19 Burst results for "John Corcoran"

Mysterious Tourist Resort Deaths

Unexplained Mysteries

05:18 min | 5 months ago

Mysterious Tourist Resort Deaths

"The dominican republic is a jewel floating in the caribbean visitors to the island. Come looking for paradise in its verdant rainforests and white sand beaches more often than not they find it and then they tell their friends. Tourism is a massive industry in the dominican republic. In fact around twenty percent of the nation's gross domestic product comes from foreign visitors though the population numbers just ten million people dominicans. Welcome more than six million vacationers every year. Almost half of them come from the united states in two thousand eighteen. A disturbing trend began among the tourists. One that would go unnoticed for almost a year. Someone or something was killing them in june that year a fifty one year old. Pennsylvania resident named yvette monet export on her first vacation in years. Yvette was excited to finally relax at the luxurious by principal resort in punta cana. Little did she know it would be her final holiday. One evening event in her fiance had a drink from their room's minibar before going to bed in the middle of the night her partner hurting gurgling sound thinking nothing of it he turned over and went back to sleep but when he woke he that was dead. Yvette was just the first in a string of tragedies. The following month of forty five year old man named david harrison traveled to the dominican with his wife. Dawn they state at a different resort. But like yvette. David seemingly had a target on his back one day. He returned from snorkeling saying he felt unwell after he dawn fell asleep. The unthinkable happened. David woke in a cold sweat. Unable to move his wife tried to get help but it was too late. David had suffered a heart attack which caused his lungs to fill with fluids. I condition known as pulmonary dima. He didn't survive as two thousand. Eighteen ended it. Seemed like yvette. And david were to random fatalities but in early two thousand nineteen four. More people died seventy eight year old jerry current in january thirty one year old tracy jerome gesture junior in march and sixty five year old john corcoran and sixty seven year. Old robert wallace. In april each of these tragedies were reported to the authorities but no one made any connection between them until forty one year old miranda shop werner on may twenty fifth two thousand nineteen miranda arrived at the bahia principe bougainville resort with her husband. Dan the getaway was to celebrate their ninth wedding anniversary. They hadn't been in their room. Long maranda took a drink from the mini bar. But after her first sip she suddenly convulsed she cried out for her husband and fell backwards onto the bed where she writhed in agony before passing out. Dan swiftly called the paramedics. Dan himself was a doctor. So he searched for miranda's polls he could barely feel it. He administered cpr until the emt's arrived. But neither he nor the medics could revive her. Miranda was declared dead on the scene the victim of a heart attack though miranda did have a history of cardiac issues. Her relatives back in pennsylvania had doubts as to whether they had killed her and their suspicion grew when they learned she had taken a drink from the mini bar right before collapsing. They took it as evidence that something else was a foot in just five days later it seemed they were proven right on may thirtieth at the bahia principe romana hotel staff entered a room to clean. They found two guests lying on the floor unresponsive. The housekeepers rushed to get help but it was too late. The couple was already long dead. The resort identified the bodies as sixty three year. Old edward homes and forty nine year old. Cynthia day of maryland. The pair had been scheduled to check out earlier that day. An autopsy revealed they had eerily died from the same cause as david harrison pulmonary dima. All three were cardiac related deaths in which fluid filled their lungs. But in edward and cynthia's case no one called for help. If their hearts gave out at different times one of them should have been able to dial reception but there was no call indicating the two people suffered identical heart attacks at the exact same moment with three dead guests in under a week. The bahia principe chain realized they needed to get ahead of the press. The hotel company released a statement stressing that they were doing everything they could to help the families of the deceased and they would cooperate with local authorities to determine if there was any link between their deaths

Dominican Republic Yvette Monet Yvette Miranda David Harrison David Tracy Jerome John Corcoran Robert Wallace Bahia Principe Bougainville Punta Cana Long Maranda DAN Heart Attack Caribbean Pennsylvania Bahia Principe Romana Hotel United States
"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

12:52 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"They couldn't sell from that but they could build their list and they could nurture but I wanted to make sure that they were they. Were GonNa be in integrity and they did the best. I could to put thirty experts together. One per topic went now. I had Aj Amax for twitter. I had The first one so far back. I'm thinking but I had one person per topic and people loved it and then the other thing is I. Each topic Each session I allowed them to have twenty four access twenty four hour access to before it got closed into the vault and I did it over the course of a month. Now I would never advise that and definitely not would not do things the same way. But all that came from my desire to combat. Something that I believed was wrong in happening and I didn't like it and from that. That's where I got the attention. That's where I started building of like a rabid following and I gained the respect of these experts who had been doing their thing for years and super successful and had no idea who I was. Because and I think here's the thing that a lot of people who want to have these friendships or relationships with influencers. They want to get access. It's all about them right for me. It was all about like when I say all about them. It's me me me me for me. This was I saw an opportunity to establish my voice and to change things that I felt were wrong. That was the satisfaction for me. Yes of course I would love to have some money in the you know at the end. But that wasn't my main focus and so I was committed to finding these people and getting them to say yes and so I went to the top people who'd never heard of me. I had no street credibility but I went to them in creative ways and each one differently because I studied them and I figured out how they like to receive things. I figured out what they want. And that's how I found my in. That's and that's what I do today as well right when you want something for yourself just like when I went to urgent care and I told my mother you know I recognized. Here's the end. So I knew I wanted to change the world in my little way and so each person that I reached out to. I wasn't spamming down the list and going okay. Here's one hundred people I wanNA. I liked retail too. And then whoever says yes great? I specifically chose each and every person for a specific reason and I did what I needed to do to get to them so coming back to John Corcoran and how he changed like He. This whole summit changed everything for me from struggle to To being a respected authority and connector and took me a while to figure out how like I I didn't under- I didn't know what was happening. So took me a while to actually like us. That's right us that credibility but for the first couple of years. All I did was give and so with John. I had heard him on a Webinar from somebody WHO's list. I was on named Nick Lowe per he was one of my first guests as well. His podcast is called Side-hustle NATION. I believe but I didn't even like I said I didn't even know what podcast was so all I knew was I found his website in there. Were these audios on the website that I would listen to and redes- staff and I just thought he was a great person and and so smart. I loved what he was doing and I learned a lot and so I got this email didn't understand lists at the time either but I got this email about a training. He was doing to connect with influencers. And so I read through that email and I thought this is perfect. This is exactly what I WANNA do right so as I was planning my summit so I went to the Webinar. And I I wasn't necessarily sold on the program that John Corcoran. Would I loved what he was saying? I thought he was a really interesting person. But the program. I was like yeah. I don't really think that I need that like. I'm already connecting with influence. I already. I'm already figuring that out. I already know how to do that. And so when he offered the program though There was an a second level of the program and I think it was like a hundred dollars more or something like that to get on the phone with him for thirty minutes or fifteen minutes or whatever it was and that when that offer was made I was like Ding Ding Ding. I just gotTa Pay. That's all I gotta do. I've just got a bias program and pay this money and then we'll be on the phone. That is the fastest way for me to get this guy's attention. He wants money. I want his time. I want his attention so that was the value to value for value proposition. That I recognized right there. Why would I try and take some? I don't understand that people always want to take again. It's me me me. Here's what I want from this person. I'm like what do they want? How can I improve their life and give them what they want that that gives that they want to give me their attention that right? I'm not asking for their attention. I'm giving them. I the value that they want. Then they're in kind giving me attention. Does that make sense does? Yeah so there's kind of a tongue for us still to cover so I'm wondering and we got into so many things great stuff but I really WanNa get into more about the value of the things doing now. Because I think it's I WANNA learn about it more from directly from you and I want to. Would you consider doing a second episode with me and one hundred percent? Okay so I think I can leave you though to with with some things to take away. That are actionable now. But I'm Mike Anytime Like we're friends now so anytime I'm happy to To support you and your audience. Thank you have fun? Yeah so yeah drop it. Drop it on us if you've got a few things that That you want to leave us with so so I think you want to know about the podcasting part right. I let up to all of that by telling you about the summit. I led up to all of that by telling you about my life if there's one train of consistency throughout this entire past hour and whatever. I think that it is when you understand what you want rather than trying to say I want an so. I deserve I'M GONNA get look at. I want this. What are the opportunities for me along the way to give instead to create the opportunity to get without asking for it So podcasts are a new medium They are you know I. I don't think we need to explain too much about podcasts. Right now because were on a podcast so your audience. People are listening right now. This is a podcast. This is now me being a guest on Mike Show. You're listening. I expect because you respect Mike. You enjoy the show. You've loved the stories that he brings and There's some reason that you are tuning in right now. You probably did not know my name or anything about me. Prior to this conversation right now maybe you think I need to listen to more of this woman or I need to learn more. How can she help me? You may be engaged and thinking you want something from me the way Mike was when he heard me on the hustle and flow chart podcast. Right so I think as I'm saying this may be the gears are turning in. You're able to see yourself while obviously podcast guesting makes sense because I'm tuning in first to hear something that I already know about right when I am introduced to something new or someone new from that that I resonate with thorough. I want more from. I'm going to go out there and figure out how to connect with that person just like Mike did with me through Lincoln right now. We're sitting here having a conversation on a podcast after we had a personal conversation to get to know each other and I've already been asked to come back on the show so if you want this. It's very easy. It's a very simple I should say But again this is something that comes naturally to me that I was born with to be able to see those opportunities and see those gaps and most people can't and most people when they do see an opportunity. They go to another place about how they're going to to take care of it I've been doing this for years now right like I told you about the summit everything evolved from there right so at the time of recording recording In January twenty twenty and I quit my job in December December. Twenty eighth twenty fourteen so this has been five years right so in that five year time. I'm a quickstart I get stuff done. I don't have the luxury or the desire to sit around and go. Oh well maybe it'll happen. No it's you know again. I'm on my own. I'm very intentional. I'm victory driven self motivated And so I also believe in path of least resistance. And if there's a way to get what I want without struggle I'm going to take that route and so that is how I've built my reputation. That's how I've built my My business around now podcast guesting. But here's the thing and it's funny because I'm pivoting actually 'cause I never there's a lot of people selling oh I'm GonNa get you podcast. That is never what I was focused on it was. I'm going to help you reach your goals in your business faster. And more efficiently by leveraging this tool this thing called podcasting which is becoming more and more popular and so as more and more people have come into the space offering. I'm going to get to on shows and people believing that's what I do and not understanding that my framework called interviews that convert is about conversion. There's lots of different ways to convert where we can go after podcasts that you know if you have people that you that you want to meet right and then we go after podcast hosts who are those people. If it's often times the interview itself for most of my clients who are mid market companies right. It's less up oftentimes about the actual while depends on. It depends on what you're offering but for especially for higher Higher ticket things. You know if you've got a a low ticket offer that's a beat AC- product. Then yes the interview itself we would focus on because we want to get. That audience wanted to get the the mass going to get those numbers to go and take action to get your products but if you're more of a in a consulting or you're in the service based industry. I should say and you have contracts. That are high ticket which is what a lot of folks do Then we focus on. Who are the people that need to know like and trust you and the podcast is a great start right in interview? Somebody here's an interview But your audience may not be listening to podcasts. But I bet you there's podcasters who are your audience. And so we figure out strategically based on your goals. What is how can we best leverage podcasts? And podcast guesting and so it always comes down to you know what are what are the company's goals would you want to achieve and This is just a really amazing way. That is like it's easier now than ever before to get access to heroes two mentors to brilliant people you know. I mentioned Gay Hendricks earlier and the big leap. He's he's a very very important person in the world and somebody who I wildly respective him on the show twice now. He knows me by name. It's not like You know I'm just some podcasters like we've we've established a relationship right. I know that when I go out To where he lives I can contact him. And say hey gay. I'm in town. Can we are coming to town? You know I'd love to get coffee with you. Love to help lunch and that that will be you know appreciated. So there's amazing things that you can do to jump very quickly from.

