17 Burst results for "John Conroy"

"john conroy" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

03:41 min | Last month

"john conroy" Discussed on Planet Money

"It felt very important to us. And I felt like the only fitting term. That is joey mogul. She's a lawyer and she's been working with some of these guys for years. She cofounded Chicago tortured Justice Memorial, says he activist group that led this effort. And Look Joey knew that reparations is a heavy word. It's usually used when we talk about making amends for slavery. That's why these activist liked the term. The men who were tortured were all black or Latino. The officers were white. The torture lives tore apart families, and amazingly the city of Chicago, said yes. We will make reparations I think the use of the word reparations. is stunning. That's John Conroy, the reporter who spent years covering this. You can't find another case in the United States where a city has paid reparations to people who have been tortured or otherwise abused by police, force and so. Soon as you start talking about paying reparations to population of people, that's largely African American you open up a a pretty interesting chapter in in the United States history. The torture victims were going to get their apology, but they wanted something else, too. They wanted money and this turned out to be a really big sticking point. It took years of back and forth negotiations to figure out what's enough. The active is doing the negotiating. I asked for twenty million dollar package in the city came back with zero. The city was refusing to provide any financial compensation. Compensation whatsoever, the victims said okay. We'll go down to twelve million. The city offered to three. They settled on five point five million split evenly fifty seven torture victims. Each man got one hundred thousand dollars including Darrell Cannon, who was tortured with a Cattle Prod Daryl spent more than twenty years in prison in two thousand seven. After a new hearing he got out, he went back to the south side and then this year he got the news. There was a check made out to him from the city of Chicago. He was finally going to get reparations. The checks were mailed out, but Darryl was like. I went and got what Donald Trust. Trust the system. so. We sent it. Are you having gotten his? You know well. Let's wait awhile. No, no, no, no, I don't I don't went through too many changes with Donald Trump's you. I'm coming to get my money. He went on into the Treasurer's office. went in and my name's Karen and I'm here to pick up my money. And they in turn Massey Idee. They already knew what money I was owned by Mitsui Torture them on. They knew and I showed them and the man gave me much yet. It was ninety seven thousand dollars. The city had deducted some money because of a small payout many years ago. A few weeks after Darryl got the money I met him at his house on the south side of Chicago. He's an old guy now he's got grandkids and this little black dog call tiny and. Him around everywhere I wanted to know how he felt about getting the money and what it meant to him, so I asked him how he was spending it. Any said on his family mostly. He sent some cash to his kids in his grandkids down south is brother died earlier this year and Darrell paid for the funeral. He got his brother. Plot on a hill. He says that's so his brother can look down on people. You bought his wife a diamond ring. Any says that her knees got weak when he gave it to her, and he bought himself a couple things to a two thousand fourteen Chevy Impala to replace his old junker and a new phone..

Chicago Darryl joey mogul Darrell Cannon Mitsui Torture United States Daryl Donald Trump Donald Trust John Conroy Justice Memorial Impala Massey Idee reporter Treasurer Karen
"john conroy" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

07:45 min | Last month

"john conroy" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Insider on news and top thirteen eighty W. A. okay when we're back into the to the other ones I don't know the opportunity to be a okay with John Conroy from the governor's office of consumer protection talking about talk about this lawsuit against Santander is the auto lender data had a judgment against them for five hundred and fifty million dollars and some of our Georgia consumers are gonna be contacted as you may be a part of a lawsuit if you defaulted on a loan or a in a different default on a loan with Santander so he got questions about that if you default on a loan a year in this and you may have to specific questions ASAP on the website that will be giving you again this hour you can call us at four four eight nine two two seven zero three but we got along with the show shot again thank you for being here thanks so much it's so good to be on follow insider with you there so before we went to the break at you we talked a little bit about lemon law and a lot of people have ask me about this over the years and why do we have this protection for a brand new car and now for a pre owned vehicle when the new car actually has a warranty by the manufacturer that says it covers a bumper to bumper to no deductibles and some problem the car they'll fix it why would a new car under warranty well that owner need to exercise their rights under lemon law what's the difference good very good question and just the gently clarified the the Santander situation in many cases we we resolved the allegations before we have to go to a lawsuit and in that situation that is that is we did have the investigation along with the attorneys general from many other states there were we were able to come to the settlement before we had to reach the eight core and so I just wanted to just just to since it just gently clarify that situation but you raise a great question too about the the lemon law I think so the the best way to explain that is there will be under the warranty is something that's offered by the manufacturer or if you choose you purchased a separate warranty and on your end you should research other than buying a separate warranty or as well but the lemon law it is it is a law it is something that our elected officials have in the end it is a law that covers the fact that they come up with a vehicle that consumers who purchased a new car can utilize if they choose to especially in situations where L. A. and and if it is a de facto the non life threatening they have the manufacturer will have three attempts to repair the condition if it is a serious thing the facts and then that's the life threatening one the other one chance to fix it so that if a Jana situation where you believe your your phrase maybe and issue with the vehicle you're protected you're certainly probably protected under the warranty but certainly you're protected under George's London law each state that we have listed in other states each state's laws is a bit different so you want to check with your own state organization that administers that one a lot to learn more about it and it's also important it's critical to keep your receipt you know we all tender hopping without sometimes the misplaced them but with the situation move but if you have a repair it and you want to document that you have attempted to repair this vehicle so if you can show you can prove that you has taken the vehicle into the dealership in the sun I will say I was the parts and service director for a fully M. dealer here in Georgia for many years and I actually had to help one of our clients with a lemon law case our opinion as a dealer that the person I have buyer's remorse and was looking for a way to get out of the vehicle example they bought a brand new vehicle and the leather steering wheel from the factory the way K. the complaint and was a was a surgeon and her complaint was that the stitching on the bottom side of the steering wheel retaining her fingertips the point is she could not perform her duties on her job and she wanted us or the manufactured by the vehicle back for that case and she bought a car to thirty times with an attempt to get that still will replace we need we actually replaced the steering wheel with the new steering wheel fire and it didn't fix the problem we were told later that maybe we should not replace that's near will because of that point we had I needed to tell the problems here with how do you see situation the waste as the buyer's remorse and people try to use this law to to get around getting rid across some other way I think that a yeah I don't have numbers on on that but it is certainly there there could be situations where the fact that can occur I don't recall seeing that but personally often but I can I I have I don't doubt that the situation that you are describing his has occurred but that is that is that that that is then that's interesting that you brought that up I'll say this and one other thing I want to add to something you said about the repair order to keep your seats one of the things I tell listeners on the show October before we don't get to this a lot is that when you take your vehicle in for service one of the things you want to make sure that you do when you have this complaint is you want to make sure that the person that you relate this information to transcribe that information on to that repair order exactly as you complain because if their description of your issue is different than what traction issues they may not actually address what your problem is secondly when you pick your vehicle up after the repair attempt has been made you want to make sure that the description of what was done Max is what they're telling you because sometimes they could tell you you know we felt something but we didn't find anything all replace this but it didn't actually speak to what you bought a vehicle there for and I would assume that if this cake their case those go to arbitration with this with the state attorney general's office they're gonna look at what your complaint was what the resolution was and that being and could that be in effect whether that was actually attempt to make a repair so would that count as one of your three attempts what could be something else your available there very good information that's very good information big I'm glad you have your bring this experience to the show and to the.

