13 Burst results for "John Collison"

"john collison" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

The Breakdown with NLW

08:28 min | Last month

"john collison" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

"Crypto using three factor authentication, providing a simpler, safer and smarter way to store, buy, swap, send and receive crypto. Arculus is offline cold storage. Your private keys are encrypted on the Oculus keycard and are never online. Stay safe from hackers with no cords, no charging, no Bluetooth. Just crypto security made simple. By arculus on Amazon today. The breakdown is sponsored by FTX U.S. FTX U.S. is the safe regulated way to buy and sell Bitcoin and other digital assets. With up to 85% lower fees than competitors. There are no fixed minimum fees, no ACH transaction fees, and no withdrawal fees. One of the largest exchanges in the U.S. FTX U.S. is also the only leading exchange that supports both Ethereum and Solana NFTs. When you trade NFTs on FTX, you pay no gas fees. Download the FTX app today and use referral code breakdown to support the show. In other in between regulatory news, the financial conduct authority in the UK has named an interim head of a new digital asset unit. Remember, speaking of our theme of liminal, the UK has been in an extra weird spot. On the one hand, the FCA registration process for crypto companies had a big deadline expire, leaving huge questions around the standing of firms like copper and revolut. On the other hand, however, Rishi sunak, the Chancellor of the exchequer, came out last week promising to make the UK a new global hub for crypto. So clearly there are some politics around this right now. In any case, according to her LinkedIn page, the UK's financial conduct authority has appointed Victoria McLaughlin as interim head of its digital assets department. So, like I said, one type of speculation that happens during these liminal periods is about wondering about regulatory approvals and things like that. But if all the industry did during this type of in between would sit around and wait for those approvals, it wouldn't be very productive at all. One of the major themes of this particular cycle is the relentless capital raises that have just continued unabated. These matter and I think will make this sideways slash downturn period different than previous crypto winters because ultimately what rejuvenates attention and energy and markets is new things coming to market that attract new market participants or new excitement from existing market participants and capital is an absolutely key ingredient to get there. Over the last weeks we've seen a ton of fundraising. Ava labs, the lead developer of the avalanche blockchain is apparently in the process of raising 350 million, Voyager innovation raised the $210 million round, moon pay, which is a crypto payments company, raised an $87 million series a led by Tiger global management, framework ventures, which is a crypto native fund, raised a new $400 million fund. Half of which is slated to go into the quote burgeoning blockchain gaming space, said cofounder Michael Anderson, I believe the next stage of the blockchain industry will be entirely about onboarding new users. And we think that gaming is by far the biggest top of the funnel opportunity. As the economics have played to earn models converge with triple-A games that are actually fun to play, we expect an explosion of growth for the sector. On that gaming front reports are that the sandbox, which is a metaverse platform, is raising $400 million at a $4 billion valuation. This is just 6 months after raising a $93 million series B so again, the industry is really well capitalized and shows no signs of slowing down. Shifting gears to NFTs for a minute, coinbase has launched its NFT platform in beta. Now easily the most interesting thing about this to me are the socially integrated features. There are tons of social interactions built in. There is a four U feed for discoverability and each NFT has comments. This is generated a ton of buzz. Fudge DX writes not even joking. This coinbase Instagram thing might be genius. Jason yanowitz, the founder of blockwork, said something similar. Coinbase didn't launch an NFT platform, they launched web three Instagram. Now the flip side is that there was a lot of making fun of the incredible rudeness of a lot of people's comments on the NFTs. Cross Ethan NFT trader writes open C is where you get the most liquidity. Looks rare is where you get the best rewards. Coinbase NFT is where you comment on your friend's NFTs telling them how ugly they are. You might not be able to filter by traits, but at least you can tell someone their NFT is hideous. Our canic NFT meanwhile has never used coinbase NFT again. Just listed my NFT for 0.01 below floor and someone called me a in the comments section. NFTs will hit a bull market again because everyone will be too scared to list in fear of getting cyber bullied. All jokes aside, I am super excited to see if this social side of NFTs takes off. I think it could be really interesting. Finally, a kind of a big story from Friday. Stripe has launched crypto payouts and I'm going to give the news through the lens of Jeremy alert from circle who wrote this thread. He writes major news today for mainstream adoption of USD C with stripe announcing crypto payouts with USD C, launching with Twitter as the first pilot customer. It's rewarding to see some of the most important Internet companies in the world using circle. A long held promise of digital currency like USD C has been removing friction and enabling anyone anywhere to easily receive payments. Twitter creators exist everywhere the Internet exists and existing payment systems are expensive and complex to reach people easily. USD C provides an open platform for connecting people with value, with Twitter users being able to bring a digital wallet and receive payments. By building on USD C for polygon, it allows for large scale transactions at penny's cost. Yes, crypto payments can reach Internet scale. Having one of the most important payments companies in the world stripe adopting USD C is an indicator of things to come. We at circle share their mission to grow the GDP of the Internet and believe USD C is going to become a key building block for Internet commerce. A CNBC piece about this captures the importance of this shift relative to stripes position on crypto before. Quote, it stripes first significant push into crypto since dropping support for Bitcoin four years ago. The San Francisco based startup stopped accepting payments via Bitcoin in January 2018, citing the digital coins notoriety for volatile price swings and a lack of efficiency in making everyday transactions. But the firm has since warmed to crypto amid hype over web three, a movement in tech that calls for the creation of a decentralized version of the Internet based on blockchain technology. Stripe last year formed a team dedicated to exploring crypto and web three. In November, stripe cofounder John Collison hinted the firm may soon offer crypto support again. Karen Sharma, a product manager at stripes crypto unit, said in a blog post Friday while the store of value aspects of cryptocurrencies typically receive the most attention, we view the prospect of open access global financial rails as becoming at least equally compelling. As a result, we've been exploring ways to use cryptocurrency based platforms to unlock broader access. I think it's a huge development and not just because stripe being involved in crypto is a sign of adoption. I think Jeremy is dead on that it's incredibly difficult for these companies whose audiences are all over the world to easily interact financially with them. This is a use case where crypto does potentially solve a major pain point. And as an aside, going back to what seems to be my favorite conversation, which is how USD stablecoins could extend the reign of the U.S. dollar for another generation. The fact that these payments are all being made in a USD linked stablecoin is pretty interesting as well. Anyway, there you have it, kind of a quiet week. Like I said, it's this liminal in between moment for crypto, but that's a good time to sit back and ponder things. And I'm glad you're here doing that with me. I want to say thanks one more time to my sponsors next to IO, arculus and FTX, and thanks to you guys for listening. Until tomorrow, be safe and take care of each other. Peace. Hey breakdown listeners come join coin desks consensus 2022. The festival for the decentralized world this June 9th through the 12th in Austin, Texas. This is the only festival showcasing and celebrating all sides of blockchain, crypto ecosystems, web three, and the metaverse, and is designed for crypto newbies, investors, entrepreneurs, developers, and creators. Don't miss speakers like Kathy wood, SPF, CZ, punk 6 5 two 9 and Joe lubin to name just a few. Use code breakdown to get 15% off your pass at coindesk dot com slash consensus 2022..