Mike Show John Corcoran twitter Aj Amax Gay Hendricks Nick Lowe Lincoln
"john corcoran" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

10:30 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"Today's episode of the Hundred Dollar Show is supported by Podesta putting thousands of creators. Earn money from their passion. It's an all in one digital storefront on that you can sell courses memberships and digital downloads in one place. It's the most user friendly platform on the market with zero transaction fees and a super super friendly twenty four seven life support team no matter what plan you're on so they're going to take care of you. Even if you're just getting started was great about portia is that it eliminates. All the technical headaches takes care of every aspect of selling your course or membership or digital download you got video courses. They do the video hosting for you. Want an easy way to charge your members on a reoccurring basis for a membership. PUTTY takes care of it. You want to secure way for people to download your products. When they pay for them they take care of that to the also offer? Free Migrations on their Shaker plan. Best of all PUTZER money. Where their mouth is? They have a thirty day. Free trial with no credit card required. See they don't love you. Don't pay a penny if you're looking to online course sell any kind of digital product or start a membership site. Check them out and support the show by going to PODESTA DOT com slash. NBA That's Peo- Dia Dot com slash MBA. So Nina Ass. Do I recommend her sharing her political and religious views on our blog and on social media. She feels like if she does. She might be alienating some of her audience turning turning them away from her products and services but she also feels. If she doesn't. She's not being true to herself. And being transparent this is where I stand when it comes to this topic I I want to say say that whatever your views are you are entitled to your views to your beliefs. No matter what they are a May or may not agree with them but I definitely believe have. You should have the right to have them and if you wish to express them that's your right as well now from a business point of view the same applies but I want. Did you ask yourself this question before you move forward before you make a decision on whether to do this or not ask yourself the question. Is it essential for my customers customers to no end to hear my political and religious views in order to get the maximum value from my product or service. I if I do not share these views with them will they not get the full extent. Will they not get the most value out of your product by holding that back back. Are you holding back the value or even if you do share it will add value to the actual outcome that your customers are desiring so in your case is your mommy blogger. You blog about balancing Life at home as a mom as well as your career. If you deliver courses are you have services do you believe leave that by not sharing your political and religious views. They are missing out. They're not getting the best thing that you can give them. This is a real question you need to answer could be could be no only you know the answer but this is the question I ask you to ask yourself why because I don't believe in order for you to be transparent and honest with your audience that you have to share every single thing about your life okay. You don't. This is a falsehood. This has been kind of a spread by modern day. Kind of influencers on the Internet. And it's just not true. Look at our parents and grandparents didn't share every aspect of their life with everybody. Were they not honest and transparent. Yes they were okay but some things are personal some things you can keep to yourself or more to the people that you feel would be comfortable that now if you're political and religious views are essential to your brand and your product. That's a different in story. If it's a part of who you are presenting and what you're selling that is different. Okay so say for example. You're a Buddhist Okay and you are selling courses on meditation. The would enhance that meditation. Course if you included how Buddhist meditate you know. This is the traditional way of of Buddhist Meditation. Now you of course can sell a course about meditation without that if you weren't a Buddhist and that's totally fine but you would be adding some sort of value to that if you were Buddhist and you had those insights from that tradition and you wanted to share them in your course in your training another scenario is that when you just can't hide your political views because of your business or the credentials you have Here's a good example. Good friend of mine. John Corcoran is. He's got a podcast goals. Smart Business Revolution. Amazing live events and part of his resume so to speak is that he was a speechwriter. And he worked during the Clinton administration. So that's just part of his expertise but I know John and I know his business and he doesn't Post about political things that often. It's not big part of his business or brand and he would be the first person that would have kind of the right or the position to do that because he worked for an administration right but again he finds it and I believe it's not essential he doesn't need to do that To actually succeed in his business but he doesn't hide the fact that that he worked for Bill Clinton right so you could be transparent and you can kind of just stay facts without kind of pushing or promoting putting a perspective if it's unnecessary to the success of your business the last thing on a touch on is you can do this and you can share your political views and you can share your religious views and you will alienate some people Maybe a lot of people and you might attract other people that believe the same things as as you but it's definitely GonNa Make Your Business Harder. You putting up an obstacle they really don't need and one of learned over the years is that a business is hard as it is. So if it's not essential will you don't feel that you have to share it then question why should you. I have friends and worked with people that are from different faiths from different political views backgrounds and publicly. You wouldn't know but privately. I know that they're very devout Christians or they are staunch Democrats. You don't the deny who you are in my personal opinion. There's a comfort to keeping some things to yourself having a semblance of a private life. But if that's not you if you like to. Have everything think public. That's your choice again. I'm just sharing what I think. And what my choices and I'm doing that because you asked me so. Hopefully that helps you but Nina hope you can answer some of these questions in your own business in your own perspective. The most important thing is to ask those questions of yourself to Kinda get down and understand what's needed and what's not needed. I got more on today's episode but before that let me give love to today's sponsor. Today's episode is supported by Microsoft teams. Hey hundred dollar. NBA Listeners. No matter what type of business you're in whether you're a new entrepreneur or a season executive we we all know meetings struggling to pay attention searching for files that seem impossible to find. And if you're not in the room you're not in the NOPE. Welcome to the new way to work together. -gether Microsoft teams from group projects to weekly all hands. Microsoft teams will change the way you teamwork. You can contribute to meetings from anywhere chat with co workers. You're never out of the loop and find all your files. Even edit them in real time in one convenient place. Getting better at business doesn't have to be hard when you have one place to create and make decisions as a team. There's no limit to what you can achieve for my team a growing remote team. It's really important to have a place where everybody can discuss and make decisions decisions together so we can move forward together as a team. This is why Microsoft teams is so powerful whether you're having a bug or even just sharing new ideas India's improve the business. Microsoft teams allows everybody on your team too freely. Communicate great ideas when you're ready to unleash. The power of your team open and teams learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. That's Microsoft dot com slash teams repetitious repetitious. Less than no lie. This is a tough one. This is a tough question but I wanNA end with this. This is really important to remember for all of us whether you have this question in your mind or not as a business your responsibility with a capital our is serve your customers and serve them well will serve them the best you can. You're offering a product offering a service in exchange for money. That's your job to offer the best solution. Possible Event Solution. Impossible includes whatever you believe in that. That's what you gotTa do if it doesn't include that if it doesn't have to be up component of that if it doesn't help it or it detracts tracks from the value then it's your obligation as a business owner to your patients your customers not to do it. We all have responsibilities and obligations in our different for roles of life as a son as a father as a daughter as a mother as a sister and as a business owner and your obligation is towards your customers. I was listening to today's episode. Make sure you hit subscribe right now on. Whatever you used to listen to podcasts? Whether it's Stitcher Radio Apple podcasts. Ask overcast him on spotify. Were on them. All hit subscribe right now. And if you're on soundcloud make sure you move onto one of these players because that way when you hit subscribe you automatically get the next episode once this available. If you're listening to you you have a question you want to ask. Make sure you ask it. Just email me over at Omar Martin One Zero Zero Mba dot net before a goal. WanNa leave you with this at the end of the day the choice is yours. This is your business. You have have an obligation to your customers but the choices you make are yours. You're going to have to deal with the consequences. You're going to have to deal with ramifications you're going to reap the benefits you're going to gain the rewards so understand that it's your choice but whatever happens because of that choice is also going to be something that you're gonNA and a half to deal with enjoy live with so whatever you do own up to it. Go One hundred percent. Thank you so much listening. And I'll check you in tomorrow's episode so I'll see you then take care.

Microsoft NBA Nina Ass John Corcoran business owner Podesta Bill Clinton Democrats Clinton administration spotify Omar Martin India executive
Will I put off customers if I share my political and religious views?

The $100 MBA Show

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Will I put off customers if I share my political and religious views?

"So Nina Ass. Do I recommend her sharing her political and religious views on our blog and on social media. She feels like if she does. She might be alienating some of her audience turning turning them away from her products and services but she also feels. If she doesn't. She's not being true to herself. And being transparent this is where I stand when it comes to this topic I I want to say say that whatever your views are you are entitled to your views to your beliefs. No matter what they are a May or may not agree with them but I definitely believe have. You should have the right to have them and if you wish to express them that's your right as well now from a business point of view the same applies but I want. Did you ask yourself this question before you move forward before you make a decision on whether to do this or not ask yourself the question. Is it essential for my customers customers to no end to hear my political and religious views in order to get the maximum value from my product or service. I if I do not share these views with them will they not get the full extent. Will they not get the most value out of your product by holding that back back. Are you holding back the value or even if you do share it will add value to the actual outcome that your customers are desiring so in your case is your mommy blogger. You blog about balancing Life at home as a mom as well as your career. If you deliver courses are you have services do you believe leave that by not sharing your political and religious views. They are missing out. They're not getting the best thing that you can give them. This is a real question you need to answer could be could be no only you know the answer but this is the question I ask you to ask yourself why because I don't believe in order for you to be transparent and honest with your audience that you have to share every single thing about your life okay. You don't. This is a falsehood. This has been kind of a spread by modern day. Kind of influencers on the Internet. And it's just not true. Look at our parents and grandparents didn't share every aspect of their life with everybody. Were they not honest and transparent. Yes they were okay but some things are personal some things you can keep to yourself or more to the people that you feel would be comfortable that now if you're political and religious views are essential to your brand and your product. That's a different in story. If it's a part of who you are presenting and what you're selling that is different. Okay so say for example. You're a Buddhist Okay and you are selling courses on meditation. The would enhance that meditation. Course if you included how Buddhist meditate you know. This is the traditional way of of Buddhist Meditation. Now you of course can sell a course about meditation without that if you weren't a Buddhist and that's totally fine but you would be adding some sort of value to that if you were Buddhist and you had those insights from that tradition and you wanted to share them in your course in your training another scenario is that when you just can't hide your political views because of your business or the credentials you have Here's a good example. Good friend of mine. John Corcoran is. He's got a podcast goals. Smart Business Revolution. Amazing live events and part of his resume so to speak is that he was a speechwriter. And he worked during the Clinton administration. So that's just part of his expertise but I know John and I know his business and he doesn't Post about political things that often. It's not big part of his business or brand and he would be the first person that would have kind of the right or the position to do that because he worked for an administration right but again he finds it and I believe it's not essential he doesn't need to do that To actually succeed in his business but he doesn't hide the fact that that he worked for Bill Clinton right so you could be transparent and you can kind of just stay facts without kind of pushing or promoting putting a perspective if it's unnecessary to the success of your business the last thing on a touch on is you can do this and you can share your political views and you can share your religious views and you will alienate some people Maybe a lot of people and you might attract other people that believe the same things as as you but it's definitely GonNa Make Your Business Harder. You putting up an obstacle they really don't need and one of learned over the years is that a business is hard as it is. So if it's not essential will you don't feel that you have to share it then question why should you. I have friends and worked with people that are from different faiths from different political views backgrounds and publicly. You wouldn't know but privately. I know that they're very devout Christians or they are staunch Democrats. You don't the deny who you are in my personal opinion. There's a comfort to keeping some things to yourself having a semblance of a private life. But if that's not you if you like to. Have everything think public. That's your choice again. I'm just sharing what I think. And what my choices and I'm doing that because you asked me so. Hopefully that helps you but Nina hope you can answer some of these questions in your own business in your own perspective. The most important thing is to ask those questions of yourself to Kinda get down and understand what's needed and what's not needed.