John Conroy
"john conroy" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"john conroy" Discussed on KCRW

"Truckers freelance writers you name it. That court ruling says innocence businesses that rely on these workers as part of their core business. Well, they need to treat them as employees and offer them benefits. It's called the Dynamex ruling, by the way, and it refers to the company that was at the center of the lawsuit. Well, now companies are trying to figure out what the Dynamex ruling means workers are trying to figure it out too. And we asked you our listeners what questions and concerns you have about it. And we're going to try to address some of them now with Michael Chaz. Oh, he's a business law professor at USC where he runs the small business clinic there. Hi, hi, let's start with. Let's just dive right in and start with a guy named John Conroy. He's a freelance journalist. He's had a steady sports writing gig for ten years with the same publisher. But he says after the Dynamex ruling things have changed. Because. That the editor with for almost ten years. Get in touch with me to tell me as HR department would allow them to use any of the California writers anymore because of the part of the test. At my age. I've had to declare early so security, I need this money. Okay. So he said something there the be part of the ABC test. What is he talking about? So the Dynamex ruling change the standard by which we classify employees and independent contractors, and they use something called the ABC test. The a part of the test is the test. We've always had which basically means that if the employer controls the manner and means through which someone performs a task, then they are an employee, and if they don't then they're an independent contractor, the be part, which was added basically says if you're hiring people to do the kind of stuff that your business ordinarily does then even though they might be an independent contractor under the other part of the test. They are an employee going forward. And this is the core business idea. It's the core business, and then so that means as he says. Says his employer or this publication would just hire people from other parts of the country. So is that an unintended consequence from this court ruling that it could hurt California workers. It's definitely an unintended consequence. The, you know, the motivation behind the ruling is to help individual workers who might otherwise be exploited by being classified as independent contractors. Unfortunately, when possible some entities are going to say fine, then we won't hire people in California. Well, this brings up a bigger issue about journalism in general, and we hear KCRW we do rely on independent contractors. We are currently trying to figure out what this really means for us here. So just full disclosure there. But in journalism in general, this is an independent contractors game. These days freelance writers make up a bulk the bulk of journalism jobs. Do you think it's going to change journalism is really I don't know that it's going to change journalism, but it might change some of the costs because one. Of the ways to conduct journalism at affordable ways, you have people do piece work for you. And again, they're fine on the a and the C part of the test. But on the be part of the test. It's a problem. Now, the the ruling itself really only impacts what's called wage orders, which means things like minimum wage and overtime and breaks and things like that. It's possible that journalism could just address that aspect of the ruling, but most employers are being extra careful, and so they're just classifying people as employee's, which of course, increases the cost. And so what do they have to provide when they reclassify people as employees, well when you have an employee first of all you're subject to all sorts of rules. You're you you have to withhold taxes. Federal and state you're responsible for paying those taxes. You're also responsible for paying social security and Medicare your response. Able for unemployment if someone gets laid off none of which apply to independent contractors. You're subject to a minimum wage law, which you're not subject to with independent contractors, and I would just add that's one of the concerns with exploitation that people are being paid below the minimum way. You also are subject to laws like for certain discrimination laws only apply to employees, and you can't sue for wrongful. Termination if you're an independent contractor. We are going to get to the employer side of this in a moment. But I want to hear from another worker. This is a guy named James. Lift lease for ten months two years ago and change the deal. The terms of the deal five times in those ten months, I've been driving for over three years, and it's the same kind of thing. Just recently, you get an Email the terms of service of chains. And we're going to cut your pay by twenty six. Nice day. It feels like the wild west of freelancing, and that there are no rules. There's no recourse, the company is this listen to that behemoth. Okay. So I guess this really was meant to address this to help workers. Like, james. I mean, he just said we're going to cut your pay by twenty five percent. Kind of arbitrarily is what he says that seems like something you can do when you're hiring independent contractors. But not if you have to reclassify them as employee's. It is exactly what you can do when you're hiring independent contractors and some market economy and companies like Lubar and lift are in competition. They're trying to lower their prices. One of the approaches is to squeeze the people were providing services to you and say, well, who's willing to do it for less who's willing to do it for less? What's interesting about about James's comment is I think it highlights the benefits and the drawbacks of this ruling. There are people in James's situation who might feel that this this rule. Ruling doesn't let me work in the way that I want to I want to be an independent contractor that would make it easier to get the job. They're going to hire fewer people as employees on the other hand, it highlights how little power you have is an independent employees and how you are subject to the whim of the major entity hiring. You unlike our previous caller where the publication was going out of state in certain businesses like lift like Uber. You can't go out of state because the services are provided locally. So I imagine they're not happy with us rolling those company. I think that's fair to say they would be very unhappy with their loving Sacramento right now to get some changes into into law. There's a lot of push to create exemptions. That would make it easier to classify people as independent contractors. And so what are they doing these ride sharing companies? I know that they say that they they're not violating the be part of ABC. The core business. Because they say, well, we're not taxi service were just a we're just connecting people. That's it's actually fascinating. Because what Uber would say is exactly that we aren't in that business were matchmaking business. Our job is to match writers. And and drivers. And that's all we do. And we help with the payment part. Is there anything in the ruling that addresses hours worked because I know a lot of people who like driving left or these kinds of freelance gay jobs, they like the flexibility that they don't have to work a set number of hours to be considered an employee because they have other things going on the main part of the ruling actually applies to this thing, I mentioned before called wage wage orders and those types of rules require minimum pay. So the, you know, whatever the limit is for pay maximum hours work when you need to take a break and things like that. And when someone gets overtime, it doesn't really address. Minimum hours work. So it wouldn't be a problem. If someone wanted to work two hours, they might still be an employee. The problems would come in for someone who wanted to work a fifteen hour shift and then take two days off. There's a huge problem because they would under the ruling be entitled to minimum wage for a certain number of hours overtime for everything. Over eight hours breaks that they weren't given an rest periods and things like that all of which are required to help provide employees with, you know, tolerable work conditions, but it may not work. Well in an Uber setting. All right. Let's talk about the employer side of this stark waxing studio owner lexin studio in silver Silverlake, the owner pause Kahane said that after this ruling she lost a lot of her workers her aestheticians because this ruling is now saying she has to classify them as employees, and she doesn't think she can survive. I worked so hard to have a business where I could have individuals. Were there and really pursue their Tauern? And then I basically. Of having nineteen employees. And if you're a very small business was. Adult to adult be professional go, and all of a sudden all my time, essentially got funneled into management. Okay. So she's going to have to change your business model. She says she called it a death sentence. Well, it certainly can be for small businesses such as that. This was a waxing business, but hair salons barbershops, some massage places often their business model involves independent contractors the the workers work when they want. They are paid for the hours that they work and this ruling changes that for them and the employers, especially small businesses don't have the infrastructure to support all of the the filings and the monitoring that goes with having employees. So there's a digital costs. There's a digital filings. There's a lot of paperwork, and sometimes even a little bit of paperwork can be a lot for a new business. So this type of a ruling where someone pas has nineteen employee's now where she had none all of a sudden puts a big burden on her just with how to comply. So I do think that's one of the casualties. The real question with this ruling is. As does it help more people or does it hurt more people? Well, I guess I'm wondering now that the legislature is considering legislation along these lines which would firm up the court decision, and maybe amend it in certain ways, if they could actually meant it in ways that would help people like pause like they could carve out really small businesses from these regulations. I don't know that saying it doesn't apply to small businesses is the perfect solution because small businesses can exploit workers just as well as large businesses can. So you want to create certain parameters where small businesses can still hire independent contractors, but maybe provide some of the protections. You would get from the ruling. So for example, if if you could have them an exemption as long as you met minimum wage standards that would probably be helpful. Well, thank you so much, very helpful in clarifying. Thank you for having me, Michael tesla. He has a lot of hazards specializes in business and he runs a small business clinic at. Hello. It's David sedaris with you for KCRW's, not a pledge drive. I give thousands of.

