen along as well as upper respiratory. That's a main similarity. The main difference is the incubation period which creates a nightmare for managing this virus. Then we have questions about immunity. We don't know the answers to sort of presume that I guess the work that I've seen recently suggests that you can more or less semi safely. Assume YOU'RE GONNA have immunity for a year and maybe longer if you've survived the disease that I won't use instant card goes. I think it's unethical to expose people to the virus. The person who is getting groceries for now actually did have the disease and did recover. So she's kind enough to get groceries for me and I don't feel an ethical problem asking her. Tell me because I think she probably does have in unity recent recovery but in terms of the time you know the incubation period for influences generally today's might run as long as for but usually shorter this is to to fourteen days. The average incubation period is five and a half to six days tripled the length of time for the average incubation period for influenza. So that makes each generation is going to be that much longer. The disease itself takes much longer to in the body. It takes much longer to pass through the body so the whole length of time. The duration is much much longer than influence is said earlier in nineteen eighteen or for that matter seasonal influenza pass community. Armley six ten weeks and then you hear about it until the next season nineteen eighteen selects wave came and this is not going to be like that also the social distance saying to the extent that it's works and it is working is GonNa add further duration to that the whole process of coming out of. This is just tremendously complicated. Do you think that the response to this has been appropriate? Has Been Overly. Aggressive has been not aggressive enough in certain areas potentially New York. What's your overall. Take on this on the response. Of course trump isn't disaster incomprehensible failure to respond his failure to lead. He said the federal government is a backup. I always thought leadership met. You're in front failure to mobilize resources incredible that. Fema in fifty states compete for the same resources. Instead of FEMA taking over unallocated states the obviously trivialisation of the threat for two months. All these things are almost off the scale. And then cutting sayings withholding five hundred million dollars from the World Health Organization in the middle of a pandemic. Stephen King would not be believe if he wrote a novel. So what else can you say about this? Guy States vary. I'm in Louisiana Governor. John Bel Edwards done pretty well reasonably early. I think the Mayor New Orleans also acted pretty early. I know there's Mardi Gras lame four Louisiana being an Orleans hotspot which may be the case but if you look at the timing when Mardi gras appeared when the now February twenty fifth was Mardi Gras. It was not a single case in the state of Louisiana at that time that we knew there were probably cases obviously that were Mardi gras read any but all that goes back to the testing tobacco which unfortunately I think partly a result of CDC. And I am. I respect I regard for CBC. But I'm that's one not great than FDA in the bureaucracy but also trump and the failure to take seriously the failure to develop infrastructure going forward seen number that says we're going to need three hundred thousand people for testing and contact tracing and so forth when we come out of that this. I don't think one person's hired for that. At this point we should be building added infrastructure up even while we're waiting for testing capacity to develop that should be done simultaneously there are countries who got this pretty right again not just the Asian countries like Korean Singapore and Taiwan Nine Gone But Germany. Very much like our country acceptable leadership. What Sweden is doing now? It's too soon to perhaps tell. But what's your take on the for lack of a better word? The natural experiment going on in Sweden. Right they're basically saying look we're going to pursue this landscape of herd immunity. Protect a long. Yeah we're going to take a selective approach to taking those people who were most at risk and now we've had the luxury of watching how that's played out in the rest of the world but we're not going to shut our economy down and their weather basically saying without saying it explicitly and I don't know if they know that this is what they're saying they're basically saying we completely disagree that the case fatality rate is one to two percent. We think that the infection fatality rate is probably closer to that of influenza point one to point two point three percent because we believe that there are far more invasive to matic people out there than we appreciate therefore creating a much larger denominator and that's synonymous with saying you're GONNA get hurt immunity quicker number one. It will get automatic nearly quicker without catastrophic findings yet. The thing is the infection mortality. Rate in the case mortality. Right are fatality rate or often used interchangeably. But they're not all the same. They're not if you did. A serological study to out. How many people were infected with influenza? The numbers that influenza case mortality. I'm convinced withdraw from zero point. One percent way off the scale way below that because there are people who are exposed to the virus serological study infection rate. Anybody who responds whose immune system response virus in which you can find serologically so there are certainly people who are infected by influence or any other pathogen who never developed the slightest symptom or the slightest illness of any kind and normally a case. Fatality rate is just that it's a case meaning. Somebody has to be ill enough to present to a physician so you can't really compare the infection. They tally rate with the case. Take Allergy right now. It's a very good point. John is if you're GONNA do this apples to apples. You need serologic. I- Afars for both going forward. Where can we bend the ARC of history? Where do we five years from? Now look back and say on April Fifteenth. Had We gone down this path it would have been a better outcome than if we'd gone down this path. What is that look like? Well I mean it's sort of the same thing. We still have an administration. His demonstrated no leadership and is foundering. Reality it's not going to happen. If trump got out of the way and left it to donate property in those working groups. I mentioned earlier. About what planning for a pandemic? What do we discussed? Who SHOULD BE SPOKESPERSON? And we were unanimous. That should not any politician because any politician health and human services secretary or president or anyone else a substantial portion of the public no matter how popular the politician was was not going to believe him or was going to have some kind of inherent negative response to anything. That person said so. We sat around and we figured the perfect spokesperson would've been ever coup. But he was already dead. It was at the time and the second best would have been Tony Vilocci. So we now have five hundred. I think were he allowed to be the spokesperson that we go along way toward figuring out what to do. I think controlling expectations is important. I think might trying to promise that we're coming out on this day or the next eight whatever it is and.

