19 Burst results for "John Door"

How Thirsty Was the FBI for Michael Sussman's False Trump-Russia Claims?

The Dan Bongino Show

03:59 min | Last week

How Thirsty Was the FBI for Michael Sussman's False Trump-Russia Claims?

"Just to kind of sum up where we are now. This break in the SPI geh case on Friday was important because it shows Hillary Clinton working with the FBI and a group of attorneys to fake these connections between Trump and Russia. And it shows an FBI more than willing to take the information in and eager and looking for an excuse to get in front of a judge and say it was real and the problem is, they kept flooding the zone. Hillary Clinton, with all of these sources say Trump's colluding with Russia whatever, and they kept telling the FBI they were working with the DNC and Hillary And it created a problem for the FBI because they couldn't tell a judge that So they needed a clean source. They needed a white knight to come in there. Someone clean as the driven snow with a clean C B. Oh, no, no. These people are just in here to tell us about Trump. They have no ulterior motives whatsoever. How do we know that? Because we know On September 19th of 2016 this white knight showed up. According to the allegations, the FBI and the indictment on Friday Michael Sussman, who is a lawyer working with Mrs Clinton, this is why I'm telling you, it's a bigger deal than you think. This guy is connected to everyone. There's no way John Door, um, locked him up for nothing. So he comes into the FBI office. And he says, I have information about Trump colluding with Russia. And according to the allegation, he says, Oh, I'm not working with anybody. I'm not here on behalf of any client. I'm just here giving you potential information about a criminal conspiracy. And the FBI is like yes, finally. Finally The FBI is like this is just great. We gotta sources clean. We can put his information down in a fight application. We can spy on Trump and we won't have to lie and tell a judge, you know, uh, cover up for Hillary Clinton or anything like that. So, it says. In the end I and the FBI's press release that suspects showed up September 19th 2016. Why is this suspicious? Because you learn later on If you watch my show today, the podcast you learn right now on the radio show. If you read the Inspector General Michael Horowitz report who looked at this entire story. There's a really interesting nugget in there again. Hat tip. Our friend full Nelson on social media is all over this stuff. Here it is. Remember, I want you to pay attention to something right here. The date The lawyer walks in. The FBI office is September 1920 16, where he meets with the FBI. And this is their clean source. Finally. They've been hearing all summer about Trump and the Russians and all the sources are dirty. They're telling people that working for Hillary, this is the one guy who said according to the indictment. No, no, I'm not working for anyone. They felt like they had it. How do I know the FBI is in on this? What I think. Let me read to you a piece of this footnote here. From the Horowitz report. The only express direction. We found that Andrew McCabe, who was the deputy director at the time gave regarding the use of a confidential human source concerned. A former confidential human source who contacted an FBI agent FBI Field office in late July. 2016 to report information from a colleague runs an investigative firm hired by two entities, the DNC as well as another individual to explore Donald Trump's long standing ties to Russian entities. So in of this part, one of the footnote, McCabe, the deputy director of the FBI knows that people are piling into FBI offices as early as July of 2016 who are working for Hillary and the DNC. Got it. Okay. Moving on. Good footnote goes on. The former confidential human source also gave the FBI agent a list of individuals and entities who surfaced in the firm's examination of Trump, which the former CHS described as mostly public source material. In mid September. 2016 Andrew McCabe told senior Special Agent one to instruct the FBI agent from the field office not to have any further contact with the former confidential human source and not to accept any information regarding the crossfire. Hurricane investigation Is it that timing Church lady

FBI Mrs Clinton Russia Donald Trump Michael Sussman John Door DNC Hillary Michael Horowitz White Knight Andrew Mccabe Fbi Field Office Nelson Horowitz Mccabe Field Office CHS Hurricane
"john door" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"john door" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"John doors to let the world know that the path to progress runs through her age not fear wow she dedicated her great Iowa results that nobody knows of by the way to illegal aliens to illegal aliens and I ran into a story from the Huffington post and it was all about you ready for this non citizens being involved in the twenty twenty Democrat caucus in Iowa non citizens foreign nationals living in America and illegal aliens the dak illegal aliens so we I mean we have people that can't even vote involved in the elections in the voting process hi yeah Louise Gomez thirty one years old Hey Bernie Sanders Die Hard awesome there you go never involved in politics until you learn about the Remonstrant now yes campaign merchandise displayed at his auto body repair shop does your Gomez is a resident not a citizen so he won't be able to caucus but he still been doing everything you can for Sanders short of that a number one last name race came to United States when she was three years old and was a recipient of Jack up she and her sister founded the group dream Iowa but of course member you have the illegal alien at that started a she Rick choose the the leader of the sanctuary movement I'm right here in town she's doing the spear headed the the the big demand a live yes yes she spear I II yes she spearheaded the entire it was a Cup cafe coupled up cafe whatever was the she she spearheaded to them to get a million phone calls to scare the honors new clothes in the restaurant because they came out sporting trump and she started the Bernie early Tina's for Bernie and she came here illegally I think she is yet livia livia some federal I think she is now here legally bites but that's I mean this is not like anything that's new but it just happens you sing a wise it's okay why anyone know why some apparently your time look at Iowa in two parts of Iowa to regents is I wrote livia thank you Ryan Zira livia that is her she is the one she is the was the illegal alien for Bernie so what happens apparently is that I guess in a couple of regions of Iowa they have in Dayton in storm lake they have meat packing plants and farms so of course you get thousands of newly arrived nationals whether legal or illegal who knows of the region to work and and that's the problem that's why changes dynamics that's what the Democrats want this stuff so yeah well we'll talk more about that so let's go really quick to this app so apparently this whole situation is a mobile app that because all these problems which I don't think their problems I think that they were just I think it's just covered because Bernie probably ran away with it because nobody is inspired by Joe nobody's inspired by Joe there is a Washington DC company that built in app.