Nina Ass John Corcoran Bill Clinton Clinton Administration Democrats
"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"You need to have a good strategy in place place and you need to take as much off of your plate as possible and I you know so many great wonderful things have come to my life because of podcasting that. I'm really passionate about helping other people to do it. Because I've been to people's weddings I've been on vacation with people have had more meals and get togethers others with people that are connected with through podcasting so I wanNA share it with the world even beyond anyone. We can the number of people that the small number of people that we can help us clients. I want want to share it with the world. I want other people to do it. And so I I'm very you know vocal about sharing what we find leads leads to success in leads to longevity and I think that's it's a wonderful attitude and you've demonstrated with me where and and other people have as well where they're willing to share everything about how to Pike because they want you to do it. Well where there's there's that's probably not the case a lot of other disciplines you know. They'll they'll share. There's more I don't know it seems you're compatible. Yeah Yeah I mean right yeah I mean for me. It's so much more bigger than that. It's so much more personal my business partner. His grandfather was a Holocaust survivor driver. He'd been in the concentration camps and everyone in his family perished except for him and his brother and about twenty five years ago or something like that. The the Holocaust Foundation came and sat down and recorded an interview with him in preserved. His story told his story and that was the inspiration gration for why Jeremy started his podcast because they have that that have his legacy his story was told was preserved and so that's that's another really important component of this and actually just like about two weeks ago. Jeremy got an email from a woman who was emailing him because has her husband had just passed away and he had been a guest on Jeremy's podcast and she had just gotten done watching again. You know watching the video and it's such a wonderful gift to preserve that that legacy In that wisdom for that person and so you know I encourage everyone to do it for yourselves but also to do it for everyone around you you know when when you start a podcast interview others. You're sharing their wisdom and and so it's a tremendous act of generosity And so as I said we can only help a very very very small fraction of all the people out there to building launched a podcast in. So I like doing interviews like this because for me it's so much larger and I hope that we can inspire more people to go out and do it just like you have. What would you say is unique about you? I think that is what is unique about me is that I. I saw a young age the importance of relationship building. A doing it proactively doing it consistently and continuing to do it in a way that will That will benefit you but also will benefit those people people around you And that is really what lights me up. I enjoy doing it and I enjoy also helping others to do it. It is well and in a way that is sustainable and that is going to support the work that they do. And what's what would did you say what's what's next for you and for rise. Twenty five and four podcasting in general. What what do you see you know? Whatever whatever ten years whatever you're doing yeah I mean what's you know? Rice advised been around for about five years. And we've been helping podcasters in different capacities since about two thousand nine But the current version of what we do now and more importantly what. We don't do what we stopped doing. his only really been around for about two years. And so I love our clarity now as a business I love that we stopped up doing a bunch of other things that drained our energy. And we're working on stuff that fills us with energy And so I'm I'm looking Ford just adding more good clients in helping them I'm also looking forward to sharing this wisdom sharing this message. The importance of it and this this message will be roughly the same even if the word podcasting or the The tool podcasting changes dramatically and tans. Your question about where do I think. podcasting is going I think it's part of a larger movement away from a handful of large media companies in more towards everyone becoming a content n- creator in every business becoming content creator. And certainly. That's been a huge movement. So I think podcasting is part of that larger movement. You know twenty twenty years ago. Twenty five years ago we only a handful of media companies and now anyone can basically be a media company anyone can produce content that can be heard anywhere around the world not for a lot of money you know and you can also use it. Use the tools because they're more affordable in a way that that can be profitable for you be profitable for the people that you interview can do a lot of a lot of good in the world all around and so I think that that piece I think that that movement podcasting will continue to grow. More carmakers are installing entertainment systems. Where you can listen to podcasts? Directly in the car for for many years while doing podcasting was really hard to download a podcast. It's gotten a lot easier and a lot more people have smartphones and even even as we record this today only about half of the population on the planet has smartphones so over the next five ten years the other half of the the population of the planet is GonNa be adding smartphones. So there's a lot more potential so I think it's just gonNA continue growing. Well John Thank you so much for being on the show today I want to encourage everyone to check out John's podcast. which is smart business revolution? He he brings on some super. He's got a lot of super great guests there and not me not me although I am on one of.

Jeremy Holocaust Foundation Holocaust Pike partner content creator Ford John Rice
"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"He gave me that end up hiring me for a bunch of other stuff and becoming a really good client so I just continued doing that over and over again with existing clients and then asking other lawyers in the community community. Hey do you have any good clients. That will be good for me to interview again. You have to decide your parameters of who is the type of person that you want to interview and then are reaching out to bigger businesses in my community than went even further and I thought. Hey this author. I who knows who's last book I read has got a new book coming out. Maybe I'll reach out to them and have have them come on and they did. And then I went to conferences. And I'd see a keynote speaker and I would reach out to them before or after something like that and say hey. Can I interview my podcast instead of having to bum bum rush them at this stage in with twenty other people and try and get a piece of their time I actually could follow up with them afterwards and I get forty five minutes of dedicated one on one time and I realized how much more effective that was so so eventually it got bigger and bigger profit came from different sources either came from my own services it also came from a digital courses that I created eventually and it also came from promoting other offerings in getting a commission referral commission for that so there are other digital courses that I promoted and recommended to my audience after having tried them myself and there's other software that I recommend it so if you build an audience of people there are ways to monetize it and also the other thing is is that you know these days it's less about the audience and it's more about what the how the podcast can get you connected to high leverage opportunities so for example rather than worrying about getting tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of downloads. I worried about getting in with different communities in audiences so one year I wanted to do a lot of webinars. I ended up doing over. Eighty three live webinars concluding for a division of salesforce. In for Tony Robins Company for a Weber and some really big companies. And I use the podcast as the tool for getting into conversation nation with these companies and then talking about ways in which we could collaborate which then led to the next opportunity. So it's not. It's it's a little bit of an indirect strategy energy so it's not like I'm going to build a big audience going to get a bunch of downloads in charge. Companies for advertising or sponsorship is a little bit of an indirect strategy but there are people all these days there companies these days that are using all kinds of different ways of monitoring their business. You know putting together real estate syndicates to Jason Calcutta's of course who's got who's using his podcast in order to build his personal brand promote different events that he does all kinds of different things just software companies that are using it using podcasts in order to feature their existing strategic partners or to get into conversation with potential strategic partners or referral partners or audiences. It's a great way to get more exposure for your own personal brand and for your business so it's to answer your question about profit in our why it you have to be clear on what you know. Your strategy is going to be. What are you selling a service? Is it software or is it someone else's services or software that you're promoting your taking commission or a lot of that or some kind of partnership arrangement any use it in that way and then also like what's the indirect strategy. How can you use used to get into other communities of people so for example maybe you do consulting and you WanNa get on? You want to could be a speaker at this industry conference. That is the biggest conference in your industry. Well we've done this. You can reach out to the organizers answers of that conference feature them on your podcast if there's a board of advisors interview all of them on your podcast and when you kind of I hate to use the word but infiltrate you know you. You work your way into these types of communities than it will naturally lead to collaboration opportunities and before you know it. You're onstage stage. You're talking to that audience full of great potential clients for you you know. So it's it's it's a kind of an indirect like you said you're you're you're establishing credibility with them by offering them the value of getting their message out to to a people who are narrowly find it or be able or or get or be their audience. I guess US yeah. Yeah and there's other value I mean so I always try really hard to introduce gas to other people too so I try and learn about them and what they would would they need or they're trying to connect with WHO THEY WANNA meet. Because I want to deliver value even further. You know I want to continue to deliver values that person so so I don't always do it but I try and do that or try and keep them top of mind so you can continue to deepen that relationship further. So it's really like the the pockets is the started. The relationship is not the end. It's should be the beginning. Do you find you. Of course you've been doing this a lot longer than I have but I have most so the people that I bring on even though there are. I don't know how many podcasts today there are. Lots of but most of the people that I bring on have either one been on a podcast or two. They don't even they don't even they don't even listen to podcasts. So there's there's there's So they didn't even know the power they don't know the power they don't know what they're just like. Okay I'll just I'll do it but they don't know what to expect But they all they all enjoy it like they get at least I may be biased but they all enjoy the experience I think to myself. There's there's it's still a lot of room for this to to grow because it does seem like maybe twenty. Five percent of the people are even aware of all this education or exposure. Whatever they will these days statistically about a third of all Americans at least Are Listening to a podcast once a month or more and the people who do listen to podcasts tend to binge consumed them. I listened to a lot of them like a lot of hours Lot of times. It's on a commute or walking the dog or working on the gym or something like that. So awareness is definitely helping And I think that's great. You know honestly it's not about the medium. I don't even care if we talk about it being podcast. Because I've used this exact same strategy before or I did it with with podcasts. I did it with books and I did it with articles and I did it with blog. Post ultimately it's not about the podcast it's about featuring featuring and taking interest in promoting the person that you wanNA connect with and people love talking about themselves. They love the opportunity to share what they're working on what they're focused on. And when you give them that opportunity you take interest in them. It's a wonderful thing and it's one of the best ways that I know of to build a sincere relationship with people even if it's someone who is achieved a lot in their career career has fame or notoriety or is built a big business. It's a way of cutting through the noise. In you're leveraging genuine humanity mandy in genuine human connection And data hope will never go away and it doesn't really matter what medium. You're using made the the first time I did this. I didn't even know what a podcast was barely. I didn't have a podcast. All I did was I said I'm going to record this to publish it to the web. Somehow and I just like uploaded the audio file to my blog or something like that and so you know there are different ways you can leverage the strategy. Now I think that podcasting is the is the best combination of ease speed and effectiveness. And so that's why I do it instead of writing longer articles or writing a book every single time because that takes a lot of time and if you can minimize the amount of extra work that you have then that's more time that you have to focus on building building relationships so instead of doing ten people in a year when you have to write an article every time you can do fifty people in a year and I'd rather have those relationships then leave forty relationships on the ground you know so so have you found to as you were talking about. People been successful listen different way to share their story which is kind of what I'm all about but then you you mentioned the writing and I thought to myself because this has happened to me a bunch of times. Well not a bunch of times but when I get interviewed by somebody and they write it. There's always something that I take issue with. I didn't say that you're mischaracterizing. You know the the the spirit of the conversation or whatever there's always some component that you're not one hundred percent right whereas on the podcast. It's this is. This is what I said. I'm intentional about what I say. You're publishing it just the way I say there's a certain I don't know there's a certain certainty I guess to to it over being interviewed and having someone you know. Look at their notes or transcribe what they you know or edit right because has yeah yeah. That's a great point and it's point you know It does it does have certainly to it because they can't alter it as easily early as they could although it will happen more in the future you know. There's this whole thing about deep acre. Yeah Yeah Yeah and you know there. There are actually services now. Now that are aimed at podcasters that are designed so that you can type in Words that will then produce audible audible. Sounds that sounds just like the speaker so in other words. Let's say this you're using the software to edit together. What I'm saying here right now in this podcast episode? They could cut out words easily which you can do right now but they could also add words and and it sounds just like the speaker. This technology is evolving. But you can see how like a year two years three years from now. It's going to be you know it's going to be here. Great Point you'll be able to get anybody on your podcast. Time far will be the Mary low to get. Yeah President Obama on. You're exactly right. How have you had all two hundred old forty presidents have been on your? How'd you Jefferson? I mean that's amazing seizing. Yeah I wish I could tell you how I did it but it's a secret. I contacted Jefferson and Lincoln Amaze you mentioned Your partner Jeremy. I think it's why is that how you say the lights. Yeah Yeah and your company's rise twenty-five yet so what tell what what is what is what is the purpose of twenty five. Yeah so we help B. Two B. Businesses to get clients referral partners. There's in strategic partners using done for you podcast. So it's it's one part and this is really critically important using having the right strategy in terms terms assists in place and featuring the right types of people or types of content the right type of referral partners clients that sort of thing And then it's also taking ninety eight percent of the work off of your plate so that you can focus on the highest and best leverage use of your time. which is this connecting with the person on the other end of the microphone? So that you can take all the other stuff off of off of your plate.

Jefferson salesforce Tony Robins Company Weber Jason Calcutta partner President Obama Jeremy
"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