U.S. UK Solana NFTs financial conduct authority Rishi sunak Victoria McLaughlin digital assets department Ava labs Voyager innovation moon pay Tiger global management framework ventures Jason yanowitz blockwork
"john collison" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:00 min | 2 months ago

"john collison" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And do you look at cryptocurrency as a safe haven or a safer asset than a traditional equity in this moment I mean we saw some optimism around at least the way Bitcoin was trading We've seen that be wiped away We've seen a lot of volatility How should we make sense of cryptocurrency as an asset How is Sequoia making sense of cryptocurrency as an asset I think we're in this interesting moment where all of crypto gets painted by many investors with a broad brush when as the world more comes to understand crypto will see that assets are quite different And so the volatility that you see with Bitcoin or what you're buying with Bitcoin is very different than what you're buying with an application token or any other type of crypto asset whether it's an NFT et cetera And so I think you can certainly look at the volatility and you can say is Bitcoin trading more like an equity Is it trading more like a commodity How should it trade But the truth is that we're just very early in the world understanding Bitcoin and broader cryptocurrencies And I think the way those assets trade over time will change a lot All right Michelle buy a partner at Sequoia Capital Thank you fascinating We'll be watching the moves Sequoia makes in this space Well stripe is announcing they're launching payment support for crypto businesses including exchange wallets and NFT marketplaces They'll also be partnering with FTX and FTX U.S. to improve stripes know your customer protocols We had a chat about crypto with stripe president John Collison a few months back Take a listen to what he had to say One thing we're really hung up on is 22% of commerce today is cross border That's it It feels like it should be much higher especially on the international where it's so easy to have cross border interactions And so crypto is one very exciting direction for trying to solve that Coming up we're going to talk about web three mixed reality and the metaverse.

Bitcoin Sequoia Sequoia Capital John Collison Michelle U.S.
"john collison" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:14 min | 6 months ago

"john collison" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're not intimidated by going and gathering putting data together It just becomes again this tool in your toolkit And it is that combination of the human intellect and the ability to work with data that makes us all more powerful Data is not an answer It's a tool for humans to do their jobs even better and to be more data driven And dare I say I mean I'm the sounds altruistic in and of itself But how does it help Tableau longer term Well certainly our vision here is to help people see and understand data It's just our core belief that everyone should be working with data and we certainly provide our tools as part of that But this is just a core belief that you can do so much good and be more so much more effective if you are data driven And how is business confidence at the moment How is the desire to be using your product to be getting out there and evolving themselves the companies Yeah You're more crossing than ever right Have you seen the changes that happened to every business over the last two years They've had to react and adapt their businesses if they go forward And the key to doing that is data and being unveiled a really understand if you look at companies like Jaguar Land Rover who has really reinventing their company and using data by getting data in the hands of everyone from manufacturing to the stores all the way across the entire chain of what Jaguar Land Rover does and empowering all of that with data is the key to really adapting with the changing rate of business Important to have in these supply chain constrained world that we currently live in Tableau CEO among Nelson great to have some time with you we thank you for giving us up to speed on the world of data Meanwhile another news the most valuable startup in the United States says has no immediate plans to go public John Collison of course is the president and cofounder of digital payments company stripe So he's happy for it to stay private for the time being Speaking at a conference in Abu Dhabi connaissance said that they are still very early in stripes journey The company raised $600 million remember in March was valued at a cool 95 billion stripe competes for square and PayPal among others Meanwhile coming up billionaire philanthropy will take a look at Jack Dorsey's donations pattern How his celebrity network.