James California KCRW ABC Dynamex John Conroy Michael Chaz publisher David sedaris USC professor Sacramento editor Michael tesla Lubar
"john conroy" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

15:10 min | 1 year ago

"john conroy" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"International law. The USA has practice torture for the last half century for Vietnam Afghanistan from Iraq to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and here at home in Chicago. President Obama refused to prosecute the tortures of the Bush era Bush's Vice President Dick Cheney greenlighted the torture saying we must go over to the dark side, President Trump who approves of waterboarding and worse said during his campaign that torture works. It doesn't tortured people will say anything to relieve their agony. Over one hundred black men in Chicago, which Richard in the nineteen seventies nineteen eighties. They confess to crimes although many of them were innocent. But in Chicago, unlike under President Obama who refused to enforce the law saying that we must look forward not backward. Something was done about it. Our guest attorney Flint Taylor his office. The people's law office, many groups in the community several dedicated journalists law students, and even Amnesty International work together in one and historic victory. What they did. And how they did. It is the story told in Flint Taylor's new book tour to force published by Haymarket books called the torture machine. Racism and police violence in Chicago. For the first time in American history reparations were paid to black person's the torture ringleader. Police commander Jon Burge was sent to prison every Chicago public school student is now taught about what happened in their city a monument for the victims, maybe put up and free college tuition, and psychological counseling are available to the victims Flint Taylor is a founding partner of the people's law office. He was one of the lawyers for the families of the assassinated, Black Panther leaders. Fred Hampton and Mark Clark. He's represented many survivors of Chicago police torture over the past thirty years and was also trial console in the landmark civil rights case against the KKK, Nazis and the Greensboro North Carolina police in the murder of five anti clan. Demonstrators. Attorney Flint Taylor. Welcome back to law and disorder. Thank you for having me back. Let's start off with how you got involved in this thing when and how did you first get involved in the Chicago police department torture cases, talk about the massive manhunt which Jesse Jackson characterize like the Nazi Kristallnacht. What happened then when the Wilson brothers who were arrested and accused of killing two police officers what happened? Well, two white police officers were killed in February nineteen eighty two the perpetrators escaped and the greatest manhunt in Chicago history as it was termed. And as you characterized the result of that man, hunters just Jesse Jackson characterized it ensued. And so for five days a search for two African American men in the black communities of Chicago because it was a witness who saw it happen. They just terrorize the community. They not only kick down doors beat people dragged people out of their homes, but also the people that they suspected of either having any information or perhaps being connected to the crime, they tortured, and and the person who was the in charge of this manhunt and terrorize ation was a Lieutenant at a outside detective headquarters named John Birch. And he ran. And the whole show, and and and at one point about three days into it. They thought they had the two two guys and a brought them and and other friends of theirs to the police headquarters and tortured them with electric shock with with bags over their heads beatings. And this was reportedly done not only by Burge, but in the presence of the cheaper detectives. And and and right in the same building and perhaps on the same floor. Police superintendent's office. It turns out that the eyewitness said that these guys didn't do it. These weren't the guy. So they kept looking and ultimately by they found Andrew Wilson and his brother Jackie they brought them back to area to head headquarters on the south side and ninety first street and tortured them particularly Andrew because he was identified as the trigger man on the two cop killings, and they tortured him. Him with electric shock repeatedly with this black box and with another elect- electrical device and again with the beatings, and and supplication with the bag, and they also tortured. Jackie not quite as extensively or offer as long, and ultimately, they got confessions from them, the the the torture left marks all over Andrew's body. But the courts totally ignored that he was convicted. And given the death penalty is brother Jackie was given to life sentences because he was only the accomplice to the crime the case wound through the courts at the same time. Andrew filed a pro se complaint alleging torture by Burge. It went to the federal courts. Several lawyers are appointed. And for one reason or another duct the case because they didn't want to represent cop killers so alternately because of our work in the Fred. Hampton case Andrew contacted us people's lives in Chicago. And we took on his case. Because obviously we felt that torture of anyone whether you're an alleged or even convicted cop killer or an innocent person wrong elite charged made no matter in terms of human rights, and constitutional rights. So we took on the case in nineteen eighty seven which is five years after the torture, and the and and the terrorizing manhunt at that point. Andrew's case was reversed because and the Eleanor supreme court has death penalty case because he the torture was so blatant. It left so many physical marks he was burned on radiator as well. While he was being electric shocked that the court had no choice but to throw out his confession. Ultimately, Andrew was retried and one juror held out against the death penalty. And he got a life in prison rather than was executed. In any event, we then that started our thirty one or so thirty two years of being involved in the police torture scandal nineteen eighty seven when we got involved in. Andrew Wilson's case and by lodge. That's what my book traces, the book is the torture, machine racism and police violence in Chicago magnificent book just came out I urge everybody to get it Flint talk about the pattern. What we what we lawyers call a pattern and practice of torture in Chicago who was involved. What did they do? How long did it last? How high up did it? Go. Those are several very important questions which I try to answer. An and documenting the book the at first as much as it seemed unlikely all we really had with this one horrendous torture case and evidence of it. But at during the civil rights trials of of the Andrew Wilson case in federal court in nineteen eighty nine. We started to get letters from an anonymous police source and each started to tell us there's more people. There's more people involved that quote from some of the letters that we got clandestinely during the trial. We dubbed this source a deep badge sort of after the deep throat Watergate fame, and he turned us on by name to some other torture survivors, who we found e- also by correct? He said that it went very high up. He mentioned the fact that this torture of the whites the ones I mentioned who were wrongfully picked up for the for the murders of the police had happened at police headquarters he said that the state's attorneys, including the state's attorney of Cook County, Richard Daley was was aware of this. So he or she we'd never found out who the identity of this person was was laying out a roadmap for us. And over the next thirty years, we filled in all the blanks in the roadmap. Yes. It was a pattern and practice of torture. Yes. It turned out over the years. We got case after case that was documented that it happened during this reign of terror not only that the short reign of terror, but the long reign of terror that being the twenty years of torture under this man, John Burgess command, and that we uncovered a lot of evidence that that. Daily both has state's attorney and later as mayor was involved in covering it up and refusing to prosecute Burge or any of the officers that had engaged in this pattern of torture, and it turned out that this pattern of torture. And and I should say that the torture where we're using it in a very precise international kind of view of torture here. We're talking about electric-shock we're talking about what's called dry submarine. Oh that is suffocation with a bag or plastic material over the face and head to simulate shop occasion, we're talking about mock executions, putting guns and people's mouths, and and playing Russian roulette with them, and we're talking about just a tremendously racist type of retaliatory that that accompanies these forms of torture in order to get confessions sometimes spots, sometimes maybe not far, but always illegal. And unconstitutional, and in violation of of all Amanda national law school made up the citywide coalition against police abuse. And what did they do? Well, there were two different coalitions. Actually, they work together. There was one more traditional organization or or coalition of organizations church groups that group that spirit edited called citizens alert, which was a police anti police brutality organization that had been in the city ever since the murder of Fred Hampton and taken up so many many causes in terms of police brutality, and they were very active and taking the evidence that we were uncovering. And and unfortunately, the judge is not allowing into that Wilson trial, and and taking it publicly and demanding that the that Burge be fired. And that there be Justice. In the case. And then there was a younger more activist in the group that also was focused on the torture cases and did more kind of actions. They went, you know, the city council and sat in and and disrupted and and fought for I know what that and a hearing in front of city council, but they were all taking the evidence that we were covering thanks to deep patch, and they were taking it to the streets into that to the politicians and raising the cry in the early nineties for Burgess firing what was the importance of truly independent journalism in exposing these crimes can't over emphasize the importance, and and underscore independent and courageous in terms of journalism because as you know, the importance of the people's narrative of dealing with the truth of these kind. Cases in the face of the official cover up is extremely important and lawyers who fighting courts, I originally unique position of being able to uncover and expose this kind of evidence. But if journalists don't write about it and don't put it on TV. And and and now, of course, there's other medium to to put it on as well. But back in the day, when we were fighting these cases, it we were definitely calling it torture. We we we were trying to change the narrative in terms of that it wasn't just police brutality. This was torture. Slowly, thanks, primarily to a journalist named John Conroy who covered these two long Wilson civil trials. John Conroy was sitting in the courtroom through the entire two trials the Wilson trials in nineteen eighty nine. He covered those cases, and he then came out with a a story. In the Chicago reader called the house of streams, which was a remarkable story, and expose of all this evidence that we were uncovering during the trials, but it really was not covered by the mainstream media. So for very long time. This was a dirty secret to the public in Chicago here, but other journalists some home were in the the straight media, but Conroy in particular continued to right over the years. Various other exposes the evidence that we uncovered and he also was investigating came to light in answer to your question. Yes. Independent journalism and the media and the narrative is are so crucial in in these cases, particularly in the cases of police, torture and police. Vacination with regard to Fred Hampton here in the city of Chicago. Chicago police detective commander, Jon Burge was a military policeman in Vietnam. That's where he learns his torture techniques. They call the Vietnamese Gook said slopes, he attached his electric box to them over there. And then he brought it back to Chicago. I wanted to ask you, what do you see as the connection between racism and torture? Well, I think there are two strands here. The the international connection that you just mentioned the kinda dehumanisation that was practicing Vietnam and later in Iraq and Afghanistan and continues to this day Guantanamo Bay..