influenza Mardi Gras Louisiana seasonal influenza John Dos Passos Fema New Orleans stephen John Bel Edwards Sweden Stephen King federal government New York World Health Organization scientist Obama Allergy
"john dos passos" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Number four it was out there it was part of the psyche. You know it may have contributed. You know who knows how much to the roaring twenties. The idea you know party on his two cares about tomorrow or You Know Fitzgerald may have contributed to what Fitzgerald wrote when he said all God's dead all wars fought all face a man shaken when BANACCI's what took over the march into Berlin in nineteen thirty three Christopher isherwood wrote was writing Berlin stories I mean that Bruin Stories became the movie cabaret one of my favorite movies. And if you haven't seen it something to stream it's really amazing anyway. Isherwood wrote when the Nazis entered quote. You could feel it like influenza in your buttons unquote. So this is fifteen years. After the fact and he expected any of his readers to know exactly what he meant so it was in the back of. Everyone's mind but you're right. I mean there's an incredible lack of literature on it. There's a little bit daffron. Poor but John Dos Passos. One of my favorite writers. He got influence on a troopship. Which is one of the worst places you could possibly get it at as we're seeing right now. In fact I mean yeah exactly and yet he never wrote about two sentences in his entire body. Work about it you know. I can't explain why that is. What do you think about this moment? That in that context. I mean I'm sitting here. I'm I'm in a closet in a house in which my kids are home schooling in which were were around each other all day. It's our lives are completely chains. They're totally disrupted. It's it's the polar opposite of of what happened in nineteen eighteen where the government said. Go about Your Business. It's fine and people's lives disintegrated or didn't that it was gone and it was horrible trauma and death. We've up ended our lives correctly to try to stave off the worst case scenario. And I wonder what you think of the what what how we will make cultural meaning of. I guess I'm asking you to predict something that you can't but how we will make meaning of this white. I don't know how to make meaning of it. That's too deep for me. Maybe but I. This is not going to be forgotten. This is going to be written about analyzed. It's also GonNa have much more profound effect. You know nineteen eighteen. I think probably did affect people's thinking I do think it was in the back of their minds. But this is the front of People's minds for a long term visits people using zoom that they won't go back to Saint meetings whether even affects architecture. If people don't need office buildings The best thing about this virus if you say there's a good thing as at least as compared to nineteen eighteen it's much less lethal the worst thing. It lasts lots going to last a lot longer. Differences incubation period incubation period. Fear influences want four days and most people get sick after forty eight hours incubation for this period to to fourteen days people even long fourteen days. Aso As at time delays cycles through instead of passing through community and it's short is six weeks and then being gone having burned through the available fuel infected. Everybody who's vulnerable coming back later by still go on. This thing is going to drag on. It's GonNa have much longer duration and You know that is GonNa be a problem with getting people to comply seat on sustain at compliance. Your you know what we're doing how we will lose benefits We don't have pine probably get into how we get back. There are ways to get back to get the economy moving at least in pieces Safely while also pursuing public health measures that makes sense there are ways to do it and bows devastating. Antibodies rapid tests right handed the and so forth and so on. I'm sure you've you know you've had yesterday Bradley talking about that You know but we need to plan. We don't have a plan The failure of the federal government and and this is incomprehensible. It really is John Berry is the author of the Fantastic Book. The Great Influenza. It was published in two thousand and four. But if you're like me and you're sort of craving deeper understanding of the moment we're in I I can't recommend enough. It's very well written. It's it's got tons of fascinating insights about a whole different sort of spectrum of issues. The history medical education more propaganda. You could also see the article. He wrote back in March Seventeenth. The single most important lesson from the nineteen John Great. Thanks a really really had a really enjoyed this. So did I thank you once again? My great thanks John Berry. That was a fascinating conversation. I.

