18 Burst results for "John Cook"

"john cook" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

03:09 min | 3 months ago

"john cook" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Same which is very little so who cares. That's why we suck signed the communist party. But in america it's cavender there's winners and losers and your company. What what city are you competing sir. Where In bloomington indiana or in spencer indiana but our primary markets. Bloomington indiana. Have we built a website for you. Yes you have. Kuwaiti surfaces dot com. If you're already services. I n dot com. Yes wilmington wilmington. What state It's bloomington bloomington. Indiana have we helped you launch ads online sir. We have john. Have we helped you with the group interview gone through the group interview process. Oh yeah can you talk a little bit about how the group interviews helped you through the covid situation I do the group every week. i've been hiring different people It's it's been tough with parole. I feel like we're getting better people coming in but while everybody was getting the government incentives and everything. It was hard to get a lot of people interested in. Come and get the job while they're making more money on unemployment and they're getting extra six hundred dollars a week. But i do the group interview. I invite a lot of people in a lot of people. Come in and they lets me. I mean it's it's easy for me because instead of sitting down with one person interviewing and then sitting down with your personal view and then get into the third person and be like damn. I'm tired of interviews. He can we please. Just hire one of these guys. You know you get one big interview interview as many people as you can in that interview that are interested in the job. And you don't have to sit through three or four hours. It's just like forty five minutes to an hour and you get a good idea of what those people are. Like now I wanna make you listeners. Know this out there And i'm not assuming that you listen to each and every one of our shows they're there but had john. If you heard about dr. Richard bartlett. I do believe i know the cliff notes as dr bartlett. Okay we've had him on our show and james you've met the man dr bartlett. Yes very nice man okay. And he's the former top medical adviser for governor perry of texas for seven consecutive years and andrew. He has treated now twelve hundred covid nineteen patients. And how many of those patients have died absolutely none of them zero of them. So it will john rush. You're not my client. You work with sean. But i would encourage you to type in clark twitter and you can find it there. But i mean literally. This guy is treated now over twelve hundred patients. No deaths and i'm telling you what it's so easy to get people to come back to work when they recognize. They're not going to die. But if you when you come to work and you've like you have to dodge. That might kill you. It's sorta hard to focus on the staff meeting. It's hard to get people to want to go to church. It's hard to get people to want to do anything when they thought they might die from something and so now it's part the show where he wants to mock the corona virus because it turns out to be less dangerous than the common flu.

john rush america twitter three forty five minutes james john bloomington dr. Kuwaiti Richard bartlett twelve hundred over twelve hundred patients sean nineteen patients four hours Indiana seven consecutive years one person zero
"john cook" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"john cook" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"We're running a crowd funding campaign to raise the money to actually develop a ninety. I find that and he plays successful at writing the To design and I find out next goal is to raise the funds to also create an android version very call. I think got both of you and I are currently android users. We're formerly iphone users When will be available for the IPHONE? Will the APP be done I goal. Oh is to release the I find vision in June next year and I think the android would I forget the exact thing we set. Maybe it was roughly three months afterwards. I'm hoping that we can be working on at the same time. So yeah middle of next year. I mean I would love to start testing it in classrooms again Twenty twenty so. I'm the APP. You said it helps. People think critically makes more able to see things for what they are by inoculating them with with this sort of information but It's intended at all for people who are who are skeptics themselves. And if so so Do you have a plan for for leading them to using the APP or convincing them to use it in a sense not preaching to the choir. I mean that's a really good good question in this. I guess I have a couple of aunts. Won't to be precise three answers because there's really three different parts of the public that irrelevant to that question. Roughly ten percent of US public dismissive about climate science so they kind of cranky uncles fifty eight percent of the US concerned or lambs about climate. Change so they on board with the science and then the left which is. Let me do the math out. Data tape the head of the rest of the public had more in that kind of undecided or even disengaged kind of great. Now there's a lot of research telling us that it's extremely Karimi difficult to change the minds of those cranky uncles as dismissive because presenting evidence to them presenting arguments presenting the data is largely ineffective or even can be Caterpillar so cranky apple's really the target audience of this kind of game time rather than to talks voices. When is the fifty? I pretend consumed or lamb. And the in this case. The game is not Rabat preaching to the choir. It's more about teaching the quiet sing asks survey data that we've collected at George Mason finds that among size fifty percent concerned concerned about climate change. Most of them don't talk about climate change to their friends and family and research Published by Gen Swim Fi. I think she's a Penn.. State finds that the main reason why they don't talk about climate change even either concerned even led the on board with the SCI. He's because they're worried about pushback. They think the cranky was gonNA come back them with them. They're going to be made to look stupid if they don't have the right answers so understanding the arguments that you might cap cranking uncle using pairing. It gives people confidence to talk about difficult issues. And and that's what. I'm a lot of research into this area. In terms of iming people with arguments inoculating them with the possible copper cranky uncle arguments they they might encounter that does empower people and give them confidence to talk about it. So so that's one of the goals of the game. The second is trying to engage. It does people who Hype is that using cartoons and humor and gameplay and even social elements in games entice any gauge age that people who are currently engaged with the issue of climate change vehicle. Now I think what you just said actually directly relates to my next question when you talked about humor..