14:22 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"I don't know if that was was the the sort of the the thing that prompted you to make that move and I'm just curious what I what you go through to make a decision like that because you spend a lot of time getting getting a degree and yeah I mean I spent one hundred. Thirty thousand dollars seems cheap now by today's standards hunter thousand dollars going to law school. And so do you know a different family members questioned. While I was doing it I I would say I didn't start at blog. And a podcast with the intent of it replacing my income is lawyer. It happened very gradually over time with some spikes along the way but I didn't really intend that it would. It would replace my income. I just actually at the a timer wanted to write a book and ever and said if you want to write a book you gotTa start a blog I. It's a great way to build an audience and test your ideas so I did but then I found that a legal topic like a book about legal or blog about legal topics wasn't going anywhere so I had to reposition it. In focus more on entrepreneurship and relationship building in networking. And that's when things kind of took off from me and then I started the podcast as an extension of that and that's actually what. I really enjoyed doing lot more even more so than actually doing the blog log and eventually I realized that there was a lot more opportunity and scalable scalable opportunity through these tools than practicing law law like for example. I was just talking to someone about this the other day. California's thirty five or so million people. Thirty eight million people But that's not really an and I'm licensed to a practice in California so but that's not really the legal market the P- possible legal market for me for me is much smaller really was just like Marin county which is about two under ninety thousand people and it's really not two hundred ninety thousand people. It's really people that have a legal need right now so that's even narrower and then it's really just people have illegal the need who would be willing to hire me for my area of expertise so it really was like instead of like thirty eight million people. It's really down to like a couple thousand couple hundred people maybe at any given time who are potential client for me. That's a really really small pool and then you take a look at there's eight billion people on the planet right and and it's like well that's a much bigger pool. You know so if I can just get Outta my head like that. I must provide legal services I can do. Anything can provide anything of value. People that people are willing to pay for me. Then why would I want to go to the much larger pool than restricting myself to this very narrow very small window of people who might hire me and so that was kind of the revelation for me and then I also realized that there these emerging tools that are just amazing like like you know email list. It's allows you to communicate in a scalable way too much larger groups of people in the Webinar. which allows you to communicate which much larger groups of people in a podcast which allows you record your voice? Once in five years from now someone might contact you because of something that you quoted in thirty thirty minutes five years earlier and I realized that it was a lot smarter way of operating and leveraging your time so that you're not stuck on this kind of you know a hamster wheel that you can be stuck on when you're in a billable practice a billable profession as I was so it was a series of different revelations like that they got me moving towards in the direction moving out moving away from practicing law. But it didn't happen overnight. It took a lot of tests in figuring out what people we're willing to pay me for and figuring out how to create different revenue sources than you know leverage that in you know it. It was many year journey and a lot of studying a lot of figuring stuff out and trying stuff and throwing stuff against the wall and finding stuff that sticked okay and during that time where you were exploring that kept the law practice in sort of strata straddle both worlds. Yeah Yeah so Tony. Robbins says burn. The boats burned on the boats. Don't go back. I don't believe in that you know for me. That wasn't my experience it was it was very gradual. It was initially ninety. Five percent of my effort had to go towards my legal practice getting revenue in the door from that kind of work getting those types of clients and initially initially maybe five percent of my time could be spent another things and then once it started gaining traction than I could do ten percent than fifteen percent twenty percent then twenty five percent a nick. You know it wasn't a perfect smooth rejected. The there were times when I put too much time into things that were aimed at the long-term terms that we're going to have a payoff further in the future. And then I got an a cash crunch where I didn't have enough revenue coming in then right then and so I had to really take myself out of it and readjust my priorities so it definitely took a while to do these things into figure out like Okay what's my allocation. This month the amount of time on a daily basis weekly basis that I can allocate to building the business that I want to have versus maintaining maintaining the business that I have today. Okay Sir I get the burn. The boats thing is it's it's It's the sexy thing to say right right and and it does. I mean I suppose on one hand it says you know you. Failure is not an option right. You burn the boats you you you got US succeed but but you can also get crushed and drowned to some exactly sometimes it. It's it's nice to have a little bit of a back door at least just just in case because sometimes you need to regroup I you know sometimes you get ahead of yourself need to regroup and agree yep whenever you. You've you've You some fascinated to get into a couple of things here. One is how long you've been podcasting. And and how oh you discovered it. I guess first of all and then another thing that you talk about a lot is building networks and me being new to to podcasting on relatively speaking and I don't think I'm great at building networks either. I'm just interested to learn a little bit about your thinking on both of those. Both of those things. Yeah and they're interrelated. Now I mean you know when I was practicing law before he had a podcast. It was going to coffee with people and going to launch with people. And you meet someone at some some Bar Association event and then you'd go and meet up over coffee and you'd be like hey all support you. I'll refer people to you and you refer people to me and then it usually didn't go anywhere anywhere you know. And it wasn't a high leverage use year time. The podcast I found was a better way to network with higher caliber. People frankly like I would get in two conversation with higher and higher caliber people initially started just dipping my toe in the water locally here in you know. There's a company called three twins organic ice cream which is nationwide now at time. They were kind of going more nationwide but there are local. They're they're close to here and I reach out to the owner of that and he said Yeah I'll be a guest Sunday by him and there's a local independent baseball like a AAA kind of farm league baseball team and I reached after the owner that and he said yes and have me on and I interviewed lawyers In my community that we're way ahead of me. You know had big practices were really successful so and I and read them and they said yes and it was like. Wow this is really cool. Eventually I realized it was a more effective way of networking because you're delivering value value. Unlike a coffee meeting where you're maybe inconveniencing the person on the other side depending on their level of relative level of success and how busy they are. And how much of an inconvenience means it is to meet with you versus like when you're recording it over the Internet and you're publishing into the web you're elevating them and sharing their thought leadership with the world giving them exposure promoting their business and so it's actually a totally different ballgame. So that's what was Kinda revolutionary for me was now that would have have an impact now. I you said I've been doing it for a long time. The truth is I've had some major stumbles along the way you and I were talking beforehand about systematising sizing podcast. And I think that's critically important because a number of years ago when my business part Jeremy had just become partners He'd been podcasting for longer me and had worked on this big podcasts at senior producer there and I look back at the end of the year it was around the holidays around December and I realized I'd only published seven episodes soad's and I intended to put a one per week but I had too many things on my plate. I'd put too many things on me including like show notes and things like that and so I asked him to help me systematize everything which he did in the very next year. I put out fifty two episodes. So when you think about it like that's fifty two high-calibre people oh that you are building deepening. Establishing a relationship with verses seven such a big difference for any business and so once I put those Systems in place then it became a lot easier. And now I enjoy the process because I get out of my own way and delegate all the junk that I don't enjoy Oy doing so I can focus on doing the stuff that I do enjoy doing. And I do absolutely view it as a tool for networking. Because you're using it as a as a proactive tool tool for establishing and building relationships with people who you WanNa stop you want to surround yourself with and as you Systematized it and were able to do more more episodes. How did you? How did you build a network of people that you wanted to talk? Talk to I. That's one question. The other question is how did you start making an actual business out of what you were doing. Because because I I don't have a business who but with my podcast mouse. Who My podcast now is just about having conversations with really interesting people like you who've had some success sharing the stories of their success inspiring people to Here's something that that motivates or or prompts them to take an action that they wouldn't otherwise take for for example sending letters to the editor when you're applying for something because you WanNa get noticed in a different way so that's sort of what I'm doing it's not a it's it's it's an entertainment thing but not a business thing and your You have a different approach right. Yes so there's two parts to that question so we'll start with the the first one which was basically. How do you network at work and outreach? How do you reach out to guests? And how do you get them to say yes. You'd be surprised how many people will say yes Especially when you position it right. It's more than people think kilotons they think. Oh I've got a new podcast. Starting out how many people to say yes and there's plenty people who will say yes and you start of course with your immediate network so people are a no entrust trust you start there start with people you have a comfortable relationship with even a friendship with first and get that under your belt to start with some really big name. I in your probably unlikely the many ways so you want to build some experience under your belt I didn't Lincoln was not as big of a thing when I started podcasting but it is now in. Its tremendous is to get all kinds of great guests from Lincoln you know so you can decide your parameters and do different searches on their The other thing is looking at like your immediate networks so you know what events you go to a conference as you go to what groups you belong to. What organizations belong to What organizations organizations stations would you like to belong to and reach out to those people you know and and really like decide proactively? What is your what? What do you want your network to look like because you can make it happen? You know you can no one and you can rise to the top of an industry and my business I have done this over and over again with different verticals where we've decided okay. We're going to target this vertical and we're gonNA work our way up and then you ask recommendations you become more referral when you have a podcast odd cast if you ask people who else could I interview. Who else do you know that meet these parameters? This is personal one interview and they'll gladly introduce you to that person because you're not approaching it as I'm a seller I want to sell something approaching it as a giver. I WanNa give you something so so for example I say this all the time like. Let's say you're a web designer like if a web designer comes to me and says Hey John you know what you're connected to. Mike Mala Tessa and I wanted wanted redesign his website. Will you introduce me so that I can sell him on my services so I can redesign his website. I'm GONNA like No. I'm not going to introduce you. You're just GonNa the pitch the Guy and Oman put Mike into that situation. But if that person has a podcast. It's a lot easier introduction because because I can be like you know. Hey Mike this this guy has got a podcast. And he'd like to interview on the podcast and it totally flip. The script is about like featuring that person instead of doing a salesforce. Now not recommend that that person then turns around immediately pitches you on that right right right but it's an opportunity to then you know build a relationship Asian ship build trust. And if you do that right and you have something that that person might need from you. Then it may lead to business in the future. So that was the first question you asked about was networking outrageous. Second piece was about profit. Arawa had profit arrive from it and how of I got profit in. Roi From my podcast and it's evolved over. The years initially was practicing all right. I was a lawyer so I was looking for legal clients so I started by interviewing other lawyers in the community and interviewing my clients the first person I interviewed was one of my clients clients who had hired me for very tiny matter but it turns out that he had been very successful. companies have gone public. And so I said can I have twenty minutes your time. I'm can I interview you..

Mike Mala Tessa California Bar Association baseball Marin county web designer Robbins Arawa Lincoln Jeremy editor producer Oman
"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

12:52 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Works in the entertainment industry. My brother still does as well. He works in reality. TV Now and So I had the opportunity to work at dreamworks and I think the fact that I was coming from a very different environment in a very different but respected area helped me stand out because I think if I'd been applying from like say Capitol Hill if I'd been one of a thousand on Capitol Hill staffers. That was applying for this position. I think I would have been one of many. And I wouldn't have gotten the job. So in retrospect throughout my career what. I've always what has been successful for me is when I stand out and do something different so now I have a law degree but I'm not competing against lots of other lawyers where I'm competing against Yale grads in Harvard grads and you know You know Georgetown grads and stuff like that. Instead I I ha- still have a lawyer. Still have the the lawyer hat on. But I'm not practicing law and I have a business that is is different and that helps me to stand out so I think that's a really important Lesson for anyone in any kind of career and after the experience at the White House you think I heard you say you went back to California l. -fornia and you were working for the governor at the time right. Yes I was young was that also a writing capacity or was that yeah I was a speech. Try To for the California Governor Gray Davis at the time so yeah in an actually a I forgot you also asked about what the difference was between interning and in writing and yeah yeah. I mean the Internet intern. Position was great because I was in the speechwriting office and there were all kinds of interesting topics that come mm across your desk. the the The writing job in presidential letters and messages we basically kind of like second tier speechwriters. We wrote everything. speechwriters writers didn't have time or bandwith to write including video scripts proclamations things like that one really cool story is I actually. Ah wrote the nineteen ninety nine Thanksgiving proclamation which originally was authored by George Washington and Abraham Lincoln and they were written by themselves like they didn't have big staffs back then so they you know when I sat down to write this thing. I'm picturing George Washington with a quill pen and like a lamp doing it himself. You know and these were historic documents. That people studied today like we don't really pay attention to them anymore. But it was the reason that we celebrated Thanksgiving originally and Lincoln's proclamation for Thanksgiving was credited with helping to unify the country in the depths of the civil war. And so just working on. Those things was absolutely amazing. You don't get that kind of responsibility when you're an intern for sure. Sure Yeah Another cool story about out that same Brooklyn nation is I had having worked in the entertainment industry. I'd been put in touch with someone WHO's working on a TV show that was about to come out about about politics in Washington DC and this mutual friend of mine had put me in touch with this person and Long Story Short. It was Aaron Sorkin. who was working on the West Swing and he was looking at the Times before the show is on? The air is looking at the time for some advice on what it's like working in the White House so I told him what my life was like at insurance state secrets secrets or anything like that. So I wasn't violating confidentiality or or Security clearance or anything like that and he got really busy Z.. After the show because it was a huge hit and so I didn't communicate with him as much afterwards but I sent him that proclamation a year later I turn on the Thanksgiving episode of the West Wing and the story line. Throughout the episode was about the speechwriters writing this Thanksgiving proclamation. The entire hire storyline was about the writing of the one that I had written. And then at the very end you can go watch it very end of this episode Martin Sheen replace the President of course and he's about to go into the Rose Garden to read this proclamation that he's holding and he looks down and he reads it's very close dramatic and climactic and everything it looks down and reads the first line of the proclamation and it's the exact same first line of the proclamation that I had written that he reads on that show and what I love about that which I remind my wife of is that the speechwriter who was playing the person who wrote that proclamation was rob lowe so I actually had roblo playing the on. TV even for a very small port. Person I I love it. Yeah so that this kind of an amazing you know. I didn't tell that story for a lot of years but it's cool to have that kind of impact in and the other thing is that You know it has such a dramatic impact on people's lives like anything the White House does you know. I don't even WanNa talk about politics now but anything. The White House does touch which touches people's lives so like you know if you send a letter to someone who sent a letter to the president and you send a letter back men they're framing that thing you know it's like research a big impact so just being part of that big of organization that touches people's lives is really moving and I'm proud of many of the things things that the administration did even if I had you know didn't have a lot to do with it and how you may have mentioned it and I just missed it because I was listening listening to the story but not well enough but how. How do you run into Aaron Sorkin? And when he's looking for yeah some background on yes so so it was. It was someone who is a person who New Him had worked with him. Okay and I had worked with her in a different capacity so it was just from my having worked in the entertainment industry immediately prior to working at the White House was how she ended ended up introducing me to him because he was looking to talk to people whose writing you know he'd already written he'd already done the American president but at that time he was looking to the west wing thing is so he's looking to talk to people who worked in the White House about their experience and what it was like so eager to here. Yeah and since that time I'm you've continued to do a lot of writing in fact when I think when Todd Bartoli I talked with him it was maybe about writing some type of an article in. Yeah Yeah I mean you've written for a lot of different magazines and such and so how did you sort of take was a natural progression from the speechwriting into that or was it some other intentional thing that you did to to make sure that you got those is opportunities. Yeah I think that I've always enjoyed writing continued. Enjoy writing which is ironic. Because I don't write a lot now. podcasting is more of an You know it's a vocal medium. You speak into a microphone. I don't write as much So for a longtime I gravitated towards writing until I discovered that other mediums were moved the needle more in in my business in and including webinars before that and so I still right but I don't write for publications that I have in the past so I I I wrote for four zero. For having a poster over business insider for entrepreneurial for all these different places But then eventually you got to really make a cold heart assessment assessment. I'm sure you did this in your business. Where you just take a step back and your dispassionate in you say okay you know I've done this and this and this and this and what really made the difference? What really moved the needle? And if something doesn't move the needle then you got to cut it and move on and focus on the other stuff that does move the needle and so that's why I don't write as much as frequently Because I find that you know you you can. You can't do that. You can ride for for these big publications over again but eventually it's kind of diminishing returns you know once you've written I tell people now the asked me like oh I want to write for Forbes or something like like that or WanNa ride for whatever say like do it once so you can say you did it and then don't continue doing it because then it just becomes an obligation and you're probably not going to get is great returns. You think so. I wrote for a bunch of different publications and it was okay but you know it wasn't like huge it wasn't like it didn't create massive leaps in terms of advances for my business since that's why kind of gravitated away from it and we're doing thing it for the business or redoing it more for just your love of writing and then seeing if you could get it published somewhere. was there a blend or did it start one way or the other. I'm just curious what what your motivations were originally because you seem very intentional for example getting the the White House job right so no I mean when I was writing for all those different businesses publications they were it was a business purpose behind it I've done other types of writing which really didn't have a clear business purpose purpose But that's really more of a hobby like for example And this actually kind of did have a business purpose so when I was practicing laws lawyer and I I was looking for a good referrals. Good clients thing. I actually found that one of the best referral sources for me was my wife's Mother's Club which she belonged to which had a newsletter this is a glass glossy full color magazine. They produce on a monthly basis. Just Kinda like insane phenomenal like that. They do this really high quality thing and I wanted to write about legal topics that I want legal referrals. But they didn't really want that because one. It's Kinda boring. Who wants to read a lawyer in our for Malloy every month so I started writing stories about my then one year old son and it I created this column called Dad's corner and it didn't explore expressly? They have something to do with legal topics but it ended up generating a lot of great referrals for me Because I built a reputation within this club lob it was. It's three it's still is three thousand successful women who are suddenly like a lot of them are home or they work part time because they've had children and they refer like crazy amongst each other so if you can become a provider who's referred by other women and moms within this group then you can get a ton of referrals so so from a strategy standpoint. It actually worked out really well. Even though what I was writing about wasn't about my knowledge or expertise per se got it and the entertainment experience that you've mentioned several times at dreamworks. What what were you doing there? I did a variety of different things. Bounced ounce around a little bit and worked in different departments The first job I had there was actually during college a couple of summers earlier before I went to the White House I had been a production assistant on a early game show. That was one of the first projects that they ever did. And it was super exciting working for them them at the time because The you know they didn't have a lot of projects in dreamworks at the time was like the Tesla it's Day it was like the hot company you know that everyone wanted to work for certainly shrimp payment industry and so it was you know it was really fun and everything you know. Now I look at it red. You know kind of like with some wisdom. In retrospect in retrospect you know we have these ups and downs in your career where you can be like at the top and then you can be at at the bottom and somewhere in between and it's natural and it happens in so I I find that it's even more reason to nurture are relationships important relationships in your industry in your field so that you have connections at times that they're they're going to be time to struggle there are GONNA be times they lose a big client. They're going to be times when you lose a job and so it's really even more important to do that. And when you decided that you were going to Not Give up the practice of law and move into more of what you're doing now which will get into. Was that a difficult decision for you. Or what was your thinking process as you're going through that you mentioned before that you know the legal profession may be disintermediated By I am thank. You pulled that one from way deep. But I don't know if that was..

