21 Burst results for "John De"

"john de" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

01:55 min | 1 d ago

"john de" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"The number one podcast globally for 4500 listeners and we are honored in grateful to be studied by ink dot com as the number one podcast to make you a better leader. You can also catch us on Google Home or Alexa by simply saying play dove baron podcast. Again, thank you for sharing this show with everybody you know. All right, let's strip it down and dive right in. As a leader today, we are confronted with many issues. Some old and others appear to be more contemporary. There is the advantages and potential threat of AI as technology, the supply chain and any number of other things. However, there is one constant, and that is people. Who are you and who are the people that you work with, are all very important questions. However, what has become increasingly important question is what drives the people who you work with and who work around you. How do you and I as leaders find out what drives them and what they genuinely value. Well, let's find out together because our guest today is Doctor John de martini. He is a researcher author and global educator and considered one of the world's leading authorities on human behavior, leadership, and entrepreneurialism. He is a he has researched and studied over 30,000 books across the defined academic disciplines and is the founder of the demartini institute and has been teaching for multiple decades. He is the author of more than 40 books that have been published and translated into 29 languages. One of those books is called the values factor. Doctor D martini speaks around the world to large multinational organizations to government and private organizations. Ladies and gentlemen, please put your hands together and help me welcome. Doctor John.

John de martini Google demartini institute Doctor D martini Doctor John
"john de" Discussed on Ringer FC

Ringer FC

03:24 min | 2 months ago

"john de" Discussed on Ringer FC

"By scoring more goals. In that it was just silence. And I was like, she is a troll. She loves it. She loves to troll. We love it. We lap it up. During the Euros, the insights that you get, I remember, because she had to do the code commentary. And, you know, I mean, I don't think I don't think she's done it before at that level. I don't think she'd done it before. In fact, she didn't. And like, one of the things that she is worried about was she didn't know how she was going to get to see the entirety, so she could see the space. And when I said, no, no, no, no, you'll get a tactical as well Emma. You should have seen the energy because she sees things. She was giving me so much insight into movement what Mason Mount was doing what Foden was doing early doors. What we should have been doing, what the midfield wide O too far back. It was just like. She sees it in a crazy way. So quickly as well flow. It's like an education just sits just standing next to her. She's say stuff and then I say, oh my God, she said, you see what a big space appeared. That's because what's happening is we're not switching it quick. If we could switch it quicker, like what we saw, what man, what man united? What man city done to man united? It's like, honestly, they switch it so quick, but then because you've got the caliber of player that when the switch happens, they totally repeat to shreds because when the switch happens, you've got players that are good enough to take advantage of the space that's just been opened up. What man united don't even realize is getting done, you know, and she was saying that this is what's going to happen and this is why that can happen. That's why he needs to go over here. I was like, this is her analysis of Mariah's center for a play. Spain Croatia was absolutely brilliant. One of the best things was probably I think the way she broke it down because there was a mesmerizing unreal. And then when we had like, I don't know. Savage the day before Murphy, everyone was like, whoo, finally, we get some knowledge here. We get some knowledge, and you know what? You know the thing with it is what really fucking annoys me is that I wish that these Neanderthals, the ones who feel those men feel like they own football. They literally not fucking listening to a word she's saying. Because if you listen to what she's saying, she's actually giving you unbelievable for free. But the only thing you need to ask her, you need to ask her at righteous house life. I really want to know where she obviously she's had a very long career. She's coaching America coach John de Vic acres. She's like done her time and obviously soaked up a lot of information. But I want to know how she got that good. Was it a particular, was it one of her badges where she was like, I just saw things differently. Was it one person who she didn't people would always look to? I wanted a boy. She said I did want to point whatever's gonna happen. She's gonna be. She's gonna be something to do. She's gonna do something in football. Well, there you go. Maybe that was it. She was like, this is my mind. But so many people should ask that. Someone who works with Guardiola is like, oh, I learned it, you know, Arteta is like, oh, well, Guardiola, so that's where all his ideas come from. Like, where did where did she get her knowledge? Is it in the states? Because, I don't know. What she's reading.

Mason Mount Foden Emma John de Vic Mariah Croatia Savage Spain Murphy football Guardiola America Arteta
"john de" Discussed on Knuckleheads with Quentin Richardson & Darius Miles

Knuckleheads with Quentin Richardson & Darius Miles

02:06 min | 6 months ago

"john de" Discussed on Knuckleheads with Quentin Richardson & Darius Miles

"Like the worst team a league. Your number six big hang. He will pay off the minutes right the other night. And it's a it's a throwaway season i like. You don't say there's no reason for him not to get this. Zimbabwe is right so like that that that was stressful and never lost a day. In your life you allows the environment then we We had all telling you. The word overdone luke. Dirty yard got thanks. John lucas john de man and now all love respect biglou below was a real one though does he. They claim by the point. Luke like about it. I couldn't even look me now is like i can tell like dying. This ain't coming from loop. That's not bisic man upstairs even extra though but you know like even you know that first year when it was just other than even when we got lebron to do they didn't know whether the outset in the world you're over to do they were trying to make a fake fights. The brian and say man bra was bad. You know came came right here rich. That's why rich introduced us to grind. We used to go to ask. Little games cleaning rich from cleveland so When i when. I worked out for the cats. Bra body brahmin rich like a week before an airport so you. We was down at the high. I think when. I was working out but he has. Ron came up the meat and brought.

John lucas john de Zimbabwe luke Luke lebron cleveland Ron
"john de" Discussed on Task Force X

Task Force X

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"john de" Discussed on Task Force X

"John Austin did a great job in fire. I love the book this time again. Not as much as earlier issues but I think John De Grace what he had and again. this is we're used to water elemental aid this point. I would want to be when it came out. I was hoping to what Alimentos going to be a typhoon who predecing character but the new one. They wanted a female character. I guess anyways is talking about the jazz directive. They say next. What's going to wrap up the comments on the Janus directive but again just another great issue of suicide squad? Check me was fantastic as always. I love these books. Just fantastic but you know what? It's been a little run hour and a half. I've been rent not ratting on Raven Raven talking about this stuff. Not Round ribbon so much by the talking about these books for an hour and a half or so so we're going to go ahead and I'm going to call it quits for today. We are check me. We had our character profile. We got the suicide squad. Got The PROMOS and other way. I guess that's going to do it. Be sure to join US next month. As We hit our fiftieth issue fifty issue fifty episode of Task Force X icon at peacemaker female. Fury's again it's issue. Twenty three a piece of check mate. Which kind of a peacemaker focused one where character profile of Albertine stock? And we're GONNA have suicide squad thirty five plus we're also. I can conjure up in the next month so on their casinos by Big Fiftieth episode. So be sure to join us but until then squad mates dismissed. Thank you for listening to another great episode of Task Force. Nex I also down rambling on my main head cast them head speaks where rant and rave about movies comics. Geek stuff in whatever is bugging me crazy. The joke well. I try boomer button anyways in my home on the Internet is it head speaks DOT COM.

Raven Raven John De Grace Alimentos US John Austin Fury Albertine
Jaguars trade former Super Bowl MVP Nick Foles to Chicago

NFL Live

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Jaguars trade former Super Bowl MVP Nick Foles to Chicago

"Let's get started with Adam schefter on this breaking news regarding former Super Bowl. Winning quarterback Nick foles like will be reunited with Matt Nagy on his way to Chicago. What can you tell us about? Details choosy moments ago the Jacksonville Jaguars in Chicago bears agreed on a trade that will send the bears compensatory fourth round. Pick the one hundred forty eighth overall selection to Jacksonville in return for Nick Volks. Who COMES INTO CHICAGO AND KNOWS THE COACHING STAFF? Where he worked with Matt Nagy in Philadelphia he worked with. He worked with John De Filippo in Philadelphia. He wrote with Bill Laser Philadelphia. And they believe that it's going to be a source of comfort for them to get that done and that will be a big move for the Chicago bears. They felt like they had to get a veteran. The Jaguar spoke to the colts about a trade for Nick foles. The colts decided to go with Philip Rivers. They talked to the bears. The bears get done. That trade at foals is owed a lot of money. What do you know right now about how they redo this deal to make it work for everyone? Well listen. They could sit down and restructure that contract and perhaps they do that but the deal just came down as we speak and so we're waiting to see

Bears Matt Nagy Chicago Nick Foles Nick Volks John De Filippo Philadelphia Jacksonville Jaguars Colts Adam Schefter Jacksonville Philip Rivers
Understanding what is at the core of suffering with Dr. John Demartini