John Dos Passos Christopher isherwood John Berry Fitzgerald Berlin John Great government BANACCI federal government Aso Bradley
"john dos passos" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

11:58 min | 1 year ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on Historical Figures

"How the war used up words. Words leaving only space behind while the glory of its success belonged to hemingway all the profits from publication onward would go to Hadley Ernest probably believed leapt at least kept the important parts of his life glued together though his career was just beginning his perfectly imagined life was already beginning to crumble under his emotional. Wait I read it again last night. Thought it needed a second opinion. I thought I knew the men writing the story. The first time around goes wrong wrong. Happy with yourself. This is beneath you. Gertrude we know how people operate these days. You aspire to be damaged. Don't you. I live and I regret Grete and I keep living. What else would you have me do? Well for someone obsessed with the truth. You run away from like terrified. Little child people are durable L.. Hadley will survive. I guarantee it my profits. Do in fact. Oh she'll be fine you on the other hand. where'd that new headscarf? Dr Come from nothing at all. Oh I heard Ernest you were drunk and you pulled a skylight down on yourself while on top of the toilet I've had enough of this. Good Luck Gertrude. Without me around. Let's see along the rest. Hang about H- you really are an American writer now. Don't you worry about me. Just don't hurt hurt the new one ernest. It's probably good. You're leaving Paris. You're not at all cut out the honest life urged onward by John Dos Passos and pauline colleen desire to return to America. Hemingway and his new wife moved to Key West. Ernest settled down believing he could now both raise a family and continue on on his path as a novelist. Two more children were born Patrick and Gregory Patrick's fraught birth and pauline near death. Experience inspired the ending of Hemingway's next next novel. A farewell to arms published in Nineteen twenty nine unfortunately for Papa as he began to be called in this time period. The thirties were not very productive. Although some short stories and nonfiction works were released. Hemingway did not publish another novel until the nineteen forties time. He spent in Key West although peaceful nod at him inside news of his father's suicide to to money concerns. That occurred minutes after Hemingway had wired him new funds and hope destabilize allies them even more. Hemingway was restless and began to travel. He made a temporary home in Wyoming traveled around Africa for writing inspiration and then fell in love love with Havana heat in Cuba and all the while he kept drinking and kept hurting himself. While doing it. So you're finally back drawn at our discussing some work if we didn't have the lighthouse hanging over our heads. I sometimes wonder if if you'd ever make it home in one piece. I'm happy to hear John is safe. I wish she had never gone to Spain to fight for those Republican fools. Funny those Passos said the same thing when he fled home you tour peas in a pod. How Noble Standing for fascism from faraway sipping drinks on the beach? I don't see you over there just buying more boats and spending more time in Cuba than you do at home get lanee riding done lately. Don't speak about things you damn. Well don't understand that includes both the Spanish civil war and my writing anyway. I'm going back it to Havana. Madrid must be joking. There's my writing for you pauline. You can read it from afar as you enjoy. You'll be killed if I die at. At least I die with my morality intact. Unlike dose Passos and others who don't comprehend their own privilege look at your is your practically swimming dimming. He would need me to do this. What the hell are you on about now? I father this is what he would have told me to do to stay true. Your father's years gone ernest. He didn't know what he wanted at the end side from a bullet Foley my letter. uh-huh pastored I'll probably go the same way. Stop speaking that way right now. What if the children heard you gregory's Gregory's anxious enough without that nonsense caller? What you like? Pauline it's good that they won't see me for a while then I'll let me sober up at peace dammit For the next two years Hemingway again went to war this time as an observer for the North American newspaper Alliance committed to the the Republicans rebel. 'cause he covered many dangerous battles including their final stand against the fascist Spanish military at the battle of the Bro but more importantly he bonded with someone new kind of woman he had never met before one who wouldn't take his B s although he had previously met fellow correspondent Martha Gal Horn and Florida. It took a civil war to truly bring them together. And I'll have another round good man. You truly never stop. Do you. Writing reading her drinking being just interesting enough to keep me here for around would rather be out there under the firing squad from above. Somehow I think you would somehow you think ingrate none of needs a few more reports wired by the morning it is the morning I better stop drinking. Perhaps we can simply drink through to the other decide not a suggestion. I've ever heard before but one I'm willing to try theirs. Was a relationship. Born born in the fire. Out of all of his lovers Martha probably saw Ernest clearest. From the start instead of excitement it was mutual destruction. They sought out in one. Another other. Much like the idealist Republican. 