White House the Times dreamworks intern Yale California Aaron Sorkin Washington DC Governor Gray Davis speechwriting Martin Sheen George Washington Abraham Lincoln Brooklyn Aaron Sorkin. rob lowe
"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"One of my pass with a simple question and that is how that happened for you. Yeah great that's a good question so You Know I. I have a strange background as a kid. My family moved around the country. Multiple Times usually three thousand miles away from family and friends and what that taught Hamis especially moving in the middle of the school. Years that I it taught me the challenge of developing relationships and also the importance of developing relationships and and Each time the reason we moved because my father got laid off he was in an industry where he would lose a job and then unfortunately he didn't really have. It wasn't the type of industry where he could just get a job immediately afterwards in a call someone up and say can you give me a job and so the what what I learned from that is that it's incredibly important to cultivate those relationships Proactively in advance and I've done that throughout my career and that's why even though I went to basically Party School for college that's amazing opportunities as writer in the Clinton White House speechwriter. For a governor California's early the employees of DreamWorks Ran Mon Boutiques San Francisco in Silicon Valley. A legal practice as a lawyer And then also launched and run my own on Online business for a number of years and now helping. BB businesses to create profitable podcasts into use them for business development purposes. And and so that's been critically important to me so for me is about release when you ask how it happened. It happened from putting a priority on relationships and building relationships ship strategically and I try and inspire. Tell everyone else that they should be doing the same. Because we've been blessed with a great economy for less for years but we all know what it was like when we had add crappy economies and people are really looking for any opportunity they can get and so you got to build those relationships early so you have them at times of challenge in struggle. And you're you're in Marin California now outside of San Francisco is that did you land there with one of these moves with your family Not With my family was after college I had worked at the White House. Then went to Sacramento. California governor's office and then came down to the bay area because my wife went to Grad school at North of San Francisco and it was a convenient spot. Not Too far from San Francisco where I could work and and it's you know it's an amazing place to be and so we've been here ever since and was becoming a lawyer something that you had wanted to do As as a teenager growing up or was it something that sort of developed later or what what was going through your mind. Yeah it had gone answer. My my I've thought about it in in college I really when I was in the White House in the California Governor's office. I was surrounded by other lawyers. who were we're working with me and often times we'd be meetings and they were the people that I would lose arguments to and so I was like okay? Well maybe I should go to law school because then I wouldn't lose arguments. These guys and I didn't necessarily go to law school thinking that I would be a practicing lawyer for the rest of my life. I just knew it was a really practical degree. They would teach me how the world works and more importantly teach me that. I don't need to have all the answers but I can figure out the answers as I go along. That was probably the biggest revelation I had from being being in law school and so I- practice for a few years but then it wasn't everything for me. You Know I. I eventually developed a business that was generating revenue revenue exceeded my legal income. And I also enjoy doing that more than what I was doing as a lawyer which often involves helping people to fight because you you know when litigation you're helping people to fight one another and and I didn't really enjoy doing that. So that's how I ended up gravitating away from it. I just Coincidentally earlier today. I had another podcast with a with a lawyer and he said something so similarities. When I first got into it I was a trial lawyer because my partner didn't like trial trial law so I try to case after it I was like I don't like win lose arrangements and which sounds kind of like what you said I like I? I like to create win-win sort of things and I thought that was just a very interesting perspective and then you sort of set the same thing. Yeah Yeah I mean. We could talk for an hour about the pros and cons. John's of the legal practice is challenging challenging industry these days. I think it's being disrupted and going to be disrupted by technology. Ai and things like that that are coming in so If you are practicing long WanNa continue doing it. You've really got to keep your finger on the pulse of those changes that are happening so so could you walk us through how you got your job in the Clinton White House. 'cause I don't know that I've met anyone who's had had. I don't know that I've met anyone who's had a job in a White House administration before so I'm going to take advantage of that. And then how the how. How did you make that happen sure? It's actually a great story because I think it's got some good lessons so I had been in college and I the the White House US really has a lot of interns that were terrorists. We all know Inside apply to the internship program. And I've worked in the speechwriting office for UH UH semester and it was an amazing experience and I just worked my butt off. I was there all the time. You're not paid. You get academic credit. But I was working really hard to just make a really good impression amongst the speech writers and so I worked really hard. It was always there and I was you know providing research notes than I even wrote a speech that President Clinton mm delivered in the East Room of the White House and I was standing there in the back watching him read my words and it was just amazing. Twenty two years old to see that happen and then afterwards afterwards so I hadn't graduated from college so I went back to college I still had a couple of semesters left and I kept in touch with speechwriters so I continued to deliver value you to them in the form of sending them poems and speeches and clips and things like that either in the snail mail or via email would send it to them and eventually intially when an opportunity came along About a writing job I was still top of mind because I had continued to do that. And I think that's why I got. The job was because I didn't just go dark when I left. I kept in touch with them. I continue to deliver value to them. And that's you know why they told me about the job. It wasn't like White House. Jobs are not advertised on craigslist or indeed indeed or anything like that you know I mean maybe there are listed on the website. Now I don't know but at least back then it was like yeah Kinda had to hear about. It is the only way really way to to know about these things. So that's how I heard about it and then the other important lesson from that experience was So I've been told about this and I get a call about a week later from from who eventually became my boss. The woman who hired me and she calls me up and she she says. Hey Lowell Weiss was the person who told me about the speechwriter who told me about the job and so she said Lowell. All told me about you. I wanted to give you call to get your resume. WanNa get some writing samples just telling me about the logistics of it and everything and I said great. I'm happy to send all the things to you but you. Oh by the way. If you want to open up. Today's New York Times you open up to the opinion page. Go to the letters. I've actually got a letter to the editor in today's New York Times and it was a little bit of a coincidence that that hadn't happened but I had no one had been given a tip by low that he was giving my passing along my name and I sent in a letter to the to the New York Times which happened to be published on the very day that I got that phone call so of course it was impressive right. You know to say that it was a little bit little bit random but the reason that I tell stories because if you have a big opportunity that may becoming your way we don't often think about what else can I be doing to stand out. What else can be doing to make a really great first impression and position yourself for that kind of opportunity and so that's you know? I think that's a great lesson for anyone that you should be looking for those ways in which you can stand out it'd be different and you first of all. How did you think about that too? It sounds like you did that deliberately. In in anticipation that you would call and you can reference. I did yeah absolutely. Yeah Yeah I mean I I sent it out. It was a little bit of a coincidence that she called them the very day that it was published. I like to joke that. If she called like the very next day it probably would have been a letter to the editor in like the Akron World Herald or something or whatever name the Akron newspaper is you know like I made. I just happened. I'd send out other letters to other newspapers which I I recall were printed around the same time it just so happened that the New York Times one one was published on the very same day that she gave me a call. Okay so you so you. It was sort of like a shock on approach. If you could get one or the more that you could get something something to point to yes yeah absolutely. Yeah Yeah so so. You're an intern. And President. Clinton reads a speech that you wrote. Okay so what happens before that. And what happens after that does anybody. Yes so one good one point I would like like to make is that. I've been waiting for a while to get that opportunity to write a speech because they didn't give the interns those types of opportunities all that often. I'd been answering phones doing research going up to the library. You know Editing speeches you know running out off errands things like that that interns do and then when I finally got out this opportunity I had about three days notice and I worked through the weekend on it and it wasn't a big speech or anything. It was one of these whenever a team A collegiate team wins a national championship. That come down to the White House and the President meets greets them in the east wing. Have a big ceremony that kind of thing and so is the National National Championship. Men's and women's basketball teams. That were coming down but I worked my butt often. I worked on it all weekend long. Came in both days To the the executive office building which is where we worked out of right next to the west wing and I worked really hard on it and I was really prepared. Even though I didn't know a lot about college basketball going into that experience I learned as much as I could going into it and so that's just you know. I think that's an important lesson is when you have an opportunity like that you really need to show up. You really need to follow through And Yeah and then after it you know I mean I just continue to try and do my best. You know throughout the rest of the internship and then as I mentioned you know remain in touch with the speechwriters after I went back to college. And when you got the actual job what was what was different than than than the responsibilities. You had as an intern. That's another great question so actually one thing I would like to point out out. Is that when they applied for the job. I was actually working at the time in the entertainment industry in La. WHO's working for dreamworks at the time And I had come from. La Might my family is it.