Rabat George Mason Penn US Twenty twenty Caterpillar apple
"john cook" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"john cook" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"If you should feel uncomfortable during this episode I challenge you to not only ask yourself why but to keep asking and fall rabbit hole as deep as you can clemma changes in issue that has become more relevant in recent years and because of special interest that field has begun muddied with climate change. Tonight years he was dishonest tactics to get their message to cross the website. SKEPTICAL DOT COM is one line of defense against these messengers and was created and maintained by a research assistant professor at the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University he both authored and Co authored two books about climate science with an emphasis on climate change. He also lead author to two thousand thirteen award winning paper on the scientific consensus on climate change and in two thousand fifteen. He developed an open online course on climate. Change denial with the global changes toot at the University of Queensland. This this person is John Cook. Eggs of forty five of breaking math claimed to nihilism and craigie uncles The and I'm Gabriel and you're listening to breaking math and with us. We have on John Cook John Cook. Welcome our thanks. Thanks for having me on pleasure to have you. I'm really really excited if you if you don't mind I want to share a quick story about how I was introduced John Cook. I follow a lot of scientists on facebook look on twitter one of the scientists I follow on facebook is Dr Catherine Heyhoe one of the lead authors of the two thousand eighteen. US climate assessment. And she put a post on facebook this last week about a new APP that is being developed Sort of climate change education APP which Dr John Cook is Creating can you tell us a little bit about this APP. Yes sure so for the last decade. Now I've been researching how to cats are misinformation about climate change and over the course of a PhD. The answer that came out of five years of research was inoculation. Relation is the answer. We build resilience against me information by helping people understand the different techniques used mislaid so Ever ever since I finished my PhD. I've been researching. How do you put that into practice and I've a number of years. I've come to the conclusion that gamification Asian is a really powerful and accessible way of explaining the techniques of misinformation to people. And so. That's what we're trying not putting the practice now of course you've already put this somewhat into practice with your a website Do you WanNa talk real quick about your website is about and what the experience of using a website is like so I started my website. Skeptical Science in two thousand seven and at that time I knew nothing about social science science communication education. My background was physics so I was coming at it as someone with a physical science background so I very naively thought that explaining wing the facts should be sufficient to capture scientific mission. Denial at the human brain is a lot more complicated than I realize so so skeptical science probably shoot. I explain what it is is a website that debunks misinformation about climate change and the the price tag suicide is pretty simple. Just look at older mice common myths about Climate Change An. Id Background with peer reviewed scientific research. The problem is that just supplying the facts isn't sufficient. It's not enough to properly kappa misinformation in that vein. How are people being dishonest about? Climate change of an in what. What tactics are the using that? You're needing to counter these With these facts yes there. How a family of different techniques used to distort the facts of climate change and in fact distort any type of science information but I found that really easy way to remember them is the acronym Flick F. L. I. C. C.? Which stands for bike experts logical fallacies impossible expectations cherry picking and conspiracy theories every movement that denies the Scientific Consensus? This US these five techniques and we haven't people have been talking a lot about scientific consensus have noticed of what is the scientific consensus because I know some people are confused about that. So what is this Sunday contentious with regards to climate change. Yeah I'm what I am familiar with the concept that it's a the budget papers that support one another. Yeah actually what I want to add on. This real quick is a think a lot of the confusion at least among my own peers is a consensus. A general consensus is not is is different than a scientific consensus. There's there's some nuances there and there's reasons why a scientific consensus Ah should be absolutely considered more than you know a popular consensus. Yeah so there's been a number of studies that looked looked at this question and tried to quantify what is the scientific consensus on climate change or to be more precise what is the scientific consensus unworthy. The humans are causing global warming or not and the very first study. That did this with Niamey. Risk in two thousand four. She looked at nine hundred. Aw papers about climate change and couldn't find a single piper that disagreed with human caused woman but possibly possibly the more Well study came in two thousand and nine and that was By Peter Doran is am glaciologist. He's the climate scientists. Hey surveyed The science community any famine. Mike's the scientists who would doing climate research ninety seven percent agreed that humans are causing global warming and Intake as in team I I published a paper with some of my colleagues skeptical science way. We looked at About twelve thousand climate papers and amongst the pipers hype is that state a position on human caused global warming again. We found ninety seven percent consensus so when people talk about consensus it it can mean different things. It can mean a consensus amongst climate scientists who are doing climate research. It can also mean a consensus amongst Peer reviewed papers about climate change. But we check away you look at it. The answer is always very similar. I've whelming scientific agreement amongst relevant experts. Experts Karma Times that humans are causing global woman. And so this album. We had a few questions about the the the APP So how's that been funded So what would doing at the moment. He's running a crab funding campaign I've actually designed the game already radio. We've created the prototype of it which we've been testing in classrooms in colleges just on Friday in fact we tested in a.

John Cook John Cook US facebook University of Queensland research assistant professor George Mason University Niamey Gabriel Co Dr Catherine Heyhoe Peter Doran F. L. twitter Mike
"john cook" Discussed on Changing the Game

Changing the Game

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on Changing the Game

"On the prize. You mentioned the peaks and valleys of competitive sports. We can learn from successes John, but many of us learn best from people's failures can can you share with us a moment when you were in one of those valleys, where perhaps someone listening to this podcast might say, I'm so glad John Cook shared that because I can use that to my advantage. What can you share with us? That's not too terribly personal where maybe it wasn't all the bright lights of the PGA tour with TV cameras on the microphone was there a time where you went through, well, personal valley is no question. I, I went through a few of them, but, you know, I'll start with this that all experiences, whether they're good and bad. Her experiences that you can learn from whether they're good. Of course, you can learn from them, whether they're not so good. Kenny would always say if he was not doing television, I would call him a weekly or sometimes daily he says, don't call me when you're playing well, I know you're playing well coming when you're not playing well, let's talk about that, and see what you're what you're feeling I remember time early in nineteen ninety six I had a very poor year. Ninety ninety five I kept my card, but I wasn't playing up to my standards. So in in nineteen ninety six I didn't start out very well. West coast was always might time always played well on the west coast, being a west coast kid, I just I played every tournament. I always had a good start to the year before he went went east to, to Florida and beyond. And I, I had a poor west coast and the LA open was the final tournament on. That swing. I missed the cut on Friday playing poor ably walking up the hill on eighteen their revere back up the hill to the to the putting green and the first person, I saw was Kenny, then Terry, he was doing the telecast for CBS at the time and he said, hey, John, and notes tough right now. What's going on? He said, I don't know Kenny, this is an I've never felt like this before I don't, I don't know what's going on. He says, well, I'll tell you what come on back next weekend. Come to Florida take next week off come to Florida and we'll, we'll get to work. I said, yes, you're that's fine. You know, just kind of like, oh gosh, I don't even know if I wanna do this anymore. And so, you know, you know, I I moved on pack my pack my locker checked out my lager through all my stuff in the car, and Joe back to Palm Springs us, we were living. And I just said, I don't know if I wanna do this anymore, this is this is crazy. I'm a miserable couple days go by and I get a call from from Kenny. And he says, hey, you, you want when you're gonna come in like to get, you know, start to work, and I said, I'll come in at this point in time would it whatever it was. I told my wife, I told Johnny said, I don't know if I wanna go. I really don't I don't know if I wanna do this anymore. This is this is driving me crazy. And she said, John, give it a shot. Go back go back start at square one go back to your guy and in and get the work done if it doesn't if you don't feel it. If you don't you know, we're going to be fine. We'll be fine. Don't you know we're behind you whatever you wanna do but give this a shot he want. He he sought you out to come back and work and start at square one again. So this is the beginning of kind of the first quarter of nineteen ninety six. Six okay, I'll do it. So he went back. I did I got back to work with Kenny stayed with him for three days. We started at square one and, and basically what we worked on. Phil was. Over and over and over again, I have boxes of note cards to say the same thing from when I was fourteen to when I was forty five years old, and that's what we started with we start with the same thing and we worked at it worked at it. And by the by those three days, I was so fired up to play golf that he just had a way of bringing it out. Start seeing good things happen. And you do things in in in in increments. You don't go out and win right away. But you can see certain things at that level. What you're looking for is finishing rounds.