'cause pauline soon seated ground another divorce followed by another speedy marriage. This time to Martha in November over one thousand nine hundred forty hemingway and his adventurous new life free from the burden of things like parenthood split their time between a house called Finca via in Cuba and a quiet. Homestead in rural Ketchum Idaho yet again. Hemingway believed to change in location was all that was needed to balance his turbulent life to environments surrounded by nature and actually for a few years this did the trick angered by his fading literary status and bolstered by the fiery determination one of Martha and her similar vision for his writing. Hemingway finally found inspiration to return to the novel. For whom the bell tolls published at the end of nineteen forty and went on to earn hemingway his first Pulitzer nomination this nuanced. Look at the ground battle in the Spanish. Civil war was his most defined thrilling. Look yet into the most existential Angela. Themes both a page Turner and epoch meditation. On life and Death Hemingway's name was returned to prominence head properly inflated once more Hemingway. We entered his glory years as the Second World. War broke out. Hemingway outfitted his beloved boat. The Pilar with equipment needed to hunt German submarines off the coast of Cuba Cuba actions like that gained a file in the darkest offices of J. Edgar Hoover. FBI agents would keep tabs on him for the rest of his life. Enhancing Hemingway's paranoia in his later years. Still duty called him back to the front lines. It was almost required by his newfound Pulitzer Worthy status. If there were to be war ernest just hemingway would be there to document it upon reaching London. Hemingway went on another bender and ended up in the hospital with concussion. This delayed him from sending press credentials chose to Martha forcing her to make passage to Europe on a ship loaded with munitions also known as a prime target. She wasn't exactly pleased by this outcome. You stupid son of a bitch. Hello dear you realize I've spent the last week on a ship ship dodging German submarines writer's life for us. Isn't it our earnest not for you never quite for you. I hear they're going to be parading. Rating you around like a sacred cow. Good luck seeing anything worth reporting you. witless drunk off now. Don't show your Gillis. You think you're a gentle mind but it's a masquerade ball in your head Ernest. You're fully. I'm through hold on now. You can join me Normandy. You know the bloodshed Ernest. I absolutely finished with this Martha Martha Timid woman. We'll return to our story in just a moment now back to the life of Ernest. Hemingway cut free once more for Ernest took advantage. He lived the wartime life. He had missed out on in the first world war this time with a bit more protection. Though he was president some incredible moments including the landing on d day Normandy but due to his injuries and superstar status was kept away from the frontlines on his boat quickly turned away from the carnage allowing him. Only glimpse will Martha's wartime reporting would go onto win herself her own Pulitzer Hemingway had to allow his imagination to do the talking. He would famously elaborate. How he was the first into liberated Paris and personally cleared the Ritz Hotel? One of his old haunts of occupying forces. All of this was Braggadocio Adagio but the craziest story is actually true. While marching toward Paris Hemingway took control of a local militia of resistance fighters. Where where the hell is hemingway? Now have my head on. Pike if I let the Nazis get him. I'm not sure Sir He split off from US ramble. A he said he didn't WanNa March the Paris empty-handed what the name of God look what I've acquired for us Buck Frenchman Raven Williams that's the ramble a militia. Who Do you think you are hemingway? Your correspondent not a commander. Pretend you don't love me buck but don't deny me this Paris's my city. I'LL BE DAMNED IF I don't return with Italian at my back. When the government later brought him up on charges as a war correspondent issuing commands goes against rules established at the Geneva Convention Ernest was able to talk himself out of punishment? What you have to say for yourself? Mr Hemingway you accuse me of leading a militia. Your honor I was merely offering my advice to willing eaters over the din of a fading war and is successful campaign freeing France of occupation Haitian Ernest and gertrude lay down their own arms and forgave one another. It would be the last time he was ever to see his old mentor. Stein passed away in Nineteen forty-six. V6 Hemingway returned from World War Two at the peak of his fame accompanying him was another. War correspondent this will less famous than Martha Bell Horn and that suited suited ernest. Just fine he wed Mary Welch in Nineteen Forty Five in return to America however his greatest enemy death itself had begun to encroach on his personal life claiming the lives of many closest to him. His loss generation was truly vanishing Fitzgerald was Gone James. Joyce was gone gertrude. Stein was gone and in the most painful piece of news. Ernest learn that pauline died shortly after arguing with him over the phone about their troubled son. Gregory Gregory Gregory. Who would later come up as transsexual and change her name to Gloria committed her life? As a doctor to unraveling the mystery of Pauline's death breaking her father's heart heart further. She discovered that Pauline's death was due to a dormant stress tumor activated in her neck after her fight with hemingway another bell tolled and Hemingway felt himself pushed to the edge.