John
"john door" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"john door" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Hungry dog wants to eat philly fans. We're hungry and they wanted to eat and they got to eat and they deserve it and it was an honor to play for that crowd for so when when you think back on your life and your career particularly your career. Is there a particular moment then in John Doran bosses mind is kind of engraved forever. Yeah Yeah Yeah I I I had a really bad ankle injury. That's where a bunch of ligaments. The doctor told me eight weeks. Andy Reid was not going to put me on. I R which means that they were going to bring in a snapper to fill in for me. Which means one of my buddies would have got fired to clear roster spot to be a temporary snapper and I ain't no way my buddies getting fired because me so not only did I play six days later? It was most pain I've ever been in but I told the coach. I'm going to go down and make a solo tackle. We're GONNA snap the game when he goes to share enough on a brutally torn up ankle. I went down and made a solo tackling the first punt and then with a minute twenty left we went out and snap the game winning field to beat the giants by two and that single handedly. When I was in a trailer Michael swelled up and Andy Reid walked by me and gave me the head nod uncut proud of your kids most proud of my entire career? John I wanNA thank you very much. This has been very inspirational. But I'm not surprised about that at all but I think the fact When people hear this around the world the think about you as a person not just an athlete is what's going to stay with them and I appreciate you sharing your story? You are welcome back here anytime. And if you find yourself in San Francisco got a seat here in the studio wants you to come back in and sit with us for another hour I would absolutely love it and if I could just tell people go to John Door boss dot com. I'm an open were performance in an area near you and I guess Okay Take Care John. Thanks very special person. John Doran boss again. Play College football at Texas El Paso. He was picked up by the bills as a free agent. In two thousand three was the long snapper who spent fourteen seasons in the NFL with the titans the Eagles and also the saints and He was traded to the saints. And as you heard him say that trade saved his life and he was a finalist in season. Eleven of America's got talent with his His magic abilities as we continue.

Andy Reid John Doran philly John saints John Door Texas El Paso San Francisco NFL America titans Michael Eagles
"john door" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"john door" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"To the FBI and even if they had information that he didn't collude with Russia that doesn't mean it was exculpatory of whether he lied to the FBI early though don't they if they have information that says he didn't like most of the three oh to message right yeah so it's a little late than that then I think the case if they have that then if they either have such reports or they had it and somehow the report has somehow disappeared. and I would say you know that then yes the judge will have a good reason to throw the case out what what you what what on a scale of one to ten what grade do you give Christopher ray and getting to the bottom of all this the scandal this ball of collusion is your yeah all calls it maybe I'm maybe I'm too much of a switch on us but I I'm giving him an incomplete because I don't think we're done yet you know according to Attorney General Barr who I have a lot of faith and he's working cooperatively with ray and we're going to get a report not only from Harwich comprehensively about the fight the abuse but we also have the US attorney from Connecticut John door is doing this investigation of the origins of the investigation and the way that they conducted at I think we ought to wait to grade right until we get to the end of that rainbow and see what they come up with white why isn't ray turning away why is he so reluctant to turn over the the Andrew McCabe by taxing emails that if he if he wants to be helpful in this investigation. my my sense is. and I don't know it you know exactly all of them we could not of us can now because it's all behind the Kona secrecy right but my my sense is that the biggest problem that bar is going to have a dorm is going to have it getting to the bottom of this is that there's a lot of participation by foreign intelligence services and even though they have appeared to have done things they should not yeah I know why we arrangement why are we protecting them. because we need them we need them to protect the country these relationships that we have with foreign intelligence services result and are being able to get a look remember this is like if this thing is a one off that's about politics that should not happen our existing overall relationship with these foreign intelligence services are about sharing information that helps prevent things like you know mass murder attacks in the United States it's vital that we keep those relationships and I think ball R. who started his career in the C. I. A. before he was even a lawyer at the justice department he.

FBI Russia General Barr Harwich US attorney John door Andrew McCabe United States Christopher ray Attorney Connecticut Kona murder
"john door" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"john door" Discussed on The Information's 411

"He wrote that looked at the math for Disney as they go down this path of creating a Netflix competitor and reinventing the company in the streaming era. All right. That's the show. Pretty good episode. I think. Yeah. Without further ado, let's get on over to my talk with read and Zoe. So where do we start with moon? Meet he is this figure that Kleiner. Brought in like I said to kind of turn around their fortunes. They've had a tough go of things and they need they need someone to get their group back. So let's actually just start off with Kleiner. And the state of that firm because I know that's interesting to a lot of our listeners. I mean, what kind of gone on with with Kleiner over the last say couple years decade or so they have their returns on the venture fund have suffered. There's Ellen Pao lawsuit allegations of sexual discrimination. So they're trying to point where they're really trying to make a turnaround. Right. This was the company. Sorry. This was the firm that invested in Google way back in the day. So they're sort of known for picking some of the biggest breakout success in the tech industry. They have a ton of cred. They do. Yeah. Of the of the names in venture capital. There's is one of the most recognizable obviously John door has an outsize reputation for picking those companies like Google Amazon. So, yeah, it's always been I think I think really since the Powell trial. It's been this question of Cam may sort of turn around that that reputation. They also had some that debts on clean energy, which also set them back. Right. Right. Okay. So that's kind of a bit of stage setting. So let's get over into moon. What do we know about this guy? I mean, what's what sort of his backstory getting into venture capital and his track record at social capital, which is the firm that he that he came from. So in came over from US venture partners, and he founded social capital, and he really made a name for himself over there. He's given credit credit for slack which was the premier deal that social yes. And he was like the rainmaker at the firm, and he left really suddenly and went to Kleiner Perkins. And you know, they had attempted to court him for a really long time. So it was a big win. Right. And right and read you wrote a story last year that kind of looked at the unraveling social capital and the infighting between chihua- and who's the head of the firm and some of the partners there. I mean, what kind of the backstory between a moon and Chenoweth and the falling out. If there was any between those two characters will I think this was really one of the central points. Most interesting pieces of the stories that the the sort of narrative, if you will in Silicon Valley is that there is exit of partners from social capital, and that that kind of caused the firm to the he said unravel what really happened. What Tomasz says happened is? He decided to switch directions and become less of a traditional venture capital firm sort of investors own money. But but that is the narrative, and what you know, really gives Zoe lot of credit here for for this reporting. She turned up that actually it wasn't exactly as people didn't happen in the way that people thought, right? And there's actually a bunch of turmoil at the firm between Mamoun and Palley who is the founder co founder of social capital, right? And so you can go into that in more detail. So right around the time that moon laughed. This was like July two thousand seventeen. It seems like maybe he was like checked out ready to leave. But there was an incident where he you spoke disparagingly about a founder, Rachel Carlson and her companies fundraising efforts at a birthday party. And he revealed numbers from a private fundraising dock and said that the round was overvalued. According to people that I spoke to he denies this. But the latter part we can I back up one second because this just to to people listening may not know the whole story. But this this company guild had been an important investment social capital at made an investment in the company..