Anxiety Slayer

09:01 min | 2 years ago

Understanding what is at the core of suffering with Dr. John Demartini

"They. It's my pleasure to introduce you to Dr John De Martini. Dr De Martini is a human behavior specialist international bestselling author educator founder of the De Martini Institute and the author of forty books that have been translated into thirty six languages. He's been featured in films including the secret is appeared on Larry. King Live and regularly contributes to Oprah magazine. And he's so much more than that when I was reading his Baiocco at that. What like three sentences. I mean this man has so much experience. He travels all around the world helping so many inspiring so many welcome to anxiety. Sleep Dr de Martini. Well thank you for having me. Thank you in. Today's fast. Paced hyper connected society. There's an undeniable increase in people experiencing varying degrees of anxiety. We get loads of email from our listeners. About how they are suffering from all types in at the top of the list health anxiety followed by the fear of having an anxiety attack in social anxiety. I'd love for you to share your view about anxiety being a form of fear. So can I give you a snarl to kind of build out the formation of anxiety? Yes please let's imagine that a mother and father are having an argument home and there's a little one after two year old baby. That's having to endure and listen to the screaming and the baby had quickly crawls off runs to its room. Hide under a bed puts his hands over. Its years closes. Its eyes and just feels a bit shaken by the screaming match this this initial perception of pain without pleasure lost out. Gain negative out positive in the child's perception is stored in a subconscious mind as an instinct to protect away from that response and an impulse to whatever That child procedures. It's opposite of peaceful safe environment now. The next morning after the only match the father goes off to work. The mother comes and gets the baby out of the bed and goes and gets it dressed up and takes shopping out when the when they were screaming the night before the father was wearing blue jeans and a white shirt. Had Brown Moustache Brown hair. The mother was wearing a particular outfit. The child had taken this in an filter this nuclear of the Chalice and filtered information going into the corona before it goes into Cortex to be conscious so child's got filtered response there now the next morning. The mother takes the baby with her shopping to the grocery store. And the baby's fine and it's sitting in the basket you know relaxed in a time and all of a sudden they turn a corner. There's a man with blue jeans white shirt brown hair brown moustache. The baby has an association with those stimuli and the baby now has a reaction because she the baby will one of fight or flight response Eliezer getting further the mother protected turning. Its back on the mother to try to protect it or it'll get behind the mother and try to create a response to pull mother away from that thing that associated with the original night before experience. And so it'll have a what is called a an association with the primary one because of associations may with the blue jeans a white shirt brown hair brown moustache so the child is not even aware that it's actually a result of the night before but it just has this instinct to protect itself from this thing that's walking by because of the associations made while the the boy I walked by with blue jeans white shirt goes down the island at NAP. Feel safe and it gets backed. It plays the mummy wonders. Why did the Child Act out for just a second man walked by then it goes around the next quarter and there's a guy with a blue? Jean Yellow Shirt Brown hair brown moustache now. The child has a little less response but still a bit of a response. His now societas with blue jeans and Brown hair and Brown Moustache but now the child has a secondary association with yellow shirt. Now goes down the next aisle and there's a guy with a blue jeans red shirt brown hair brown moustache now. It's Gone Association. Red Shirt then it goes around the corner and sees a guy with a blue jeans. A white shirt blonde hair blond mustache and that associates blindness with that and all the sudden without even realizing it there is a hundred stimulus as stimuli in the environment. Triggering varying degrees of response to the original fear so these secondary tertiary ordinary pit Associations eventually have stimulus to our act a stimuli to create a anxiety response and anxiety responses a compounded original fear that's never been neutralized so now what happens is the child has started to having a hundred different things because now music is playing while they happen to see a guy with blue jeans and a white shirt. Brown Moustache now. That of mood music is now associated and after a while there's hundreds of things in the environment without even being aware of the original event triggering an anxiety response. This can be occurring in health because we could have a scare with some sort of a health response and then we can have secondary association to that it can be social. It can be learning at educational institutions. It can be fitness Exercise to every injury and it can create secondary injuries. Anything that is compounded an associate on top original event that hasn't been neutralized can create anxiety response triggered now if I go back and take that child to that original event and ask a certain set of questions. Make the unconscious conscious of the opposite at that moment and neutralize and balance perceptions. The cascading of the secondary church events dissolve. It's quite amazing how it's done. So there's a way of liberty going back to the original primary event and asking questions to make us fully conscious of the opposite sides. Let's say that you beat somebody that you're infatuated with their. You're a single person or married acting single and you meet somebody and you're highly attracted to him. You're kind of in a fantasy about them. And you're now conscious of the upsides. Things that are attractive. And your unconscious the downsides and as a result of you know you stimulate dopamine oxytocin Kevin's endorphin. Serotonin estrogen. And you've got an attractive response of impulse towards but now you're unconscious of the downsides. That's why you're vulnerable to that impulse or you meet somebody that you resent you. Perceive consciously this way more downsides because of previous experiences in Toronto. And there's no upsides and now you're conscious the downsides unconsciously upsides and now you create a nor peninsular never cortisol. Osteo cows in testosterone response. Now when you do that those chemistries get skewed. You get subjected bias as a as a protective mechanism to accentuate that. And now you split your full consciousness and the conscious unconscious hats anytime you store that you store all of those imbalances in the subconscious mind as impulses toward things and instincts away from it will run your life irrespective of time or space until they are neutralized right doing as you're now asking questions to make you. Cognizant conscious like. Your intuition is a typically do that? He'll you trying to ask you information. That would make you aware of the unconscious at the time. We're conscious of your infatuated. What's the downsides current at that moment if you resent the upside and once they're balanced you free it from the subconscious mind in its liberate into what we call the super conscious? Mind a of love and attitude when it's in love and gratitude is wellness. There's no response. There's no impulses there's no instincts. There's no anxiety secondary responses etcetera. So what I do is I go to the moment when you perceive the original event occurring and you go in there and you identify what you think is more negatives than positives with a father's yelling at the mother and go and find out what's the upsides because I you think well there's no upside. Its downside there's more negative than positive withdraw from it. You try to protect yourself etc. But at the same time you might find that. The mothers disempowered and all of a sudden yelling as she's communicating in a way that goes against his values She's maybe overspend money and he's now reacting or maybe that he's she's had an affair. You don't see the whole picture so you just respond until you ask enough questions to try to find out. What the real dynamical

Dr John De Martini Dr De Martini De Martini Institute Brown Oprah Magazine Larry Eliezer Founder Toronto Jean Yellow Gone Association Cortisol Testosterone Dopamine Endorphin Oxytocin
Living Life By Your True Values