Pulitzer Hemingway Hadley Ernest Martha Martha pauline Gregory Gregory Gregory Cuba John Dos Passos Havana Paris Gertrude Grete Normandy Martha Bell Horn writer Martha Gal Horn America Spain
"john dos passos" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

11:19 min | 1 year ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Cafe e lead chuck a lot though in Yori multiple nomadic on perhaps alcohol Parmi pay a medic on on a vote. TROPPO INTELLIGENT MIA madre ditching shaken by the mortars. No doubt have no fear though tonight nothing Out The sort Cherie chess but it they they medicom not likely. I think something's hit my legs. God the blood must go. Red Cross did not sign you up to die for us. Unfortunately it did tell Ya know. Now gimme your damn hand. We're GONNA crawl out of this mess. If it kills US and kill him almost did Hemingway's act of Heroism Zero Ism just a month into his tour under the Red Cross earned in the Italian silver medal of bravery at eighteen years old however the shrapnel hits taken to both his legs were a harsh cost young ernest was shipped back to Milan. Where surgery saved his ability to walk? Still it took six months to recover any semblance of normality malady. But leave it to Hemingway to get down to romance while under duress during his stay in Milan he met and seduced his older nurse. Agnes von Kurowski agnes became the prime inspiration. For one of Hemingway's most famous characters. Catherine Barkley from a farewell to arms agnes was earnest's first great love and when the time came for his return to America he refused to let their connection die goodness ernest. You're drunk on your beautiful. Well hope you had a sloppy must be America calling out. You shouldn't drink. You're still on medication. I'm disappointed agnes. It has a nurse at the front. You must know what the most important medication of all this. None of that on the street. No Oh why the secrets anymore were to be married. Aren't we all we OUGHTA. Don't be coy. You accepted my proposal two nights before sealy boy. If I knew all that was waiting for me across the sea I would have made this journey ages ago and you definitely would've died then. Do not pretend not love me. Agnes I know you do. It would be hard not to my idea. Promise me I'll settle back into Chicago. I'll send for you. My parents will be amazed that they will be. Please Watch your today because as you move about. Forget my legs I I know only you promise me agnes I promise silly boy. I plum Earn assailed home with dreams in his head dreams that were quickly. Vanquished wants back in America Ernest. Receive word from Agnes Agnes that she had married an Italian officer. There loves possibility was simply and illusion of war. This shook ernest to his core stranded back at his parents house with two bum. Legs no prospects. He nearly drifted away at the last moment. Three things saved him a job offer a new city and the girl who reminded him of that beautiful nurse. He lost to time in one thousand nine hundred twenty ernest. Hemingway met Hadley Richardson a vivacious. Girl from Saint Louis much like Agnes. She was older than Ernest. Unlike agnes she did not have the good sense to perhaps not marry a guy you met a few months ago. Their engagement came quicker than in his entire relationship with Agnes and freshly equipped with a new posting as a foreign correspondent for the Toronto Star newspaper Hadley and Ernest took their lives to Paris. If he could not have a European girl he would have a city in her place. Although the move was justified by favourable exchange rate for American cash Hemingway's ulterior career. Motives soon became clear perhaps inspired by his war. Comrade John Dos Passos. Hemingway came to Paris for the culture specifically the art and literature. That you're seeing gathering around a peculiar American expats home. The Salon of Gertrude. Stein around comes Joyce once more out of his Gaelic Gaelic mine on Sangria pissing on the print. She stole from Picasso itself because at this sounds vaguely to take gets not one of his best. This is incredible Sherwood was right. Had this room is the center of the city again. Mr Pound and Mr Joyce. The stories are wonderful but everyone might actually like to hear themselves. Think now why here themselves when they can hear me. Perhaps they'd like to make a proper introduction to everyone our new guests tonight Hadley and Ernest Hemingway. We'd like to express how pleased we are to be here. Pleased have we are scholar here. This is not the university son and certainly. Isn't the only three quarters of the people here. Alcoholics out to drink to that. We'll return to our story in just a moment. Hi It's Carter. Sure you're a fan of true crime but are you ready to put your skills to the test and be crowned undisputed expert. Then try your hand at par cast new Trivia. PODCAST killer knowledge. Join me every Tuesday as to competitors go head to head to to correctly answer multiple choice true crime questions. Whoever gained the most points after twenty questions wins? It's all the murder mystery and suspense suspense. You've come to expect from podcast now. In a fast paced interactive format each episode dives deep into different shocking topic from history such says the Manson family Jimmy Hoffa and even the Jonestown massacre with each question and answer comes additional context surrounding the event enlightening even the most most knowledgeable true crime lover. You can play by yourself. Challenge your friends and prove your prowess by sharing results with Park. Cast on social media you. You never know you may even find yourself in the hot seat one day. Follow killer knowledge free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts now back to the life of Ernest Hemingway Ernest. I'd love to chat for a moment. Of course I hear you've come to Paris to right. Well I've been tinkering with the thought. I respect the idea. Is it play over