Tableau CEO Jaguar Land Rover John Collison Land Rover Jaguar Nelson United States Abu Dhabi PayPal Jack Dorsey
"john collison" Discussed on Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

04:59 min | 9 months ago

"john collison" Discussed on Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

"Impact. Though seconds and moments seemed to last an attorney. But once i'm with doctor. Dr baxter colonel david and then wonderful lady from the navy natalie. Ogle tree had grabbed her bible when it was time to evacuate. Get out of the building. She grabbed her bible. She coming down the stairs sees me. She's just lead to to pray with me Speaking is very difficult because of the installation injury. May i've got the lungs of a twenty or smoker without ever having smoked a cigarette but She reads the ninety. I saw him over me. dr baxter administers the treatment rights out on the toe tag. What he did puts it on my big toe but all of that took about thirty to thirty five. But it seemed to pass lickety-split On the eventually loaded on a body board the in the in the pentagon because the building so large Kind of like the relief pitcher golf cart That's what the ambulances are there along gated The ambulance gets to where. We're i don't how it all happens but the ambulance gets there. They put me on the body board. Load me onto the golf court Specialist pain is driving and sergeant nimrod is is my medic that Sitting next to me as my body board is they get me out out to the eight quarter exit which is on the north. The north side of the building that looks toward the washington monument But all the ambulances because of the crash is at the fourth quarter. It's closer to go to south parking so the end up Taking me to there's a a young captaining cap wine limits. His first day of work. What a day to be your first day at work He was there to sign in He's got a driving. A ford expedition. Lay empty out the back of his ford expedition. Throw me in Joe heison is an air force medic. She's they're doing her two weeks of annual training at the de lorenzo clinic but normally she works at georgetown. She hops in the back. Also major john collison who. I knew john help. Load me in the back did knows me. He was loading but he sees my toe tag with my name on it. And it's like oh my god. This is colonel birdwell so he optioned the back. And so i've got captain winelands driving. It's with folks terms. Dr george sounds what nearly killed me. Not a dc. Traffic's bad. and so.

Dr baxter colonel david Ogle tree dr baxter navy golf pentagon Joe heison expedition de lorenzo clinic ford john collison washington colonel birdwell georgetown john Dr george
"john collison" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

07:57 min | 10 months ago

"john collison" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"That i'm interested in i wouldn't think anything more about that so to me. It's so much out there now. And i also really really use love the hashtags because i started spend some time figuring out that now. If i'm digging into an artist that i don't know that much about it might be an artist. That's no longer alive. And i want to see how institutions have for example previously installed bat artists. When i use the hashtag i get like a million views. Where like lots not institutions. But mostly. it's interesting to see how the audiences have taken this not shots and use that hashtag and you get also the audience's view when they see something it might be something in the sculpture park outdoors. I work a lot with public art so for me. That's where i have to like. Start to look for them. So i love that with instagram. To like hashtag artist name and then i see from all over the world how people have seen it. How it has been installed what people think about it. I think it's britain. I need to work on that all right back to what. You're talking about You talked about how when you start to do an exhibition. You try and find a story and then you sort of build out from there. How do you find a story because literally like your topic could be well anything in the whole world in history time of existence. You know human experience. It could be anything. How do you take all those options and whittled them down to. That's the one that i should do a project about what i guess. It's the same question as you can ask an artist rights but why did you want to tell this story and then that was sort of because that artists had that i guess the answer is to say as everyone else in the sense and you might be like if i'm working institution. It's maybe a tossed that i have to solve is a why i remember you talked to pay plateau another in the region artist about the big y but i was in a different context. But i think that's the big the why is really important. I think for a curator because that gives you if you answer that you're forced to answer the context and you need to know why you should do this and the same. I guess as an artist you need to answer that as a curator. You can have this brilliant idea. You want to work with this and this artist and you want to tell the story but if you can't answer the why the maybe it's not a good idea because you need to have a good recent for. Why should they story be told right now was previously told by no one okay. Maybe that's a good reason. Does it have anything to do with the political climate at the moment okay. Maybe that's something you know to really sort of need to have reasons. I think for it to also become interesting and so you need to latch onto the big context at the moment. So you need to answer the why and i have. Sometimes i work the opposite so the wise. Maybe the reason why. I want to tell the story. If you see my what. I'm trying to say do. Yeah of wise my biggest Like question constantly. I had this friend in grad school. John collison he sat down mondays. I got an artist statement. Like okay go start. Read it out loud to me. And he just started with it. I had my back to. I wasn't even looking at him. Wasn't even paying attention. What he was saying anytime he would. Just stop talking. I would just turn and say why we kept doing this for like and so i had no idea what he was saying. Who's we kept doing this for like forty five minutes. I don't know maybe it was an hour and in the end at suddenly editor. And i was like why. He's say i've got it figured it out. Thanks a lot and he just like ran off. And i have no idea what he said but just continually pushing him just just no matter what he said. I just saying why why why. And he figured it out of self and lay it sometimes takes being pushed really hard to figure out why because like for my artwork. I i'm more of a practice. Based so like i will do something because i enjoy the process of making something and oftentimes takes me. I generally say three to five years to be able to have the hindsight to be able to look back on. Why made something and so. It's really hard for me sometimes. Still show artwork. That's new because i don't really know why making it yet. But then in hindsight atkin then look back and be like. Oh yeah the reason why i made. That was because of this. This exactly is really important. But i guess it always starts with something of your own personal interest. It has to be an eye for me. It's the same. If i can and i have the ability to do that. The royal projects always become a little bit better. If you're invested personally in something so let's say to give you an example. That's maybe easier on this than when i did my ma. I worked at target. I gallery on. It was supposed to celebrate. Its forty years on over serie and so we needed to do something that could celebrate this forty years of history and then since i am also a little bit of interest sometimes in science fiction and these type of things i had also just recently read that the golden records project this nasa project and. That's yeah you're nodding so call sagan's knossos project and also celebrated its fifty years anniversary the same year on the voyager. I believe is what that was on. Undevoted juries physical archive that was sent out to space. And it's still out there. And so i realized that i was reading about. That's and i realized that that was also forty years ago. And so i saw this amazing opportunity to connect with us and so i used that as a project to look at forty years anniversary of the photographers gallery and the naza golden records at the same time because they sent up hundred and eighteen photographs which was part of the archives. And so i- dig into those hundred and eight thousand photographs to see what was sent out to outer space and they were supposed to represent. The whole earth says a super interesting archive project with lots of problematic issues as well but also super fascinating and so i started to like recreate and did like little remake. A contemporary remake of those than eighty photographs. Like what would. I invited hundred artists to answer that question. Like if you were to choose one photographic image that you made yourself that would represent the earth and i was the only thing you left behind before you died to communicate to who else is going to pick it up. What image would you choose. And so two hundred actors from all over the world and then i collected two doll- hundred come up with a good answer to that. Because i would imagine there's a percentage that would come up with really bad answers to that. It's a good mix. It's really confusing. Mix and that was kind of the point as well. That that's kind of the diversity you get as well and the diversity in the original hundred and eighteen which inal predict the south was also really really weird. I've watched documentaries of the story of the making of those disks and all the thought that went into the the mathematics behind the science behind it like all the different kinds of things and yes it certainly has some flaws in it for sure but out for its time it was incredibly progressive and very forward thinking however it's.