Duct Tape Marketing

08:18 min | 2 years ago

Living Life By Your True Values

"This is John. John is my guest. Today is Dr John De Martini. He is a world renowned specialist in human behavior. A researcher author author and global educator on his most recent books has called the values factor the secret to creating inspired and fulfilling life. So let's talk about values. Shall we welcome John. Thank you for having me. Thank you appreciate the time here. So let's give people a little I read kind of the official stuff that you do. But let's give giving people a little bit of background. How'd you get here to to where you are today? Well I was a I started when I was seventeen. Actually I I had a dream to travel the world into teach. I set out to do that at age. Seventeen almost eighteen and I god I. It just didn't give up on it. And I just kept of emerging. It had a learning problem as a child. I was told that I went in first grade. Never be able to read never ever built right now relocate Mounting never go very far in life and high school dropout was living on the streets from years and But then I met this amazing teacher named Paul Bragg when I was seventeen that made me after During his talk for the first time in my life I thought maybe I could to overcome learning problems. Someday I could read become intelligent and I'll tell you what that was the most inspiring night and the turning point of my life and I never gave upon. I had to. I learn how to pronounce words and spell and practice speech things. I had a speech problem and I just I never gave up on it. I just and this is is the thing I just love doing much so at seventeen you were still not reading or even speaking well. I didn't read my first book till I was eighteen was it was it ultimately neurological solar psychological. or well I had when I was very young I had a speech impediment so I had to go to Speech pathologist very young. And then I when I got into first grade I had what they defined. Now's dyslexia. I I wasn't able to put it all together together. The only way I've been through school by asking smart kids questions and and but but you know when you really really really really WanNa do something and there's no turning back on it you can turn your life around. That's what happened to me. Just I had such a desire to win and I never thought I'd ever be intelligent. I had a desire to be intelligent and man when I went out on the pursuit of that it was like a relentless pursuit that I I I had with. The help of my mother had read thirty words a day and pronounce them and spell them properly and put them in a sentence and say I could go to bed until at thirty new words a day when I was eighteen and my vocabulary groove and eventually took a ged in high school equivalency test and a college entrance exam. And and I went on and then I end up being a scholar so I I just never give up on IT I. I've read now over thirty thousand books and I just I love reading. I just love learning and you people might have heard me introduce you as a doctor John D. Martinez so you now have even achieved advanced degrees. Yeah did I did ten years. Here's a college in almost in. Yeah I just. I wanted to be a teacher philosopher heater. That's so high fulltime travel around the world today researching and teaching students all of the world today every country. So I've I've been quite Hundred and fifty four countries in this January one hundred fifty four and you reside you were telling me before we started recording Somewhat unique home I live on ship call. The world went on their most time. I'm traveling like my residential last eighteen years on a condominium private condominium ship that travels all over the world I often on his I travel placed. That's right so mentioned the name of one of your core works is called the values factor. I wonder if you could define that. Term values factor. Yeah well every individual regardless of gender or age or culture lives moment by moment by a set of priorities a a set of values themes that are most important to least important in your life an every in this hierarchy a set of values that they hold things that the most importantly sports so this set of values is unique to them and it determines how they perceive what they decide and how they act the the perception decisions Actions are dependent on these values and whatever's highest on their value they spontaneously inspired intrinsically to pursue and this this is where they'll excel and fulfill and expand whatever's low in their values lower in the party's they'll require extrinsic motivation to get them to do it so they'll need lead punishment if they don't do it rewarded. They do kind of things in order to get them to do it. And this is not where they excel. This is where they kind of held back and finding out what's really truly truly truly most important people's lives and structuring their life through prioritize action a delegation to pursue that it's extraordinary it capacity to build momentum and go on to greater achievement as an entrepreneur or is anybody in any field early. I'm fascinated by that. And that's what the values factor is How do we get people to live concurrently in line with what they value most so they can be inspired so let me make sure? I'm I'm hearing this right. You're suggesting that people have these values even if they haven't it really associated words or names with them you're saying that they make decisions based on them and part of the job is to figure out what they are. Well if you ask somebody what their values are they'll tell you social cliches and ideologies and I'd idealisms that are injected in inculcated from individuals individuals like mothers fathers preachers teachers conventions traditions mores of the society that their subordinates and conforming to but I'm not interested in that I'm interested in what their life demonstrates I look at. I have thirteen value determined to help look objectively what their value determined. Germans are so how do they feel their space because things are really important to me fill their space with how they spend their time. They find time time spent time on things that are truly valuable. What is it the energizes when they're doing something on their values? The energy goes up there not to damage goes down. Wears their money. Being spent look carefully at how they spend their money tells you what the priorities are where they most organized and ordered where they most disciplined disciplined spontaneously. What is that they think about visualizing affirm inside internally dialogue with themselves about how they want their life that shows evidence coming true not fantasies but what are they converse with other people about most about what they wanNA keep bringing the conversation to what inspires brings a tear of inspiration to there is what exactly is it? The consistent persistent goals that they've been pursuing that are actually coming true not the ones fantasies that are self-defeating and what is the thing that they love studying about reading about learning about in listening to I look at those value determines to get a clear understanding what their life is truly demonstrating not their fantasies about what they hope it will be. However would you suggest also that there are a lot of people that fifty sixty seventy eighty percent of their lives? They're living outside of those things that you just described exactly. Most people people are comparing themselves to others putting on others on their pedestal. Minimize themselves into the pit living vicariously through other people paying high nine dollars for other people's brands instead of building brand around themselves and they are basically doing one. Emerson warned not to do n being imitating people which is sort of a death breath sentenced to their their self worth their empowerment and key. The key is to giving themselves permission to not subordinate to the world on the outside but to let the voice navision vision on the inside direct their destiny and take command of their life as as Ernest Becker says instead of conforming to the collective heroes you WANNA BE A. They'd be the individual hero within and so in the process of doing it. Most people don't give themselves permission to do that. They they live in the shadows of others instead of on the shoulders of giants.

Dr John De Martini Researcher Paul Bragg Speech Pathologist Ernest Becker John D. Martinez Official Emerson
"john de" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"john de" Discussed on WTVN

"For the next couple hours doctor John de martini a world renowned specialist in human behavior is a researcher author global educator he has developed a series of solutions applicables across all market sectors age groups is educational curriculum ranges from corporate empowerment programs financial empowerment strategy self development programs relationship solutions and social transformation programs is teaching start at the very core of the issue addressing the human factor and the range out to a multitude of powerful tools at a proven the test of time doctor John demartini on coast to coast John welcome to the program well thank you that evening I'm looking for to this how did you get involved in this field which I find fascinating well I was seventeen years old and I was just living on the north shore of Oahu as a surfer he nearly died and I was lead to a health food store and then a yoga class to try to recover and a guest speaker name called black was there you probably have the black you know last night we we know his daughter and verification Jacqueline yeah and I've been friends are there all these years but one night this one man with one message in one hour later they opened my eyes to the possibilities of what I could do with my life and I was told in first grade I would never be able to read or write we're going to communicate the mapping of a gold record life I was a high school drop out I was living living in a tent with a common item she has that one night was the first night I thought maybe I could overcome my learning problems and things are not as you know read and learn and become intelligent and I want to become a teacher that was forty seven years ago and I never gave up on that dream and that was the starting point of me going on a journey to first go back to take the GED test than a high school coach Roger Clemens to test and then finally a college test and eventually learn how to read and eventually go on a journey of mentioning a scholar so I I I was inspired one night and it's been with me ever since now when people come up to you John and they say yeah doctor marks demartini what do you do for a living how do you explain I just tell people that I'm a professional educator and then I I have an educational institution and I am constantly searching riding and probably in teaching that's it how many people do not reach their full potential what we know there's a boundary on full potential I think that's kind of a fine night on a you know potentially we can keep growing the next day so I don't know what the full potential is but I think that most people themselves to others and put people on pedestals and put themselves in the pitch and in the others and imitate others instead of being on the authentic magnificent beings that they're capable of being and as a result they shrink instead of Sean they live in the shadows instead of on the shoulders and they hold themselves back from something magnificent that then the hearty would love to create and I'm I'm I believe that we're not here to compare ourselves to others were here to compare our daily actions to what inspires us most what is really most valuable and meaningful to us that serve the greatest number of people when we push ourselves to excel is that part of this well when you're it was theirs every human being has a set of priorities a set of values things that are most to least important I like to deliver a lock box they're taking actions in doing intentions that are aligned with what they value most they spontaneously inspired from within asked they don't need any outside motivation interested in extrinsic you know punishments if you don't do it rewards if you do it kind of thing they're just spontaneously inspired within the act and that is where we excel in finding out what we value most of sticking to what is priority in filling our day with high priority actions those bars our data Philip low party destruction to don't we excel double ma'am someone expand and we wake up the genius of sitting in hidden dormant inside all of us when we do that John there's some people that will go the extra distance to get something done whatever it might be and then there's some other people who fall short whether they're lazy or not and they just simply don't follow through to get the job done why are these two people different well it's just one of the great did studies show back in the sixties when people are living aligned and congruent with what they value most they are they did inspired their unfocused they they they unstoppable but the second they try to live in other people's values and cloud the clearly what they really feel inspired to do they'll procrastinate hesitate frustrate and you'll need a motivated to keep on going analysts say cost billions of dollars trillions of dollars in economic markets when people are not engaged at work and it cost me learning education when they're not engage in school but if they can find out what they really value and they can start to prioritize their life accordingly and they can delegate lower party things and give themselves permission to shine a shrink amazing things come a merchant people I've not met whenever I've seen people label people lazy when I go and find out the person label lazy and find out what's really important them and then structure published watching the live accordingly they're not lazy they're not lazy what's valuable to them they're just lazy what somebody else projects on time and expectation in somebody else's values on film so I don't like labels I like to find out where people excel and help them structure the lives accordingly do you think some people sell themselves short absolutely they they anytime you compare yourself to others just like a beautiful woman comparing herself to a supermodel will automatically have body dysmorphic syndrome they'll they'll start thinking well I'm not pretty enough I'm not this we do this in all areas of our life we walked in a ball we reach somebody who thinks more spin Telligent we need from his things more successful more wealth and more stable relationship better social networks you know more physically fit more spiritually where and the moment we compare ourselves to them in shrink in comparison will you inject their values into our lives cloud the clearly Voronin lose sight of what's meaningful to us in trying to be like somebody else but is ever since says in his ignorance of imitation of suicide we have to give herself permission to shine being who we are and set goals and truly meaningful and look at what spontaneously we love doing and structure our lives and we're the first people to earn the income to delegate the rest away one an inspired life what creates that negativity as that example you just showed us in people where they don't feel as if there is up to par as they should be well if we could get you know Albert Einstein said if you replace your tag and you compare yourself to a fish you gonna beat yourself up up to a you know of a cat you're gonna beat yourself up but if your honor who you are you will beat yourself up by sheer story it may take a minute but can I sure we've got a couple minutes before the break go ahead well yeah there's a gentleman there asked me to consult for mood but is that I want you to help you become successful and I see where you successfully says or not I see where you successful I'm not right where you six have a great relationship with my wife never great relationship my son and I have a you know I do a spiritual thing at my church and have a beautiful yard and I get along with my mother in law I sure will be north Europeans not successful you must to compare yourself to somebody said what's that doctor on that hill you know you're at the six car garage he's got the big prize of a million dollars a year and I don't do that I sure if you compare yourself to him you're going to be yourself up you know just the house relationship with his wife their Bach to divorce what's the problem with the houses relationship with a spiritual path all he doesn't involve himself for that what about his son well he's got problems the sun what about the mother mother moved out of the country to get away from her what about the yard he has people to take care of it I think we are controlling us up to some it's got a different set of values in you're beating yourself up because you're comparing it don't compare yourself to others compare your daily actions to what you value most watch where you'll shine you won't shrink it's amazing you know I think of a Jeff Bezos from my Amazon John is a pure genius yeah been here's a guy who several years ago all the internet was beginning at some moment who decided to sell books online in look at him now what do you care enough about humanity to find out what people need and find out how to deliberate more effective efficient somebody else you're on your way to fortune that's right and I always say if you're not feeling enough about humanity to go and do what you can to serve some great need that ever expands you're holding yourself back by potential and so I think that it's you know if we're living in a shrinking life we're not we're focusing on old problems that are focusing on solutions and so I'm sure she's that server we do we have the most fulfilment the most meaning we don't get into the box tree we get into plants okay what creates this in people to lose sight of their own potential comparison to other people if you put people on pedestals you minimize yourself if you put people in kitchen which address yourself in either of those is neither yourself it's only when you are yourself for your son SO exaggerating or suffer minimizing yourself as the loving yourself not gonna get your powers so we're not here to put people on picture pedestals replacement a heart you can reflect and get on with our life sometimes we think that somebody that we admire has something we don't but we could admire if we didn't have it inside as we just too too humble to admit it waking up and looking deeper in reflection on it finding it we can thank the person we admire for revealing to what we have inside that we've been ignoring and then we can step on their shoulders and not live in their shadow where Dr John demartini his book is called the values factor the secret to creating an inspired and fulfilling life his website is.

