10 Burst results for "John Dali"

"john dali" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

07:02 min | 7 months ago

"john dali" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Out how a sexual assault allegations against Joe. Biden is shaping his bid for president. It's the first presidential election. The metoo movement gained momentum in two thousand, seventeen with this allegation heard Biden's chances with women voters. This November search for into America wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. Because I'm a journalist and frankly a nerd, I should have been way ahead of the curve on Corona virus. Think back to the thirteenth of February twenty twenty. I know it feels a long time ago. Only three people outside of China had died from the new virus at least as far as anyone new at the time. Nobody in the US was thought to have died of it. Nor had anyone in my own country the UK. The virus felt very distant threat. But it wasn't. Bolden thousand people had died in China. Not Number was rising rapidly. twenty-five countries had confirmed cases. Well respected Epidemiologists said he concluded that there was little chance of stamping out these other cases quickly. The novel Corona virus was to contagious. Like the fire in the Supper Club, it was spreading everywhere and rapidly gathering speed. And I know this because I interviewed one of those well respected epidemiologists on February the thirteenth Dr Natalie McDermott of King's College London walked into a studio at the BBC untold the latest thinking on the new corona virus. The early data had suggested that the virus killed more than one in ten of the people. It infected. Dr. McDermott reassured me that now. It probably wasn't quite that dangerous. The best guess at the fatality rate was more like one in a hundred, maybe as low as one in two hundred. Nobody knew for sure should I just assume that everyone on the planet would get it I asked. No she's had that was too fatalistic. But if we couldn't contain it, it was certainly infectious enough to infect a majority of the planet's population. A noted. Believed her. Even did the mental arithmetic. They might be five billion cases, and with a one in one hundred death rate that would be fifty million people around the world dying over the course of a few months in the United States it will be two million deaths. What? Did I do with the doctors information? I did what Pastrengo resorted as his ship plowed on towards the rocks. Anxiously forward my brow. Kept on going hoping the worst wouldn't happen. Now, I don't want to exaggerate my feelings. I didn't crash oil tankers. Nobody died because of my mistakes. But I could have done better easily. Could have held off on booking my summer vacation. I could have made sure I caught up with my elderly father and stepmother who are in high risk groups. I could have sold all my shares, or at least most of them, and waited for a couple of months to see whether Dr Mcdermott's grim scenario were starting to become a reality. Instead. I took some money out of savings to pay down some of my mortgage, because I had gigs firmly in the diary. That would talk the savings back up again. Those gigs were canceled. Of course which means I drained my savings at the worst possible moment. If it goodness sake I could at least an extra toilet paper. But none of this went through my mind. It wasn't that I wasn't anxious. I was anxious just like Pastrengo. Yati was anxious. I was aware that was a problem. And, yet I didn't step back. Think things through and intern my anxiety into action, and perhaps you may recognize yourself in that description to. Remember the experiment by psychologists. Biblo Tana and John Dali. They slowly pumped smoke into rooms, containing people filling in questionnaires. Solitary subject didn't hesitate to leave and report the smoke. But groups of people stayed and stayed as the smoke thickened. Reassured by each other's passivity, those experimental subjects had done nothing. Now a decade later, the customers of the beverly. Hills Supper Club were re enacting that experiment in the most terrible way. Some people moved in reaction to young Walter Bailey's warning, he saved them. But many people with too slow to react lulled into complacency by the fact that others were also to slow. Four minutes later, the power failed, and the lights went out in the ballroom. Toxic smoke rolled in an anyone still in that room faced a dreadful challenge in getting out alive. Walter Bailey repeatedly held his breath and headed back in to drag out as many people as he could. One, hundred sixty seven people died that night if it hadn't been for Walter Bailey, the death toll might have been many hundreds more. Bailey, also survived. He's a true hero. I'd like to think that if disaster struck odd, have the courage and the presence of mind of Walter Bailey. But I fear I'm more like those poor unsuspecting supper club patrons enjoying that food and looking forward to the music, then wondering what to do, and taking cues from everyone else. With social animals, we humans, we know instinctively that it's normally safer to stay with the group and to do what the group does. But not always. I hesitated to and then when I started. Reacting in earnest to the pandemic I found that the stock market was already plunging the pastor and toilet paper was already sold out, and there was no hope of getting masks. I'll governments found themselves in the same situation for much the same reason. This series I'll have more to say about what our leaders have done and failed to do, but for now let simply note that many Western democracies found themselves in the same crazy scramble for ventilators for swap testing kids, the mosques and for gowns. If everyone had started taking action in January while the risk of pandemic was still just a risk. We'd all be in better shape now, but just as in the supper club. Before, they acted. Everyone wanted to be a little more certain that there really was a problem. Amy Evanson professor at Harvard Business School. Calls this salt, problem and.