John collison instagram britain grad school atkin sagan nasa inal
"john collison" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"john collison" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Stripe is a private company valued at 36 billion, founded by brothers Patrick and John. Collison looks like more like collision. If you put another eye in there who remains they remain citizens of Ireland, So I guess Trump can't touch him. Stripe alleges that President Trump violated the company's policies against encouraging violence following his reaction events at Capitol Hill. What did he do to encourage the violence? I really don't know how that went down anyway, There's that What else? Oh, we have a Florida nurse charged with allegedly trying to obtain $420,000 in covert relief. Ah Giraldo Caraballo Age 55 of Miami made the it's a He, by the way, made his initial. I know you want the same thing I did. A nurse is better. The woman that was a guy there. Male nurses, and you can't even call the male nurses now because that's sexist. His initial appearance in Miami federal courts, according to Associated Press he's charged with engaging in transactions and unlawful proceeds and making false statements to financial institutions. And trying to get $420,000 in covert relief. So there you go. He also scolded, has denied the Democrats bid. To have universal vote by mail in Texas Supreme Court turning away a Democrat bid to force universal vote by mail in Texas, leaving intact a state law. The least lets people cast no excuse absentee ballots on Lee if they're 65 years or older. The Texas Democratic Party and its allies argued unsuccessfully with law violates the Constitution's 26th amendment, which says the right to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of age. Well, they're not denying your Right to vote. They're denying that you can get a mail in ballot anytime you want. One. Voting by mail became a sharply partisan issue amid President Trump's Unsupported contentions is from news, Mac. The practice led to widespread fraud and the November election. Texas Republican governor and attorney general urged the Supreme Court to reject the Democratic appeal. So there you have Vance and I'm trying. I'm trying to unload the kitchen sink on your folks..

Trump Texas Supreme Court Stripe Texas Miami President Texas Democratic Party Collison Ireland Associated Press Patrick fraud Vance Florida United States attorney Lee
"john collison" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