John de martini researcher
Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

How I Built This

24:51 min | 2 years ago

Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

"Welcome back revenue which is which is great rate. You know you could start to see maybe a path towards towards real profitability. <hes> and i guess the the next year you really i mean you. You're still running his business by the way out of your apartment in boston that you guys share right <hes> the starts to turn a corner though because as we see that reaction in the street and boom we start thinking about distribution and hiring a sales rep and that that summer of ninety five the momentum starts rolling and debt was when you made your first higher as well i guess right that's right yeah. The <hes> cary sherman moved in upstairs cheers from us and became a friend and we just used to beg her when she got home from work to help us <hes> pack orders and help us try to organize the orders ars and <hes> she was a big help so we begged her to quit her job eventually and she did it. She could do things five times faster than us for one thing and then it became clear we needed the help pretty badly and she needed to take a leap yeah. We we had a friend over for dinner one night because he was pretty sharp and we asked him to tell us how much business we would have to do to be able to afford to pay carry <hes> seventeen thousand dollars which is what she said was the minimum the question to her was what is the lowest amount that you could possibly get paid to work with us and seventeen thousand dollars so he did the math for us and he said that we would have to do a quarter of a million dollars in business which sounded like a billion dollars yeah and we we did two hundred sixty two. I think it was two hundred sixty two thousand a a year yeah and that two hundred sixty two thousand was like that's to pay for all your supplies and everything and everything was not profit that is that is oh no in those in those roche revenue days we we would get prepared for died t shirts p._f. Dis they caught and we'd store them. We didn't have enough room for them in our apartment which store them in a bulkhead in the building and we had to put them in trash bags <hes> that were tightly wound up because it was moist down there and so a in any given day we would get a certain amount of orders we would be designing during the daytime in the afternoon and we would take those shirts down to new bedford. Get them died in the shirt collars. We wanted the next afternoon. We'd take those shirts out to a marlboro mass and to screen printers midland graphics screen printed t shirts and then <hes> by four o'clock drop them off at u._p._s. Whatever the orders were which was you know two or three retailers a couple of order and then we then we set up a trailer like the back of a eighteen wheeler container owner containers like permanently stationed next to our screen printer with their permission they had a dirt parking lot and for zero rent they because we were afraid to to get the overhead of a warehouse and so they let us was thirty dollars a month to rent the <hes> lease the container and end for zero dollars. They let us <hes> park it on their lot he because you didn't take the risk on on like a long term lease so you'll just let us a shipping containers are warehouse makes sense your we want. We wanted to make sure the revenue ran way out ahead of this needed a couple extension cords lighting and not a lot of ventilation in those containers but <hes> we cranked some of ninety five ninety six and it was kind of non stop twenty four seven how did you how did you get the trademark on it. I mean it seems like a very very common phrase. Life is good but you got a new trademark. How did that happen well. We failed five times. We were going to the boston public library at all you couldn't important attorney and we sent five applications and failed and then i went one night to play basketball and some guy asked me. Did i see you and your brother selling t shirts in front of the boston garden the other night and i said yeah and he said how's that going not so good but we have this great idea the eh i went on and on about what the concept was and that we're trying to trade market and then i realized that i'd been rude and not ask the guy what he did. I said what do you do for a living and he said <hes> trademark attorney and guy's name was bob pierce and i went and saw him two days later and convince them to do the work pro pro bono and he knew just what to do so we had to make a lot of changes we had to create hang tags and labels we the label in our shirt said jacobs gallery gallery so we switched the label to life is good and then we had to get affidavits from five different retailers who said that it represented a brand and by definition legally trademark denotes the source of the goods so there's when you just put a mark on a t shirt that's called ornamental but if people look at it and say that represents the source of the goods in some way then it's a brand so he did all those things correctly and i gotta tell you it's twenty five years later and and bob pierce still gets all our intellectual property business. That's amazing so you got the trademark on this phrase. Life is good as a brand and that's your you sort of you own this phrase phrase and you can use it as your business even the fact that you said it a few times during this podcast you owe us money got yeah. It was a it was a big day when we got it. We we still didn't really know how to run a business or what to do but it was. We knew it was a a valuable thing yeah. How did you guys divide up labor between the two of you like who did what who did finances who who did the art who to the delivery. How how did you guys who was in charge. Who was the boss older brother. The boss anything that involved brainpower pretty much fell on my side no seriously bur burden off he had more of a background coming out of school <hes> on the business side and he's a great communicator great motivator so he worked worked the phones a lot. I spend more time on the drawing table or like at the screen print shop or maybe packing up stuff but there's plenty of crossover birt's. It's very creative as well so it mixed pretty seamlessly over the years. I guess there was a turning point pretty significant turning point in nineteen ninety-six. You guys get a call from a pretty big sporting goods chain based out of indianapolis named named kelly ins or gaylon galleons something something like that yet galleons yeah. What was that yeah they were. They were actually in our opinion. The best sporting goods in the country <hes> their stores were incredible and yeah they they were open to a sales call and interested in the brand so they invited us to go visit them in indianapolis and we actually actually couldn't afford to fly out so instead we've just transparent with them and asked if we could piggy back when they came here would they come and visit us i would they didn't realize was that there was no life as good in that when they came to visit austin becoming to our apartment so they <hes> anyway a we made them prince spaghetti and rago sauce and we hung out and they they were on board and <hes> they placed the biggest orders is by far that we'd ever seen and they kind of put us on the map outside of new england. I think dick's sporting goods eventually bought galleons right. That's right and i i i don't know if it was apparent to them that the entire company in burt myself in kerry or sitting with them in our kitchen at dinner but but we did have a lot of laughs and then we got an in order and that was a huge step for us to suddenly be shipping two hundred and eighty eight pieces instead of twenty four pieces to a retailer so so once you get into galleons aliens was at just like a game changer i mean. Did you see your business just like skyrocket. It was a game changer because once he would happen was <hes> most of our business stan and now is a specialty mom and pop business so the mama pops will take a look at the big guys. Try to find brands. Sometimes that different <hes> retailers carrying galleons was kind of a model citizen that a lot of small retailers looked up to and so once we were in galleons we're in all these geographic <unk> graphic locations and there was great visibility for us so all of a sudden our phones were ringing like crazy from other retailers from other territories and so- galleys was probably responsible responsible for hundreds of new accounts over the next year or two and business really started booming. You know went from that. Two hundred fifty thousand six hundred twenty then we broke a million at one moment to the was just mind blowing t- thinking how do we go from having like seventy eight dollars between us three years ago. Two million dollars in sales was pretty mind blowing and we didn't have a concept of you know like what it meant to do a million dollars. I think we thought maybe we should retire knows wow we hit a million dollars. I mean i think we definitely stopped and sort of you know how to how to beer and kind kind of said wow man what what has happened but on the other hand was still in our apartment and you don't really look around and see any differences just a mad scramble we'll still but but i think yeah i think galleons an crossing not million dollar mark connor gave us the confidence to invest in a lease get the warehouse and and we hired a few people we i mean we we didn't even have a computer would do untold kerry who still works with us to this day by the way she actually owns five percent the business. He's a partner yeah but she you know she said to us. You really need to get a computer and both on our like oh. We're artists we. We don't want a computer and they so she needed to run the business. Why do we need a computer but she was right well. There's a lot of absurd of exchanges. We had this guy who had run champion the brand chair and wilson sporting goods and he was helping us out through his a sales up. You know we connected personally. Jay phillips god bless him. He was flying up phillies like an angel. We didn't yeah to get angel slash devil the best kind and he <hes> he would give us advice and direction and then he would ask us very basic questions like you know what he got on the books for next year. We're like what what what do you mean like. How do you plan how much product to make me. We like <hes> we just. We've been doubling for like the last few years. We figure you're on a double again. He's like that's a very scary way to run a business and he asked us what our assets sets where he's trying to get us off our personal