Kenny John Cook Florida Johnny LA Palm Springs Phil Joe Terry CBS three days forty five years
"john cook" Discussed on Changing the Game

Changing the Game

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on Changing the Game

"Back to changing the game a podcast voted to being fifth living a healthy lifestyle and positioning yourself to be all you can be for as long as you will be today. Our guest is John Cook. Former PG touring pro and John. We were talking before the break about so many things related to this great game of golf. And one of the key things we discussed was fitness. I recently read a quote, John, that said the mind is the most important part of a cheating any fitness goal. Mental change always always comes before physical change. How do you feel about that? Yeah, I couldn't agree more that you have to be strong mentally to reach the level that you want to reach nothing wrong with, you know, wanting to better yourself and reaching the highest levels that you can possibly go. That's all I ever learned from my father. You know, the, the great the calm the old ball coach Steve spur. Like CO ball coach. But in my world, my, my father, Jim cook was the OBE all coach, you know, just having that mentality. He wasn't really a golfer, but he, he certainly he said that you have to, you know, you have to mentally, you know, be stronger than your your opponent in in or the mentally stronger than the other team. That's just the way that he learned from Woody Hayes away that he coached that's way, Kevin curry approached the game. He says, you know, if you out workum you out think them, then you try to intimidate them in that, that was his history, things that he learned from Ben Hogan, and Byron Nelson. So in my world, I had some I had some pretty good lineage, right there. So I wasn't going to really question what they, they were talking about. I'd I certainly know that they were talking about the mental game. So I always practiced a how I was going to play in that, that, that gave me that mental advantage. I think is because when I got into. Game mode. I was already. I had already practiced that. So this is before this is before sports psychologists in all I basically learned that as we as we went along mentally, you have to be comfortable in uncomfortable situations. You have to learn that at each I think, no matter what sport, you take part in at this level. The pro level as you say you have to be in that realm. But what about now that you've stepped away from competitive golf considerably? I know you play a few tournaments. How do you stay strong? John mentally in your personal life. That, that that's interesting. I have have great support around me. I have I can be honest and say that, you know, I've, I've gone through the emotions of ups and downs. And the, you know, Kenya been Theriault is said, beware of the peaks and valleys, the peaks, she'd never really appreciate the valleys. You think will never end. I've been down to the bottom in in because I've. Had a strong support system. I would work my way back up. I probably never enjoyed the, the, the peaks as much as I probably should have. So, you know, you just you go along, and he just you try to just mentally be strong as you can. I've been blessed with a very, very strong support system, pet a wife of forty years now, that has been there since day one, and, you know, something to be said, for people that believe in you, that understand what you're doing that, that get it, not, not every not everybody has that behind them, and which is unfortunate, but I was very, very lucky. I was very, very blessed to have a support system from my wife Jan and my kids to my mother and father to my inlaws d- to, of course, my, my great friend and mentor the late great chemistry. They, they knew. We know what kind of journey that we were going to be on and where you need to go, and how passionate I was about it. So, you know you just you rely on them, but it, you know, it's it was a hard road. There's no doubt about it. So you just had to be strong and keep your eye on the on keep your eye on the prize. You mentioned the peaks and valleys of competitive sports. We can learn from successes John, but many of us learn best from people's failures can can you share with us a moment when you were in one of those valleys, where perhaps someone listening to this podcast might say, I'm so glad John Cook shared that because I can use that.

John Cook Jim cook Byron Nelson golf Theriault PG Woody Hayes Kevin curry Steve spur Kenya Ben Hogan forty years
"john cook" Discussed on Changing the Game

Changing the Game

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on Changing the Game

"And in really start to, you know to, to make his Mark on in. I was just kinda you being in that group. I got to play a lot of practice rounds with them. We talked a lot ninety eight we decided we were going to move the family from California to Orlando just, you know, I'm sure we'll get into that bit little bit later. But, you know, we all became great friends great practice partners. But the, the, the what, what tiger did you know, in transformed from a skinny little. Twenty year old that just, you know, free wheeled everything. And, you know, just brought this, this aggressiveness to the game that we had not seen since, you know, he took it to another level. Greg Norman had that, but and Fred Couples had that tiger took it to a whole new level. In thing about tiger was he was never afraid to change change a routine a little bit to get bigger to get stronger to get faster. But he also kept wanting to learn, and he would ask questions of Mark and myself in in, he always, he wanted to keep learning on, on how to, to be better whatever he was doing. So I think that other players started to realize that, hey, we got somebody special here that we need to look, up to, and we need to, you know, see see exactly where this guy is going. And what he's doing. Next thing you know, he's doing he's training with ABC. Heels he's doing the hundreds he's doing. He's doing the pyramid workouts. I mean he's taken. He's taking working out to a whole different level. And you know, you could argue that maybe his body broke down at some point. But you know what? He he changed the game. He got people involved. He got he got people that didn't really appreciate the game of golf involved. He touched a lot of people. So it was very, very it was interesting. Interesting times it, I would say that in my now I'm close to my forties. And I'm in my forties, and Mark is in his forties. He probably prolonged our career just by being around him and seeing how how he worked how diligently he worked in how professionally he was about about his game..