Chicago Andrew Wilson Jon Burge Fred Hampton attorney Flint Taylor murder Guantanamo Bay John Conroy President Obama Richard Daley Amnesty International John Burgess commander Jesse Jackson USA Dick Cheney Afghanistan
"john conroy" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"john conroy" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"It looks like most of the weekends looking great of the weekend. Not too bad. All well. All weekends are good. That's the key. It's seven sixteen and for the Benatti spine institute, we go to the newsroom in John Conroy a convicted killer is dead. Jose Antonio Jimenez was executed via lethal injection last night at the Florida state prison in Starke the fifty five year old sentence. Death for the nineteen Ninety-two killing of sixty three year old woman. Some Florida lawmakers want more time before restoring voting rights to felons over one point five million felons would be restored voting rights under amendment four which was approved by nearly sixty five percent of voters in November. It was scheduled to take effect January eighth. But now maybe put on hold the enforcement of the is on pause until governor elect Rondi. Santa's is sworn in today is free shipping day more than a thousand retailers will take part in the shopping holiday by offering free shipping on items as well as various discounts. The day serves has a last chance to save big on gifts and holiday items this year after black Friday and cyber Monday, I'm John Conrad NewsRadio nine seventy WFL. A now here's a look at sports from the ninety five three WD a in an six twenty sportscenter on there and Jacobson the Tampa Bay Lightning extended their win streak. Dave now, one eight in a row after a four to one win over the Toronto Maple Leafs at. Emily arena last night. The Lightning's eight game win streak is tied for their second. Longest in franchise history. They returned to action Sunday when they start on a four game road trip beginning with a matchup versus the Winnipeg Jets at seven o'clock the Tampa Bay rays completed a big three team trade yesterday with the Cleveland Indians and Seattle Mariners they acquired infielder Iandi. The as in minor league right handed pitcher Cole Salzer from Cleveland in exchange for first baseman Jake Bowers who went to Cleveland and cash considerations to Seattle. The bucks are on the road this weekend and take on the Baltimore Ravens kickoff is on Sunday. At one o'clock. You can hear that game on ninety eight rock home in the box for more on these stories. Listen to Tampa Bay sports radio ninety five three WD a.

Tampa Bay Lightning Tampa Bay Florida Cleveland John Conroy Jose Antonio Jimenez Baltimore Ravens Benatti spine institute Toronto Maple Leafs Seattle Mariners Cleveland Indians Emily arena Cole Salzer Winnipeg Jets Starke John Conrad Jacobson Santa Seattle
"john conroy" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"john conroy" Discussed on KCRW

"Is principally I'm Madeline brand. Remember when Ellie unified was going to spend more than a billion dollars buying ipads for LA public schools. What that was all about the so called digital divide. You know, the idea that kids in public schools would fall behind without the latest technology kids in private schools would have access to all that stuff. But now that's turning on its head. There's a screen backlash in Silicon Valley. For example, the same tack insiders who helped make screen so addictive have decided that well there too addictive for their own kids, and they're starting to strictly limit screen time and some private schools are getting rid of screens altogether and going back to old fashioned books and chalkboards Nellie balls has been writing about all of this. She covers tech and culture in the bay area for the New York Times high. I don't drive me out. Great to have you back. Well, let's talk about the nanny part. I spoke to to some of them. Let's talk about the nannies. So they have to enforce screen roles. So just sort of set the stage Silicon Valley, you're seeing a growing backlash to having kids. Use technology, a news any kind of screens and doesn't matter. What's on the screen? What's being played or read or whatever? But just like the screen, and and and this is something that's been happening for years jobs. Saying was nervous about his kids. But now you're seeing in the rank and file among valley. Engineer's VC's everyone. Others result. The work life of Silicon Valley Manny has become like a almost an Amish experience. And and then he's already decided no phone contracts to promise their player that they will not even expose a screen at all to a child that Trump won't see them on the phone or on a tablet in points. What what? So they can't even use their own phones. No, they can't and in parks around so dollar. You're also getting margin of phone police. So parents who are taking pictures of men are maybe take your phone call while they're pushing a kid on a swing or texting while they're whatever like nannies just existing in having a phone around while they're with a kid, and you're seeing people post that photo in parent groups and do call out, and it's just become a really tense heated debate within. Parenting culture now. Well, meanwhile, are the parents themselves limiting their own use of the screens and the phones. Well, of course, the great irony of it. So a lot of an anti talk to you over the story. We're like, no we can understand this a little bit. If genes like it's gotten extremes. But the hardest part is I spend all day making sure that you'd never see the screen, and then the parents come home and start texting for half an hour before they even start playing with kid. So of course, it's a lot easier to hire someone to do sort of your ideal vision of child rearing than than bits do yourself. Yeah. What does happen? I mean like this that and the kind of panic of the extreme, and what what happened to eight broader realization here that screen might not be good for kids. Well, I guess worry. Yeah. Yeah. It's super real everywhere with parents, I think, but I think that what's particularly interesting is do these parents who are actually working in Silicon Valley, creating the very products that their they don't want their children using are they questioning their livelihoods their roles. I yes. And no, I think that there's been a big reckoning all about whether or not the work. People are doing is good for the world. I didn't get offense that there's a lot of anxiety about the work. And I guess they're still sciences. Not hasn't weighed inconclusively of whether this is in fact, bad. I mean, there's a lot of totally story focused on behavior in practice. What are people doing? And what are the perception for the people who are building technologies are very scared of it and are increasingly nervous about goes into their children. Let's look at the digital divide part of this too in the classroom because you you examine that and you are reporting that some of these wealthier schools are saying, okay, no more screens in the classroom. We're going to take out these digital boards these whiteboards and put back in the old green chalkboard. The old digital divide with the idea that poor kids aren't gonna get access to the internet. And so they're not gonna be able to keep up with wealthy kids who are going to be really attacking the internet. You know, when when they'll enter the workplace, and that is still initially there's still, but that's a real question. But you know with homework is supposed to be done online and some kids can't get online. Then that's a big problem. Yeah. But what we're starting to see more as the new digital divide. The something off is that rich kids are getting play based or hands on education. They're getting. Say there's pre and the retro screen free. Schooling is trending in wealthy neighborhood. And then put neighborhoods are now getting more computers into posture and less clay base. More ipad education, you're seeing a program now spreading across the US to do and tablet based preschool, like an entirely online. So kid just sort of sits in front of a screen and activities Catholic preschool. So this is now new news is by the divide between children who are gonna be raised on screens and children who are going to be raised in tactile real life situation. So if the wealthy districts, the wealthy schools wealthy parents are worried about this about so much exposure to digital media and they're trying to limit. It are lowering comparisons equally concerned. Yes, it starting to if Silicon Valley now, it's reached sort of cacophony, and in almost comical proportions of fear and screen the rest of the country is parents are beginning to push back. So these people in Silicon Valley are they assigned from coming up with time limits on your phone, which you can do. Now are there any actual tech fixes to this tech problem that they've created? I mean, there are there things you can do like, I've turned my phone screen gray, which I think makes it a little less than mutilating. There are things you can do. But at a certain point these tools have just become so incredibly good and chanting and entertaining and delightful that there's nothing you can really do to make it less delight bowl or less pleasing. You just. Yeah. And and any addictive I mean, I personally am terrible at limiting my phone. You. Basically, we've all put ourselves into this huge experiment of live tapping away at a peak of black glass, and I don't know how to make myself. Did I don't know what it does to kid? I didn't. I don't know. Yeah. But so in the absence of this lack of knowledge, though, do you think that there is there's a panic? Well, that's I mean, that's the nanny stories like it. At what point does a reasonable skepticism and a desire to educate yourself? Become like sort of panic. And that's always the question. The thing is like we we've all been at the center of these kinds of paranoia over over technology that have proven every generation panics over. The technological revolution. The argument for this one being different is that the text never been. This guy is a quantum leap beyond a television or movie. Right. This is. Yeah. But the thing is we spent I mean, I remember my parents being really afraid of cable television because it meant that we were going to spend all this time watching MTV instead of being out in the world. I mean, there was a similar level of panic. When MTV rolled around. I know that this is this is more pervasive. But it's still the same kind of worry totally in. I'm not really sure what that worries based on aside from you know, what what what is the big panic of what is this going to do two kids panic is that I it's it's it's a matter of extreme. So it's like sugar is addictive. But we're kind of like okay with that. But like, we're not okay with like crack, so you draw a line. So the MTV's sugar and when now our phones cracks like. Spectrum for sure, but that this has gotten to be more. And I don't know if that's the case. Kids can learn all the social skills, they need social media and all that. But I'm just it's amazing to me. How trusting we've been? Yeah. Allowing. But it's amazing to me. Also, the reaction is so extreme like there's like to extremes like either you're totally full fully embrace or or freak out and ban it from the house like there's enough. No, happy medium. Part of that is also just like the reporting like I reported on the families who are going through the extreme. But there's a lot of people across the country. We're doing something in the middle. Yeah. Nelly Bolshie covers tech and culture of the New York Times. Thank you. Thank you. Art. Bordellos here now. Hi, hey there. So you talked earlier about the fourteenth amendment and birthright citizenship, and the fact that anyone born on US soil automatically becomes a US citizen. Whether their parents are citizens, oh, not the president says he's preparing preparing an executive order that's going to change that. So I asked Ellison is what they think John Conroy says, I think must have Trump must have slept through all his constitutional law classes that goods agrees. I think the.