Walter Bailey Dr Natalie McDermott Supper Club United States Biden China assault America Hills Supper Club UK Pastrengo president Joe Bolden Amy Evanson Harvard Business School
"john dali" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"john dali" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"This cautionary tale is going to be a little different I. that's okay. The world seems different these days so I've been writing some new stories for you to suit the Times wherein there'll be a little shorter, little simpler, and perhaps a little more focused on the challenges. We face right now. And this episode is different than another way, too. Because in a small way. It's about me about what I got wrong and I hope about what you can learn from my mistakes. We'll come back to my mistakes and to the fire in the Beverly Hills. Supper club but I I wanted to ask you a question. Do. You remember Captain Pastrengo Rouge Yati? You must cautionary tales season one episode one. was about an oil tanker, the size of the Chrysler building a ship with the name Torrey Canyon that ship was headed for a sunken massive rocks with the vicious reputation, called the seven stones and Captain Strangle Majority Poor Pastrengo. State his ship closer and closer. And closer. To disaster. Go listen again if you like. White! The mystery of Torrey, Canyon, you may remember his that while captain. Gret was steering his ship towards the rocks. The weather was good. The visibility was good. Torrey Canyon had radar, and the seven stones were clearly marked both on all the charts and by a lighthouse vessel, warning ships to keep away. Wolves still time to change course just as there was still time to evacuate the cabaret room. And yet. Torrey Canyon did not turn. Just as the people in the Suffolk up cabaret room did not move. Captain was he was a man in a hurry had made a plan to head straight for harbor the hundred and fifty miles beyond those rocks, but his original course was charted safely through deep open water. That at least was the plan. But now new information is coming in the ship has drifted off the expected course overnight closer to shore. He's now heading for a tight squeeze past seven stones, fishing boats have appeared blocking his way. The current is pushing him towards the rocks. His plan is getting riskier and riskier. But at no point, does he stop? Reflect. And rethink everything. Instead with each new piece of bad news, he furrows his brow, and re dedicates himself to his original plan. So his my confession. In the face of the growing corona virus epidemic. I behaved in exactly the same way. It took me far too long to really think about the information that was coming my way. It took me even longer to take action. I to. Captain Jacques Teti. Very first cautionary tale I discussed one reason why we don't change course. Psychologists Call it plan continuation bias. We focus on a particular goal when bad news comes in, that should make us rethink our tunnel vision and we narrowed. The bad news makes us redouble our focus on the initial plan. Now that we know it's going to be difficult. Geography was racing against the clock and with each setback, the tunnel vision must have closed in further. He also made his fateful decisions by himself. He was a captain who didn't inform his crew of the details of his plans and didn't seek that comment. As, he acknowledged. I must answer for everything for everyone. I must carry the cross alone. If only we. had been open to criticism and had sought the views his officers, they might have helped him to regain his grasp of the risks and rethink his plans. But having other people to guide, you doesn't always help. If they're in the same situation as you with the same assumptions, they can lull you into thinking that. None of you have a problem. But. In fact, all of you have a problem. There's a famous psychological study conducted in the nineteen sixties by Latina and John Dali. The scientists are subjects to sit quietly and fill out a questionnaire. Sometimes. The subject would be alone sometimes in a group of three. Gradually the researchers humped smoke into the room. When the subject was sitting alone, he or she tended to note the smoke and calmly leave to report it. When the subjects were in a group of three, much less likely to react, each person remained passive reassured by the passivity of the others. Based on what we now know about. The Beverly Hills Supper Club in Nineteen, seventy seven. That experiment seems darkly prophetic. Incident is vividly described by Amanda Ripley in her book. The unthinkable remember where we left off. Twelve hundred people were in the cabaret room, listening to the warmer packed crack jokes on stage. A fire was racing towards them. Young Walter, Bailey supervisor had shrugged and ignored the problem like strangle majority. The supervisor had a plan and didn't seem able to fully appreciate. The plan would have to change. So Walter Bailey did something big something he assumed would cost him his job, but someone had to act. He decided that it was going to be him. Although he was just a teenager, and although he suffered from stage Fright Bailey strode down, the middle of the room climbed up on. Grabbed a microphone. Everyone to look to my right, there's an exit to the right corner of the room and looked to my left as an exit on the left now look to the back as an exit at the pack I want everyone to leave the room calmly. There was a fire of the front of the building. And then ultimately left the stage. I wish I could tell you that one thousand two hundred people rose to their feet and filed out of the room. But they didn't. He was this kid they thought, was he? Part of the act was the fire for real. Was it a problem? People thought to the expense of their ticket of how much they were enjoying the food. They were looking forward to hearing. John Davidson Sing. They didn't want to rush out if they didn't have to so. Did they have to. It wasn't clear. Think about the last time you were sitting around in a building. The fire alarm went off. Did you spring to your feet and seek the nearest fire exit? And I didn't. I looked around to see what others were doing. The same thing happened in the beverly. Hills Supper Club. People did what people do. They look to the left and to the right as Walter Bailey had told them to, but they weren't looking for the exits. They were looking what the people next to them were doing was season to my left moving. What about Fred to my right? With everyone taking cues from everyone else, the group was slow to respond. And they really didn't have a minute to span. Hey everyone. It's mainly MSNBC correspondent and host of the podcast into America in our latest episode, I joined forces with NBC News. Political reporter Aliatalia to find.