Mark Fred Couples Greg Norman ABC Orlando California golf Twenty year
"john cook" Discussed on Changing the Game

Changing the Game

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on Changing the Game

"I'm ready to go. Let's go do it. I'm playing as good as I can possibly be playing right now this just go and, and getting the two or school. And, and so I made that decision it was a tough one, you know, talking to, to coach Brown. He you know, he was he was great. He was great about it. Once I talked to Kenny, he did not agree with it. And you know, to this day, you know, God, rest of soul, he felt the same way all the way through. But he said, you know what I don't agree with you decision. But you know what we're going to get you ready to go play the PGA tour. And that's what we did. So, you know, I just like I said, just keep getting better at each level, and I thought I could get better. As I went along as a professional at got through the Q-School qualifying school. I try never had to go back, John. When I first saw you come out on tour. You're in pretty darn good shape that was not the case with so many golfer, senior to you on the tour at that time, there were some guys out there that I wondered if they could even spell fitness winded staying in shape being in shape become important on the tour for me fail. It was always part of it. I was like I said, I played football and basketball, all the way you know, pretty much through high school. I was always in pretty good shape. I always liked I like to be in good shape. So, I was I was when golf season came around I was always, I was ready. I was ready to go. So I always pretty much kept myself in, in good physical condition, because I knew that, you know, the rigors of playing professional golf is not just one round is four rounds and you have to be as sharpen his fresh. Know finishing tournament, as you were starting the turnament, and that was really instilled upon me by Kenny, and I also my father, who is a football coach Jim Jim cook. So he was a coach. So he knew the advantages of being in shape in and and practicing like you would play. So, you know, I think that getting into the middle eighties you had Greg Norman coming on board. You had other really good athletes in high school. And in college playing our game curt Byrum was an incredible athlete in, you know, he was basically the Dustin Johnson of, of the the middle eighties. You know, along with Greg Norman Kurt didn't have the, you know, the, the winning career that he probably could have, but he was certainly a great athlete. And so you looked up to guys like that. So I, I would say the mid eighties was about the time, you know, when Norman came out and he you know, look the way he did. I was training the way that I try. Rained. I always thought, gosh, what you know what advantage, it would be to be the in the condition of tennis player playing our game. And so I always kinda took that, as you know, a little bit of motivation to be in better shape than than the guys that I was playing against in. So I could beat them down the stretch being as fresh as you could possibly be, you know, going into the back nine on Sunday. Then it was, you know going in the front nine on Thursday. Interesting, you bring that up because let's ratchet forward to the mid nineteen eighties young man by the name of tiger. Woods was winning the junior championships at Torrey Pines and San Diego. He and Mickelson would lock horns each year as twelve and thirteen year olds. But when tiger matured and made it onto the tour John. He brought with him a fitness regimen. The I don't think anyone on the tour had seen previous to that. What can you tell me about Tigers impact when he first turned pro? So when Tiger Woods. Came on tour. Mark O'Mara was picked out to be his mentor and Mark was a great great friend of mine from junior golf all the way through college and AMR golf and into, you know, our years as professionals, we locked horns many many times, and he won a lot of golf tournaments. So we're talking into the nineteen ninety six when, when tiger hit the scene..

Greg Norman Jim Jim cook Brown Tiger Woods Greg Norman Kurt golf Kenny football Mark O'Mara Mickelson curt Byrum Tigers John tennis Dustin Johnson basketball Torrey Pines San Diego thirteen year
"john cook" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Way, John Cook does speak English. So I was right. He does speaking spokes speaking at a lot of of public things is our M remains to be argued about this lady actually looked it up online. CBS Sunday morning thing on them. Yeah. They were talking about how he always does. The speaking spokesperson for the I didn't James hold sour Nazis. Twentieth. Victory on jeopardy on Wednesday. The thirty four year old professional sports gamma from Las Vegas is now as in second place tie with Julia Collins for the most consecutive wins. Although he remains far behind the all time champ, Ken Jennings. One seventy four times. He's wrecked up another hundred thousand dollars one point five to eight what it says one point five to eight million dollars inching closer to Jennings two point five million dollar hall in just over a quarter of the number of appearances, a Chinese family. They paid six point five million dollars to get their kid into Stanford. Wow. Six point five million dollars to get you. College. The LA times is the first report the story the family met with this guy that Rick singer guy, the consultant at the center of the scandal through a Morgan Stanley financial advisor, according to people with knowledge about the matter the girl known as Molly was omitted into Stanford in the spring of twenty seventeen or family lives in Beijing. She and her family of not been charged in the scandal. She's apparently now inactive at Stanford, but six point five million dollars to get your kid into college. If you're trying to set your kid up for life or six point five million exactly obviously loaded just set them up and don't toe now you're going to go to jail twenty. Will they have been charged at twenty year old woman in southern California potentially exposed to group of movie goers to measles. The woman went to the AMC movie theater attendance nice screening of adventures endgame avengers in game and then went into voluntary 'isolation selfish of her. She had the measles, but you had to see avengers. Should've bought all tickets theater. Every single one watch it by yourself. Health officials are warning that those who attended the theater to review that they should review the vaccination history to confirm they've been vaccinated for measles and monitor themselves for the.