Kleiner Perkins Tomasz Zoe Google Disney Ellen Pao Netflix US founder Powell Cam John door Chenoweth Silicon Valley Rachel Carlson chihua Mamoun
"john door" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"john door" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The house was already proceeding with an impeachment without hearing from Joel ski by contrast in the current environment. Congress has almost entirely subcontracted its investigative authority to a prosecutor who has not told the legislature. What he is doing it has done so both because under Republican leadership. Oversight has been to put it mildly lackluster, and because where it has taken place it has generally happened behind closed doors as investigative reporter, Mike is a cough who has been crusading of late for congress to hold open hearings. Put it to me in a text message Wednesday evening. Congress has quote completely punted. Outsourcing fact, gathering to an executive branch official unquote, Q writes, quote, getting the facts and airing them to the public are core to Congress's duty unquote failing to hold hearings makes it quote impossible for the house to act while everyone waits for an executive branch report that they may or may not see anytime soon. Whether one agrees or disagrees with is a coughs critique, and I very much agree with it. It indisputably means that the house is far more dependent today on Muller than congress was in nineteen seventy four for the factual basis of whatever action it might contemplate one solution to this problem is as is a cough suggests to hold public investigative hearings. But another concurrent approach is to formally request a referral of information that judiciary committee might need to do its job. That's what Redon did in nineteen seventy four the committee's request came in response to wars skis filing of the roadmap with the court and the grand jury's request to transmit it to the committee in response. Judge circa held a hearing on March sixth nineteen seventy four at which the committee's chief counsel John door appeared before the judge along with a lawyer named Albert Jennings door informed circa that the committee had authorized him. Quote to request the court to deliver the material which the grand jury delivered to the court last Friday to the judiciary committee of the house of representatives unquote in the hearing Serena asked whether it might be possible to defer the impeachment inquiry until after the trial was completed. Regino sent the letter two days later in it. He informed the court that the committee had quote agreed unanimously to authorise and direct me to respectfully request that you provide the committee the materials delivered to you last Friday by the grand jury he argued that quote worthy house to act in this impeachment inquiry without having had the opportunity to take the grand jury material into account, I fear that each house member. And in fact, the entire country would experience an enormous lack of confidence in our constitutional system of government unquote, in response to the judges question Redeina wrote that quote, it is in no respect possible for the committee and the house of representatives now to suspend for any period of time there present pursuit of the constitutional responsibility. The house and the judiciary committee are under a controlling, constitutional obligation and. Commitment to act expeditiously in carrying out their solemn duty unquote, ten days later ceriga approved..

judiciary committee Congress cough investigative reporter prosecutor John door executive Regino Redon Redeina Serena Muller chief counsel Albert Jennings official ten days two days
"john door" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"There are more likely to go volunteer for a charity or in their schools, then to see the political process as a way to make things better. I think the exciting part about this cycle is that all these women who are now going to go to Washington have a chance to change that and to show him in around America that actually when we step up it can really make a difference. Over Lauren mentioned her concerns about millennial women turning out. But it's not just a millennial women problem. It's a millennial problem. There's a new poll released yesterday from NBC news. We're only thirty one percent of millennials say they definitely plan to vote on Tuesday. Thirty one percents for all the marches, and the hashtags and everything we've seen from young people all that energy you've seen right? It doesn't appear. We'll wait to see if they show up, but it doesn't appear that they're actually going to go do something about it. Well, we don't know. That's what we don't know at that is actually what's going to determine what happens. I'm pretty sure we're gonna take the house. The question is do we take it with twenty four seats? So he's taken with fifty sites and young people particularly women are going to make all the difference in this election. If they. Show up, and you're somebody made the point here. These are not necessarily liberals. I mean, there are people who are this next generation is actually somewhat libertarian economically. And that's goes across the board. Not just left versus right. So you're going to have to see young people showing up in places like Kansas where we have two seats that we can winner. I aware we have two seats that we can win if they show up we're going to win campuses. I want to go to John door. It's for a final thought. But but before I do that. I just wanna touch on something that Lauren brought up because Lauren you talked about women being wanting to be over prepared at know, everything about the candidate know every detail there are risk averse, and this sometimes keeps them from running or voting. So let me make a very clear call out to women right now, the risk is not voting. Okay. Because the only reason why you might be voting if you don't know enough about the candidates this time around is if you want to check on Trump, that's all you need to know. And if you want a check on Trump, you've haute democrat at this point, it's pretty simple, but the risk again is not voting and you don't want to take that risk. I totally agree with women being risk averse in this election. John fedorowicz. Well, so this is the question you're saying you have to vote for Trump. If you're a woman vote against. For Democrats vote against Trump. But that that cuts against let's say the race in Tennessee. There's a Republican woman in Tennessee, Marsha Blackburn, running against Phil Bredesen's. So if you want more women in the Senate, maybe got a vote for Marsha Blackburn, though. That's that's not what I was saying. I was saying. Vote against a woman if that woman is not going to give you a check on Trump. You know, women don't just have to band together blindly. And we band together to do something. And right now women should be voting for a check on Trump because I think women actually have more of a sense of value and decency and at this point. And I'm sorry, I'm saying they are risk averse when it comes to human decency when it comes to racism when it comes to using politics of fear. I think this is something that digs deep for women for mothers who are raising children who are raising boys and girls to be better people. I'm not saying men aren't. I'm just saying I think women need to step up and stick to their beliefs. If they want to check on Trump vote against the Republicans, and yes, it can be a woman, Marsha Blackburn. Take a look at what she said take a look at the things that she has said in this election and tell me if that's the type. A person you want an office right now alongside this president Howard Dean, Lauren later..