11:08 min | 2 years ago

"john collison" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Window on the ESPN and we often talk to her members of course the last time was in the forty Niners drafted Brandon I you but if but a far different conversation great video that you sent out her arm when America huddles up we are a pair of powerful team you should check out that as well in her when we were thinking of voices that we want to hear from two to educate our listeners you were one of the first guys we thought of so we really appreciate your time at her mad words head coach at Arizona St new judges courtesy of the my gas line in and we just heard that a cut from you there go ahead and expand just what do you see and what do you think about what's going on well it kind of ironic fifty two years ago for Martin Luther king was assassinated and I can remember didn't suffer terrible with my father we were watching all the chain of events that took place after that in our fourteen years old and this week I'm having the same conversation with my daughters there are two important trying to figure out what is all this Daddy why why are people doing this you know all the all this this is a conversation at the supper table and you know it's coming here to call her we have we have we gotten better it got better but we're still having a conversation and you know I think when you're a person of color in grown up you know only in the neighborhood and realizing that you know lady justice's blindfold and that's supposed to mean that the scale that you hold on to our equal and I think sometimes people of color to feel like it's not balanced it's not and I think you saw which is what is what happened it's kind of like being on the team when you think about police department they're not coaching bad behavior but police officers with that being said you still can't allow it to happen and would it happen there has to be consequences and I think this is what you see up for right now country when you watch the protesters of all colours younger young young people which is great because they will they will push the wheel it will push the will to progress with their children and that's important and I think which is fed up with it you know there's always been racism a lot of been hit in right now the company you can see it in other words the voice you hear on the only guest let her I think a lot of people in and your comments are strong and and you're talking about sitting down with your kids at the dinner table and having these conversations I think a lot of people ask the question what's my responsibility what am I supposed to do where should I go where should I have these conversations I can I follow who plays football at university of northern Colorado julen Aisin put out a statement on his Instagram yesterday that said we still care about me when the ball is deflated a and and I've heard different people make these comments about college football coaches and maybe even NFL coaches but college specifically about the recruiting of young African American man what's the responsibility of her colleagues who sit on these on these couches in the living rooms of of moms and dads and say I'm gonna take care yourself well hopefully late lately your university we say enough diploma and I've called every pair of that odd business listing homes that he doesn't really hear about Amanda that's a responsibility we are building a man your bill of young men that won't be in until dark they'll be fatherless W. hopefully I will be involved in the community someone will come after the this is very important is the culture that hopefully you're trying to build a new program you know all programs real simple we want we want young men to become the best version of themselves and we are helping with that remember to get enough to join us on the sports we were talking about to what is going on in our country right now yeah it is something just it just hit me in in in what you just said in that your father talk to you fifty two years old lady you're sitting at the breakfast table in your you're talking your daughters about the very same thing maybe it's navy T. on my part because I have obviously not seen normally what you've seen that through the lens you've seen seen it I seem to have optimism because I haven't seen in my lifetime the the racial makeup of the people who are angry and they're going out and protesting do you as you see this one do you think this one is different or not hello this is different because young people this is young people and then if they're the one leader not to have to carry the torch now and and when I watched him when he told us that it is not violent it's it's a protest of passion all of which I will look at this movie it's a bad and we're tired of it we gotta fix it and you know and I think that your time until you you're able to hold up it's a hard hope you got a walking tour because you got a similar your differences and this is how you learn your desire to learn about other people because sometimes you're not you're not involved with other people there that matter to you to be associated with it but you really don't know what you just said I don't know if you really don't know how they're feeling and I think this is the conversation is a hard conversation and we got a hair you know there's some irony as a like in the media as far as the NFL goes in the last couple of days in city when we talked a lot yesterday about an interview he did I think was over the weekend or on Monday evening saying that the night Ivete of some white people is what hurts the black lives movement are the black lives matter movement because they don't believe that people are capable of doing something this disgusting or this terrible of this racist and then just yesterday Vic Fangio does an interview of the same division I head coach of the Denver Broncos and says that I don't see discrimination in the NFL you get what you earn and I and I think that that's not not even tell you that we're talking about can can you tell us your thoughts in your feelings on those comments from Vic Fangio well it's a corner with each student right yeah so it's always it's not always live in somebody else's shoes wonderful walk out at you know in advance American dream I mean really I mean they're good contrast between of America you know that you're told that we when you when you grow up in this in this country and that guy it's a place that everyone could obtain their version of the second class what upward of mobility is possible if you work hard that statement that thank but that's not always true for you to think there's always you know nineteen because that's not always that's not always the case yeah you're in a unique position in that you obviously played you coached at the NFL level and now you're coaching at the college level and you know we talked a lot of former professional athletes and talked about what it's like in the locker room and I've always you know get through this whole thing a lot of thinking that I've done I wish we could take that locker room and put it into American society because there doesn't seem to be as much at least racial divide because you're you're a team you have that in common and it doesn't matter where you came from and what the color of your skin if you can help me win we're brothers I mean that's what it seems like in a locker room but it but at the college level and maybe this is why you went back because it you know people are still clay at that point and you can mold them and I and I got to believe that that's that's a pretty cool feeling when you get him at that level and you can really influence the kind of people that they can become well you know they're they're about to start demand work when they leave you're going to graduate and then your life begins he'll sport kitchen with the suffering of intervention again it just stops I need a call would you like to work not not some local support you're not going to question what would most of us are not ten percent and the rest of the data for the life work so one had to obtain your colleagues you know years I can remember going to cal Berkeley in nineteen seventy two can you imagine that your mom best all of it and I remember on that campus how tall is it not clear and watching the protesters come up and speak open open market twelve o'clock and I remember where it shows you all this in gold wow you know it is really kind of you can make your slack account of what America is and how all the different people have different you know different maybe twice since I've been stressed about your base you what you wanted he also side note if you have worked in this role that you could obtain success this call report is that other people didn't want to watch that why is this happening that's a question you have to ask yourself nineteen seventy two on the campus of Berkeley said during Vietnam added we don't believe what what what were the protests like then all my god you know it was part of it and I and I so I would you know I went to the Niners game championship game because I don't go out to the listener calls animal all up in the box after computer silent and I committed a lapse in your inbox Dr yeah wow you will be able we he's in the booth what year is I'm I'm not trying to eighteen that's fifty years a lot of now I'm and I'm telling you still working in a that that's tremendous you know what I heard some about him I'm trying to think where I read it or sought the Ronnie Lott actually said yesterday in our season he said the reason why Dr Harry Edwards is so great and this is this is one of the things that we need to do is that he said that he sees it from the the macro perspective he sees it from you know from a from like at a helicopter view point he sees all the elements understands all viewpoints as a runny set it down and you know when you think about him you know he was part of the crew the sixty eight couldn't be electric he was a sign of respect he was an athlete disarmament and middle Thomas John Collison those gas yeah he was involved in that yeah so now.