panic Silicon Valley US New York Times MTV Trump Madeline Ellie LA Engineer Nelly Bolshie John Conroy president Ellison executive
"john conroy" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

10:27 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on 790 KABC

"With Brian. We have attorney maiden John Jason studio, and we have Flink Taylor on the phone in Chicago. You've been doing a lot of these cases for for years. And I know that you're hearing this story and just like when I actually heard about this case, I couldn't believe it was happening. What's your take on all of this? Well, mister Taylor the conduct that you've been describing that Mr. Burge engaged in shocking. It is so shocking to anybody who hears it that it makes me wonder what sort of person could do this sort of thing to another human being what sort of person could do this, and what would motivate that person to do it when you were working your way through Mr. Wilson's case. And through the cases of the other people who came to you for help. I did you gain any insight into the mentality of Mr. Burge in the people who were who were engaging in this conduct with him. Do you think that you know, he was racially motivated? Do you think it came from a dislike for people who've committed crimes, what are your thoughts on that? Well, you know, I had the occasion to cross examine him on. I would say eight nine occasions over the last twenty five or thirty years, and I've often. Often asked that question. And and in some ways have answered it at at various times in the best way that I can know how to do that and racism is a huge part of it is upbringing was on the southeast side of Chicago and racially changing neighborhood and those attitudes by by the folks so out of the white folks during that time in that era, we're we're very racist towards African Americans. Obviously his work was directed against African Americans and often racial epithets were repeatedly used while the torture and the attacks on the genitals in the electric shock. Even his box was called the end box that he called it to some of his victims. And of course, when he was in Vietnam on a POW camp as a m p he started happening. He was bringing people to the torture chambers in Vietnam. And so I. I think that he he brought it back from Vietnam. There was a dehumanisation racism as it were in Vietnam. That torture was was almost matter of fact because these were yellow people people are less than human. And so when he got on the south side, and it was all about numbers. It was all about getting confessions getting conviction sending people to the row dealing with people who he had characterized as less than human because they were African American because they were suspected of committing serious crimes that it just lead one to the next and before long he was a commander of police, and he'd left a trail of what we now know to be at least one hundred and twenty-five torture victims almost all African American. And for those of you who may have just tuned in. We are talking about the concept of documented policed torture within the Chicago police department, and we're talking to an attorney that represented. A substantial amount of the victims, Mr Flynn Taylor. So how did this story? Get blown open. Well, we were in the middle of diverse civil trial of a civil rights trial of Andrew Wilson, alleging the torture. I had Burge on the stand. And we went back to the office. And I had a message from someone who called him or herself tie. And I at the same time received an anonymous letter in police department stationary telling us that look I work with Birger I worked with Burge. This isn't an isolated case you're dealing with here. This man is a racist. This man had the torture devices that your client was saying that he had an look there's another fellow in the county jail who was tortured with the same electrical device nine days before Andrew Wilson was and I it is is you to go find him. So this note from someone actually within the police department, right? We later called him. Deep badge batch. From a reference to the Watergate deep throat. The anonymous reporter. But I think what's more significant is that it it reflects that there were many law enforcement officers that did sink this was wrong. And there were many people there that were level working with them that had a problem with this and weren't afraid to come forward. Now, like doesn't come all the way full, but he actually led you in the direction of of some of these other other lead what happened after that? Well, we found Melvin Jones, and he told us his story, which in fact was a similar to Andrew Wilson. And he said, you know, I testified about this back in nineteen eighty two. And so we then scurried around got the transcript so now we knew that this wasn't just something that he was coming up with because he'd seen something on the news about Andrew Wilson being tortured that he'd said it seven years ago and the judges headed Noord him back then another important thing that he testified to back. Then was that Burge said to him we're going to have you crawling along the floor like Satan and co cheese. So we said who's Satan and co cheese? We'll Satan was the nickname of Anthony homes, and coaches was the nickname of another prison. So you just about two more cases. Yeah center, we found Anthony homes each all this way back in nineteen seventy two ten years before Andrew was tortured that he'd been electric shock towers, seventy two seventy three. But yes, and he told about what happened to him it sounded very similar. He was very credible to us. And so from there, I've kinda describe it as we started until we found other people the fact became well known in the media other people came forward, we researched the court records and found out the people who had alleged that they'd been tortured. And so we started to put this all together. So let's look at what's happening here though. Okay. Because this is a situation where this police department was getting. Record numbers of convictions, in difficult cases cases, where the confessionals very important. You had a lot of attorneys that were with a high up attorneys within the DA's office who are actually having their careers made politically by putting these individuals away in solving these problems that are sometimes related to homicides either law enforcement homicide on a couple of occasions. So this is a situation where by all external factors. This department is cranking. They're doing what they're supposed to their reading the streets there absolutely gaining convictions at a high rate. How is it that you're able to somehow unpack this when all of the people that are going against you are benefiting from this? Well, it wasn't easy. And it it certainly didn't happen overnight. And it just piece by piece as as as more evidence came out. There was a tremendous investigative reporter named John Conroy who covered are two trials in nineteen eighty nine. And he saw. All of this developing and coming out there was at the officer professional standards had a chief who actually was swayed. I deposed him and confronted him with listeners when you're talking about the office of professional standards. You're talking about basically, the internal affairs wing of the Chicago police department. So this is coming from within the department now. Okay. Keep going, yes. And he was he was swayed by when I confronted him in a deposition with the evidence that we were uncovering and he turned and had a reinvestigation in the late eighties and early nineties after trials and that led to Burj being fired for the torture of Andrew Wilson. And when was that that was in ninety three and it led to another report by that same outfit. The oh PS did found looking at fifty cases of torture that many of which we had uncovered that. There was systematic torture. That command personnel. Mel knew about an participated in. Now command personnel could have been Burge because at that point. He was commander, right? He had gone through the roof he had actually succeeded, and he was he was just traveling like a bullet through the chain of command northward, and he's he's getting. Additional jobs is getting more respect and more more prestige. And and this type of thing is still going on. So you ultimately what it looks like is that was an investigation from within the department though that greatly assisted you you had good police officers that were that were not willing to accept that. This was a way that they wanted their department to be either coming forward, you're getting a documented evidence of these things happening fifty cases or some odd. It would later be more than twice that. But at some point, I know we're gonna probably be considering taking a break soon. But at some point this investigation went from being just an internal investigation within the Chicago police department to a municipal investigation within the the the as office to a state investigation to a federal investigation within the United States Department of Justice, and ultimately an international investigation looking at it from the perspective of human rights was implemented. And this all happened on your watch as an attorney. You saw this. Mushroom right in front of you. And again, what what are you? What is your experience as you see this? This incident becomes something that was an international phenomenon. Well, you have to understand that the cover up was extreme in this case, and it went to the highest levels. I mentioned Richard m Daley people were mayor, she was state's attorney when Wilson was tortured. He was giving evidence of the torture from a doctor who I examined Wilson. And also the police superintendent confronted him with that evidence and daily chose to cover it up and not prosecute at that time. Tough-on-crime right. That'd probably might have helped his political career for all. We know. But still definitely definitely helped. And then in eighty nine he moved from being the state's attorney of Cook County to being the mayor. And so he switched hats. But he continued his role in covering this. All right. And when we come back, we're going.