Trump Marsha Blackburn Lauren NBC John fedorowicz Washington America Senate Tennessee John door president Kansas Howard Dean Phil Bredesen thirty one percent
"john door" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"It vice that sticks out that I got from John door was in two thousand and one John Doe, by the way is a famous venture capitalist. Let's try to reset the whole thing. They advised that sticks out. I got from John donne who two thousand one said my advice to you is to have a coach, the coach. She said, I should have Bill Campbell. I initially resented the advice because after all I was a CEO I better go. I can't work under these conditions. Do you realize I've been future such future rooms as to today. I was pretty experienced, why would I need a coach? If I do something wrong, I'm Eric frequent, Schmidt fire that party to To that. that argument was how could a coach advise me from the best person in the world that this freak air expect it into that part dramatic effect narrative reader that I haven't, but that's not what a coach dust. The coach doesn't have to play a sport as well as you do. They have to watch you get you to be your best in the business context. Coach is not a repetitious. Coaches, somebody. Right there. I said somebody I got a funny right there. I did that for you. Love it. Coaches. Somebody who looks at something with another set of eyes describes it to you, and here's words and discusses how to approach the problem. That might have been the best piece of ethic reading in the history of humanity. Wow. Well, anyway, so. That we know that Marshall breakdown, what? Why? Eric Schmidt, the CEO of Google is saying that the best advice he's ever gotten. He said this in an interview and fortune magazine, he said, the best advice I ever got was somebody telling me that I needed to coach. Why is that so important to be coach, AMAN, coach, you gotta be coach -able in being coach. -able means one receiving a constructive criticism or receiving coaching with an open mind in with humility that I'm going to get better. That's the first thing. Then the second thing about Marshall, you're talking to me. Do you know that I'm kind of a big deal, right? No. I said, okay, I took that feedback. Idiot because I am one of the best of my time. That is right. But you gotta be coaching. Some people will go get feedback like that. You see there, they'll take feedback and they'll say, how can I get better at sales? And you'll say, what you want to do is you're going to want to build reports when you meet them here, the questions you would ask I, it was different. I can't do that, but this is what happened in no matter what you said. Yeah. Yeah. But yeah, but you know, yeah, yeah. I know you've sold eight hundred million dollars of homes, but this particular can you talk to me about the level coach ability you're looking for it Sean homes dot com. Yeah, you bet. I mean, we're looking for people who are teachable in teach ability. It's like we obviously have the video cameras. You mentioned in our offices. We also have the call recording on our phones and I always believe that with every person there's a better version of you inside of yourself. And so I'm going to quote the great Jim Harbaugh coach of the Michigan wolverines the. Latest university on earth, and he says that people need to focus on getting one tenth of one percent better every day..

Eric Schmidt CEO Marshall John donne Bill Campbell John door Jim Harbaugh fortune magazine Michigan wolverines Google eight hundred million dollars one percent
"john door" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Find the time to get things done. Yeah. So I use this strategy because I was running my CPA firm. I financial planning practice and I decided, hey, I'm going to write a book. So the only time I had because I had three kids and wife and I didn't wanna get divorced was I had to get up at four thirty in the morning. So four thirty to seven in the morning is when I did my writing, I just took a page out of the wealthy people self made millionaires in my study and and lo and behold, I've been using that routine ever since and since then I've written five books and done a whole host of other things. So that warning routine is been paying off like crazy for me. I and I think that's why wealthy people do it because they know that's the first thing in the morning. They won't be interrupted nobody's up anyway. They can get a lot done and it's called the block time blocking so they can focus their mind through this time blocking strategy and get things done. That's a move. That's a move. If you're struggling to find time to get things done, wake up earlier, the final move I wanna talk to you about today. Mr. Tom corley is getting a mentor getting a coach, Eric Schmidt, the most successful CEO somewhat argue of the modern generation. The former CEO of Google said, the most important advice he ever received was from John door. The venture capitalist who said, you need a coach. Bill Gates says, everyone needs a coach. Let's go with Steve Jobs. Said you need to hire a coach. All these people hired a coach. It is so important that you have a coach or a mentor in your life. Ninety three percent of people according to your research, ninety three percent of wealthy people that had a mentor attributed their achievement and success in the world to their mentor, Tom breakdown. Yes. So mentors I found in my research where the fast track to accumulating an enormous amount of wealth because mentors tell you what to do at what not to do. They tell you what the read, what not to read, they tell you what skills developed, what skills you don't need to develop. They basically like pinpoint, they dentist. Exactly what you need to do in this large circle that you call your career. They said, now, just focus on this thing here and you're going to be wildly successful. So they,.