Walter Bailey Torrey Canyon Torrey, Canyon Beverly Hills Captain Jacques Teti Beverly Hills Supper Club Chrysler Hills Supper Club supervisor beverly Amanda Ripley Gret MSNBC John Dali Fred re reporter John Davidson America
"john dali" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

05:11 min | 8 months ago

"john dali" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Welcome to bedtime history could evening. Everyone this is break. I hope you're doing well and I'm excited to share with you and other episode tonight. I shout out to our new donors. Nolan had made from Vancouver Canada and Noah and Oliver in San Francisco to donor so that puts us at ten with ten. New Donors will do another bonus episode. You guys are awesome. I have the best fans thanks to those who've been able to donate. We understand that not everyone can donate. And that's okay if you've asked your parents and they're not ready to be sure not to bug them. We're happy that you're listening. Anyway there freeways you can show your support to like sharing on social media and doing a quick reading or review speaking of that a big. Thanks to everyone who left ratings and reviews this last week. We had thirty new reviews which was pretty awesome. I said I shouted a few random ones so big thanks to Riva and PIA in Texas Isabel from Oregon Kuprin Pat Adrian and Joshua from Sydney Australia and Donna also Yanni from Saudi Arabia. Thanks so much for leaving reviews I read them all and really appreciate them and will keep doing shoutouts from there now onto our episode. Chances are you've heard of an iphone and probably an IPAD. What about an Imac an IPOD? Mac Book these are all devices created by a company called Apple. Did you know that last year they sold more than forty million iphones and over two billion since they started creating them? That is a lot of phones. Did you know the very first apple computer was created in a garage by two guys named Steve? At one point it looked like apple. Might fail pretty crazy right well tonight. We're going to learn about one of those. Steve's name Steve Jobs and how he came to create apple and all of the billions of devices that came with it over the years. Steve Jobs was born on February. Twenty Fourth Nineteen fifty five in San Francisco California to a woman named Joanne Carole. Schauble Steve's father's name was John John Dali and he was an immigrant from Syria which is a country in the Middle East. He left Syria because it was dangerous at the time but even before Steve was born his mother decided it was best to give him up for adoption because she and his father weren't ready to.