Andrew Wilson Mr. Burge attorney Chicago police department Mr Flynn Taylor Vietnam Chicago commander Brian John Jason studio Richard m Daley Anthony Noord reporter Cook County
"john conroy" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:36 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Showers and thunderstorms early today, then patchy clouds throughout the day high near ninety but the heat index up your one hundred tonight mainly clear early then showers and thunderstorms moving in late low down to seventy three it's sixty eight right now in Chicago, I'm Steve Grzanich in the WGN radio newsroom. And this is the stuff that matters on Chicago's. Very own seven twenty WGN. He's a monster. Six forty two. Oh, he's no monster. He's delightful is Chuck Todd. Meet the press empty daily and the nine forty seven podcast. Hello, my friend. Good morning. How are you doing? Are. You. No complaints had an easy fast. I'm a tone. So I'm ready to screw up or another year. Congratulations clean the slate. Clean. Yeah. Career killer with you. Yeah. Exactly. And I'm happy to help. Brad Kavanagh is a what everybody's talking about. And then stories like the fact that oh it looks like fifteen hundred kids again, get buried. What are you guys do when you get into meetings when you go, okay, there's this? But we gotta talk about that. And the thing comes up as an example from earlier this week. We have a thirty minute argument about it. Usually. I mean, when we have essentially, I look at us. We have three lead in room for two. On any given day or three major stories, and you know, you have to drop one. And he just timing for all of the all of the reasons you're not going to do it. Right. You know? I mean, you look one of the things I've learned it. Don't try to do a little bit of everything do a couple of things. Really? Well. And and I think the mistake that some shows make when you try to do a little bit of everything is you don't do any of it. Well, right. You don't do any of it thoroughly? So, but we have it's hard. I mean, you know, there are there are these, you know. There's so many competing interests. You sit there and say that should be bigger story. But it will take so much longer to explain exactly. You know, we we go through these people hurt our meeting. I think it would be better. They'd understand what our jobs were better than it would also frustrate them. 'cause I walk away myself. Can I have a second hour or end up? Well, you know, we have we have similar situation because the Pfizer story, for example is vitally important, but it's got a tremendous amount of layers to it and a tremendous amount of explanation to it. And I need ears and you need eyeballs, and we both need eyeball said. It'd be it. Oh, socially and things of that nature. Then you come down to a discussion about okay, we know people want to hear or see this. But we really do have to talk about that. So how do you split the time? Give you the three stories three stories that were very difficult for manned Tuesday. And it was the third story that we dropped right cavenaugh at five and you had the tariffs. And I could make a case that the thing that impacts people's lives more than any of the other stories. Yes supreme court to big deal. Don't get me wrong. But some of those terrorists. Let's pocketbook. And yet that's the story that may not doing right? Didn't make the cut. And and it's you know, part of it is. So you're you're having to your what I always call future. News eighty coming. It's gonna be bad. Nobody ever pays attention to future news. You know, they only pay attention to what's happening to me right now, especially right. Right. And that, and that's why tariffs I think always a difficult story to get to get critical matched under to to buy into. All right. So I am. So let's go back to the cabinet. I am personally conflicted. About this thing because I think it's horrific that this woman has to come under the circumstances. She has to come in under. However, I think Chuck Grassley has done a nice job of putting out four different options. That makes it look like she doesn't want to tell her story if she says, no. So what happens? It does feel like we're in an awkward standstill today. And and I imagine it isn't going to budge anytime soon. I do think I agree with you. I think Chuck Grassley has given the impression that he is. He is he is being flexible, but he's only being flexible through Monday. Right. And that is I do think while I agree with you. He has shown flexibility as to how to hear her story. They don't have a good explanation of why it had Monday or body. Right. Right. What is hurry? Why is it that this can go another week or two? Look, I I buy the argument, you know, Democrats to say, oh, this can wait till the lame duck. Please democrats. We know what you're doing. You're trying to gain control the Senate. So that's that to me is is is a political argument. But there's certainly nothing wrong with waiting till mid October. Right. Nothing wrong with waiting till the bad. And while you have here's the thing. This judge Cavanaugh want this Asterix. Why hasn't he stepped up and said I want this investigated. I think. Clarence Thomas is the Justice city is today because of how those hearings went I think he got defensive. I think he got better. I think he decided he was going to keep he's gonna keep a little profile once he got on there. And then once you start keeping a low pro you keep the low profile pointed I think it's impacted what kind of Justice he is maybe not on his ideology. But certainly on how we participate how you know things like that. I think this is going to have an impact on him the type of Justice. He may be we don't need another Justice on it with an asterisk just don't. And I just think it's a bad. So that's where I'm I am surprised. I'm with you the Judge Kevin hasn't been the one to demand and FBI investigation as you pointed out earlier cleared it as you pointed out earlier this week. How does Brad Kavanagh know what party? He wasn't that. When the accuser didn't name the party. Over denied. Maybe he over denied by action. Right. Maybe he's like, I don't even know where I never used to go to this parties or whatever. He gave a detailed denial where she hadn't given that much detail, or at least we don't know it yet. So it is that was something. I thought was a was a yellow flag. You know, because it's certainly that. You know as soon as we get any cooperation about where this took place. Nobody knows where there's took place. We still don't know that information. So it's hard to figure out how you deny being at a party, and what constitutes a party. I don't mean to you know, I look I somebody who was a veteran of the high school party circuit in Miami. Parties were more than we're we're we're more than a dozen people as far as we were concerned. Right. You know to so that that's another thing. What what does he cuts? What is he defining? It's party and things like that. So. And and of course, if you need check after meet the press on Sunday, you know, where to find him he'll be at Redskins park watching watching your Roger to ratchet Aaron Rodgers Aaron Rodgers is playing. I hope he's playing. I I I assume here's here's my guess on whether he's going to play or not he sounds like a guy that realizes. This is a mistake. I don't know if you saw the news. He's quietly admitting you know. Visit a good idea to sort of play on this. I'm guessing here's what happens every Monday morning. He wakes up and his knees. The size of a grapefruit is it all week by Friday. He's like all right. I think I can do this Saturday. You know, he gets a shot. Okay. I can do this. I can do this. And then, you know, wash rinse repeat, I bet you. He's starting to get worn out by this wash repeat cycle window. The Andy Masur win the bears and Packers plaguing. It's not so much later in December. Right. So. If you. How's that going to be in cold wet? I'm just saying if you can keep Aaron Rodgers and your Packers alive till Khalil Mack murders them in December. You know, you're going to be fine. Yeah. I I am more and more more more pessimistic about the season. 'cause I just think. I would argue that the real reason the Packers didn't win that game. He can't do. They couldn't score. They don't know. How to score touchdowns because they can't roll them out of the pocket. Right. I mean, I just think it takes away your part of the offense. I think there's a reason they hit by field goals. Five field goals. December sixteenth is the day. There you go. Check in cold weather. Fun sunday. Enjoy Chuck Todd, and is a registered to say, you know, whatever their what do they gotta be fun in your office free. Come on. He did it. Daily. Meet the press nine hundred forty-seven podcast. Thank you. Check. And we come back in a moment with the discussion of Jon Burge passing. John Conroy will join us. A guy you've known for a long time. I have his what he is the reporter who broke the story back in nineteen ninety. He was Chicago reader reporter. They did twenty twenty over twenty cover stories on the alleged torture. Eighty million dollars later for the city of Chicago, man. Let's see what's coming up. Steve Steve a baby and a thirteen year old girl shot in the south loop. We'll have details of that coming up at seven o'clock from the WGN newsroom and traffic.