ESPN Niners Brandon America
"john collison" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

12:09 min | 2 years ago

"john collison" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Let's play golf together so it's kind of the way it was he always had a way of connecting with people and feel does but you know and then the whole political aspect came and I think it was uncomfortable for me because you know you can't undo things are not that I would undo a friendship for you know the political support is totally different than the support of a friend he's right about that too I guess because we used to go off together don't mean that I support him you know in in his political endeavors I don't I don't support the writer gets coming out his his mouth now it is definitely a fine line are you there is a fine line is just the line very irate since we're talking about people with money right now let's talk about your rate now Drake that did it architectural digest suit of his house and everybody's been going crazy now this is home in Toronto his maintenance around it's a twenty one school has a twenty one square foot as skylight basketball court I mean it's amazing I know you all saw the pictures and everybody talking about this online yesterday right this house is a masterpiece I mean fifty thousand square filed amount of money the amount of of everything he did from the marble to the paint to the to the furniture that house is a masterpiece him in Ferris amazing Zeina designed that house in that house came out great is one of the best houses I've seen in fifty thousand square feet I mean our house is amazing I would never leave the house his dad well he can't right now so that's great for him a bed in his bedroom alone is thirty two hundred square feet that's bigger than my whole house so as to how to Drake for making all that money and investing him into that amazing one hundred million dollar Toronto mansion and we got it and then he has that he has that Birkin collection right that he's been getting these Birkin bags and collecting them for years he said for the woman who I end up with he's done that in an interview previously were he talked about it I and he has all kinds of bags he has bags that those broken bags they range in price from forty thousand to five hundred thousand dollars each day as a Himalayan Himalayas about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars a lot of people say why he I have bags I think he has I think close to seventy bags autos bags because he we have like the safe from seventy two hundred but if you purchased a bag for eight thousand dollars and he wanted to resell it the next day you probably would sell it for about twenty thousand so as soon as you buy those bags of their investment you can make a lot of money of those bags Birkin bags and Kelly bags are investments well it's your wife so it's an investment into that's true all right and this whole entire room report segment right here is all about big money and Kylie Jenner is the world's youngest self made billionaire yet again according to Forbes this is her second year in a row and she's only twenty two years old and her net worth is a billion dollars so you know congratulations headed to other entrants under thirty snap co founder CEO Evan Spiegel and John Collison of at payments startup stripe they're both twenty nine years old and they're considered self made billionaires according to Forbes as well so Kylie Jenner had told Forbes two years ago she invested two hundred fifty thousand of our own money from modeling to pay on an outside company produced her lip kits that eventually launch and that's what's made her a billionaire there's a don't hate on any of those people they figured it out in life okay and that's what you need to figure it out in life whatever that talented S. Q. Li whatever idea you have inside of you that can possibly you know unlock your unlimited potential do it all right I'm Angela yee and that is your room a report all right some of the Yasir Yasir double to go with that Tom Brady Howard Stern interview too because it it'll it'll make you definitely feel like you need to grow and evolve I respect because you gotta know when to growing of all he could to state in New England comfortable what is ready for the challenges and if you have other things he wants to prove himself I respect him moving on makers bishop TD Jakes talks about getting comfortable at ten and sometimes you got to go back to one and going back to one of the next level which is actually eleven when you get to twenty is the same thing so so on and so forth so respected Tom Brady I feel all right we'll give you don't get you Adrian yeah he's a young man needs to come to the front of the congregation we like to have a war one all right we'll get into that next keep it locked as the breakfast club good morning the breakfast club your morning so now would be the same H. B. O.'s insecure star Issa rae is back Sunday following oesa in France as the attempt to figure out what's next The Hollywood Reporter called in secure one of TV's sharpest funniest comedies don't miss the season four premiere this Sunday at ten on HBO W. P. O. FAM H. D. one New York your life Angeliki show me the yeah we the see see see Chris soules they you will thank you my name was with correct you should the you'll do you'll those tools the bulls devil thank you Dave April night goes to a twenty six year old California man name Adriana Adriana the sucker a complete and total punk and the reason I say that is because what he did is despicable and I don't use the word despicable unless it's absolutely necessary this is the word that cause me to spit all over things all right is a word if you have a list you shouldn't be saying during this current cold nineteen pandemic unless you're wearing a mask because you will spit all over the place and that's unsanitary but what Adrian did is despicable we write a screen off all right yeah reported last week about how there has been an uptick in domestic disturbances since to sell quarantining started a lot of people are trapped with their abusers when you think domestic disturbance you don't usually think about family members beating on each other you usually think about couples people in a relationship well this clown as do name Adrian yeah and showed me that is absolutely not the case let's go to ABC seven to see why I keep speaking all over things the call these do despicable all seen the barren store shelves with no toilet paper in sight the tension over toilet paper has now turned violent in one home in Saugus LA county sheriff's deputies in Santa Clarita valley say a twenty six year old man attacked his own mother because he thought she was hiding toilet paper the twenty six year old was arrested the sheriff's department is expressed concern over the possible increase in violence domestic violence in particular during the pandemic you heard that right Adrian stole off on his mom listen to all the people pushed his old earth his mother the warning from which he came in the face over some god damn toilet paper I don't know what's in the cotton now nowadays we got Joe acting like streets beans you got mad heads Sherman age crack heads and shaman heads out here in these streets is ridiculous it's been a few weeks now you know since we've all been so quarantine in the CDC has yet to tell us what's the correlation between corona virus in toilet paper I understand when I go to the grocery store and Lysol is sold out I understand why hand sanitizer is sold out I understand why all the soap was sold out I understand what a sanitary wipes is sold out why is all angel soft going what am I missing seriously I see videos online of people fighting in the grocery store over Scott toilet tissue and I'm like dang yeah already the dials into Adrian yeah and you are twenty six years old let's discuss the obvious first of all you too old to be living with your mother okay you are described do you buy the Chilean left I was singing about also known as a buster and you got the nerve to point your mother in the face the woman was clearly taking care you'll be growing twenty six year old ask you know how we know she's taking care you because you live with her and you need to have your own toilet paper you can't even properly wipe your **** without asking your mother's permission your mom had to hide the told the people from you because you were using too much of you is putting too much quilted northern Inyo booty I don't know what's going on in his world but there is something in the toilet paper and every time I hear a story about how YA wildin out over toilet paper it really makes me understand this meme that that's floating around that I that I saw it's just me where instead a capsule of crack instead of a counselor cracked Nino brown was holding a roll roll of toilet paper and I can look at demi turned it into a whole parity movie call new crack city okay to crack has nothing to do with drugs and everything to do with the crack in your **** it would be about a crew hustlers who come into a community during the coronavirus crisis in realized is the shortage of toilet paper in clearly people are dying to wipe their **** hi at the club's right some of you may just double it with a blackjack dealer to bug you need to buy like a what was going to open a back wheel would hit it on the paper and you know do you believe the club back with people with someone come back for a call K. they came back to the paper the wheels on that is going to change the world all that changed the world what I do know is that if you go and if you put it on the paper no Adrian was charged with battery and if I'm his mother I'm making him find another place to self quarantine please let review ma give Adrian yeah the biggest E. R. he ha he ha you stupid mother are you dumb all right well thank you for that don't you today Sir now when we come back.