Steve Jobs John John Dali Apple San Francisco Syria Joanne Carole Middle East Nolan Saudi Arabia Riva Pat Adrian Sydney Vancouver Canada Australia Noah Donna
"john dali" Discussed on HBO Boxing

HBO Boxing

09:04 min | 2 years ago

"john dali" Discussed on HBO Boxing

"Be just not being an exceptional. Yeah. I don't know fight. Really? I mean, part of the reason why I stopped PASCAL when we did our predictions because I really thought the PASCAL would would open up a little bit would give him those opportunities because I really thought that he'd. You know, really want to try to do something. And we just the way the PASCAL was very strange. He was just there. And then suddenly he would have these very strange warming attacks that you'd never imagine. This guy used to be the champion of the world. It was a little so that was a little bit odds. And it wasn't like vivo. Like, you said it wasn't like he didn't try to get him out of there. He was throwing good power punches. He was mixing them out nicely. I think if you dropped him at the fight like two or three different occasions, you'd probably see the same thing, you know, Bill coming for throwing nice combinations hard combinations. And you think oh this looks like this guy's about to get the other guy out of there. And he just kept going. I I wonder if of the problem a little bit, right? And I with the Mitri is that he he doesn't seem to have an extra gear another plan a different look, he he didn't have anything to surprise them PASCAL because PASCAL guy who's been there and seen it and done it. And he kind of PASCAL knew everything that we've always going to do. Sometimes all it seems to me can get in a track. And then he just stays in that track. And maybe that's because he and his corner figure. Hey, it's working. We're winning really easily against this tough veteran guy. Why change anything? I don't I refuse to believe the whole hasn't doesn't have a punch. I mean, we've seen the effects of his punch. I mean, obviously, he's flattened lesser opposition. He did eventually stop Sullivan Barra which Andre ward couldn't do. I just wonder if that he he's lacking that spark that imagination inclination to find a different way to deliver that punch a new angle in new speed. You know, like we would say often with Gennady glove Kamini was at his peak. What's the weirdo punch that he's gonna find in this fight? You know, whether it's the Arkin thing punch on the top of the head or whether this would always find something. And then when he found that he was zero in on it until it got the guy out of there. You don't get a sense that be vol- does that he just keeps coming keeps throwing through. It's very nice punches or it's very good combinations. But sometimes you just gotta have that spark to surprise a guy, especially when you're up against the veteran. And I think that might be what he's missing I would agree with all of that. I think that's a that's a good observation. But I also I would disagree with you not doubting his punch. I starting to doubt it. Questioning whether he has those naturally heavy hands the Barreira knockout is a good point. He did get them and Brera is not easy to knock out. But I also think we got a little fooled by how quickly and easily dispatched Trent Broadhurst, which was a case. A case of it was Trent Broadhurst didn't mean as much as maybe it looked like to be fair, though, many lesser punchers than evil who you know, my assessment of him now is probably that he's somewhere between an average and slightly above average puncher somewhere. And then in that range, many lesser punchers than him have become elite pound for pound IRS and big stars. Floyd Mayweather is the obvious one although his talent and his marketability we're both kind of hard to to repeat, but like Vasily Loma Sankoh like Winky Wright like Pernille Whitaker. Like Joe Calzaghe like Timothy, Bradley. Beal can climb pound for pound list or get into the hall of fame with average issue power. But he needs to find some other way to be dynamic if indeed he is not going to display those heavy hands. Again, one way to be dynamic is to be tested and prove your worth in the face of adversity. A tough fight is a dramatic. Right. I feel it's time to put all in with a guy experts. We'll give a real chance to win. And there are plenty of them at one hundred seventy five pounds Turbie. Ev Stevenson dick Jack Alvarez Kovolev I'll be blunt. I don't want to see him in next with anyone outside that list. Do you feel the same way? Karen? Yeah. I totally agree. I mean who all else is really for him to fight now outside of that group. I'm