CEO Eric Schmidt Mr. Tom corley Bill Gates Steve Jobs Tom breakdown Google John door Ninety three percent ninety three percent
"john door" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on Acquired

"And so I was the first person hired in that bureau to cover the internet per se, like what it was and online services. And Yahoo and said, there was no one covering these. These these people excite their excite, you don't remember that company? Yeah, John door was in that one and you know, they just didn't have people that just didn't. That was it. I was at and people make fun of me. As I've said, many times will care. What? What do you think it was about you that you know, this is weird corner of society. That's clearly not a thing yet, but yeah, you're all in on it. You're saying the internet. I got it right away. It's sort of like seeing a movie and going, oh, like, you know, I think I just saw it and I was very interested in it before when I was at the Washington Post. It was very interested in. We had these little trash eighty computers that we use used to write party stories about Washington for the style section, use the trash eight, and we'd put the couplers on telephones. It was crazy that we did this at like payphones if you remember those. And then I started liking the phones that we had. We had a, we had a portable phone that was in a suitcase, and I was obsessed with it and I carried it around. I, nobody was interested in it and I kept saying, this makes total sense. Why aren't we using this? Why isn't everybody haven't? Why don't you just started like making connections? And I think I just made connections on just this one thing and the minute I saw when I saw the the browser and the World Wide Web, which you called it, the worldwide web. You have to spell it out all the time. You knew you saw, oh, just a minute. And so there was all these experimentation. Going on, like there was a AT and t. of this thing called inner change, there's CompuServe and prodigy. There's all kinds of stuff. But I remember thinking this is going to be. I'm going to change everything and I covered retail for the Washington Post, and you can see classifieds, we're gonna get screwed. You could see. I remember being mad at deadlines at one point. I'm like, why do we have deadlines that stupid people should get news anytime. And I, I don't. I met a lot of people that thought like I did, you know? So there weren't that many, but what was one of them? And and so I just kept pursuing it. And even though people made fun of me and until they started to be worse, something in the nineties in the mid to late nineties, that was a boom. That was one of the first booth, the pre crypto, boom. No, it was the boo. It was several booms that was one of them that the nine early nineties in the late nineties. I'm sorry, not the early nineties were a time when all these, these companies started to be worth a lot. And there was like Mark Andriessen was on the cover, the twenty, the king, the king of something. He was on his throne, and he had hair at the time and was barefoot and like this guy's gonna rule the universe. And so there was lots of attention to it. And then Bill Gates got very wealthy and that was a big deal. He when I met a me was wealthy, but not that wealthy. And Steve Jobs was making his comeback, so cemented deadlines, you and wall together, I believe went to the Wall Street Journal. Yeah. After you've been there for a while and you're like we do a blog. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I got. I got pregnant and had a baby. And when I came back, I was just fat. I'd read a lot of blogs when I was away and especially Andrew Sullivan had one. There was a suc dot com. If you.

Washington Post Bill Gates Washington John door Andrew Sullivan Yahoo AT CompuServe Wall Street Journal Mark Andriessen Steve Jobs
Eventbrite plans to go public

BTV Simulcast

01:09 min | 3 years ago

Eventbrite plans to go public

"Online, ticketing in events site event bright is filing to go public company filed for its US IPO. Listing the offering at two hundred million dollars? The company plans to use the proceeds to repay debt, and raise working capital ice spoke to event writes co. Founder Kevin heart's on Bloomberg studio one. Point out back in March where we talked, about the advantages of going public take a listen It used to be I think it was John door that said that after six quarters of revenue. Growth was, time to go public that was like the sentiment of tech in the nineties that you would be out really. Quickly and now we kinda swung near the direction where companies are just saying private for very long time and, that, that, can have a detrimental. Effect because you don't have the, kind of light the sunshine or the public markets. To shine in Breed more accountability and in a lot of bad things can happen so we I personally a lot of benefits to going public and and you know the company's writing when when when Julius ready to make that call Julia hearts of course as a CEO, of event bright Julianne Kevin Hart's co-founders also