Stanford Ken Jennings John Cook Molly LA times CBS AMC Julia Collins Morgan Stanley California James Las Vegas Beijing advisor Rick consultant five million dollars hundred thousand dollars eight million dollars
"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"And so you're gonna chew certain markets with certain characteristics and attributes because that's where the talent is going to be attracted. Yeah. That's perfect. That is a perfect example. You're absolutely on the Mark with that. Yeah. So when you think about the things that the business community can improve upon in the metropolitan Seattle area. You know, we talked about geographic equity as far as you know, distribution of highway jobs. You know, we've talked about trying to make sure that you know, underrepresented communities are part of leadership and are employed. What are some things that you think the business community can do better and let me say businessman de employer community because it's not just business. There are a lot of employers who are members of the chamber is fall. Yeah. This is one where do think that business community Seattle specifically needs to step up and be a bigger player as a observer and a journalist covered the community, and as the community has changed and being a resident of it. I am disappointed both with the. Response by the business community as I see at night looks at three mainly through the lens of the technology community, and I'm disappointed with the political leadership. And I think that problem needs to be solved and somebody needs to step into that. Void and it really is about leadership. I think the business and tech communities to step to the table and do more. And I think the political establishment needs to come closer to business community and do more as well. And so we're at this impasse where. No, it seems that no one can really talk and get things done in the way that needs to get done. And so anything we can do to build more bridges to make that happen where there's a dialogue. I mean, there's a great thing going here in Seattle. I mean, we have a lot of problems certainly and there and we need to solve those. But boy, this these are problems that we can solve if we get our community rallied together to solve them. And the one of the challenges in Seattle is I think we have a lot of different turfs, you know, and not everyone always works together. To come together to to solve the problems. And as a result, not as much happen. So we'll see I know we've got, you know, an important election coming up in hopefully, there's a movement towards progress. And what city and what Seattle is going to be calm in the next five or ten years not trying to think about preserving where we were or holding onto old turf battles. I mean, we that ship has sailed as well. And so I think it's just time to think about what we want the city become because we can do it. If we put our mind together, there's enough money here. There's enough intellectual firepower to make it happen, and this agree place. Why wouldn't people want to invest in making that happen now? I think you're absolutely right. And I think it's absolutely possible. If the will is there that I think to your point, you know, eight it's that time because the challenges that we're facing from all this growth are too great for us to be so divided. That's not going to solve a problem down the road. And so I with John I hear you. Okay. So you are raising a family here in Seattle..

Seattle John ten years
"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"It is typically, you know, large companies that have such a huge supply chain that they employ a lot of small businesses and a lot of Jebel. And I think sometimes, you know, we think about oh, it's a big company, and there's often this narrative of like, you know, large company bad, small company good and people kind of forget, there's a very interdependent ecosystem in. So your example in Ohio with you know, I mean when you talk a lot of people were satellites, and you say rust belt, there's a certain image that comes to mind, and I just you know, you think about the political ramifications. You think about what it means for people? And how do we think about geographic equity? When we talk about prosperity. And how do we share it? Yeah. And you know, the interesting thing that's going on. And I think this ties into the apple announcement here recently, where they said they were going to be expanding to Austin as well as Seattle San Diego, some other cities and the Amazon HQ to announcement where they picked suburban DC and Queens, New York and Nashville and Nashville Nashville Nashville, maybe a bit of an outlier, but they're kind of going against this narrative of this idea that the tech industry can the rising tide lifts all boats across the country because you if you would have done that you would pick a place like Columbus or Pittsburgh or Indianapolis in order to have a little bit more geographic diversity, but they chose the coasts and very urban centers. And there's been a lot written including by geekwire here recently about this dilemma that the the centers of business and prosperity and innovation are really centering on the coasts. And I think part of that is you know, this is about a fight for talent. And so they choose markets based on the type of people who want to live, you know, their employees are going to choose where they wanna live what kind of community is. And there was so at your geekwire vent. Steve bomber was on the stage recording the podcast. And I think someone jokingly said like when you bring the clippers to Seattle, and he said young men in the NBA wanna live in LA. So it's interesting. Wants to live..

Nashville Seattle clippers Steve bomber Ohio NBA Amazon LA apple Columbus Indianapolis Queens DC Austin San Diego New York Pittsburgh
"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"And then on the in the outlying cities, those were the wages aren't as high. And so how do you think about geographic equity Seattle continues to grow? There's less space to build in again people having to come in from out or communities to come into downtown Seattle, which puts such a strain as I know on the transportation system. Yeah. And we got to get this, right? Yeah. We gotta get this. Right. I think it was red fin that did a study on neighborhoods in Seattle from few years ago. And I'm sure this is chain. But it was the headline was something along the lines of a a firefighter a schoolteacher at a software developer live on the same block. What city in America's that likely likely to be and it was Seattle at the time. Right. And that's something we should strive for and be proud of. And I think we are losing that. And we need to make sure that we continue to fight to to preserve that and accelerate. It that everybody that is. Everybody can benefit from the prosperity that the tech industry that has brought as a relates to this topic. The one of the bigger issues, you're we're thinking about it and very much of a regional bucket as thinking about Seattle and Renton and Everett an Edmonds or what have you? But when you really think about it in terms of the country. I'm thinking of my home town in my home state of Ohio. Then it this is a real big talking point in the tech industry right now on your starting to see some of the discussion around this as you see on the coast, these very very prosperous companies since the ATL in San Francisco, largely and they're not they're not doing enough to be connected back to places like so there's a real disenfranchisement between geography there that people are not being brought up by the prosperity and a place like like Seattle and the New York Times did this great analysis. I think it was earlier this year where they looked at the auto and. Distri and the the the tire and spoke of fact of being around, Detroit and places that that went into our home state of Ohio like Toledo and other places. Like in the supply chain was so important to fuel the Detroit engine and manufacturing engine that there was all this Ansari benefit in a big big region around that and whatever you don't have that. And like when you look at big manufacturing..