here but I think the American style Exa a strong clear perspective your inner journalist coming out no not like that but the words used to convey the news can be reimagined reapplied side two fiction to the inner self well and never thought of it quite that way but yes I've read a few of your pieces all right then you have touch earnest and meeting makes it clear to me your one of my lost. Excuse me you you hold it well but the world has shaken. The most recent generation caused them to lose a step some in the process however gained a slight insight a lost generation the lost generation. You see that in me enough to turn the pages yes I do in the Montparnasse quarter were Stein lived. She gathered together. The greatest minds of this lost generation and fostered an artistic culture that would resonate for decades. It's it was during these years as argued with Ezra pound drank with James Joyce and studied under Gertrude. Stein that Hemingway's signature style came into existence stance. Hemingway himself later described it as the iceberg or theory of omission instead of diving deep into the emotions the romantics or or engaging in deep psychological deconstruction of characters hemingway brought his journalistic skill of brevity to the page by saying the absolute bare minimum about out characters and crafting simple description of setting and plot. Hemingway believed he could focus the reader's attention onto filling out the outlines themselves so basically Gli. He believed that by showing as little as possible. The audience would actually be able to perceive the emotional enormity of esteems stories to give them a spiny sense for detecting protecting the full iceberg. That is human existence. Hemingway style perfectly sinked with the modernistic artistic movement of time putting together the transatlantic antic review with Ezra pound and others. Hemingway began releasing his short stories. His first story Indian camp was about a boy forced to watch his father. Perform an emergency agency c-section on a native American woman themes of death life and women were already at the forefront of his mind. The modernist audience responded very well so so much. So that after befriending F Scott Fitzgerald who had just found great success with the Great Gatsby. Hemingway decided that a novel was also his next mountain to climb on his professional. Life was not the only thing influx Hadley was a lively companion for Ernest in these European days and they would often travel with friends is to pimp blown a Spain for the festivity of the bullfights they had their first child in nineteen. twenty-three named John Hadley Nick Noor. After his mother and earnest's is favorite. bullfighter gertrude. Stein became the child's godmother but his earnest reputation increased. He found himself increasingly at odds with his motherly mentor. This initial dispute dispute evolved into a decade-long scandal regarding who truly coined the term loss generation young vain and arrogant and his new-found dominance of the local scene. Hemingway was happy to claim it for himself in front of the press and as he wrapped up work on his first novel the Sun also rises inspired by Hadley and his travels to Pamplona and channeling the weariness and Philistine nature of the loss generation. Hemingway found a stronger source of support from a friend named Pauline pfeiffer. We're Hadley Hadley hoped. Ernest would be more selective and cautious in his choice of publisher. Pauline thought the novel needed to be released as soon as possible. So earnest took the first offer given to him followed quickly by a divorce. Order from Hadley. Hemingway was married to pauline within months of a separation old ernest. Never want to rush into things. All of this occurred as the sun also rises became a sensation. It contained many elements considered scandalous for the time it detailed the excessive lifestyle of the lost generation. They're drinking partying and sex in fact. The novel drew criticism from his own friends as hemingway had clearly based the characters and their dirty little secrets on people. Well he knew Hemingway's mother was not a fan either hoping he would go back to the less sensationalist pursuit of journalism. Yeah on the world. Stage it struck a modernist dischord critic Henry. James Believed Hemingway's writing was an echo of the effects of world. War One that in his words hemingway saw.

Ernest Hemingway Hadley Hadley Agnes Agnes Hemingway Agnes von Kurowski agnes James Believed Hemingway Stein America Ezra pound Red Cross Pauline pfeiffer Paris Milan Hadley Richardson MIA madre Yori Cherie John Dos Passos James Joyce
"john dos passos" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Hi I'm Vanessa. Richardson and I'm Carter Roy. Welcome to famous fates apar- cast original exclusive to spotify notified each week. We'll release five. Fresh episodes centered around a common theme such as Hollywood icons influential women or music legends in each episode. So we'll take a close look at the remarkable life of a different person with the help of voice. Actors will dramatize their incredible lives reimagining. Their greatest hand and weakest moments then will examine their controversial deaths. Some dads came too soon. Some remain shrouded in mystery and some change the world forever today covering Ernest Hemingway. A seminal author in the American Literary Canon for his book the old man and the sea it was awarded the Nineteen fifty four Nobel Prize in literature but despite his success was haunted by a deep sadness and no amount of travel more women are alcohol. Could ever help him escape. You can find episodes of famous fates and all other podcast originals for free on spotify defy to stream famous fates for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type famous fates in the search bar famous fates is a spotify exclusive so you can the only find it on spotify at par cast grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram instagram. At podcast in twitter at podcast network now back to the life of Ernest Hemingway. The man who single-handedly developed the dominant style of Twentieth Century American literature the man who made it to both world wars without even being a soldier the man who constantly constantly strove to outdo himself to perfection simplicity to return America to its naturalist roots. There we go over elaborating keep it simple stupid internist. Hemingway lived as he did to defy death and in many ways he might have succeeded in eighteen ninety nine Ernest Miller. Hemingway was born in an Affluent neighborhood called Oak Park right outside of Chicago. A true twentieth century. Life was ahead of him. His Father Clarence was a respected physician and his mother. Grace was an Opera singer and musician both were easily welcomed into a high status community and raised their children within it but their parenting methods did diverge to some degree while L.. Clarence emphasize the importance of nature. Grace was a city lover and forced her children into the arts. Hemingway later claimed to despise his mother playing cello and and even his own name which he believed to recall the WORC- protagonists of Oscar Wilde's famous play. Historians agree that Little Ernest got most of his spark and artistic talent Alan from his mother this divide in his soul would be there for the rest of his life. Ernest would never be able to settle down or choose a permanent home. Both the city and the country entry held their appeal for the young boy. He was a consummate Jack of all trades excelling in music sports like boxing and football hunting but most importantly early journalism. His work for the High School paper earned him a job as a cub reporter for the Kansas City Star at a mere eighteen years of age. Such a job pleased both of his parents who thought it was a career worthy of the hemingway pedigree but hemingway always had his eyes set on a bigger canvas the world stage and right now that stage was consumed by the fires of the First World War as nineteen eighteen. Don America was finally pulled deeper into the conflict unable to let go of the guiding hiding wisdom if his father Ernest knew he had a duty. Instead of directly enlisting he signed up to be an ambulance driver for the Red Cross. An interesting choice for someone. Someone considered by history to be the ultimate ideal of a man some see many contradictions in the man's life. But this choice rings true despite his macho posturing there. There was a gentle side. The Hemingway that only wished to guard and protect life and that wish was quickly fulfilled along with other volunteers. Ernest left his comfortable American American life behind for the Italian front and the horrors of war. Once they're as fate would have it. He had his first meeting with death and another ambulance driver. We're on course. For literary greatness John Dos Passos with whom Ernest would share both friendship and intense rivalry over the coming years damage need alight friend service American to glad to hear a familiar voice in this carnage fresh to the war then easy to tell these. Corpses they're hauling from that decimated munitions conciliating not the front. They're beautiful compared to what you'll see soon wasn't being yellow just unused all this noise. The Cross shouldn't hire from the crib. Charip you High School Footballer. Something a reporter writer really good Lord just what they needed another one wanna me your journalists as well. Let's straighten one thing. Being a journalist and being a writer writing is about truth not spinning stories. Well my father always told you'll be dead days of you. Don't forget everything your father told you. Keep the lighter I imagine Eh. You'll need it arrogant bastard. We should get a drink. One night is involvement on the front was as dos. PASSOS predicted did brief but explosive moved from Alan to a station directly on the Italian front known as for Salta DP AVIC. It took only a month for Hemingway's ways war to become personnel.

Ernest Hemingway Ernest spotify Clarence Ernest Miller Alan Twentieth Century American lit reporter American Literary Canon Nobel Prize Hollywood facebook John Dos Passos twitter Richardson Grace you High School Red Cross Oscar Wilde
"john dos passos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by starving. Hysterical. City lights current publisher director, Elaine Katzenberg says the business continues to draw customers from all over the world despite challenges in the industry, we don't have bestsellers, and we're not publishing bestsellers and so- staying true to those ideals and maintaining them. That's the hardest thing and on the other hand. It's the most important thing. Katzenberg shows me into third and Getty's old corner. Office upstairs at city lights. She flips through his Rolodex studs terkel, Jack Hirschman of a veritable who's who of twentieth century literary life Farini, salsa dance. Mrs John dos. Passos selling Getty status as a literary institution is palpable. It's no one's. There's a street named after him. And the mayor of San Francisco is proclaiming his birthday March twenty fourth Lawrence failing Getty day, I asked if he's proud of his many accomplishments. I don't know that word proud. Is just too egotistic. So how about happy happy would be better except? Get down to train define the word happy. Then you really in trouble. Instead of all the fuss around his big upcoming birthday, this centenarian laughs and says he'd rather discuss what it would take to start a revolution. For the California report. I'm khloe Veldman in San Francisco to find out about some of the celebrations for Lawrence, Furling, Getty's hundredth birthday. Visit California report dot org. If you grew up like I did in one thousand nine hundred as Los Angeles, you will recognize this song and the way it reshaped, southern California. Pop culture..