Alibaba Bloomberg Amazon Selena Wang United States Facebook Ali Baba Softbank John Door MIT Alabama Julianne Kevin Hart Kevin Heart Founder Andrew Kobe Julius CEO Julia
"john door" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"But Mamoun came is running the early start a business. Well, he's not running it, but he's he's a principal. He's a prince. So he's one of the main guys. That's right. Maintain members there. So. Yeah. Is that true? You gotta try to recruit your mouth. I guess for there were discussions. I think language is important here. Sure. We had conversations as we were looking for how to refresh and renew. Look. We were all getting older at Kleiner, right? We'd all sort of come through this green investing streak that we needed to dig out from. Right, because I not because by the way, I think going into green investing cinema, vesting is exactly venture capital should do, but they should do it in a in a measure away when you're put in. I, we didn't. We didn't. So we had to dig out from that. And when Ted Shlein came to a group of us in the just after twenty ten and said, let's let's rebuild this company. Let's go, let's firm and let's go back and start to get involved in all of the other spaces that we've ignored over the last four or five years, four or five signed up to do it. Seidenberg may John. Mike Abbott, John door in touchline. That was that was a group and we went out and said, okay, let's get displaced back together, going and forced into return. You're seeing. Now we just did. I think we did more IPO's last week than we'd done in any month in the last ten or fifteen years. That's the result of investing starting. Got back to your didn't exactly exactly which was series as series Bs of xactly high tech company. And so as we came out of that feeling like we're feeling pretty good about where we are again, but realizing we now need new talent, follow this talented, getting a little older. Yeah, we started looking around and shaimaa and his team were definitely one of the candidates that we looked at. We said to do, we hire everybody, we hire do we bring in a group do so we looked at some good ideas, right? I mean, it's a pretty smart cat. He figured out a lot of things that were wrong in venture capital and kind of pushed by fellow. He's he's clearly very, very bright. It's just was not a great fit for. We wanted to accomplish in moon, I think, is a much better cultural fit. We're Kleiner Perkins and he, he's the guy who found slack is that right? Right. So he's basically the guy who. Is responsible for the big head over social capital anyways, ain't got him on your team. Let's talk about that sort of. When should venture capitalists retire and get out. I think benchmark has their own view, like whatever age it is. They have an age cap, like Logan's Ron or something. You're fifty five sixty. What's the best way to do succession planning at a venture firm because you guys are learning that I think in real time. Yeah. I mean, I don't think there's a retirement age. I mean, look, John should never retire, right? He he may want. You may want to play a different role, maybe play different role, but his enthusiasm and his experience and his network are so valuable. Why would you ever put on the sideline? Right so sense. It makes no sense. I do think though that you always need fresh is right. I mean, I'm a boiled frog, right? I mean it it's funny and writing this book. It was Jen tunes fresh eyes that let that focused me onto things that people needed to know. 'cause I knew all of that. I could write literally could write all that in a week, which is how it got written after a year and a half of Jenn, tune breaking his, pick that being said. It could only happen which on tune because I know all that, but I don't know what you need to know because I've been doing this a long time, and I actually feel like for somebody like me the opportunity now is to work with talent, investing. Other people's money is just not as a tractive as it was when I came to Kleiner Perkins because I saw it as a scarce resource dribble to assemble all the money to be able to support a team out of the blocks without having to go and beg it from others. Right? Just not the case anymore. The money is everywhere, right talent into development of talent. That to me is the scarce resource in the entrepreneurial community. Yeah..

Kleiner Perkins John door principal Ted Shlein Seidenberg Mike Abbott Jenn Jen Logan Ron fifteen years five years
"john door" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Yeah. And I was like, wow, that is an incredible like. Indicator of how serious of an investor John doors. He's. I mean, there's a reason he's alleged. Yeah, I learned a lot from him. Good and back. Yeah, particularly a lot of good. Yeah. What's the good? What's the? What were the good lessons that you took from John Doerr -cation into his projects. You You know, know. bloom is just went public last week. I think he was in that project for seven, teen years seventeen before my puppet another overnight success Jiang years in the making exactly, but that's John John mazing and what's the leak in his game. He's sort of there was some bad lessons. There are some leak in his game when he's too ambitious too big. I thinking the way we went into green which was all in ride versus sort of getting a sense of the opportunity before we put resources and time into it and that we unfortunately missed a lot of what was going on in the valley and the time because we were so integrating. I think that that's John doors optimism. Right, right. Yes. Going to full bloods, right? You are an investor in the tesla competitor, right? One of them try that was a, so let's go through that decision. Were you involved in that one? By was? Yeah. So that's got to be an interesting. Look back because we always look at the anti portfolio. You guys have so many win. So it's easy for you to be intellectually honest about the losses you invested in. What was the name of that company. I car Ma fisker Darren, I'd put it out of my brain, but yeah, thank you fisker. So fisker versus musk? Yes. So you took the pitches from both and you didn't bet on alone must take us through the painful recollection of that. Well, I think I think everybody was impressed with the lawn. You can't help, but be impressed. You didn't come in the car business. And so there was a sense that we're dealing with an arcane complicated business capital-intensive something we didn't fully understand fast, and we went with a somebody coming out of the car business, famous person or various was famous for making the Maserati designer. And I actually think that's a great car. Frankly, I don't know if you've driven when it is a great car, the Tesla's a looks good. Yeah, it's also a very good car. Yeah, but but the marketplace was not going to capitalize two of these companies and Ilan is a master at conveying optimism and potential to investors. And I think he was able to bridge the gap on the financing side that God couldn't get too right. That was the issue right? You had to at that time two thousand seven, two thousand eight, two thousand nine during the recession, everything imploded. That's right. And he barely made it out himself. He was the skin of his teeth. Amazing. I mean, you know it it the story of his success is is is very remarkable and inspiring. I think too, but they need to understand that boldness usually leads to disaster, right, right. Which some people are betting now about twenty percent of the people betting against or twenty percent of people are betting against it being a total disaster, but he'll pull it out. I think let's talk about the book and why you wrote it. I'm halfway through it and have to say pleasantly surprised. I thought, oh, a list of one hundred things. It's kind of like a device. I, I always have this repelled by the top ten things you need to know. But what they're like, wow, these are all check boxes that even if you've done a startup, you probably only know sixty or seventy of them and is a great discussion point. So explain to me how you came to the idea for straight talk. Well, my. Co, author, John tune writers. He's very key to this because John tune came to one of the Kleiner companies as a CFO from Goldman and Morgan Stanley. He's a Dutch guy, really, really smart guy. And when he came in his questions were were really, very fresh. He put fresh eyes. What was going on individual business in Financing's in the startup world..