WGN Chicago Chuck Todd Brad Kavanagh Aaron Rodgers Chuck Grassley Packers reporter Steve Grzanich Jon Burge John Conroy Clarence Thomas Senate Steve Steve Andy Masur cabinet FBI Cavanaugh Miami Redskins park
"john conroy" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WGN Radio

"It is time for the Steve Cochran show. Let's head over the AllState skyline studio Andy Mazars there and Mercado L. Justin, Kaufman, guys. Good morning. Hello, Andy, heavier, buddy. Thank you get to be here. All right. So we've got a big show. Chuck Todd, of course, coming up in the six o'clock hour also joining us, John Conroy the award winning journalist who who really broke the Jon Burge torture story in Chicago back in nineteen ninety. He was a re a reader reporter who I was one the only reporters to to cover what was happening with the quote, unquote, midnight crew, and John Conroy is gonna join us to talk about the death of John Burge which happened yesterday afternoon. So that's coming up in the six o'clock hour also Pat Brady, Bridget gainer, Cook County Commissioner Bridget gainer going to be here today. Lots of talk about in politics local to as twenty preckwinkle today expected to launch a bid for Chicago mayor. She has a press conference a little bit later this afternoon. We got swapped me coming up, Dean Richards, John HOGAN for river rose to be here as well. And we'll talk about the seventy million the seventy millimeter film festival at the box. Right about say it backwards. So lots to do. So we'll do it today here on Cochran show. Steve Cochran show celebrates the most valuable person on the planet. Weekday mornings at seven twenty on seven twenty WGN. Chicago smart speaker users just say play WGN radio on tune in. The news is sponsored by Lindemann chimney and fireplace. Here is Victoria. Thank you any good morning. It's overcast in sixty seven degrees at O'Hare Chicago police spent much of the overnight hours that Cermak in state in the city south loop. That's where someone shot a six month old baby boy, a thirteen year old girl, and as well as a woman in her thirties who was with the children the woman's recovering. Northwestern. Both children are at Lurie children's hospital in critical but stable condition. US attorney general Jeff Sessions told a gathering of law enforcement professionals in Waukegan yesterday that groups like the ACLU may crime worse in Chicago. You want more shootings more deaths listened to the ACLU antiga back lives matter in groups who are do not know the reality of police he argued without direct evidence that the increase in Chicago crime that occurred after the city entered into an agreement with the ACLU was due to a clause that prohibited. Stop and frisk. Developing news this morning in Asia. Japanese Prime minister Shinzo Abe's has been re-elected as head of his ruling liberal Democratic Party, he defeated a former defense minister paves the way for three more years as Japan's leader today marks one year since hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico devastated. Much of the island. Thousands of people were without power for months. A recent report rather a suggest as many as three thousand people may have died in Puerto Rico in the direct aftermath of that storm. An inmate has died and Lake County lockup the body of thirty one year old Edward Robinson was found Wednesday morning in his cell. He was from Park City was brought in on felony charges back in July. Disgraced former Chicago police commander, John Birch has died. He was being involved in the torture of African American suspects in the nineteen seventies and eighties as a method of extracting confessions. He's blamed for taking those false confessions that led the overturned convictions cost taxpayers hundreds of billions of dollars. Edina, Angelo was the former president of the Chicago police union. I don't know that got a fair shake based on the years and years and years of service. He gave the city we'll have to wait and see how that eventually plays out in history. Burge.

Chicago Steve Cochran John Burge John Conroy Park City ACLU Puerto Rico Bridget gainer Andy Mazars Chicago police union Jon Burge John Birch WGN AllState Edward Robinson Chuck Todd Shinzo Abe Dean Richards Asia
"john conroy" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WWL

"Show we'll preview the matchup and their. Kickoff of college football at four thirty LSU game with the voice of the Tigers. Chris, blare six thirty s gametime LSU Miami Sunday on tiger radio WWL Klay young here? With, John Conroy founder and owner of pest stop your do it yourself. Pest. Control solution John Lewis talk about, killing roaches keeping them out of the house it's a year round problem what, do people do. About it well it's amazing you know the little roaches have nothing to. Do with the cleanness of your house yeah, exit transported in UPS boxes. Or Brown paper bags grocery store so. Once they. Get in just don't. Reach for a can of aerosol because you actually have to, bathe 'em because they're going to build a nest behind a cabinet or inside a? Wall cavity will you'll. Never be able to spray insecticide to kill him and if you catch one. Of those little jobs goosestepping across your. Kitchen floor you want to have the product nukem right actually, you don't want him to carry the bait back to the nest okay so in the New Orleans area where do I get this stuff or. Memory store is. Located at thirty five twelve Saverne avenue our store on the north shore is located at fourteen seventeen north highway one. Ninety that's in the same shopping centers Villoria floors and Sherman Williams And on the West Bank run the palca just past, the Harvey bridge hot enough for you, well we're, about, to make things. A little, hotter with these burning, earn promotion featuring three bad boys. Of the rebel family of. Multi process welding systems look a? Here, this is. Mousy with gas and supply and we will offering the best yet pricing on east. Sobbed, little brother rebel to fifteen complete MiG Tig stick package along. With this bigger better brother the rebel to thirty five much like the two fifteen but with increased output and flexibility now both rebel to fifteen to thirty.

LSU Tigers John Conroy John Lewis Chris New Orleans Sherman Williams Miami founder Villoria Harvey bridge
"john conroy" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WWL

"Foundation repair neighbor brothers said nope you got to do is cut the tree down seventh generation of abra involved with the company they bring the latest technology with them as well as seven generations of experience when it comes to dealing with just about every type of soil condition this area can present abraham brothers call him four four eight eight two six seven one or go to abraham brothers dot com a b as in brother ab are y brothers dot com no question this is a hardworking city working folks we've always been especially good and mixing work and play so whatever you do by getting the work a lot more blue bites from bluecross blueshield is a new way to navigate nola new rights is an affordable bike share program just for our city these bikes are smart and sharp with gps tracking and bilton safety clo confidence on a bicycle bill thing you even if you all work and no play riding a blue by his anything but don't find us on social media at blue bikes nolan enjoy klay young here with john conroy the founder and owner of.

bluecross blueshield founder abraham nola john conroy
"john conroy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That the first person the first man the she ever spent time alone with didn't want anything from her who is actually the first person she'd have eye contact with who can't seek in some way to manipulate towards their own made what they wanted for her role will they wanted for himself and he genuinely have nothing that he wants to gain he was born with a position the he'd gone as far as he could politically he was rich he didn't care he was kind of over it'll and it gave him a new lease of life but what the real connection was the fact there was a genuine connection based on no need on his part and he was able to just give him give her very true advice based on what he felt she needed and that was surprising because her family was sort of the opposite observance of john conroy who was she never really not a father the only father figure she'd none was to john conroy was effectively among elsa fodder nigger toyair no what you have moms boyfriend basically who really really was incredibly controlling and they did it was not a good relationship now dan i wonder reese the price by how modern she seemed when you when you begin to look into the history a little bit more deeply to prepare throw all i'm i was surprised by how much he still eh the is still relevant today like they they kind of and the conversations that we still having today and what she was navigating and i mean i'm what i find really am fascinating is that she was the first queen who was a mother and i'm with not actually talking that long ago reeler's he first queen rick first green inherent right to marry and have children will overthrown which allen she had nine of them nine of them each week i think make a huge difference the way women were perceived in the 19th century because suddenly it put paid to all the myths that women was salah less up because they were having children i couldn't cope with the stresses of of of life that they couldn't held was positions responsibility because there she was doing it raining on having nine children i said the fast royal family yes image of the royal family came from victoria and albert and and pushing their you know the family portrait and yet and into the into the.