off our loans because our our personal names were on the loan notes and <hes> he said we gotta. We've got change this. You know what do you got for assets. Burton are like we can get a mountain bike and we're dead serious. We didn't even know how to answer questions like think. I got that picture mom. We got a v._c._r. And he was just like dumbfounded. Looking at us like these guys are so so clueless spine shirts like i because i mean when i think of life is good. I think like <hes> going to ocracoke island. You know someplace. I like cape. Cod like you know you would life is good and it's the summer and it's easy to feel that way. Is that where the shirts were being solden like beach towns and places like that in the summertime. <hes> one of the strengths right away was that it wasn't one distribution channel. Oh so you're talking about destination resort which became important to us right away but sporting was really big. Two gift shops for people like you know around themes like home. Themes like you know love family gardening grilling all that kind of stuff so it really was <hes> oh the distribution was really spread out which which you know we didn't really i can't take credit for strategically planning that but a helped us a lot through the two years the economy has gone up and down and when you're in a single distribution channel it's hard to weather economic downturns but for us you know some would get hurt worse than others and we were always able to weather it because we were <hes> not too many eggs in one basket yeah there. It was so many different places for us to go in when the economy went down it would not all the channels will get impacted the same way i mean did you. I mean when you think think about <hes> a very simple phrase some very basic and not i mean your guess agreed artists no no no oh judgment but like very simple our work and it became this thing t shirts and and dinner plates and posters and things like what what are the things that i'm probably forgetting about recipes backs towels. I mean really doesn't you know it really just became you know what he's a good canvas to connect emotionally with people and in more recent years more things like video content and publishing books excetera which is extremely exciting to us but we're still most known for the t shirts. Did you guys. I mean you've been doing this now. Since really i guests since the late eighties rape on t shirts. Have you ever <hes> any part of of of of you guys want to sell it. You know sell it to a bigger her company and just kind of cash in 'cause you 'cause you've both of you become pretty well off from this tiny little t shirt business and <hes> <hes> you can. I don't know can do whatever you want. I think the reason that we're not interested in selling going. Public is what we learned. Learn from these customers that started sending us letters emails sharing their personal stories and they really taught us that optimism is most powerful aw in the hardest times and these are people dealing with chemotherapy losing loved ones and they'd say we all wore life as good t-shirts to the memorial service for my brother because that's the spirit with which he lived and we've got thousands of those letters and emails and people kind of <unk> opening up their whole personal lives to us because the emotional connection to the brand. They're the ones who taught us this and if we'd hadn't received those letters that may they have been appealing to us like yeah. We've been at this for a few decades but we want to spread that message as wide as we can because we believe in it more than anything anything else in the world am burt but what what are your thoughts on. I mean did did you ever consider find to sell the business well in a lot of ways. We really feel like we're just getting warmed up. It honestly feels like a startup today. We're we're like a twenty five year old startup where there's all these young people oh walking around that remind us of ourselves but are much faster and stronger and smarter and i'm not <hes> operating the business. I was as president and c._e._o. For a long time and we replaced me with a woman that actually came from our nonprofit side and she's killing it and you can tell pretty quickly oakley that she's about ten times the operator that i was and it's allowing me to dive back into the creative and i haven't been there in a while l. so we're really kinda back to where we started in the beginning. Hey let's design some t shirts but now we have a really strong balance sheet. We own one hundred percent of the business us and you know we have no intention of going public or selling the business we just wanna see you know how far we can take this in at some point figure out what to to do with the structure something creative maybe denisov to our staff. Maybe we can sell it to our customers. Something that enables the <hes> that will enable the best work of life is good to be done after john de gone so i mean. Do you guys feel like you grew up up with very working class home. I mean in the room upstairs with frost on windows and like you presumably today a a up. Both of you are doing pretty well. I mean you can you can live pretty comfortably. No no question about it yeah just to have our own home seriously not not to be too corny but that that's pretty cool and to be able to travel. It's incredible and <hes>. I don't think we would ever take that for granted to your what what is your i mean. What did your parents make. If your business your mom passed away <hes> a couple years go and then i can see your later. Your dad dad passed <hes>. What do they make of this. I mean this t shirt business at turned into something huge yeah they they loved it. I think they were proud of it and <hes> they really did do their part while we had our dysfunction growing growing up and there were times. Were you know right right up until the time that our mom passed away if she saw somebody in life is good t-shirt she'd run up to them and say my son's made it was embarrassing when your weather but <hes> our our dad got a kick out of the nuts and bolts of the business he always wanted to know the details els and he was so encouraging when bert ni- for that year and a half when we did live at home and we're still doing the van trips he always was. Just you know we'd roll in at three a._m. Some night how'd you do did you do. It was never what the hell are. You guys doing like your you know your college graduates like you get get your act together. There's no pressure on career. It was always how'd you do and that helped a lot and maybe maybe the interesting thing going full circle. Oh with our dad is that in the autumn of his life he he came out of that funk he really came out of the depression and he really became the a guy that we never knew that we see in those pictures you know before we were around and it's hard to say what that what caused that but as our business grew grew that house that we grew up in really fell to pieces and our and our parents while we were living just like you mentioned guy better and better along the way and we'd go oh visit our parents living in that same house falling apart so we decided to knock the house down and build them a nice new home and <hes> you know i think it was the first time in my father's life since he you know since he had all those kids that when people came to visit they had a place to sit down and at the he could be proud of his home and i think also where he felt like he was a failure he looked at his six kids now and you know we we landed on our feet all of us and he didn't screw everything up so i think he was a little easier on himself and in some ways this success of the business <hes> might help my dad you don't get over that hump and realized that if we're not failures he wasn't a failure and it was really cool to see him relaxed and and enjoying his grandkids and it was like it was like he in our mom were dating again. I mean they just like hang out and spend time and you know the who won away on some weekends and things they hadn't done that and you know thirty years i mean it just they were married for fifty six years and then the the last one believe it or not while it was tough with moms illness in everything they they had some great years now. Our mom said that too just before you know once she knew the cancer was was taking her life and there was nowhere to go. She said nobody should feel sorry for me. On the happiest i've ever been in my life you know part of that was i'm sure because because my dad had come out of the funk and also that she knew that that she did a good job with with our kids and they were all okay wow you know when you think about this crazy story going from t shirts up and down the eastern seaboard to sell them out of the back of van and knock on the dorm rooms to seventy dollars between you two you know a shipping container as your office and and the company today what it does reportedly almost one hundred million dollars in revenue years at about right that's right. You got about what almost two hundred employees today right pretty good. I mean do you for for seabird to you. When you think about the success of this company the attributed to your hard work and you brothers hard work or in your intelligence or do you think that a lot of it came from just luck law to walk. I think we we stumbled into something. That's much bigger than we are <hes>. I think we've been resilient. You know maybe more resilient than smart but it's a good good fifty percent ain't luck we right place right time <hes> two percent skill and then we've we've worked our asses off so that that's that's played a big factor factor too so you know maybe there's all those parts are equal and john how much of it because of like how much because of your hard work and your skill intelligence. I would say skill intelligence. Maybe twenty percent <hes> hard work another twenty eh and then brute strength. Maybe from me twenty so neither only in really the you got your answer there in that neither of us know hotter add up to one hundred percent and yeah just you know so until definitely not skill a lotta luck clearly no question that's john birt jacobs. Co founders of the life is good company for the way we know for a fact that at least one other t-shirts has traveled traveled all the way to space and twenty thirteen astronaut karen nyberg posted a video on the international space station and she was showing how she washed her hair in zero gravity and the shirt that she's wearing in that video. It's from life is good. It's a grinning girl who looks like the original jake sitting back to back with her dog and underneath. It says lean on me.