Stripe: Patrick and John Collison

How I Built This

06:58 min | 2 years ago

Stripe: Patrick and John Collison

"Did you guys get into coding. How did that happen? I bought a book when I was thirteen. And I read it one Saturday and started writing some web pages and really. It was all certify. It was all downhill from there. Yeah and how about you John? Did you like seen Patrick get into coding? Did you think I won't try to? Yeah those definitely influence and I think I had an experience That a lot of people I know who've learned code had which is it's often an end result the pulls you along and you're making everything up as you go and you don't really understand you know you're copying things from a book or from website and typing them into a computer to get it to work and it seems like the two big motivations that people often have our websites or video games Answer in my case the initial website I made was not very good aftertaste. Patrick taught me a lesson in insecurity. I was probably fourteen at the time and I call it together. This website and there were vulnerabilities issues and stuff patrick. Then hacked this is to teach me a lesson on that. Okay so Patrick. I mention this because you're not going to mention this. The in two thousand and five. You won an award like the young scientist award of Ireland fifteen and Or sixteen or something like that. And I'm assuming and maybe weren't cognizant of this but we're I mean people must have said. Oh they're the collison boys you know. There's those two S- really smart boys. Were you aware that you guys were just really smart? I mean did did you would you? Would you wear the people? Were aware of the two of you when you were kids. I don't think they were when we were kids. I think actually this kind of science contest is that was really the first time where anyone might have had even the slightest. 'cause yeah to have kind of come across or heard of either of us What would you do? What was your invention or experiment or submission when you young scientist of Ireland. Well as we touched on I'd gotten really into programming and In particular become interested in this program language called Lisp and I was Kinda fascinated by list because it had been invented in the late fifties like really early in the history of technology. But it'd been kind of forgotten and ignored. The thing I worked on was a new version of less trying to kind of update it making it really straightforward to build sort of complicated applications and things like that and you know it's funny Tony kind of looking back on. It becomes clear for a very early stage. I was interested in working on tools or just going to building things that created leverage for other is in that basically the whole point of working on this programming language was to provide a tool would make it easier for others to build things. And so I. I didn't consciously think about it this way at the time. He kind of running stripe or whatever but basically all the things that I've worked. I'm kind of somewhat seriously. Having some ways been kind of tools for creation show in two thousand six. After Patrick won the young scientists of the year award he decided to go to the US to mit for college and two years later John would follow his brother to Cambridge to attend Harvard. But all the while the brothers were always working and conspiring ways to solve problems they come across the Internet for example why it seemed so hard to buy and sell secondhand things in an efficient way so one afternoon while mulling over some ideas at their local pub Patrick. John came up with a potential solution back end technology for Ebay users to manage inventory and they found two other guys who were working on a similar problem so they joined up with them moved to San Francisco and called their company optimistic. What automatic did was? It made it really easy to kind of manage and to list items for sale on existing platforms things like Ebay Or you know other marketplaces for for selling some of these items. You could use automatic to sort of track your inventory and to upload your items and to manage the listing photos and said basically who's a tool for people who are selling significant amounts of stuff online and so with software to help. Those people do that job better and the idea was kind of that could help us gain kind of one side of the marketplace such that over time we could come and then build a better user experience for customers so you guys build this thing and who is the public face of automatic because I mean obviously you guys are super smart and talented. But you know you were really young right like eighteen and sixteen years old so were you guys sort of staying in the background. And with the other founders. The public face was really the website right. The great line about how on the Internet. Nobody knows that you're you know. We kind of took full advantage of that but the company must have done pretty well right because I I guess just over a year after you've had your original idea I it sold reportedly