Seattle Ohio Detroit software developer Ansari Toledo America Edmonds ATL New York Times Distri Renton Everett San Francisco
"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"Along with that that that type of hyper growth, and and the displacement of people in our community as a result. And so we cover that full cycle or a media entity that is here to to tell the stories of what's going on the good the bad and the ugly going back to my roots in the rust belt. There's certainly a lot to be proud of and thankful for that. We've had this sort of growth in Seattle that we have these types of jobs. I know there's a lot of argument and debate right now that you know, technology and the technology industry really in the last two years has gotten a really bad name that this. And and that's unfortunate. I think because I think at its heart to us technology is not only new software program. So we're going to help us communicate more efficiently with people. But it's it's advancements in science and biotechnology medical devices that are going to help save our lives. So I wanna ask you a question because you know, you cover tech your Seattle based, but you also cover tech nationally and internationally. So wouldn't you think are the key difference? Is between Silicon Valley tech and Seattle center tech. If there are any. Yeah, I think there are a few things I think in part because Seattle is isolated in the northwest. In doesn't sit in a big media hub that a lot of the innovations in creations that you've seen come out of Seattle are what you would maybe call a bit more boring. You know? So there's a reason why enterprise software, and cloud computing has grown up here. This is the nitty gritty infrastructure of what makes everything work. Now. It's extremely important. There's a ton of money in it. And there are some amazingly valuable companies that are growing up in this area. And so I think Seattle historically has been able to develop hard technologies and hard and complex areas. And that's a real benefit the other thing Seattle, historically. And I think this is changing as we've seen the arrival of all the Silicon Valley tech giants and. And really changing dynamic, but historically Seattle, and the employees and workers that were at these companies weren't in it for the quick flip. So I think of companies like Tableau software, which took very little venture capital, and has built a very successful company over many, many years or concur which was purchased by SAP a couple years ago for eight billion dollars after twenty years and a lot of ups and downs. And it's cool for us to see those types of stories, but they're not the sexiest stories out there. We've had a number of those we punch way above our weight and Seattle in terms of the number of successful acquisitions in PEOs compared to the valley now on a more negative side of that. I would say Silicon Valley is absolutely still the epicenter of venture capital and funding and a lot of our entrepreneurs here in the northwest have to go to the Silicon Valley in order to raise money, and personally, I would like to see more. Or homegrown capital in Seattle. Supporting the entrepreneurial ecosystem here, I've often said what Seattle needs or sparked this next generation of capital and investing is that we do need a.

Seattle Tableau software SAP eight billion dollars twenty years two years
"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"And it's really kind of the strategy that we've employed geekwire shoes is being the voice of the community and covering what was happening and what was going on. So really, my mom being a newspaper reporter and growing up around that when I was in high school while my mom was overloaded with work as most journalists always are. And she decided I'm going to John's not do anything. I'm gonna throw some worked his way. And so my first real job in high school was she assigned me with the task of calling the funeral homes each day to ask who died, and I would compile the list of information on who died that day and send that into the newspaper, and it would run as a list in the newspaper. So I got a little bit of a taste of journalism very early on helping my mom doing the funeral home calls and also helping on elections. And other stories she was working on. So she kind of fed me things. So that was the my mom's have, but since my dad's here, I'll give shout out to him to. And he doesn't often hear this side of the story because my mom's connection to me, and my path in journalism is just so obvious. I mean, she's I'm adjourn list. Now, the interesting thing, but my dad is that my dad ran a small business and was an entrepreneur and ended up running the family business, which was a car and truck dealership in and Worcester. And so I have memories of him, you know, working Saturdays, and were, you know, working at a pace of an entrepreneur. And I think that was really important for me to see that you know, he would be watching the Ohio State football game. But he'd have documents spread around the hem, and he'd be doing something. I don't know what he was payroll or something at the time, and and that sort of work life kinda resonated with me because the nice side of that was family vacations or being at soccer games, or whatever it was. For us. He was there. And so it was a cool lifestyle to be able to see my mom who has kind of her own entity and managed managed her own turf, really successfully. And then my dad who has not Trapani Moore who was able to live the life of an entrepreneur, which you know, the famous adage is you can decide what whatever eighty hours a week, you wanna to work, you know. So that's very much the lifestyle that that I live now now, and it's interesting to you talk about, you know, your mother's career and your father's career in many ways, it's kind of merge. So that you were kind of you kind of raised to do what you're doing now because doing something that's very entrepeneurship. But it's based in journalism, and the fact that you were checking obits means that what you are all about fact checking which is really one thing you don't wanna get wrong. When you're calling funeral homes in your chronicling somebody's death. Is you don't wanna get their name wrong? Yeah. So that's you gotta make sure you have the accurate spelling on the names. So you've been in journalism for a while in Seattle talk about how geekwire housing. Been shaped by the volition that you see happening in Seattle while well, you know, we have seen so much in terms of the transformation of this community really driven by tech in the last twenty years and really an acceleration in the last five so geekwire being eight years old we've kind of seen that hockey stick style growth of this community, which has really just accelerated pace that we certainly didn't imagine. And so at the pace that most people do not imagine not most people do not imagine that in a lot of that is tied obviously to Amazon success and growth in the community. We were just driving here from Fremont through the downtown. I was showing my dad like here's an Amazon building, here's their this is south lake union. And it's just amazing that sort of a growth that they have had and geekwire we sit at the middle of covering that story. And and not only the success that Amazon has had as a business and the products that they're launching to try to conquer new markets. But some of the challenges that have come..