John John mazing John Doerr Ilan fisker Jiang Tesla Goldman Darren CFO Kleiner Morgan Stanley musk twenty percent
"john door" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"The show were bragging on thrive clients, big celebrating big winds in thrive town. And I think the first step for somebody growing successful company is realizing that they need help. I think so. Bill Gates, his number one. Advice to a new start up to new business person was what hire a business coach. Can I want up real quick? Sure. Okay. Here's a notable quotable from. Your Schmidt, Eric, Schmidt? The former CEO of Google. He was asked to fortune magazine, they asked him, what is the number one advice that you would give to an entrepreneur? He says the buys that sticks out. I got was from John door, famous venture capital investor who doesn't want said might vice to you is to have a coach. The coachie said I should have is Bill Campbell. I initially resented the advice because after all I was the CEO Google, I was pretty exprienced. Why would I need a business coach? Am I doing something wrong? Merriment was how could it coach advise me of? I'm the best person in the world at this. Google. That's not what a coach. The coach doesn't have to play the sport as well as you do. They have to watch you and get you to be your best. In the business context. A business coach is not repetitious, coach, a business coaches, somebody who looks at something with another set of Himes, -scribes it to you and his words and discusses how to approach the problem. Once I realized that I could trust Bill Campbell, my business coach, he could help me with perspective. I decided this was a great idea. There's a business conflict you tend to get rat holed into in Bill Campbell's general advice has been to rise one step higher above the person on the other side of the table into take the long view. He'll say, you let it bother me Eric. Don't. Z. and Sweden, listener out epoch, reading music. Alec he reached out to good, and there's a company called green line plumbing. And before working with us, they were doing thousand dollars a week of revenue. Now they're doing between three to five thousand dollars a week of revenue, but I want to celebrate and wanna plot greenline plumbing for actually reaching out because e you've been around so many people you've been so nice and so kind the Steve Martin concert at the casino there in Tulsa? Yes, you took my beautiful wife of seventeen years, and I to to the Steve Martin and it was awesome, and you've even vited us to attend the rhodium the rodeo of throw the big rodeo of it and tells even by us two different events. And I've sat next to some pretty successful folks, and I've also set next to some folks that are not having any success at all, but you've been kind enough to invite him. And it seems crazy to me but seems like the people that are the most successful are the most coach of oil and the people who are the least least successful feel like they don't need coaching. They say, well, might industries different? Yes, I don't need. I mean, you can't possibly help meet understand your understand a plumber. I'm a dentist. I'm an attorney, my industries different. Can you please explain listeners out there one, why everyone needs coaching and to why?.

Bill Campbell Google Schmidt Steve Martin Bill Gates CEO Eric fortune magazine Himes John door Sweden Tulsa Alec attorney Z. five thousand dollars thousand dollars seventeen years
"john door" Discussed on View from the Cheap Seats

View from the Cheap Seats

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on View from the Cheap Seats

"The. John. I cannot get enough this. I'm like, keep returning to the only thing I want a year and I know I'm gonna wear it out, but it's kind of this indulgence that you just can't stop his music this year. It's making me excited for the episode at the end of the year that we always do Rehmat price j logic. It's always a good one at checkout. Disappointing diamonds are the best of the rarest of them all you really are on. And it's just a great song. It's really well-crafted and whatnot anyway, where the Sklar brothers, this is view from the cheap seats. We have a phenomenal show today. One of the rigid guys who who we had the initial conversation with that created the phrase. The call out that we get from fans of ours on the street wherever we are. John door joins us is one of the funniest comedians. We know he's one of the Brad always gotten so big. I'm excited. I don't know what the new catchphrase out of today's show. We called Brandon from the spot cast of big. He's gotten so big, maybe calm again. But what I do know is that we'll talk hockey. We'll talk about what it would mean for Canada to win the Stanley Cup. They were very close this year. Winnipeg Jets were in it every great hockey talk, and he's Canada in our minds. So we'll talk will, hey, John, we'll get into that. There's a lot of funny takes. We have later on the show nNcholas cage left us of voice mail that we will play for you. But first, our main take today is we want to talk about this whole Papa John thing, which is imploded in because it has to do with, I think so much of what's going on in the world of sports and in the world. Certainly in the world of Trump. In sports. So Papa John schnatter which sounds like what you do when you take a shit in the toilet is everywhere. There was a tunnel schnatter on the ball, and that's who he is is a human base. He shit the bathroom and schnatter it everywhere. He had a lot of schnatter and he go back a couple steps and you say, who was hypercritical of the NFL players who were kneeling as a way of protest for police brutality? And he jumped on the Trump train and said, I'm going to I, he's seeing that there. He's like, look, I as a pizza guy who sells who does commercials with Peyton Manning. First of all, I'm gonna even go back and say that whenever a CEO of a company is like, I got to be in the commercial, fuck you number one. And number two, because you taking jobs away from actors who could be so you're not good. You're not talented, you're not compelling. You're not a person I give a shit about, or do I wanna see when I get on a plane and the and the. CEO of Delta's like were we want to provide a comfortable ride? I don't care. I don't care what you wanna do. I don't wanna see your stupid face. You're stupid narcissist and you're stepping out in front of my face for no reason get outta here on every commercial. No one has ever seen those Papa John commercials and said, all that John schnatter man guy. He's great, quiet guys in the room. I know we're on commercial break in the Super Bowl. I just want to hear what John schnatter has to say. I want to hear what a low rent Graham Elwood has to say. This guy's like the worst kind of Graham Elwood ever. And so and then he gets out in front of this whole thing and he's so he puts himself in courses. You already know what kind of an ass elite then he starts to talk about, you know, here's kneeling and have a place. So he's now got a he. He has a big sponsorship contract. The NFL thinks he. I'm gonna jump on the Trump train and make an and jump on. What I think is all the people. He's like, I'm gonna get a lot of business because people going to be like, he's right..