what would be the point he's gone through now tough cagey heart to beat Veterans Day his career that everyone needs to have as they build as they build on ease B's emerged from that undefeated. He's beaten the guys that the previous champions of beaten Hopkins. Be that Cova beat the would be. But unfortunately, going through that stage has left us with more questions about in the answers. And so as you say the way to get those answers is for them is for him to face those who are perceived as peers, and there is a really good crop every weights. You mention them this the younger contenders. Like. Doc voice, Nick. And better. There's veterans like cove eleven Stevenson and Alvarez any needs to be a not makes now I mean there will they're starting to fight each other now after all. It's okay for him to mix and other names. He doesn't have to fight those six in a row. Great did. Right. But, but the, you know, we're still asking so many questions about him after having seen him play several fights in a row means it's time to try and find some of the answers. And also, that's what's going to help his popularity unit to go back to our original point clearly fans unenthused by what turning up to watch Dmitri Bill be up an old veteran the only way. Now the way for him to get the popularity and the attention is for him to to be against those rivals. And let's see who emerges top out of out of that mix. 'cause it's it's a really intriguing mix right now. And Stevenson, dick, of course are about to face each other in a week. And that is a fascinating fight. Yeah. I was surprised to learn while surfing the betting odds that dick is actually favored make some sense. It's not crazy, but I just wasn't expecting it. Because Stevenson has been the champ for so long. But that should be a really interesting fight see play out, and that's the kind of fight evil needs to be in Stevenson to whoever wins unless it's a rip-off decision or something. The winner stock is going up. That's what we've all needs a fight where you don't know who's going in who's going to win and thus by virtue of winning. If he does win all stock goes up. Yeah. All right moving onto the co featured bout, unlike be vol- Mirage, John Dali of got the stoppage in his fight against ISAACs Arata that opened the show, but it took him until round nine and even then he couldn't knocks down given that Zara take clearly has an exceptional chin. How impressed were you? Or weren't you with MJ's overall performance? I enjoyed watching him. There were several times during the bow where I was sort of saying to myself how much I liked his compactness. And I really admire these these these compact guys, and by that I mean, you know, guys don't reach with punches always seem to be perfectly coil to never off balance. In a position to land with nice short punches. You know, you could draw a line from the top of his head to his feet and that line you feel be straight and stay straight for the entire fight wouldn't lean forward because he's reaching or wouldn't go to back to back. He's just fights in a nice box. And I love to watch guys like that his footwork was enjoyable to watch too. I like the ways he was repeatedly looking to find a different angle and a different approach them. I love this body attack. You always wanna see a young guy who works at the body. And that was really I think a key to alternate success. Some of those body shows really hurt you could tell the other thing all these has a ton of amateur experience and helps with his comfort level and his confidence in the ring. And that's why he's able to fight with such poise and only his fifth pro fight. But sometimes the experience can come without sights. And that sometimes really experienced amateurs may be good boxes, but not necessarily good fighters because it's such a premium on planning points in the Amazon, but Dali f it seems to me as a. Fighter. He was on his front for all the way through. He was looking to damage look into inflict harm, and that's encouraging. So I enjoyed watching him. Yeah. I did too. And I was impressed though, Akhmadov is undoubtedly rough around some of the edges or, you know, he fights in spurts, sometimes he faints and makes the other guy flinch, but doesn't actually do any punching behind it. But good legs. Good variety. Good punching accuracy as you said great commitment to the body, powerful jab. This kind of performance that you you great it on to separate curves. He gets grated gently because it's only his fifth pro fight. But he also has to deal with the high standard of being Olympia and the guy who's on HBO after four fights and