Amazon John geekwire Seattle reporter Worcester Ohio Trapani Moore soccer Fremont hockey eighty hours twenty years eight years
"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"Scenes with the people and companies shaping our involving region today, we meet John Cook co founder of geekwire John thanks for being with us today. Glad to be here. So geekwire is a national tech new site with strong roots and Seattle, and you actually have global following. And in addition to publishing regularly online. You actually have vents do lists. So talk a bit about the origins of geekwire in what was the idea behind it? When you started at the origins, actually, trace back many many years even the geekwire about eight years old. It was started in part because Todd Bishop and myself or to longtime technology journalists based here in Seattle working for the Seattle post Intelligencer, which was a printed newspaper that used to get delivered to people's doorstep some action that and so taught and I were technology reporters, and we really saw an opportunity to create a digital. Hearst digital only online news source that really covered. What was going on inside the technology community in Seattle and beyond thought Seattle was really interesting tech market that was undercover d- compared to other areas. And so our readers Riveria much pushing us to be at the forefront of the changes in journalism in terms of consuming information and news on a digital first platform, and we really believed in that we were bit hamstrung by the physical newspaper, which wasn't quite moving at the same speed or the direction in which we thought things were going to relates to media. And that's why we ended up leaving and eventually starting geekwire. When did you realize when you're at the PI that there was really an audience for tech stories and coverage about things tack while I've been covering the tech community for over twenty years now in the Seattle market. And so really it stretches back to my first job in the northwest, which was at the east side journal, which was a newspaper in Bellevue. I have a history of. Going to newspapers. And then they closed down after I'm there. So I leave a trail of dust in my wake. But I was at these journal, and I kinda got thrown in kicking and screaming onto the technology beat and that was a smaller newspaper, and I wasn't sure I wanted to do it. And I I was a bit hesitant about taking it on and part because as a small paper, it was hard to carve territory and make inroads, and and headway on the beat and Microsoft was in our backyard there, and so what the conclusion that I came to if I really wanna make some inroads. I think there's some pretty interesting stuff happening with startups and venture capital in this emerging world of technology and business here in the northwest, which which really wasn't getting covered at that time. And there was a real niche there in terms in hunger for that sort of information because no one was really covering it. And people really did want to know who the next generation of companies and entrepreneurs were actually covering startups before they were thing. I yeah. I guess you could say that. Yeah. It was they used to be. It was cool at the time. Yeah. Absolutely. So let's go back a bit to your personal history. So I know that you're from Wooster Ohio, that's right generals generals. Which is for people who don't know tells exactly where Worcester is Worcester is the county seat of Wayne County. It's about thirty minutes outside of Akron about an hour, south of Cleveland. So it sits between Cleveland and Columbus in the heart of the rust belt and a interesting community because it was both industrial and agricultural sits right there in the heartland. Excellent. So we do have a special guests in the studio. We have John's father Roger cook. Who is here, observing and listening? That's right. So so let's go back a bit Tulsa about your childhood education at what actually led you into journalism was it a linear path, or did you do some other things before you decided to become a journalist that that is a great question. And I do really trace things back to my parents a lot of ways in terms of finding the path that I. Got onto interestingly enough, my mom was a newspaper reporter for the Akron beacon journal, and she covered wing county, which was the fifth most important of the five counties that they covered. And so no one wanted to drive out to Wayne County or Worcester to cover stories from the Maine bureau in the big city of Akron..

Seattle geekwire John Cook Wayne County Worcester Akron Seattle post Intelligencer Akron beacon journal Hearst digital Cleveland Bellevue Tulsa co founder Microsoft Todd Bishop Wooster Ohio reporter Roger cook Maine
How to talk climate change with skeptical relatives during the holidays

Climate Cast

03:36 min | 3 years ago

How to talk climate change with skeptical relatives during the holidays

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy, initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs. Bank of America NA member FDIC happy thanksgiving week. Here's a number to impress at the thanksgiving dinner table thirty three percent about one in three years. Features a white thanksgiving in Minnesota. According to the Minnesota DNR climate working group and think about these three words, sex, religion and politics, taboo, topics at the thanksgiving dinner table for most. Now some include climate change in that list. So while you're stuffing yourself with the traditional Turkey and gravy. What's the most effective way to slide into a serving of climate change conversation? John Cook is a research assistant, professor at the center for climate change communication at George Mason University. He created the website skeptical science dot com. I talked with. Him via Skype. I was getting into arguments with my father-in-law about climate change. And like any son-in-law who doesn't want to lose an argument with he's bothering. I started to list all the possible arguments that I might encounter the next get together because he didn't accept climate change and he'll throw in various climate denial man's. So I build these databases even arguments and what the science said about each one. I and eventually I realized this little lot bulb went off. And I thought other people might find this resource useful as well. Other people have cranky uncles or father-in-law's. Did they get into about climate change with? And so I probably skeptical science online, and it turns out of this, right? Lots of cranky uncles. They getting to accurate about climate change your climate science, communicator and educator. What's working these days to move the needle and climate? Change. Acceptance and action will one thing that we've done a lot of research here. George Mason University in collaboration with the island university is just seeing the powerful role that perceived consensus is what people think the experts thing. And it kind of makes it a lot of sense because everyone's busy Weedon. You know, we don't have time to become experts on everything. So we often defend to what the experts think I'm an issue. And so what people think the experts in this case climate, scientists think about where the humans are causing global warming turns out to be really important basically information so just communicating this very simple message that ninety seven percent of climate scientists agree that humans causing global warming is a really simple and powerful message. These are strange days John for climate change in policy are you Optima stick or pessimistic about climate action in the critical next five or ten years. I mean in the longtime I neither we'll get there. In the short term. I'm probably a little pessimistic in at a federal level. I think that we've gone backwards by dry and the US at the federal level. But at the local level, I think there's a lot of exciting things happening happening. You have businesses and local governments all aggressively working to reduce emissions and transition to renewable power, and the there's a lot of exciting things going. We just need to Skyla it up and just CPA CHAD'S the current efforts that are already happening. John Cook with George Mason University and creator of the website skeptical science dot com, thanks for your work and for being on climate cast today. Thanks, paul. Thanks for having me on that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter.