john conroy reeler dan reese rick allen albert
"john conroy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Pass in it's incredible but when you see headdresses in particular let you see how she was absolutely tiny am summit live to begin with yes she got a little primer toll over she got low year dan i mean it's it's is it wherever she yes she did it her um but it is really amazing to see you kind of really especially as one house she really get a sense of of her yeah now rufus you play the queen's confidant the prime minister lord melbourne um did he released up forward an event her grinned resorting oh absolutely i think it was really formative fall victim tori because she'd never been alone she had to the she slept the same bed with a mom she had to be escorted down the stairs fame pat yeah and she'd never really had any time unknown until she was queen and she could simply punish them out of the room in atlanta and it's very important i think in their relationship and in her development that the first person the first man the she ever spent time alone with didn't want anything from her who is actually the first person she'd have eye contact with who can't seek in some way to manipulate towards their own made what they wanted for her role they wanted for himself and he genuinely had nothing that he wants to gain he was born with a position the he'd gone as far as he could politically he was rich he didn't care he was kind of over it'll and he gave him a new lease of life but what the real connection was the fact there was a genuine connection based on no need on his part and he was able to just give him gave her very true advice based on what he felt she needed and that was surprising because her family was sort of the opposite dragged the observance of john conroy who was she never really noticed father the only father figure she none was a john conroy was effectively among elsa father miguel toyo no what you have moms boyfriend basically who really really was incredibly controlling and they did it was not a good relationship now can i wonder were you surprised by how modern g seemed when you when you begin to look into the history a little bit more deeply to prepare throw all i'm i was surprised by how much he still ed the is still relevant today like the the kind of and the conversations that we still having today in what she was.

the queen john conroy miguel toyo prime minister melbourne atlanta
"john conroy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"First person the first man the she ever spent time alone with didn't want anything from her is actually the first person she'd have eye contact with who can't seek in some way to manipulate towards their own made what they wanted for hurdle what they wanted for himself and he genuinely have nothing he wants to gain he was born with a position he'd gone as far as he could politically he was rich he didn't care he was kind of over it'll and he gave him a new lease of life but what the real connection was the fact there was a genuine collection based on no need on his part and he was able to just give him give her very true advice based on what he felt she needed and that was surprising because her family was sort of the opposite the observance of john conroy who is she never really not a father the only father figure she'd nine with john conroy was effectively among elsa fodder nagar toyair no what you have moms boyfriend basically who really really was incredibly controlling and they did it was not a good relationship now dan i wonder were you surprised by how modern she seemed when you when you begin to look into the history a little bit more deeply to prepare throw all i'm i was surprised by how much he still eh the is still relevant today like the the kind of and the conversations that we still having today in what she was navigating and i mean i'm well i find really an fascinating is that she was the first queen who was a mother and i'm with not actually talking that long ago realize he first queen rick lived suppose queen in her room right to marry and have children well a throne which of and she had nine of them nine of them each week i think make a huge difference the way women were perceived in the 19th century because suddenly it put paid to all the miss that women was somehow less up because they were having children they couldn't cope with the stresses of of of life that they couldn't hold was positions of responsibility because there she was doing it raining i'm having nine children and he said the fast royal family yes image of the royal family came from victoria and albert and and pushing the you know the family portrait and and into the into the.

john conroy elsa fodder nagar dan rick albert
"john conroy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was really formative for victims tori because she'd never been alone she had to the she slept the same bed with a mom she had to be escorted down the stairs siniphen pat yeah and she never really had any time alone until she was queen and she could simply punish them out of the room in atlanta minera it's very important i think in their relationship but in her development that the first person the first man the she ever spent time alone wave didn't want anything from her who is actually the first person she direct contact with who can't seek in some way to manipulate towards their own made what they wanted for hurdle will they wanted for himself and he genuinely had nothing to do once again he was born with a position and he'd gone as far as he could politically he was rich he didn't care he was kind of over it'll and he gave him a new lease of life but what the real connection was the fact there was a genuine collection based on no need on his part and he was able to just give him gave her very true advice based on what he felt she needed and that was surprising because her family was sort of the opposite absence of john conroy who was she never really not a father the only father figure she none was a john conroy was effectively among elsa father nick out toyair no what you have moms boyfriend basically who really really was incredibly controlling and they did it was not a good relationship now gina i wonder were you surprised by how modern she seemed when you when you begin to look into the history a little bit more deeply to prepare throw all i'm i was surprised by how much he still ed the is still relevant today let the the kind of and the.

john conroy nick atlanta gina
"john conroy" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on Historical Figures

"The duchess wasn't a popular woman among the royal court due to her previous marriage and domineering presence over her children especially poor victoria she had also come to rely heavily on her husband's comptroller or royal accountant john conroy if every fairytale needs a villain john conroy was victoria's conroy was a conniving snake of a man who had slithered his way into edwards favour after edwards death he swooped in an offered aid to the morning duchess of kent he soon became her personal adviser conroy coveted being a part of the british aristocracy he even had mechanization for the throne yet he had had trouble rising through the ranks due to his reputation for being a weasel it was only through his skills and accounting that he sustained himself after victoria's father died conroy use the duchess of kent sorrows to get more power he became her confidante and friend secretly manipulating her when victoria was born he told the duchess of kent that victoria wasn't safe from her relatives that they all sought the throne and to tear the duchess and her new daughter apart the only true course of action to protect the family was isolation from the royal court under conroy's personal protection of course so the duchess of kent moved to kensington palace in the royal borough of london there she kept poor victoria in complete and total isolation from the rest of the world the duchess and conroy came up with what could be known as the infamous kensington system this cruel system was designed to keep the tory a weak and helpless purely dependent upon conroy and the duchess of kent this way conroy could eventually use victoria as a puppet and rule the kingdom behind the scenes once she took the throne victoria was forbidden to leave the premises without first consulting her mother and conroy she couldn't have any relatives visitor unless they were first screened by conroy she was to live in the same room as her mother and was forbidden to be left alone ever.

comptroller john conroy edwards kent victoria accountant kensington palace london
"john conroy" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"john conroy" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Options for confronting north korea following its intercontinental ballistic missile march then brooks what the amended numbers long standoff at home this afternoon arresting fifty six year old john conroy the murder of his brother body of thomas powell he was founding conroy's backyard before the standoff began again tonight thunderstorm snow possible overnight low seventy 75 right our looked in its seventy eight degrees in irving crisscrossed standing by to continue is exciting and interesting program from the wbap newsroom i'm dennis martin i have never heading calling exciting and interesting i will take that i will take them i will take the thank you so i want to thank him for of rising us the fact that steve scalise is back in the hospital thinks that democrat terrorists that liberal leftist democrat terrorist who shot and tried to kill 23 republican congressman he as dennis said from the wbap newsroom scalise free admitted to the intensive care unit in serious condition to infection concerned it he's not of the woods this poor mana tell you what is the congressman than saturday shen tempt you better believe this means getting the best healthcare no country can can can can afford i i mean i i don't know what has of the does it matter do do you think that anybody will get better care than him what i'm saying seriously any so this shows how seriously this man is in in the media is just go after an attack cetera all my gosh there is more news coming out before get into the whole marijuana.

north korea murder steve scalise congressman marijuana brooks john conroy thomas powell dennis martin intensive care seventy eight degrees fifty six year