T Boston Kerry Indianapolis Cary Sherman Attorney Bob Pierce Marlboro Boston Garden Bedford Phillies Ocracoke Island Karen Nyberg Basketball John Birt Jacobs Dick Stan Jay Phillips Partner
"john de" Discussed on Q95

Q95

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on Q95

"Words chastised. I'm taking him as disrespect. I'm chest is similar to the word chased. Oh. I have no sex. I'm incredible lose no sex gods. Between drinks. I'm very excited for you. That'll you'll get a lady now that new car smell knows this new or is this us new. It's a couple of thousand miles on a new. One of those deals has four four hubcaps. The whole thing doesn't have hubcaps Scott fancy wheel. So no get to the what's this, Johnny Menzel? Dude. I have no idea what's going on. Say it's worse than usual. I really don't know what's going on. What what what are they told you? Here's the story. Here's what they've told me. I was on the phone all night. Sure Johnny Manziel has been released from the Montreal alphabets. John. Blue. John de Plumer Ray. My Dong what does Plumer? Polic- skin did help out of it. Here's the thing. He has been barred from playing for other Canadian Football League teams as well. Not just the watts. What did he do? What did you do? The. Johnny. He drink Canada, Dry CFO..

Plumer Johnny Menzel Johnny Manziel John de Plumer Ray Johnny Polic Canadian Football League CFO Montreal John
"john de" Discussed on First Things First

First Things First

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on First Things First

"The Nick foles, I don't think that was the case in the twenty seventeen season and the twenty eight team season two to my is the offense did seem to open up greatly in the final month of the season wants Nick foles went in there. Now, we can talk about the other things that weren't as one to one as far as quarterback change offense of lying better. Guys, got healthier. What more desperation they really could wear the underdog roles, whatever it is. But I understand why guys think that what change was the quarterback. Now, I'm getting my numbers. Now, I'm getting my targets the other part of this that I thought was interesting was that you had deeply believe you had the offense coordinator leave and Frank Reich leave and all of a sudden they said now Carson Winston run over the room that that he was he had the ability according to this report to with their new offense coordinator, grow to kind of impose his will more. So than he ad last year. And that could be a problem for any young quarterback for anyone that hasn't seen as much football as Frank Reich in his thirty plus years, John de Filippo in his twenty plus years, and whether or not that that hurt they're often somewhat the silver lining for the eagles is see they've been looking for with wins reason to say man, people are doubting us. And now all of a sudden if they wanna be able to rally on main guys think you're a bad guy guys think that we're better with Nick foles who's going to be on a different team next year. Maybe that can be the rallying point for next season. I just believe in in Carson wins. I believe he is the answer. I know each quarterback has their personality. But from everything that I have felt coming out of Philadelphia to players I talked to that. They would really really there's no way that they believe this story, and I can understand people thinking old Nick foles old Nick foles a better quarterback. But there's no way that I'm going forward. Nick foles is my quarterback. I'm putting cars. Wins in their regardless of any rumors of those other receivers, and what they're saying because you can believe there's a disgruntled wide receiver on every team if you put a microphone in every receivers around the NFL to backups they would be telling you, and we'd be getting stories a lot like this. All right. Thank break. Coming up is the NFL about to make major changes foaming the no column. New Orleans C says. That is next person. I three times.

Nick foles Frank Reich Carson Winston NFL coordinator Carson Philadelphia eagles John de Filippo
"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Working today in the next two weeks on this Dover. Intelligent design thing. What is extraordinarily about? This trial is oh the religious fundamentalist Christians. Simply lied lied. Lied by to the point in which the judge in the middle of the trial. Goes, you know, Mr. foul. There. You know, Buckingham you were winding. This is perjury. This is a federal court. I could have you on contempt and which it at the end of the trial actually, put the people up on contempt. Just the whole process of line is to me has so invaded our our culture, and I have to say that Fox News. Twenty two years ago. I mean, you know, you began going oh my gosh. And the amount of people watch it, and then you get into deceptions the whole thing of deception. There was a very interesting documentary. I just watched on whatever it's up counterintelligence, but but the section, and I have to say that halfway through it. I being going, you know, I don't know who to believe anymore, and that's a really dangerous place to be and as a country we are. And and they was back to that young lady who said well, God is my bus driver. And I go oh my God. She is so vulnerable to anyone who comes around. And I think that part of that has at least in the area than I am in this lack of critical thinking, perhaps is encouraged by the religious upbring. Bringing that they go through, but these people vote. Well, I think it's.

Buckingham perjury Dover Mr. foul Fox News Twenty two years two weeks
"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"And it all worked out. I wasn't easy. And I can't even say it was fun. But it was it was certainly a challenge and. I got a call of a couple of months or so ago saying from guy in Amsterdam, I'm writing Iraq opera. And I'd like I like to write it. You know, I'd like to do it around you. My agents. Don't know, you know, you you know, that he wants you to commit to it. Now, I said, well, what's the problem with well, John? I mean, there are a lot of things who knows what will happen September next year. I remember saying how many rob them? Are being offered the seventy year old. What am I waiting for like a better rock opera or another one to pick room? I mean, come on. Let's go for it civil lot of. I mean, do I call it humanist activism, John, you know, some of the stuff that you're getting into your interviewed in the humanist. You are appearing at. Thing for the freedom from religion foundation in San Francisco's marvelous. A really marvelous convention super terrific presentation that you speak. I spoke about I spoke about lying. If you wanna know what has me really upset? These days is just the lying. That's going on. I just are we back to Trump two point. Oh here. I mean, you brought him up. So yeah. Yeah. I remember watching those early early debates. Yes, I remember turning my life for what you find. God. He's but he's lying like right in front of me. But he didn't say something which I just heard him say I was really struck by that I was really struck by that. And I'd like to say that I was struck really early on. And I've been just whipsawed with it. And so my speech was about lying, and how corrosive it is the storyteller, then whether it's in film, whether it's on stage for a play, whatever you see utility in using the storyteller in that context to help course. Correct. The culture what you're doing with the Clarence Darrow portrayal with the play you're writing do you see that as your contribution to trying to promote a culture of reason? Yes, I mean, the speech in which I gave was prompted by a lawyer who is having dinner with and the lawyer made the comment to me that you know, if I ever got you on the on the stand, I could destroy your credibility with. With the audience because actors are by their very nature wires. I went one you said, well, that's what you guys. Do you buy? I said, no, you completely don't understand what it is that we do or what the whole process. First of all what the process is packing. And then what the intent is if the intent is to present a mirror up to nature. You have to understand is that the process when we get down in the room there what we are looking for is not lies. We cannot act cannot literally act, but the -ception you can be in phoen- where where the audience is looking at somebody who is deceiving. That's what the characters doing this evening of the actor who plays. It is not in in the process of the evening. They're actually looking for the truth and the truth of this character is at their liar. Yes. But that doesn't make the actor liar. That isn't what that isn't the mechanism that we use it. It's just completely different. And the other thing is that as opposed to many. Other professions. Not the least riches lawyers profession is that we bring people into a room. There's a permission that's giving we enter an imaginary world and the audience knows that they're entering an imaginary world. So there's no deception that's going on the only thing that's real that. That happens. You know, again, I'm going back to play. The only thing that's real that happens in a play is the emotion that each audience member feels that Israel, but there's no deception. So in any case when I am now. Yes..

John Clarence Darrow Amsterdam Iraq Trump San Francisco Israel phoen seventy year
"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Age of fourteen but a lot of the population doesn't know what they wanna do at fourteen much less forty. You know, they just didn't have a passion in life, which is unfortunate. So in any case, I got a call. I. I got a call. I didn't know addition or anything else, I got a call from this the saying, we we we want offer you five days on this show days our allies, I never watch days of our lives ever. I never watched a soap opera as far as I was concerned, especially from the drama school of you know, soap operas and warn. We're kind of all in the same boat. I mean, it was just like oh my God. We don't do that stuff. We only do Shakespeare, but I needed a job and a lot of actors identified their careers by what they didn't do. And so they didn't do very much. And I just went watch it asking me of the answer's yes. And what have you? So I got sent them Aotearoa, and I looked at the show, and I went, oh what they want is a psychopath. That's who I'm supposed to play. I'm a psychopath, but what this show desperately needs as a comedian because everything's sort of. Oh, really slow and very much fun. So I went on and I figured I live days on whether they're going to do and I played fully a psychopath. But with a great sense of you, and as I walked out after that as I walked out on the fifth day on the Friday to my car to you know, to forever, never, you know, be on this show again to producers came out, and they said, we're we're bringing you back. We you have to come back, and I go, well, I don't know how that's possible. I'm up repairs. And they went off don't worry about. That says, oh, Barbara we'll clean you up. And it became I did that for three years, and it was the most fun job. I have ever had you'd like the anti hero thing. Like, I I have to bring queue up. Right. I mean, he's the tag inist sort of. But is that just your preference? You like to sort of throw the wink in with those types of people to keep it interesting. Probably the enters. Yes. The other thing is is that just from an acting point of view, you really it doesn't really serve you to play of villain. As of Lynn. I've always played villains as the hero. It perhaps is simply a temperamental thing or a subtlety that, but I just don't play them that way. So as far as I'm concerned, Hugh is not at from from a writing point of view villain is always there to make the hero look more heroic. But as far as I'm concerned, I'm the hero. Well, and you provide a mirror you're the mirror that the hero gets to look into. I mean, you're saying all the things that nobody wants to talk about right with Star Trek. You know, it was the same thing. I came into one job, which was the first job. And then the first episode, and that was supposed to be was the end of it. So I have a career of sort of asked backing my way in the thing. Do you still audition or do you have this sort of career under show after all these decades? It's only it's really after my sailboat trip. I knew it by taking my sailboat trip at the age of sixty six or so that I was very likely after a two year hiatus going to come back to not much. You just can't go away for that type of time. And that's in fact, what I did I came back to not much, and then I began thinking about it and. Go you know, what I I really don't enjoy auditioning. And frankly, most of the shows in which I should pro or I don't really care whether I'm in, and so am I going to really work hard to resurrect something or make it, you know, I know. I'm not I'm not that interested. If a good project comes around. Then the answer is sure I did a marvellous play exactly a year ago in Washington DC John Rodman Bates play code by kunia where I play essentially Trump two point. Oh, Bill brilliantly written wonderfully directed by. Bob Egan who used to be at the taper. And and it was a big deal for me. I really committed to it..