George Mason University John Cook Minnesota Bank Of America Fdic DNR United States NPR Chief Meteorologist Chad Paul Hunter Research Assistant John Professor Ninety Seven Percent
"john cook" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"And you turn on the water on your sink amazon just turn the water on any given point in time in sales come out right i mean this just sales inside think as an investor of it is important to note how easy it is for them to execute this they're making it a little bit longer i think this year doesn't really cost them anything to do that right i mean it's just a little additional marketing and wariness but it really does create more i think it creates a more powerful brand and prime thing don't you i'll be interested to see how the third party sellers get involved in continued to grow that marketplace that's not necessarily tied to amazon and their own inventory it's more or less people using as a platform to sell and then pay amazon fee in response but tons of buzz around this and now you've got whole foods involved and so certainly i don't think it's a maker break for the company but you definitely don't want to see a year over year decline in in the use of prime day because that might signal something but i'm just looking forward to seeing all amazon boxes in my condo buildings stack the next couple of days what are we i don't know i don't have anything particular mind but tonight's to poke around see if you can find some gift ideas for for folks over the summer so birthdays anniversaries stuff i mean i've got a specific thing in mind you're always spend a weekend doing some repair work to our deck at our house the next task for me is going to be able to basically replace all of the boards on our front port our front porches forty feet long that has its loan it's a lot of wood and so i have to go in there take all the stuff out all those new and i'm getting a nail gun because there's no way i mean that's that's like forty feet of like a lot of nails side need a nail gun to do it i got my ten dollars credit from the purchase any at whole foods last week getting nailed him that's great and do you have the skills or is this going to do well no i do not you do not want me putting your porch car washes for ports for you know i grew up i was i wrote a lot of big bmx guiling not motocross but like bicycles so i mean i was a kid i built a lot of ramps and wooden nails and so like when you're talking about decks you just throw joist hangers in there and then that's it's gonna put putting pieces of a puzzle together it's i'm going to stick to the detailing baby steps tips that's what i need to find i wanna find like a new and maybe you have suggestions but some great cleaning product for the interior of cars so just armor all this other thing for amazon that i like but i know there's something else so if anyone out there has a suggestion you know that gets the muck out without getting to know that anything anything you can recommend market fuller at fooled dot com or actually if you have questions or comments about other stocks the muck out the gung sticky stuff you gotta get that google orange how nice it's called google on and it's like an orange scented cleaner that removes gum and gummy bears like whatever it is it it does pretty well i like that yeah okay jason taylor thanks for joining me thanks as always for listening people on the show may have interest in the stocks they talk about and the motley fool may have former recommendations for against so don't buy or sell stocks based solely on what you hear that's it for this edition of market for the show is mixed by dan boyd macaroni but i don't like to talk about myself thanks for listening and we will see them on.

amazon forty feet ten dollars
"john cook" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"Not like we used to see at least as i just it doesn't surprise me that there aren't as many people stocking away as many dollars abc and whatnot i think going forward we look at things like index funds etf's and those perhaps better vehicles for wealth generation i think in snp index fund is on a risk adjusted basis when you consider inflation and everything i think it's it's a lower risk form of saving then an actual amy's account beyond considering it is while the consider but when you will get it over longer stretches of time time if you just dollar cost average into an index snp index von you're gonna do better you've just will and and so i think probably some people are looking at that as an option thankfully bank of america does have an investment way in the business so i think they'll continue to be okay it's a huge bank but again we look at these big banks there so unknowable i don't know that i've you them as the most track investment opportunities okay guys let's keep it on the subject of cash cash money and bust open the full mailbag we got a great email from eric wallace eric rights hey there can the gang of fools explain a little more about this so called war on money mastercard visa pay pal owned vinho everyone loves some then mo my wife uses vinho everyone but me for now uses vim oh how does all this fit in air goes on to ask how is pay pal slash vinho not going to crush the rest do we need all these cards aside from the mileage and benefits cards i mean it's a good question and i think the initial way to approach something like that like this is to view it as not being a zero sum game it is not a market where there is going to be just one winter and that was really the purpose behind the the basket is that when you look at the war on cash sure use that at not me i'm gonna maintain some humility year i think it was more about identifying how a number of these companies their positions identifying their positions in the value chain and then recognizing their competitive strengths and that basket again for me i'm sure people probably stick it at this point they're going to get sick of it next week to because next week the baskets actually year old mag but it is mastercard visa pay pal and square the basic idea by off four companies equal amounts and just let the basket go and that way you're not trying to pick just one winter you can pick a lot of winters to the point on pay pal i liked pay pal allot don't get me wrong actually in the basket for syncing ception while squares outperforming them all mastercard is outperforming pay pal and it's worth noting that all four companies are outperforming the market individually so it's it's done well but i think the base idea behind the basket was instead of trying to pick one winter try to pick a few of the companies that we know are really leading the way and if you can put your money down on four winters well maybe that's a little over a risk friendly way to to get exposure to the space in participate in what i think is one of the bigger long term trends out there in that sort of this move away from cash towards more electrons payments war on cash not we're on money yeah yep very good point okay guys let's close with amazon's prime day which is officially here we've got thirty six hours of deals exclusively for prime members now jason we're gonna talk about what we want to buy in a minute but first as an investor as an amazon shareholder how meaningful is prime day how much attention should be paying i think it's just important to recognize the strength of amazon as a business that they can do this i mean they're essentially just like you know when you go into the bathroom in the morning.

thirty six hours
"john cook" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"john cook" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"A guy named gary lang staff had this to say about schneider's problems he said quote when you have an ego the size of louisville you say things without considering the ramifications so is this once again i want to i've got a really i've got a i've got a trademark this but it's the matt greer humility index this guy lacks humility he has a big mouth and when you throw in kind of the racial insensitivity then you've got a bad bad combination like that the macro say that it can the mac humility and k because he that was the most the most humble ceo's i know like like jim and now that i know a lot of okay waiting dole hypothetic yeah okay i just think that humility humility is it's a business advantage it's not just a nice attribute it's a business advantage i one hundred percent agree and i like that you're coining phrases with your own name and then i think that's a human humble humble that is so true last week june coms and i remember i was showing you that was what we coined the mac greer affect right i mean you're going we're bump on i don't want my name n g h fair point you have hit con a very important issue all seriousness because clearly he lacks humility needed i think you see other ceo's out there that are figuring out ways to sort of tap dance around these types of things too let's let's use on musket as an example just because recently he on a skirmish on twitter and lovable but that's not the first time he's done that you look at on musk and tesla eons lightness is not used for tesla in tesla doesn't have his name in it but that association is so close that he has to be very careful with stuff like for sure whether it was this back and forth with someone in regard to the to the cave rescue or it was this republican super she's i mean you see people on twitter now going crazy lama canceling my test order because i don't want to have an instantly whatever but i mean you just see the problems when you have a company that is so levered to the individuals individual has to be able to temper themselves you gotta learn when did just shut.

schneider louisville ceo jim greer twitter tesla gary lang dole one hundred percent