Ev Stevenson dick Jack Alvarez Kovolev Dmitri Bill Trent Broadhurst Sullivan Barra Andre ward IRS Joe Calzaghe Amazon Arkin HBO Hopkins Beal Akhmadov Cova Floyd Mayweather Gennady Karen Nick John Dali
"john dali" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"john dali" Discussed on Unorthodox

"The podcast are gentile of the week is Kevin b goes, he's a journalist and the author of tasting the past, the science of flavor and the search for the origins of wine. Welcome Kevin. Where are you right now? I'm in Florida. How is it a super hot. I wish I was in a nice cooler place. We were expecting Napa or Chianti or something like that for you. Well, you know, this whole book started and and I'm on Jordan hotel room. So I kind of took a roundabout way to my wine book. You tell us that story. I mean, the first opening pages of the book are just so kind of inflict Kaleri intense. Will you tell us how you went from being a, you know, a journalist who spent a lot of time in the Middle East, like how did you? How did you decide to write a wine book. You know, all started with that hotel room. I was in Amman Jordan doing a completely other story. I was tired. It was the end of the day. There was this little unusual bottle of wine from Krems on monastery and winery in Bethlehem, and I never drink wine or liquor from hotel mini bars. 'cause it's always terrible, especially in the Middle East countries, you know Arabic countries where it's supposedly banned. But it was so unusual that I try to didn't know that monks were still making wine and two thousand and eight. And it was a really nice wine, and it turned out that we're using these strange grapes Donnie and Jim dally and Belotti grapes, which I'd never heard of either. So that just obsessed me for years because I couldn't find out anything about them. That's how it all began. So you wrote a piece for us at tablet magazine a couple of weeks ago which which is part of of this book, which is completely fascinating apropos these graves saying that these were the the real kind of native grapes that that you know. Hit the scene much much, much much before you know the cabernet that we know today. And yet here we are in Israel today making all these French grapes t tell us first of all, what happened to these native grapes and second of all, why do we only hear about the French and not about the the local Canaanite fair? Well, grapes were widely used up until probably around with time of the the Muslim conquest. But even after that they stayed, you know, Jews and Christians in the region kept making them, but not to the same level as the French or the Italians or anything like that. So there are references of like a rabbi and Jerusalem mentioning grapes John Dali, and Donnybrook grapes in the fifteen hundreds thing wine was being made from these two types of grapes. So we're, you know, from genetic testing and historical records were sure that people kept making wine, but nobody really paid attention to it because the French and the Italians. And the Greeks got all the attention before we carry on the system. Can I? Can I ask you to be Mr. obnoxious wind guy and tell us about John Dali and Donny about their with kind of flavor. Do they hit the pallets with what are they k- I want to work now I want the word mouth field and tear ya if you could work terroir, and we'll be very grateful to me. They're more aromatic than a recycling they're. They're lighter white wines, but kinda with more flowery and grapefruit and lemony notes than than you'd find in most. Recently, I find in a lot of other people find that go very well with Middle Eastern foods. Your timeout Langi is a big fan of the great London chef, that sounds that sounds lovely, but then you right to to get back to the historical thing. You're right that these lovely grapes that he so lovingly just described face somewhat of a hurdle right when when the first kind of a modern Jewish migration back to Israel. Starts around the late nineteenth century. Many of these cats are being paid for by the baron Derochie who says something along the lines of, well, you know, if you're going to start a wine industry cabalanasian hoopla..

Jordan hotel room Middle East Israel John Dali Kevin b Donnie Donny Amman Jordan Florida baron Derochie tablet magazine Napa Krems Kaleri London Bethlehem Jim dally Belotti
"john dali" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"john dali" Discussed on Science for the People