Aotearoa John Rodman Bates Bob Egan Washington Shakespeare Bill Barbara Lynn Hugh three years five days two year
"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"You walked on the set you went everybody is at the top of their game here. And usually certainly in television, if you have a two or three page scene, you can expect it that will take maybe about. Or hours yourself, and you are usually afforded one or two takes. But surely by the third take a well, first of all by the on, the first take you wanna be spot on and if they're still running it's so saying, okay? Well, let's do another take. And then let's do a third take, and you have been in fact, you know, at least all the words have come out, and they wanna do third take you began going the making you don't like what I'm doing. And so I actually I remember saying that I go is everything. Okay. Don't know yet. Well, what was very different about that show is when I went when we took a break for a second while they were changing cameras around have you? I looked over at the video what we call the video village. And it wasn't just the DP in the director. It was the writer and the the Showrunner, and you know, the the executive, and what have you and I realized oh. Oh, they're working to they're not just collecting like on some shows. Did he say all his words? Yeah. All right. We got the shot. Yeah. Okay. Let's move on. It wasn't that they were creating as well. And once that became evident to me, I want I as an actor kube, relax, which is always what the issue is in these type of environments, especially if you are simply guest star. You know, everybody is new and everything is new and about have you so relaxing is paramount in terms of being able to do one's work. Is there ever been a time in recent memory? I mean, not even IBM have to answer this if you don't want, but if you ever had to compensate for the material like I'm going to have to interpret this in a way that elevates what I'm being asked to do that ever happened to you. Well, yeah, it happens all the time. I mean, you know, are are you know, amongst actors. We always say, well our job is to. Turn shit and shine. I mean, you know, and and there are scenes that you know, it's only because I've been asked about them over the years where I go. You know, why don't you go? Look what you lay down a little bit of a smoke screen to get people off the fact that the scene at south is really bumpy. But you do a little something over here and a little, you know, like a little shiny object over here for the audience, and and one gets a pass that scene shore. But in this stuff in this show it was spot on. So what you wanna do is to really stay in it. And so there was no smoke and mirrors on any of it. It was just cannot just relax and stay out of my own way at the camera. Do what supposed to do? You got your start on the daytime is that right? I did I went to drama school. And then I went into the theater and then out of that I got a contract. I I was at Stratford. In connecticut. And then I got a contract to go to Los Angeles. And I was a contract player. I didn't really know, frankly, what I wanted to do or I just all I saw around me or people who were having a very very difficult time actors who are having a very difficult time making ends meet. And I did not think of myself as being particularly talented about any of this stuff. So I was desperate not to fail that was one thing. And so the issue was was getting a job you have to get a job and for actors, we don't work very much. I mean, the the irony if for an actor is that many actors, you know, knew that they wanted to be actors by the.

Los Angeles IBM director writer executive connecticut
"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"I'm going to try to talk about this issue. We had spoken a few minutes ago, you were mentioning the scenario involving a grieving parents are grieving child and then -ticipant. This is a note that I had had I wanted to talk about it. There's no totally smooth segue into the role of Donald Margallo's from breaking bad. But I wanna talk about playing Jane's father. This is an interesting role that you had because breaking bad being probably my favorite TV show ever. And you have you know, this one part the sort of punctuation Mark here in this one story line, and it left such an impact. And I think for me I wanted to sorta roll this by you. And you tell me if I'm over thinking. But with that character, it seemed like you had done so much with restraint. I mean, you're you're essentially with your eyes and the faintest of gestures with this Konami of movement with the gravitas in your voice, you are telling the story of your hopes and fears for your daughter and the heartbreak of losing her. And I was just I wanted to kind of go down that road and talk about the making of and the playing of the character of Donald and breaking bad well before I get into just the technique of what the obstacles were. And what have you let me tell you something about that? Which I've always found to be just wonderful. And what it is that theater? I'm calling this theater storytelling can do. And that is that I've had now three or four times almost identical conversations with three or four people who've come up to me, just, you know, at an airport or convention somewhere or on the street, and it's always. The same. It's a it's a guy who is maybe about twenty four or five years old. Looks like they've already been living really hard. And we'll look at me kind of scans not directly in the I kind of you know, just. Yeah. And and they'll say. Hey, man, are you Jane's father? Did you play Jane's fonder, I go? Yeah. Then they'll say, yeah. Yeah. Well, now, I know what my parents went through. I just thought oh this kid who you know, who knows when he became a drug addict, I had been told by his friends, his teachers, and you know, million other people there are a ton of other people probably also the police, and they rehab people and on and on you can't do this. You gotta stop, you know, had not really gotten it. But in watching the pain of watching on a show, a theater piece, a, you know, something imaginary hat, the the pain of that that I was portraying had gotten through to him. And I I've always gone. That's why I'm in this business every once in a while you can touch somebody like that. So how do you tap into that? I mean, are you drawing on a tragedy in your own life? Well, what you cap into. To is that first of all you have to stay out of your way, that's one. The other thing is is that the desire to act can be sort of overwhelming. And what you have to do you have to say, listen, I just need to stay out of the way John needs to stay out. If a out of the way because the writing is so good that the story is being told, and I don't need to tell the story I need to be in the story as opposed to, you know, and I'll use another example, let's say you're on the stage and one needs to make sure that the people in the back row understand the story and understand your urine through the story of the characters journey through the story. So you have to sort of project and film. It's very different. I don't need to project. I just need to get out of the way. So that the camera can come in and look. So most of the time I'm just thinking, that's all I'm just thinking. And again, if freely good, I forget, I think it was in three episodes. They were usually well written and really well directed and just on on the set sort of story about that. And that is when you walk on the set, you know, what's going on pretty quickly. What have you, and I've been on a few sets that, you know, oh, this is a special show west weighing and and and actually Star Trek is one of those things, and it certainly breaking bad..

Donald Margallo Jane Konami John five years
"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"You know, it isn't like a road trip where you just go. You know, I'll just drive a little of Dr later into the night, and I'll get there are all drive faster. And I'll get there not. There's none of that. Have you I've ever been through it? You know, like the thirty foot waves the big storm. Have you ever felt very alone in the middle of a crisis on the water? We had two instances where we have some equipment failure. And it was very anxiety producing. And the problem is is that it laugh for days. You know, people would ask me, my friends, I'd say, especially my acting friends. I said, hey, we all know how it feels to to have an opening night where you're not quite as prepared as you would like to be. And you know, there's a lot on on the table here and your heart is. Sort of up your throat. Well, imagine that for four or five days. So we had one experience like that and three other experiences, but we we took care of it. We just took care of it. And, but, you know, listen, there are people who sail in very very dangerous waters. And generally, if you sail these sort of milk run routes during the you know in the middle of the period that you are supposed to be there, though, the weather can get a little like, ooh like that. But it's never going to get the survival level. And I have not experienced that. Now, you feel the need to get away. I mean is this a way to plug from all the insanity in the world. Is there any of that going on a yes, I I mean, I travel a lot. I have to say that with ones, you know, phone doesn't matter where you are. You can be reading the news, and we are. Big news junkies. And we know what's going on. And there are times that you know, I will say to my wife or or just say to myself gotta stop kinda stop just not you know, we can't be on this as much as we are. Because it's I don't think it's healthy, frankly after while, it's balanced hard for you. I mean, are you one of those all in kind of people? Yes, I'm a project prison. So one of my sons who works for a large company. Call the US government said, you know, the dad we came out of we grew up in you know, you and mama project people, and he just can't have that type of twenty four seven when you work like I do. Now, we you have to learn how to to stop. But we are definitely project people. I I'm I'm working on a project now that I know that I thought I was going to be able to get at a month ago something came up and now I am. Working simply I get up. I have something to eat. I sit down on my desk, and I start my writing, and I'm have to write this play the next two weeks. So is it's something you can talk about or is it all under the under wraps right now. Sure. It's it is about this the subject, which I find to be really fascinating on gonna give you the long version of it. And that is maybe ten years ago. I went on the road with the trial transcripts of the scopes monkey trial and at as Nur played William Jennings. Ryan, and I played there. And we went around the country. And you know, I thought at the time it was sort of a, you know, I recognize that this is sort of a marquee trial. Not sort of it is a marquee trial and the and evolution is key. How kind of you know, in that kind of controversial area. But I had no idea. I. Has simply had no idea. How current it is? And how I was going to get caught up in the whole issue. And so we we had a I had a number of experiences when I went when I spoke in colleges and spoke to people and then mostly a lot of after the show. We would have a talkback which is where the audience gets to pass questions, and we got to respond, and what have you, and it really sent me off on this whole issue of how religion has got..