Elaine Katzenberg Getty Lawrence California San Francisco Jack Hirschman khloe Veldman Mrs John dos Los Angeles publisher Farini director
"john dos passos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sons couldn't handle a fifth born a few months after his father died of a heart attack growing up fun and Getty, experienced extreme contrasts of wealth, and poverty, but poetry has nearly always being in his life. One of his aunts wealthy. Employers would have him recite poems on demand here. He is trying to remember one of them for me. Oh the series game down like a wolf on the phone. The. Their helmets gleaming with gold. Funding Getty came to California in nineteen fifty. He was drawn to it as a place where people could start over. It was what he called this country's last frontier. He launched city lights in San Francisco in nineteen Fifty-three with a mission to break poetry out of it, stuffy academic cage and make it accessible to all. It was a massive risk. We were young and foolish. Unlike other bookstores around the country city lights was open seven days a week and late into the night. He wanted to create a sense of community a place where people to toss around ideas and the business was originally focused on selling paperback books at a time when the literary establishment only cared about hardbacks paperbacks weren't considered as real books. The only paperback books were murder mysteries and some science fiction books. Funding Getty was all about democratizing, literature city life. Lights weathered its fair share of ups and downs over the years like funding Getty's arrest in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven on obscenity charges for publishing Allen Ginsberg's groundbreaking epic poem howl. I saw my of my generation destroyed by Madison. Starving. Hysterical. City lights countered publisher director, Elaine Katzenberg says the business continues to draw customers from all over the world despite challenges in the industry, we don't have bestsellers, and we're not publishing bestsellers and so- staying true to those ideals and maintaining them. That's the hardest thing and on the other hand. It's the most important thing. Cats and baggage shows me into Getty's old corner office upstairs at city lights. She flips through his Rolodex studs terkel, Jack Hirschman of a veritable who's who of twentieth century literary life, Vincent Farini thousands. Mrs John dos. Passos sounding Getty status as a literary institution is helpful. It's no wonder there's a street named after him. And the mayor of San Francisco is proclaiming his birthday March twenty fourth Lawrence failing Getty day, I asked if he's proud of his many accomplishments. I don't know that word proud is just to stick. So how about happy happy would be better except? Get down to define the word happy. Then you're really in trouble. Instead of all the fuss around his big upcoming birthday this near centenarian laughs and says he'd rather discuss what it would take to start a revolution. For the California report. I'm khloe in San Francisco to find out about some of the celebrations for Lawrence, Furlan, Getty's hundredth birthday. Visit California report dot org..

Getty San Francisco Elaine Katzenberg California Sons Allen Ginsberg Lawrence Passos Jack Hirschman murder Mrs John dos Vincent Farini Madison publisher Furlan director seven days
"john dos passos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"john dos passos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Few months after his father died of heart attack growing up fund, Getty, experienced extreme contrasts of wealth, and poverty, but poetry has nearly always being in his life. One of his aunts wealthy employers, which have him recite poems on demand here. He is trying to remember one of them for me. Oh, the series came down like a wolf on the phone. The. Their helmets gleaming with Cindy Ango. Registered funding Getty came to California in nineteen fifty. He was drawn to it as a place where people could start over. It was what he called this country's last frontier. He launched city lights in San Francisco in nineteen Fifty-three with a mission to break poetry out of it, stuffy academic cage and make it accessible to all. It was a massive risk. We were young and foolish. Unlike how bookstores around the country city lights was open seven days a week and late into the night. He wanted to create a sense of community a place where people to toss around ideas and the business was originally focused on selling paperback books at a time when the literary establishment only cared about hardbacks paperbacks weren't considered as real books. The only paperback books were murder mysteries and some science fiction books. Fanning Getty was all about democratizing, literature city light. It's weathered its fair share of ups and downs over the years like funding Getty's arrest in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven on obscenity charges for publishing Allen Ginsberg's groundbreaking epic poem howl. I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness starving. Hysterical. City lights current publisher director, Elaine Katzenberg says the business continues to draw customers from all over the world despite challenges in the industry, we don't have bestsellers, and we're not publishing bestsellers and so- staying true to those ideals and maintaining them. That's the hardest thing and on the other hand. It's the most important thing. Cats and baggage shows me into Furlan Gatti's old corner office upstairs at city lights. She flips through his Rolodex. Stunts Turco Jack Hirschman of a veritable who's who of twentieth century literary life sent Farini Saul Zaentz. Mrs John dos. Passos felon Getty status as a literary institution is palpable. It's no wonder there's a street named after him. And the mayor of San Francisco is proclaiming his birthday March twenty fourth Lawrence failing Getty day, I asked if he's proud of his many accomplishments. I don't know that word proud. Just to go to stick. So how about happy happy? We'd be better except. Get down to try and define the word happy, then you're really in trouble. Instead of all the fuss around his big upcoming birthday. This news centenarian laughs and says he'd rather discuss what it would take to start a revolution. For the California report. I'm khloe Veldman in San Francisco to find out about some of the celebrations. Lawrence Furlan, Getty's hundredth birthday. Visit California report dot org..

Getty Fanning Getty Lawrence Furlan San Francisco California Elaine Katzenberg Mrs John dos Furlan Gatti Turco Jack Hirschman Farini Saul Zaentz Cindy Ango khloe Veldman Allen Ginsberg murder publisher director seven days