White House President Clinton intern San Francisco New York Times California dreamworks Clinton White House President editor Party School for college basketball Multiple Times Sacramento Lowell Weiss Hamis craigslist Silicon Valley
"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Here's here's John corcoran everybody. Welcome back to the show. I am very very pleased to have John Corcoran on today John. Hi Welcome to the show Mike. Thanks for having me my pleasure sort of. I'm returning a couple of favors here but there's also a sort of a selfish reason for it so John had me on his show back in July and I was very grateful for that Introduced John by Todd. Barden our mutual friend and but but more than having me on the show John Actually spent. He's been passing. I seven or eight years and he spent a good amount of time on the phone with me beforehand. Just kind of walking me through what it's like what it takes in and what I want to accomplish as a podcast and I was I was you know maybe a few months in at that point maybe a little longer but I was not quite sure. Well I wanted to get as much experti- expert advice as I could and John Very Graciously Salihi volunteered his time to help me. So just recently I was listening to another podcast and This woman named Nicole Holland was on the show. I hadn't met Nicole that She's like three or four times during this during her her conversations. He mentioned John's name and I thought what I have so missed the boat here on reaching back out to John and and seeing if he would be on my show so So glad so so. I'm happy to have him here. John I start I start every.

John John Corcoran John Actually Barden Todd Nicole Holland Mike Salihi
"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"One of the podcast hosted by Mike Nella Testa in this episode. Mike Welcomes John Corcoran of partner. At rise. twenty-five a company that helps B2B businesses get more clients referrals and strategic partners through their done for you podcast service. He's also host of the Smart Business Revolution. podcast where he interviews. Today's top entrepreneurs and authors to reveal how they use use relationships to grow their businesses and their incomes John graduated from UC. Santa Barbara with an English degree received his law degree from the University of San Francisco. Go Law School. John's career began as speechwriting intern in the White House. Before earning a full time position there and in the administration of California's Governor Gray Davis as an intern. He was given a unique opportunity to write a speech that President Clinton delivered in the east wing of the White House. Later after collaborating with Aaron sorkin align line from a Thanksgiving proclamation that John Rope was used on the TV show the West Wing while practicing law in his own boutique firm. John was writing on the side side for publications like Forbes. The HUFFINGTON post and Newsweek. When it became clear to John that blogs webinars podcasts could move the needle for him them more than just writing? He began the gradual shift away from lawf- and toward fulltime content creation GIOVANNUCCI. Mike's podcast producer and blog collaborator. And I've got a quick favor to ask if you like. What makes doing with this podcast? Please consider subscribing on apple podcast or wherever you like to listen you can also read it on. I tunes in less than thirty seconds. It's by visiting Mike. MELA test dot com slash review. Your opinions will help us make the show as interesting and relevant as possible. Thank you Mike and John Cover a ton of great stuff in this episode including how moving often as a kid helped him appreciate the need to cultivate relationships. Why he doesn't subscribe to the burn? The boats mentality How a letter to the editor at The New York Times got him noticed why a podcast is better than a coffee medium and his keys for building an awesome network? The podcast ask I found was a better way to network with higher caliber people. Frankly like I would get into conversation with higher and higher caliber people and initially started just dipping. My I tone the water locally here in lawyers In my community that we're way ahead of me had big practices really successful and I and raise them and they said Oh yes and it was like. Wow this is really cool and eventually I realized it was a more effective way of delivering value. Unlike a coffee meeting where you're maybe inconveniencing conveniences the person on the other side versus like when you're recording it over the Internet and you're publishing it to the web you're elevating them and sharing their thought leadership with the world giving them exposure promoting their business..

"john corcoran" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

"It was a great it was a memorable evening and and for a guy like me who doesn't speak Geek doesn't know anything about computers and software engineering that could have been really. He really boring but we enjoyed it. We had a good time. That's cool really cool yeah well. I'm that brings me to the end of my questions nations here John. But you know I've I've mentioned it before. What's the best place or before I asked before I say that. What else have you got for the good of the order anything that you ask her anything? I you know I've been an advocate of doing of of getting out behind your computer and connecting with people face defaced for a long time so I highly recommend doing it but be strategic about a be intentional. Be Deliberate about it so you know so. one thing we haven't mentioned is. I don't recommend going to events where you're looking for a needle in haystack. You know what I mean by that is like the huge cattle call networking event where there's hundreds of people and you're just like searching trying to find that right person you end up stuck talking to two or three people the whole time who aren't a good fit your polite to get away from them. You know instead find where people are hanging out. Wherever that is online are off. If it's alive physical event you might have to buy a ticket and go away from your city to wherever it is but it's going to be a better use of your time than going to an event every month. That's not a good fit for your time and also do it yourself and your own local community. When and I was practicing law I would do little get togethers lunches dinners stuff like that bringing together is still doing it. I had one's got over this Friday that we've read scheduled scheduled because we had a conflict but I still continue to do it and so it's one of the best things you can do by bringing people together you get decide who gets to be involved involved the net and I highly recommend doing it but you know doing events of some sort integrate. The am into your business is a good idea yeah absolutely and it just gives me a bunch of ideas as I was listening to you. Talk there because I've gotten away from the whole. I like the term from us their cattle call networking. I've gotten away from that just because for for the very reasons you mentioned it's it's needle in a haystack. It's far too many conversations rotations that go nowhere yeah but I've started doing one on one lunches again. you know as as a starting point and I think doc even for not a coordinated event necessarily but for something where you just invite a small group you know four or five people to to start with. It's a great way if you do your homework ahead of time and find out what they're really looking for. What's the what the hardest part of their job is. At the moment you can really demonstrate your ability to strategically connect people if you can also invite somebody else who could potentially solve their problem absolutely yeah and that's the critical component like you make that introduction people are so grateful. I mean I feel very fortunate. We've had people that have started businesses says together or who've collaborated on some kind of partnership of some sort who met at one of our events or met at a lunch or dinner that we put together together. You know so when you do that it makes a huge impact with people and they they don't forget it yeah but thanks for. We're having people but it's my pleasure John. Where where should we send people who or what a rise twenty five dot com and if you're not a podcast or yet there is a short video of my business partner and I write on the page or anything like that talking about everything we've gotten and from from podcasting so I would highly recommend it and start you know start modest if you haven't organizing before aimed at three or four people for lunch for dinner or something like that you know what's the worst. GonNa Happen Right so give it a shot and I think you'll be glad that you did awesome well John. Thanks so much again for joining us. Thank you write. This.

John partner
"john corcoran" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

12:40 min | 2 years ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

"That it just really made a big difference and then it accelerated celebrated that process and made it a lot easier for people to connect the next morning another thing that we would do is we would do we would share details tales about people would ask people in advance. What some quirky fact about yourself that you know. People wouldn't know people say things like in college. I drove Zamboni bony machine around the Ice Rink at local hockey stadium you know or I once works on a fishing boat in Alaska or I've eaten squid it or I've eaten spider some strange thing you know people would mention these kind of quirky things energised would let people laugh and they would get into a conversation about it and they share something other bizarre thing they'd eaten or whatever so so that was one technique that we use that. I found all his people to connect in a deeper way faster. I remember doing stuff like that when I was networking and local chambers when I was still in the insurance business I would I would say let's do a truce ally type of game or something like that and and the stuff that people would come up with some people would be pretty generic stuff but other people would come up with interesting things and you're like I cannot picture you doing ah being like that and then they all three of those things you're looking at then you're shocked. You're like two of those things are true yeah yeah and and in and and some people were pretty creative about the way they phrased it and that kind of thing and you know there was some degree of familiarity there among the members members but still mean even even especially if you've got you know business owner professionals. They tend to be pretty plainly dressed in they come in. They say these outlandish handed things you know this is I've done this. I've I've lived through this experience and you know it's a pretty it's a pretty tough gig definition say so right right yeah. It's funny any great when you get to know people like that because you know maybe find connection over something to you know yeah well yeah. I mean I've had so many times like my my favorite thing to do is say I've I speak two different languages. I hold three different passports and I've lived in five different countries and and actually actually all three of those are true so I'll use to them but I'll change the number on one of them right and people just like I. I guess that Anyway Yeah it's fun. That's okay. So what do you find. Let's let's let's let's look at this from the opposite end though people that may be tried to do this either not do it. They give up or they try. Try to do it on a shoestring something like that. names obviously but maybe maybe story or two that will live in infamy for people trying to do this versus using versus doing it like through company. Philip like Rice twenty-five well yeah so you know I'm not an advocate of spending too much money and losing money on event because it's there are easier ways to lose money. I mean it's it's a lot of work right so I I've seen people who beat their head against the wall. They're working so hard to put together an event and then they lose money on it and that's just the tragedy you know. Just sat add like you deserve to earn money off of it so fortunately just about every event we've ever done has been profitable on the front end in the back end. and I don't even credit. That's not me gets credit. My Business Partner Jeremy is very very much focused on that so he's always been really careful about that. now now there are there are different types of events. Some people have events that if they have a strong backhand offering and then we can talk about what that means but it has strong backing offering then they don't care about the front end an event being profitable so what I mean by that is like if you have a a service you of of a higher higher value offering if if you have a consulting or or high level coaching program or something like that Lonzo people will do events 'cause events are a great way of getting people into the room them and then selling them on your offering you deliver value of course but then you also give them the opportunity to join whatever it is you're selling so some people do that and so they don't care about the front end piece being profitable or not for us we went through gone through different cycles but for a while sometimes the event was the only profit which I wouldn't recommend recommend having a backhand offering because then you can it can allow you don't have to to be as profitable in the front end and really if you're going to do an event you wanNA. Have you WANNA be selling them into something that is ongoing so that your revenue is as isn't as spiky because what we found when we were heavily event depending on which were not as much anymore. We've actually decrease the amount of events that we've done our Our revenue is very spiky up now up and down over the course of the year would have really great month and then a couple of months of really slow man so we diminish the dependence on events as a revenue source. We still use them more for a lead generation tool because we have a back and offering which is we have done few podcasting we to help clients to be clients to launch a profitable podcasts as a business development and networking tool and client acquisition tool and so now our events have taken a different flavor. Our events are more of a you know they. They might be a strategic partnership with business and they might be profitable in the front end but that's it's not the only revenue source. It's also as a tool for a back offering so I highly recommend having some kind of back end offering which is aligned with the event that you're doing now. If you're an event production company your your revenue comes from doing the actual event I imagine a lot of people are listening to this or not an event production company. They're thinking thinking about they. Have some kind of service or something like that so I would think how. Can you do that event. You know what I mean. It could be six or eight person dinner can qualify as an of that you know especially if you are a service professional like Sonos insurance and accounting or law or something like that on your local level get together eight people for dinner sometime and four of them could be existing clients for could be potential clients. They Start Nixon talk to one another in and boom. You've got a couple more clients so it's like one of my favorite books mastermind dinners. Have you read that by Jason Gainer. Yeah yeah terrific book and that's not yeah and Jason was someone who I interviewed for my podcast then he was coming through. San Francisco invited me too one of those little dinners here in San Francisco is actually funny. There was it was like a five person dinner and there's an empty chair next to me and he was like it. It was like yeah I invited Tim. Ferriss to come down and I'm like but sitting there the whole time like Oh. There's GonNa be awesome like I'm a big fan of four hour workweek. That's so cool. You never came so I didn't get to meet him but I did end up signing up for that year's mastermind talks conference so it worked in the sense that I bought a ticket tickets to that year's conference where I did meet Tim Ferriss as he was speaking so it you know it that was it that was that's an example of of you know a he built his business doing that going around the country and having a small group dinners in different cities and connecting with people that way and you know and then in using it to then you know have a heavy client relationship with them in his case. It was selling a conference people buying tickets to a conference and becoming part part of the community but it could be something else on the on the back end so to speak. Yeah Yeah No. I've listened to his book many times TMZ while working out just to try and reinforce that whole idea because I think that that's the my experience has been that those are the you you know there's a lot of different ways to connect podcast another great way but those face to face intimate encounters you know where where there's no distractions and it's an it's a small. It's small enough that there's maybe one or two or three conversations going on at the most but not thirty in a room full of people and you can. You're having trouble making out. What's right right yeah so what we found with our business. Doing a mix of you know. We're we're. We're big into connecting with people online. I'm active on you know heavily active right now Lincoln. I've been you know I I use facebook. Even when I was a practicing lawyer facebook was a great source of clients because it's a great way to connect into keep in touch with people you wouldn't otherwise keep in touch with I still use facebook a lot to connect with. You know have a lot of people in my network who I'm in top of mind with so I still use online online tools. I still use email marketing. We still use webinars. We still use podcasts all those different things but what we've found is that the event then ends as a being a critical piece that helps someone who might be a attend general connection then become a client though so it's like they're warming up's you. They're building trust and then you connect face to face you know at an event that you organizer that you're both at especially. If you're the organizer then you're really you know the thought leader in charge connector and then they become a client you know and it's not a coincidence but it's it's actually the the fact that you have that event you connect with that person face to face face to face is what then leads to them becoming lion yes yes yeah but it's just amazing how all this stuff works together and and one person you know you can you can unreach- online pretty easily and other people like you said there's layers yeah that that have to be applied and then when it gets warm enough so to speak doc square you capitalize on it so I mean look I mean some of the biggest companies out there all have user conferences of some sort you you know. I mean I'm thinking like here. I'm in San Francisco and San Francisco in the next couple couple month or two. two huge companies. Raqi Kitin is one which is Kinda like the Yahoo of Japan they're not as big here in the US but they are a huge international company and salesforce is another one both of them have big conferences coming up in San Francisco. They're both basically you know web based businesses but in spite of that they have events that user conferences. What are we want to call them that bring people together face to face and they're not doing he added to charity. They're doing it because I'm sure they see that an uptick and then it helps them with their business. I just went to one of those recently and not not to Belabor this point John just to give you a sort of a add weight to what you're saying there. My wife works for a software firm here called the alliance enterprises and and they had a conference near Seatac which was which brought in the representatives of all of the different state agencies that they work with because that's that's their primary client has like the California State Department of this Washington State Department of that and anyway so all these representatives of these agencies flew in and they they held this massive massive hotel ballroom everybody at dinner it was all catered and then they also had some entertainment so they had Richard Turner who's that blind magician with cards and black belt in karate can't you know can't see at all but he's he can tell by his fingertips what type of car what color what suit and what number of cards he's holding it does as a entertaining time wow and yeah you should know and anyway yeah..