US William Jennings Nur Ryan thirty foot five days ten years two weeks milk
"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Our broadcast is going to deal with faith healers, specifically, the failure of faith healing with stories from people who have been sort of under the hand of the faith healer in came away and wanted to share what had happened to them. I'm also going to talk to a guy who went to exorcist Bob Larson's service. You've seen the Bob Larsen videos on YouTube. Right. He's got these people who are like growling like animals and come out demon. And they're like. No, come out. I come in to you. And it's just the stuff of parody. But he's playing it real. He's playing it for real. And I'm gonna talk to a guy who was a turtle poser who went in and acted like he was infected with demon and got it on video. So he's an atheist. He doesn't believe in demons. But he went in there when I came out in these gotta store he's going to talk about this ridiculous experience with Bob Larsen. It's going to be wildly entertaining. It's coming up next Tuesday. Okay. All right. Let's get underway with today's conversation. This is one I've been looking forward to for a while as we talk to actor and humanist John Delancey, his stage, film and television credits. Go back to nineteen seventy five he's been on everything. Of course, we probably best know him as q from Star Trek. The next generation. Just a quick smattering of some of the stuff he's done over the past forty five years starting back in the seventies. And kind of moving forward he had parts in television series. Like police story the six million dollar man battle star galactica emergency mini series. Like the thornbirds. He was in macgyver it apart in the television series. L A law. He was featured in the Terry Gilliam masterpiece. The film called the Fisher king was also in a movie called the hand that rocks. The cradle, of course. Next generation deep space nine Voyager, the Star Trek franchise from two thousand one to two thousand and two he played Colonel Frank Simmons on Stargate s g one he's been featured on judging Amy played Dr e and of course, he had a pivotal role in breaking bad. We're going to talk about that. He does a lot of acting for video games and some great ones to interstate seventy six assassin's creed starcraft to Nova covert ops world of warcraft, legion way too many credits to fully mention here. But the guy has been around and lately he has been a vocal proponent of humanism, speaking out against anti-science and speaking in support of science reason evidence rationality and this often crazy world, and he joins me for a conversation today. John Delancey to pleasure to have you back. Thanks for being here. Thank you mind. We spoke a couple of years ago. And of course, we talked about the usual stuff. I'm sure somebody who does as many interviews as you. Do you hear the same types of questions? I'm going to try to steer clear of a lot of that John. You know, what was your motivation? But I want to talk a little a little show business. I want to talk a little bit about your craft. I want to talk about your long pretty amazing career. But I also wanna talk about the humanist in you and just life stuff the stuff that everyday people are dealing with all the time. I I though my speak about adventures you're having is that on the Pacific Ocean. Is that correct? Oh, yes. A couple of years. I took a trip or have a sailboat, and I went from Ventura, California to the markes which is south of the equator and the to a motives, and then ended up in in the society islands which include Hedy, and Brian ya and places like that. And and. Then a park the boat and then came back a year later or less than that eight months or so later after hurricane season and then brought it back up with a with a young man who had actually never sailed before. So and we had some ventures. So that was a long trip arduous trip back to Ventura. I've been watching though, the sort of you, call them diaries journal entries from the Nepenthes. Well, you know, what my I had so many people ask me about it. And you know, I couldn't be I have to say I've never read them after I wrote them just like I never watch any of the stuff that I've done..

John Delancey Bob Larsen Bob Larson Ventura Colonel Frank Simmons YouTube Terry Gilliam Pacific Ocean Nepenthes California Hedy Brian ya Amy Dr e six million dollar forty five years eight months
"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"It's delicious. It's one of my favorite dishes. It's like a Korean meal, and and we had a couple of times a month. And if you haven't tried it, you really need to easy to make like steamed rice in the bottom, and there's some seasoned meat in it and some chopped up mushrooms and shaped carrots and chopped zucchini, half moons in it, and there's a sauce that goes on. It's the Lucious it's delay making bebop. Okay. And while I'm making the BBN bap. I'm streaming. I got my phone hooked up to the echo speaker there in the kitchen, and I'm listening to the great courses. Plus specifically, I'm listening to this lecture on dieting not because I'm dieting, but I'm trying to eat better. Dr Steven novella is on my speaker in the kitchen, and he's filling my brain with knowledge, and he's talking about stuff like vitamins and vitamin myths in what we think we know about vitamins, what's an antioxidant. That what is that? What do I need that is an all natural food automatically better for you. I learned a few things there the non science surrounding homeopathy, and magnets and microwaves. I I know somebody who will not microwave their food because they're afraid of getting cancer. I mean, there's no science behind this. But Dr Steven novella addresses, this kind of stuff in the great courses, plus lecture series, called medical myths. Lies and half truths. What we think we know may be hurting us, and it's pretty amazing to be able to stream lectures, like this one from the great courses. Plus while I'm doing other stuff of doing household chores..

Dr Steven novella
"john de" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Why we play this game. Now, you know once you get to January and February. That's why we show of in April. Bard try to build some special. Go ahead. You said you enjoy all Sean Jeffrey employing the crowd. I mean, listen Jeffrey won that battle because he's a Super Bowl champion after he left Chicago. But as I was watching this game, I thought a two things right? As from the Viking fan perspective that I try to tell boomer that T needs to understand was the Vikings lost by fifty to the bears in this game. And the bears screwed themselves by beating the Vikings on week seventeen. They've loved to get that Vikings offense up there yelling and screaming at each other. Because they'd probably be an individuals. And also there was this big debate at the end of last year with the eagles foles, and how this happened at who is the person who was most responsible out of these coaches right yet Peterson yet Frank Reich, and you had John de Filipa that everybody loved okay? Frank Reich ghost in. Playoffs. Starting one in five. All right now, they're going to go in play in the divisional round Doug Peterson once again with Nick foles is in the divisionals and John de Filipo gets hired as a Vikings offense Goerner gets fired before the season. Sorry about that. Dude. Man. You got the wrong guy. Anyway. But it does look like they're not gonna hire Hugh Jackson, which is a that's a good. Chargers ravens yesterday in Baltimore and Lamar Jackson a very slow start came to life in the fourth quarter. They had a chance down six with the ball. Second. Ten.

Vikings Sean Jeffrey Frank Reich Doug Peterson bears Lamar Jackson Hugh Jackson John de Filipa Chargers John de Filipo boomer Baltimore Nick foles eagles Chicago Goerner
"john de" Discussed on PhotoBiz Xposed

PhotoBiz Xposed

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"john de" Discussed on PhotoBiz Xposed

"I love the idea of coming back from one holiday and knowing that I've got another one to work towards at all times. So yeah, I one hundred percent behind you, the L, and there's also an interesting post or comment from John de Medeiros who I've interviewed on the podcast, isn't it you need to get back and have listened to his episode. If you get a chance he says that staying small and avoiding growth can be more enjoyable more fulfilling and possibly more profitable than going big. And that's been his philosophy for the last decade. He he's enjoyed it. And he says he can't complain. But he says he's always leaving a little on the edge. And that might be stressful for some photographers, and I totally get that. But I am with you all the ways you on. I love the idea of being small staying small are do have some help. But the the days of growing. My business or having a multimedia business with multiple photographers and lots of stuff. I just that's not something that really excites me anymore. You know on the other hand can't see vantage of that. I mean, we had a post inside the members group from hot tan, again, another previous interview guests who cracked one million dollars for his tone either for twenty nine Justin credible. He has multiple studios a bunch of stuff multiple shooters. So yeah, look, it's swings. Random bands, isn't it? But for me on with pole, and I love the idea of Bank small being responsible myself for what.

Bank small John de Medeiros Justin one hundred percent one million dollars