"All right. The found of Science. Fantastic. All right. So I'm doing this the right way with science. I am queuing up some of the music that you mentioned pairs best with white wines, the white wine, which will be paired with a Carnegie Hall performance by the unsolvable connect of the Mozart, flute quartet in d major as opposed to trick hausky which might be better with red. Oh, it's now. All right. So I've got my flute concerto going and pouring a little bit here. Other smells very, it's very, very fruity. Am I saying this right? Emit doing this, right? What am I supposed to do? Can you talk me through this? You're supposed to just sniff it and smell it and taste it and tell us what you feel. There's not really that much of a right or wrong way. Although if you swirl it around in your mouth a little bit in the beginning that lets the aromas go more up into your, you know your nasal passages which is actually where a lot of what we call taste happens in our nasal passages. That's how the brain centers things not just the taste buds. Let's see. Wow, that with the Mozart and everything, it tastes classy. I feel so adult and, and that's, that's John Dali, and Donny wine made from chromosome sellers. And a lot of people when they first hear about this wine, they think, well, gosh, that must be weird, taste terrible or and view. I think it's it's a very classy wine. We could see whether we taste different fruits or overtones, but it's a very elegant white one. Let's see. I think I taste this is hard for me. I think grapefruit a little bit. You know, I taste grapefruit true. Although some other people call it apricot, which might not be that far. You know some apricot and I taste a little bit of lemon sort of. There's the first grapefruit juice and then an aftertaste which little. I'd say more citrusy more lemony than orangey. Yeah, yeah. No, that's nice. And it's not. It's not so light. It's just it has a little bit of weight to it has a little bit of weight and. You know, that's really kind of how experts judge wine. I mean, I find this to be a very nice wine. It's not, you know, the super most complicated wonderful wine in the world, but it's not just a, you know, average bottle of plonk or you know, it has some complexity to it and you hit on it. Complexity is just sort of a couple of layers of flavor and some depth to it. Instead of just being like, boom, a little head of alcohol or sweetness, and that's it. So that's kind of the difference between. What critics really love and wine, and just the wine that gives you a little buzz about crawl is the complexity and your book focuses a lot on getting people to try these native grapes or at least grapes they've never had before, and there are a lot of people out there who are like me. They don't know a lot about why they just want to pick something that tastes nice. And that makes them look like they're not an idiot. What piece of advice do you have for novice? Wine-drinkers. I would say, follow your own interests in history. You know, if you're from Italian American heritage or Jewish heritage, no. Ask about these Middle Eastern wines or if you're Greek heritage, you know there's a nice way to dovetail one's own personal history with the wines that your ancestors might have drunk. If any good wine store in DC or New York should be able to help you find some of these ones. They might not be on the shelf, but if you say, hey, I'm really curious about, you know, Austrian wines or the caucus mountains where wine originated. And I just find it's a little more fun and less threatening way to explore. Why? Like, you know, you could have a party. We're going to try wines from the caucus mountains where wine-making began eight thousand years ago, that would be a completely different experience and some, you know, you might like them or you might not. But you know, other than trying to decide between one hundred bottles of Chardonnay, which used to drive me crazy. I mean, I would literally kind of go brain dead. When I walked into a wine store. In a restaurant and I stay twenty or thirty or fifty of the same type of gripe was like, how could I possibly choose? Which one?.

John Dali Donny wine Carnegie Hall DC New York eight thousand years
"john dali" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"john dali" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Here michael avello is with us sipping on an iced coffee on a nice summer night we're gonna talk about wine our guest kevin bay goes is the author of tasting the past the science and flavor the science of flavor and the search for the origins of wine he's journalist is an mit journalism fellow a scientist and a big fan of wine how do you do sir hey bradley thanks for having me on absolutely what can we learn about human history by tracing the history of wine you know it was one of those things where you ever wonder where something began and it really does you and you wanna find out the story that got in my head and it turned out it was a lot longer ago than i ever thought eight thousand years ago at least you got it in your hand as i understand it you're hanging out outside of jerusalem and you find some wine with an interesting past and it went from there exactly i found some wine with made with grapes these strange names john dali and donny and belotti and that was a long way from jab rene and merlot and dino and i'd never heard anything like that so i started asking around you know what what are these they whether these wine i nobody really knew much about them but then it turned out they were old native grapes that have been in the middle east for public couple of thousand years doing over there roussel i'm in the first place was actually reporting on that trip in nearby amman jordan during a medical story about medicine in the arabic world so i reported a fair amount from that region so you you probably go back and forth over the allenby bridge is something to get to jerusalem so you hanging out jerusalem outside it's just enjoying wine.