San Francisco facebook Tim Ferriss business owner Jason Gainer Zamboni Ice Rink Alaska hockey Lonzo Partner Seatac Nixon John Japan US Raqi Kitin Philip Jeremy
"john corcoran" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

12:54 min | 2 years ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

"Here's your host Paul Edwards welcome to influence or networking secrets Paul Edwards and great great to have you again with us this time the second time in the saddle for John Corcoran the CO founder of rise twenty five and hosted the Smart Business Revolution podcasts. We're gonNA talk about live. VIP events now if you're at all unclear as to what that means usually this is a corporate slash entrepreneur type of thing and basically what you're doing is you're bringing ringing in probably a mix of really good clients and New People that you find and the the the process that John and his business partner Jeremy Wise is come up with here is really useful in my opinion for eliminating a lot of the excuses and reasons that people don't show up to these things so if you're looking for a more strategic and sharper way to do this that really cuts down on all of the LEGWORK and the hassle of getting people there John has some really great ideas to share with you. This episode helped before you please be sure to leave us a five star rating in a review on itunes and share it with anyone you now don't forget to head on over to the policy which dot com to to apply for consideration for the business beyond business mastermind which is coming coming up next year. We're going to start a new group here really exciting especially if you are in the business of connections and what I mean by that I mean your business really really thrives off of strong relationships but of course in addition to not knowing what you don't know you also don't know who you don't know and I know that was a lot of uses of the words. Don't know there but basically I'm what I'm trying to get across to hear his with everyone. You Know Oh behind the face you see is a vast network and many times what what fools us in the context of meeting. Someone is just how how close we are to meeting exactly the person we want to know. We're not talking about celebrities here. We're just talking about the person who is an ideal fit fit for your next partnership venture client. Whatever the case may be so go ahead and head on over to the Policy Edwards Dot com sign up or or put in your information to be considered for the two thousand twenty business beyond business mastermind and now. Let's get started and learn. Why entrepreneurs shouldn't do their own? VIP events with John Corcoran all right well. He's back ladies and Gentlemen the man the myth the legend John Corcoran co-founder of rise twenty-five host of the Smart Business Revolution podcast a good friend of mine joining us to talk about why all of you find entrepreneurs and executives out there should not manage your own. VIP Events John Great to have you back on the show our back Paul. Thanks for having me. Hey great to have you and by way of introduction. we've done your bio before on this and it'll be in the show notes as well but what I wanted to. It's just to just to get the audience up to speed on his. Maybe if you could share a little bit more specifically perfect about how you and your partner. Dr Jeremy Weiss got into customizing. VIP events for businesses yeah great question. Shen a bit of we've done different types of events. I'm a huge advocate of events and it doesn't need to be intimidating. It doesn't need to be scary Gary. I've done everything from small tiny to large. If you are a local business person and you WANNA connect with more people bring two or three people together over over a cup of coffee or lunch or something like that. It's a great way to build your our connect with more people. How do we get involved in it. We literally Biz Jeremy Night before we were business. Partners who are both going to a conference and it was common for both of us when we go to conference at Trion make it go further by by organizing at dinner or lunch or something like that while we're there and he reached out to me about three weeks before and said what if we were to do a small group mastermind the day before this conference cents and I usually said notice stuff like that because I had too many other things going on but he was very persuasive and so I agreed to do it we had a dozen people come they paid hardly any money and but we did it and it it was a lot of fun really enjoyed it and we just kept on going with it and so we did a lot of our own events where we would bring together people we would invite people sell tickets small curated events like that usually business owners working through challenges that sort of thing and then we eventually started partnering with other organizations who asked if we could do it for them and so we've done that as well where organization will bring us in in order to run an event for them so just like so many other businesses you. I discover a love for doing something over time you keep doing it until enough people. I know about it that somebody is willing to exchange money in order for you to facilitate that for them and then that yeah ever look back yes and and it also we we also found that what we really enjoyed about the events themselves were running the events themselves being in the moment enjoying the experience of the event and and and hiding really high caliber people who were participating in the event. That's what we enjoyed the most and what we didn't enjoy was all the schlepping and hard work that you had to do beforehand to get people to come to it because anyone who's done that before knows. It's hard work to get people to come to an event especially. If you're asking them to leave their home mm city by a plane ticket. Get a hotel room. Come to a different place all that Kinda stuff that's really challenging and so we found we weren't too crazy about that piece of it but by partnering with a Larger Organization that had people that were going to come to an event one way or the other we could focus on what our superpower was and and they could focus on getting people there into the room high-calibre people into the room and it was a great marriage and so that's what we've done a lot of is that sort of collaborative operative event where we're basically collaborating with a business. We're doing the pieces that they don't want to do which is basically like kind of the blocking and tackling of the organizing the event and facilitating and on the day of and they're doing the pieces that we don't want to do which is like the all the heavy lifting of like inviting people in getting butts in seats to come to the actual that that's an interesting way of doing it because of course as I think about that. It's the same thing for me. I enjoy the the interaction I enjoy what happens. When all those powerful brains start feeding off of each other and you know to some extent I I probably wouldn't even enjoy the blocking and tackling part of it but even less? Would I enjoy the inviting in securing. Oh you know logistics and all of that yeah so I I like how you've taken some of that big chunk of the workout of it by partnering with organizations that are already already doing it anyway. That's a clever idea. Yeah I mean I. It's really I would encourage it for any. you know in any business like find the parts so you enjoy you love doing and delegate the rest or find someone else who enjoys doing the pieces that you don't like doing and that makes a great collaboration. You know yeah so I mean I think it would. We found that when we're doing our own events it was just such a such a slog to really give people to come to the events that we weren't enjoying that process and once we started partnering. We enjoyed it a lot more. What's an example John of a company that is already doing something like that where the slog gets taken out of. I mean because I think of is like a corporate group getting their employees off too. Yeah yeah so what we found was. It was a lot easier to get people to come to an additional event if they're already planning on going to another event so if if there is a conference happening it's a lot easier to get people to come to an additional dinner or section or something like that because they've already made the decision to leave home. They've party bought a plane ticket. They've gotten a hotel room. They're already planning to be out of the office all that kind of stuff so you don't have to convince them of any of those things. You just have to give them some other additional thing to do so. It's kind of like piggybacking on on another event. oftentimes is really complimentary. Some people fear that okay we'll maybe the conference organizer. GonNa feel threatened by that but we actually sold thousands and thousands of dollars of additional tickets who for people who will come to an event that we're organizing because because they know we're doing it. They know it's going to be a great curated. Smaller event within the context of the larger events often the conferences that want us to come and do events events at their conferences you know because they know that we're going to bring more people in the room but that's one example another example. Is You know we did a great project. The summer where we went to a sixteen thousand person conference in Chicago and they had US run a on a big advocate of pod guessing yours well we ran a live podcasting booth there avenues a great add on on the floor of the show and we interviewed attendees and exhibitors and speakers and sponsors answers in all that kind of stuff and it was a great add on because it it gets created tons of tons and tons of content for the conference organizers. They didn't have to do it because we were doing the work of it and it also is an you know great value add for the ten dis. The exhibitors weren't expecting it. Sponsors weren't expecting it and getting them exposure so it's kind of a win win all around so I I I. I love those types of arrangements where you can really benefit one another. It's kind of a win win for everyone absolutely yeah well so sure the audience if you have not been over to arrives twenty-five dot com you should watch some of the videos and testimonials over there. We're going to talk a little bit about some of the legwork that that you're doing here because when I watched John I was like what that looks fun but I can see how there there are probably some aspects you said it. It's it's it's still a lot of work. It's not fair picnic. you sort of answered my first question here but when people are what do you what do you find really really works and maybe it's not the same for every event that facilitates the kind kind of connection that you and I are both known for and that are frankly both trying to foster to begin with yeah yeah so. I think that eh every event has is a reflection of the organizers and there's a lot of decisions you can make along the way that are going to determine Erman kind of the feel of that event so one of the things that we've done is Germany are even a we have way too many years of schooling schooling between the two of us. I'm recovering lawyers of doctrine chiropractor so we both into a lot of years of schooling. We don't take ourselves too seriously in spite of that man. That's really important to us. We don't want people to treat US formerly. We love laughing. We love humor comedy that sort of thing we love you know just being you know we think at some of the best connections in Business Happen when you let your guard down and you get to know each other on a personal level and so you know with our events we would always was trying to do things to get people laughing. Joking around enjoying themselves were casual. Get them a little bit outside of their comfort. Zone not too far outside out of their comfort zone so like one of the things for example we did a number of years for events is the night before we do a dinner the night before. Why do we do that because it allows allow people to have a more casual entree into an event versus like showing up in the morning not knowing one when you do that it takes a while for people to warm up and to get comfortable until their guard down and to to really be vulnerable and to open themselves up up to feedback and to say what they really need help with. It's really takes a while but we found. If you didn't event the night before and people had gone gotten the the opportunity to get to know each other talk and smaller groups around the dinner table where it's a little bit more comfortable.

John Corcoran partner Paul Edwards John New People John Great US Jeremy Wise Dr Jeremy Weiss Chicago CO founder Shen John I Gary co-founder Trion Erman Germany three weeks
"john corcoran" Discussed on The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

"I live in a town of nine thousand people and I've reached <unk> out to people in my local community just reaching out saying hey I'm a local professional here. I'm targeted about it so I'm not like just spraying. Pray there certain types of individuals that I'm reaching out to but our reach out and then you bring three or for them together bring six of them together for dinner for drinks introduce them to one another you become the hub who's delivering value to then. Hopefully all of those are different ways different ideas you can think of but taking interest in someone else finding out what their needs what their desires what their interests are is a great way to start so great stuff and so kind of let's summarize one more time. The three things that we talked about number one is just get out there right yeah getting out there. You Know Oh telling others who you are. What you do updating your you know it's it's a digital world that we live in today so that means updating your Lincoln and making sure that your search results because ever Google's everyone else you're searchers also make sure that those are updated in an accurate affleck who you are and what you do number two don't follow the needle in a haystack approach? It'll take you forever to find people find the big pile needles. Find the people that you are interested in connecting with the U.. That are most important for your business or for your career. Career and go and join that organization or join the community wherever they're hanging out in and then third deliver value to other people it doesn't need to be something huge or related to your vocation but just make sure you take an interest in the person of your seeking to connect with and you know find some way to help them with an interest or introduce themselves some knowledge education so that they can achieve the goals that they set for themselves John Outstanding stuff man. That's it spot on. I love what you're saying. I'm sure my peeps are GONNA WANNA learn more so what's the best way for them to do that. Great so <hes> I'm sure we got lots of <hes> people who are active on linked in here so I'm going to say you know what go to Lincoln and search for me John Corcoran you can find me on there and you know send me a connection request and make sure that you say something. Though that's the most important thing you know allowed to Jiggle send connection requests and they won't say anything so you're left kind of like why is this person connecting with me you know so <hes> semi connection requests on their say that you heard me. I'm Brian podcast and you just wanted to reach out and I love that I love responding to those and connect with people and then that's just a great way for us to remain in touch yeah and one of the things that happened just going to build on that a little bit since I've run a podcast. I know you do too. You probably get these all the time you get these emails. Hey discreet guys. It's going to be fabulous free but guess man he can talk about this and this and this and this though I you get so many of those you don't have time to research people so if somebody sends you connection requests. They're basically saying hey you don't know me but just go look at my profile and you figure out why we need to connect you know nobody has time for that now. The people I pay attention to the ones that say hey I was on deb's podcast and deblaze on yours and you know deb now I can go to deb and say hey deb. Do you know this person are they scale of one to ten or they WANNA ten and now you've got this connection so when you send a Lincoln message along with the connection request saying hey I heard you I'm Brian podcast or you know I know this guy in town or you know hey we met at a party for years ago at least some context that you you're going going to get the kind of response that you're looking for it right yep absolutely way better to do it that way than to just yeah right the lazy man's approach and then you've got a podcast too so how do people find that what's the name of the podcast and how can they listen. Thank you for reminding me Smart Art Business Revolutions The podcast I'd love if you go and click subscribe. <hes> you know that's a great way to keep in touch with people. A lot of people don't realize that but you know when you have a podcast which is not intimidating as as it sounds. I encourage everyone into everyone literally for years of inciting. Everyone should have one because it's such a great tool for educating yourself. Personal Professional Development is wonderful and <hes> you know. It's funny when you I'm sure you've experienced this. You run into someone who you didn't know subtract your podcast and you're like hey you're just listened to an episode so it's a great way of keeping in touch so in love it if people went in their APP and and <hes> subscribed yeah it happens all the time and I love it. You know it's like it. Just it makes you beam. That's all so John Man. This has been fabulous. You drop some Great Schism Hot Bacon knowledge bombs in my peeps I so appreciate you and your time and I really look forward to connecting up with you in the future man so thanks again sounds great thanks Brian..