Papa John schnatter Papa John Trump Graham Elwood John door Brandon NFL CEO Winnipeg Jets Rehmat hockey Sklar Peyton Manning Brad Delta
"john door" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"Executive producer jordan peele tracy morgan is back what in a new tv series that the new york times goes a gritty funny comedy i just did fifteen years in prison storing tiffany haddish the inner tainer your thoughts just go wait to discover loss you got love or another man's bouncy house don't miss tracy morgan's return second chances are beautiful thing but last oji tuesday's ten thirty nine thirty central only on tbs if you had invested a thousand dollars in google's ipo today those shares would be worth well over twenty five thousand dollars and if you had purchased a thousand dollars worth of amazon at its ipo you would have over a million dollars today those are quite some returns on investment well venture capitalist john door did even better he got in at the ground floor of these companies before they went public and invested millions on behalf of his company kleiner perkins caufield and buyers and it's not just amazon and google doors legendary for picking company after company that went onto unimaginable success i wanted to talk to him about that about his new book measure what matters and about the serious questions silicon valley is facing today john pleasure to have you on thank you i want to ask you about the the swirling issues about technology these days people look at facebook and google and they say you guys are selling data that isn't yours you're selling data that we my browsing data my what what apps i'm looking at what the searchers i do and you shouldn't be able to do this at least you should be able to do it without my explicit say so do the critics have a point they do and travis privacy entrust are essential to all the internet companies but i think that has we adopt privacy regulations and there are a number in place today to make sure the regulations have the right balance if they're too burdensome it won't be possible for entrepreneurs to innovate and if they're too lax than this sacred trust could be violated so you are perhaps the most famous venture capitalists in the world how how does get started doing that what did you do that to q down this path well i was born and raised an engineer and saint louis missouri and.

tracy morgan new york times google amazon john door facebook Executive producer jordan peele kleiner perkins caufield engineer saint louis missouri thousand dollars twenty five thousand dollars million dollars fifteen years
"john door" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on This American Life

"Support for this american life comes from ziprecruiter every business needs great people and most need a better way to find them something better than posting your job online and just hoping for the right people to see it ziprecruiter's technology finds qualified candidates for you it learns what you're looking for identifies people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job try it for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash american that's ziprecruiter dot com slash american zip recruiter the smartest way to hire and from turbo tax live new from turbo tax now you can get a personal review of your tax return with a cpa or e a rate on your screen quickly connect to attacks expert as often as you need for answers and advice on your taxes you can even have an expert review your return before you file and make any necessary changes all backed by a one hundred per se sinn accuracy guarantee connect with a turbo tax live expert at turbo tax live dot com slash american to smirking life mira class each are going to burgum of course should use a theme bring you different kinds of stories on that theme today's program wait do you have the map stories of people in situations they have no preparation for whatsoever because most people have not been in those situations in the second half of our program both stories take place where you need a map that his on the road we've arrived in two of our programmatic two final rest stop digging taro is a comedian has been on a programme before back in 2013 she went on a tour across the country that was filmed it was a strange tour she in this canadian comic named john door when around the country performing people's living rooms and their backyards and just lots of situations where there the adhoc the way through what they were doing whenever producers nancy uptake saw the film which has many many moments in it that fit today's theme there's nancy taken john are like door to door comedy salesman in the film invaded salesman showing up at people's houses.

ziprecruiter john door salesman
"john door" Discussed on About Last Night

About Last Night

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on About Last Night

"Hey guys adam rave the about last night podcast coming to you from you will cooney japan that's right baby got a few more days your left on the adam devine army base air force japan tour it's been an adventure to say the least australia now here will definitely be doing a to a recap ever so we're qiao washing adam devine when we get back to the states uh but for now enjoy this unbelievable rerelease of an ailing classic with a one and only rory skull holy shit you know rory he's just one of the highest regarded standups in the game been on countless tv shows his conan appearance with john door would they performed there sets at the same time still might be the greatest weight and i said to me in the history of late night tv he's also got a new movie coming out amy schumer called i feel pretty trilogues drop for that it's going to blow him the fuck up and finally put him on that star serge that he should be on because one of the best and this episode is one of my favorites not only because baseball season's getting ready to start up in a month or so and we have an amazing baseball announcer improv riff but brad is not on this episode and brent morin the alltime alien appearance record holder guest host so it's me roar and brent morin just laughing is our as i've ever had on this podcast and in reminiscing about this viewed as i said i cannot put that back up because because on i'm still in japan and and i thought about doing another one solo from here but i was like you know what i'm going to save the rest of these stories in the past week.

australia rory john door amy schumer serge brad japan adam conan baseball brent morin
"john door" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"john door" Discussed on Recode Decode

"But that didn't turn out so well for women and for alan for sure it didn't for a couple of years but i actually think the tide has turned deadly rush she she lost the trial i would say i think this onions kleiner perkins minor plant can lawsuit around this uh was gender discrimination i would say that kleiner part of his sexual harassment is gender discrimination correct kleiner's feels they lost the trial in the court of public opinion and and i think he you know now a few years later i i think that is the case when ellen came out with her story because she was a first a lot of people didn't believe her mmhmm and something must be wrong there were look i you know and i've done i know you have as well a lot of reporting on this and talk to a lot of people have some people who work there say while she wasn't that good another said well of course it's nine hundred who for happy bros come on it and linked please i i do think there is an interesting lesson in kleiner in that uh i believe john door actually tried to hire women and but then didn't do didn't change the culture did we do it to exist day there the acid museum i have it's like i said you can get women in the door people commodore but then you don't do the things that keep them there or promote them or to think about their different needs and stuff like that which is you know and then they'll fail when they're inside and then he goes i look they fail right like it's a really interesting problem and women are quitting tack twice as fast as men mmhmm we're adds that they're not leaving the workplace they're going to jobs in other fields they actually report.

alan harassment kleiner ellen john door