michael avello kevin bay mit journalism scientist jerusalem rene amman jordan allenby bridge bradley john dali donny eight thousand years thousand years
"john dali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"john dali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from npr news in washington i'm jim hark thousands of people lined avenues and she lays capital monday to get a glimpse of pope francis as he passed by in the popemobile some and santiago cheering long live the pope when he passed by but others carried signs criticizing the pope for not taking decisive action against those in the church who abuse dozens of children over decades pope francis will also visit peru during his weeklong visit to latin america south africa is asking the us embassy in pretoria to explain the comments about african countries on haiti that have been attributed to president trump as peter graenitz reports from pretoria a us ambassador has yet to be appointed the department of international relations and cooperation summoned the shark eight affair from the embassy to explain what the south african government cost president trump's disturbing comments jerko as the department is known issued a statement saying that the relationship between the two countries must be one if mutual respect in official at durres noted that south africa and the us heavy cordial cooperative relationship the embassy has not had an ambassador in more than a year the previous ambassador who was a political appointee of president barack obama finished his turned before president trump was sworn in president trump has yet to name an ambassador to south africa which is one of the united states is most important allies on the continent for npr news i'm peter greenwich in pretoria one person has died after a boat shuttling passengers to a casino cruise of the florida coast caught fire w u s s steve newborn reports about fifty passengers were able to jump to safety after the boat was run aground off a beach the fortytwo year old woman was the only fatality reported after the boat burst into flames she died sunday night at a hospital north of the tampa bay area officials say the cause of the fire has not been did termined but it appears to have started in the engineroom local resident bacher john dali told spectrum bay news nine he watch dozens of passengers leap into the cold gulf of mexico one lady ran up to the grass right behind tearing she couldn't breathe she was in shock most like vomiting chairman man of the.

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"john dali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"john dali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What are the most hideous crimes was to smear peanut butter and glumpang stuff under seat so that you didn't notice what else walk in a class also looking around went back right sit down in it and what they do is put glass and then we'll talk about how integration changed her life and because she was forced to move alone from little rock to california her family bills has to new memoirs i will not fear for adults and another aimed at younger readers called march forward girl also david dental seen reviews the new german film in the fade which just won the golden globe for best foreignlanguage film first news live from npr news in washington i'm lorry london search teams in santa barbara california are still trying to find victims from devastating mudslides that are now attributed to at least twenty deaths lance or orozco with member station casey l you in monte sito near highway one which has been closed since the tragedy says several people are still missing gum of the missing are related career graham recruited wa multiple members we know the pre one family at father are who daughters had been confirmed shared the third gathering michigan bakun wires wonder regarded as well who a lot of tragic combinations what this the storm's sense flash floods cascading through mountain slopes that had already been burned of education by a huge wildfire in december one person has died after a boat shuttling passengers to a casino cruise caught fire off the coast of florida w u s fs steve newborn reports that about fifty passengers were able to jump to safety after the boat was run aground off of a beach the forty two year old woman was the only fatality reported after the boat burst into flames she died sunday night at a hospital north of the tampa bay area officials say the cause of the fire has not been determined but it appears to have started in the engineroom local resident bacher john dali told spectrum bay news nine he watch dozens of passengers leap into the cold gulf of mexico one lady ran up to the grass were behind here and she couldn't breathe she was in shock most sewage warning iran of the house for blankets pastel blankets fifteen people were treated for chest pains smoke inhalation and other minor injuries for npr news i'm steve newborn in.

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"john dali" Discussed on You're Welcome! With Chael Sonnen

You're Welcome! With Chael Sonnen

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"john dali" Discussed on You're Welcome! With Chael Sonnen

"Well i've been what what what are you thinking that if if if you didn't see but what is the boxing is just always been clouded with controversy and it seems like they cannot get away from an mma has plenty of what we don't have the deep roots of flop all also the lawful it's not bad boxing is plagued with a though because if you historically followed back the it was ran by gangsters and it was corrupt at one line what i what is the i don't know that it is i i wanna make this point of it tell me if i'm wrong as i don't know that it is corrupt as people still think as i think sometimes there's controversial calls i don't actually do an olympic boxing olympic boxing has been caught there's been pales in professional boxing in dogs i will go back a couple of decades which represents most of my life i haven't seen actual corruption i've seen some controversy but that's what you have people judge people i haven't actually seen corruption naive ease leaving your body lay in and so for years we were one eight eight years we were told that john lonnie criminal mastermind at it was responsible for you know corruption corruption as far as the fish market new you know even the milk deliveries whenever you know whatever cost money john die was involved in okay grateful we spent millions of dollars to prosecute john dali okay great so finally after kyle kraus shroud we put them away you know what i noticed is that in my neighborhood milk beaten cost less money.

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