Brian deb Lincoln John Man John Corcoran Google John affleck
"john corcoran" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Democrats on Vince counties alongside amber atheist this morning. For mary. Walter Amer, good morning. Good morning, Vince. What is going on? The Dominican Republic have have we, can we get a handle on what's going on down there? Every so often, we get these stories like to Cuba where every, you know, all of a sudden, he knows like people were having hearing problems in the embassy and it's just like a gigantic mystery what is happening to Americans, and then all of a sudden now in the Dominican Republic with a bunch of Americans quote mysteriously dying. Now, we've got at least seven American tourists. It was yesterday morning was four or two days ago. I was hearing the number four. Now we hear seven American tourists have died in the in the Dominican Republic for these so-called mysterious reasons. And all of a sudden now we we get a famous person involved. Shark tank star Barbara Corcoran's brother, John Corcoran, died of an alleged heart attack in April. While vacationing in the Dominican Republic Nasim going through this remember, I mean, all this could actually just be coincidences. The guy could just have died from a heart attack, and that's it. But it is causing the American government to investigate a Representative for, for Corcoran, Barbara Corcoran, confirmed the news of his death to NBC news. John's death who Barbara one of ten siblings, described as her favourite brother to TMZ is not believed to be related to the recent deaths of six American tourists who have died while on vacation in the Caribbean nation. I'm reading from here. John was sixty years old and retired. But previously owned statewide roofing and siding and Edgewater New Jersey. John visited the Dominican Republic frequently was waiting for his girlfriend to join him on the vacation when a friend discovered his body in a hotel suite. No autopsy was performed Barbara was informed that the cause of death was a heart attack. And now this is after a couple of suspicious deaths, of course of Americans have been happening in these Dominican Republic hotels. And they said these trace the start of this around June of two thousand eighteen. Two Americans dying at the hard rock hotel and casino. Poon Kana, four have died at various Bahia Principe resorts unclear which resort John was staying three of the deaths heart attacks. One is an accumulation of fluid in the lungs was listed pulmonary and Dima as a cause of death. And a new gauge couple from Maryland were found dead in the room in may. The cause of death was to respiratory failure, and pulmonary Dima. So the Dominican Republic has saying these are all isolated incidents like you shouldn't read too much into all of this. But you do have Dominican officials end the FBI now the American FBI investigating the deaths. All of this trying to figure out a wire Americans dying in the Dominican Republic. What is going on? Yeah, you might have had me with isolated incidents until the couple, right? Like the idea that a couple died of respiratory failure at the same time in their hotel room. Yeah. It's just too sketchy. That's where I fall, I start to get into conspiracy conspiracy territory. Right. Right. So what is so what's behind it? So, you know, this'll be one of those stories either either we'll get a resolution. Or it'll be a mystery in an continue and it'll be in the news cycle for the next week or so. And especially if we get like any more deaths, and then it'll just disappear. You know what I mean? Predictable. Some of the people said that they were drinking from the mini bar before they got sick. Apparently, that's very common. I did the minibar was supposed to be the safe thing like, if you're traveling in foreign countries no gas, Mr. touch the water. But if you open a mini bar and you get like liquor isn't like. I was in Cancun for spring break a few years back and they have a mini bar where they have liquor on tap. So those bottles are already open define liquor. Literally bottles of tequila vodka rom on tap in the room, like a lever that you pull their flipped upside down. Yes. And then you just pull ever at the bottom. Yeah. Defense them. Yeah. But still, I mean, isn't whiskey I'm getting into territory. I have no idea on the answer on this, by the way. So don't take it as a recommendation, but I always assumed like that whisky. You can't like it does not gonna be germs whiskey. It's just hard alcohol. Yeah. Is like people take it for medicine. Just burns everything off. You know, I don't know if that's how it works is not I don't know. I kind of assume that I have a little bottle of, of Johnnie Walker black, at home that I started drinking when I was sick like I was, I was on vacation, I bought a tiny bottle of it now was feeling a little sick. And I took a swig of it, you know, just as a self medication I still have the bottle and I had a back from when I was sick. And my presumption is like maybe there's some germs on it or whatever, but that's probably long gone is just, you know, it's just a bottle. So I haven't appointments I still use it. I feel like whatever's killing these people is probably stronger than your average cold Geremia probably. It's probably stronger than that also. You know David Ortiz. New footage of being released of the attempt on his life as this assassin comes in and tries to kill him. We now find out that he was the alleged target of an eight thousand dollar hit. Which by the way, seems pretty measly. Eight thousand bucks. David Ortiz guy's a legend. The guy's name is raw fee for Ray ura. I'm scrolling his name, but whatever he's a killer he's been tempted killer Roffe crews, he allegedly shot RT's at a nightclub Sunday night. But we did we see the fetish, he's in custody along with several other suspects. Prosecutors say that it was an eight thousand dollar hit. They described it as a sophisticated hit job. I would disagree. Yeah. They didn't kill him. See rather. Unsophisticated their failures. Yeah. On the whole killing him park. And he's recovering in Boston. Now apparently, he's been sitting up and showing some good signs of progress. So that's good news for him. But bizarre news all around that of the Dominican Republic five forty four w mail. We're here from one eight hundred God junk. Wow. That was.

Dominican Republic John Corcoran Barbara Corcoran Vince Cuba David Ortiz Walter Amer mary Maryland American government Dima Edgewater New Jersey FBI Cancun NBC Poon Kana Bahia Principe Caribbean Johnnie Walker
"john corcoran" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"Com, and I posted arch Campbell dot net. And we'd love to hear from you. Send us your Email to at the movies twenty two at g mail. We have a couple of extras video. Eric galley, and they opposed it on this Facebook site for us you guys want to shout over in the corner. So they're no Salo fans. It looks as if they're on trial. Very. Have you guys here? Thank you so much. Thank you for listening to the show. These we come to you from chatter at Wisconsin. And Jennifer, it's our restaurant and our podcast studio and its own our friend, Tony Kornheiser and everybody, please come see chatter. Yes. And And have have a meal. a meal have a male or two. Yeah. You know, when you leave you've finished your launch say I'd like another meal to take home with me if it doesn't seem reasonable. Yes. What does that take his to the song or we we went to? Let's do the new news. Okay. Marshall die. Soon as I got so sad. Very sad. She's one of those people that whatever she was involved in you smiled, and you were happy because she was part of it. She was so talented whether it was in front of the camera or behind the camera. You just I speaking for myself, but it was always full such joy to see her do her work. She was pro. Post today by Hank stupor, comparing her and they would compare themselves to Lucienne Ethel. Sure. She was she picked up that. And elevate Shirley was just delightful. They were who they were and then her films including big and a league of the league of their own. That was the only thing she did. Yeah. That would be enough, and it's kind of a time, and you know, she made history as the first female director to earn more than one hundred million dollars big right with big big and then had a huge success with. League of their own. But it harks back to a time when they were making that kind of movie. That we all miss. Yeah. Kind of just middle of the road, or you know, you don't see those special effects. It's not based on anything. It's just somebody had a good idea. They did a good job putting it on the screen. It was a good story. Well, told we need more that you know. And it's like please for the love of Pete can't we find it again. Although I thought that something that was missing league of their own if. Gena Davis character. I thought if she were like the lost Princess of a fallen city court. Yes. Where's where's this in here? Because then you don't got the tasting the end. What are you talking? This isn't a movie beautiful movie, wonderful performances all throughout John love. It's five minutes. And you're like I. Yeah. So great I read yesterday that she had been developing a movie about a woman that played in the female negro league ring. Yeah. Yeah. I mean 'cause she was a big sports fan. She was like huge Lakers fan, and she loved her sports and her, you know, with that just to think of what she could have done with a story like that would have been really special, Gregory Marshall was her brother, and you know, they were they seem to be a good loving family. He helped open doors for her Marsha rally, the Iraq name, I gotta post from a friend of mine. John Corcoran worked in TV in Washington. And then he reviewed films for KABC in Los Angeles and later Casey AL, and he said he was remembering that he was on the red carpet for a league of their own. And the movie was about to start and penny. Marshall hadn't shown up yet. And they got the word that her car had broken down and just in time for the moving. She drove up in a ten year old Toyota..

Gregory Marshall John Corcoran Shirley Casey AL Eric galley Facebook Wisconsin KABC Tony Kornheiser Gena Davis Hank stupor Toyota Iraq Lucienne Ethel Jennifer Lakers Washington Pete Marsha
"john corcoran" Discussed on Book Marketing Mentors

Book Marketing Mentors

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on Book Marketing Mentors

"If you're an author or plan to be one get excited because this podcast is for you book marketing mentors is the only podcast dedicated to helping you successfully market and sell your book if you are ready for empowering conversations with successful marketing mavens then grab a coffee or tea and listen it a your host international bestselling author susan friedman well come to book marketing meant is the weekly podcast where you learn proven strategies tools ideas and tips from the masters every week kind reduce you to a marketing monster who will share their expertise to help you market in selma books today my guest is an expert at developing relationships with the right people john corcoran is an attorney right tournafol other he's a form at clinton white house writer and speechwriter to the governor of california throughout his career he's worked in hollywood the heart of silicon valley and owns his own boutique law firm in the san francisco bay area catering to small business owners and entrepreneurs he's the creator of smart business revolution he's the cofounder of rights 25 inner circle a small exclusive group of professional service entrepreneurs and business owners who want to move away a from trading abbas for dollars diversify that income and create multiple streams of revenue his writing has appeared in forbes entrepreneur dot com huffington post business insider get rich slowly and numerous other publications blogs and websites so john welcome and thank you for being this week's special guest expert and mental.

susan friedman john corcoran attorney writer abbas forbes selma clinton white house california san francisco
"john corcoran" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"john corcoran" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"So as the google task list right that we decided and he will calendar so at the top ten jerry you can act recurring our daily tasks that just are at the top the list and actually does is my should use sultan italy have twenty two fifty of does a day but these recurring ones are there without fail every month in they come in and out like there's people i deleted yesterday just that back in my contact list because they were someone that akinshin chech ivanchenko but we join at the same connection anymore and that's okay of maintaining relationships is housekeeping in under their skis analogy to relationships than is sending i've had to really come to terms with is letting go a little better known you can't wellmanaged everyone like you and i have thousands of connections and ask great for them to live on social media but more than a few hundred you're really not flinch manage well there's a general principle of five closed it d secondary one fifty tertiary lee than everyone outside of that issue uber lose so if you think of it that way of how can i go deep with be superintendent those are sorta deep like looser with fifty and then looser still but in some amount of regular touch with one fifty that makes you be really considered with those people are gap yana actually uh john corcoran is a somewhat i've interviewed he's a really savvy super connector and he has his fifty a conversation list which is fifty people that he wants to be talking to that year and he has it up on his wall and he designed his own daily planner has a spot in every day for one person and so he make sure he he reaches out each day to one of those people and he's like oh he's able the scam at list to think of that it helps the intuition a little bit when you're a have certain names in front of you so you can like think about i haven't seen them in a while online and all that stuff you describe so i think that's a really cool system to of just like i'm being intentional about.

social media john corcoran google sultan italy superintendent