for five million dollars. So was this strange to all of a sudden at that age land into that kind of money. I mean no. You didn't get five million yourself yet to divide it up and it's still you prominent pastors and yeah you still probably walked away with a couple of hundred thousand bucks. That was probably more money than you'd ever seen in Your Life. Who certainly more money than we'd ever seen in our lives. Yeah was enough money that it afforded a kind of freedom and really I think just kind of forced to the kind of reflection that had we been or had. Ibm kind of on. Just the treadmill of you go to college and you get your debris in his first job and so on such that I I can certainly imagine sort of a different version of my life or my career where I didn't do some of that thinking on until I was much older. Yeah so I guess this was like right around the time you were at at Harvard John and Patrick you eventually went back to mit for For a while right. That's exactly right in the fall of cousin nine and I should just prefaces was saying both of you with dropout and never return But in that in that brief moment of time where John Hubbard and Patrick you're at Mit Is that really this around? Two thousand nine is that were the early sort of idea That would become stripe began. That's interesting question. 'cause on the one hand stripe was the most interesting idea. We had come across during the course of automatic in this It was the single hardest thing about developing an Internet. Business was just the the business side of the accepting money. So the pain inside. Yeah it's and it seemed like a really important problem at and we thought there should be something really easy. Folks developers instance at up to people started to starting accepting money but on the other. Hand what we

Patrick John Hubbard Tony Kind Scientist Ebay Ireland Harvard John IBM San Francisco United States MIT Harvard Cambridge
Stripe: Patrick and John Collison

How I Built This

01:43 min | 2 years ago

Stripe: Patrick and John Collison

"Ghairat on today. Show how two brothers from Ireland wrote seven lines of computer code and built it into a nine billion dollar business. So the holy grail for venture capitalist is the Elusive Unicorn. This is what hundreds or thousands of business school graduates working at venture firms. Search for every day they said through pitch after pitch powerpoint after powerpoint hoping that today will be the day that one of these pitches will be the next Uber Airbnb and Opportunity. So rare so coveted. It's like a Unicorn well. Welcome to today's story because stripe is basically a Unicorn With Extra Whip Cream Cherries on top. This was a company. They went from zero to a hundred million dollars in value in a matter of months and today barely seven years after its founding. Stripe is valued at more than nine billion dollars. So now your next question. What is stripe? Well Stripe isn't a thing you buy. It's not like under armour shirts or worby parker glasses but it is. What allows you to buy those things online if you use instant cart or lift or kickstarter or even if you shop online at target you're using stripe it's basically the back end technology that allows you to safely. Enter your credit card details and pay for what you want to things that make stripe very different from its

Stripe Ireland Airbnb
Lucky Stripe: Silicon Valley Fintech Startup Zooms to $35B in Value

Business Wars Daily

05:34 min | 2 years ago

Lucky Stripe: Silicon Valley Fintech Startup Zooms to $35B in Value

"This episode of Business Wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from Pitney Leabeau's. Try It free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit. PBA DOT com slash B W daily the from wondering I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily happy Monday everyone. It may be the biggest his tech startup. You've never heard of unless you own your own business that is stripe and online payment service and outs last Thursday that it is now worth more than thirty five five billion dollars that's according to valuations by investors who just poured another two hundred fifty million into the company which helps small businesses accept payments over the Internet funding boosted stripes valuation by twelve billion dollars making it the third most valuable startup in the US according to Bloomberg that news outlet says only the we the company owner of we work and jewel the vape company are worth more and unlike those two companies stripe doesn't appear to be financially troubled as the week company is or struggling with controversy like jewel but if you're not familiar with this giant company well that's reasonable stripe handles back in payment systems for businesses ranging from tiny one person startups to mammoth businesses like airbnb lift facebook and shop affi- and its CEO and president the young brothers Patrick and John Collison in who founded the company have operated quietly without the flash of more well known Silicon Valley UNICORNS becomes roots sound like they were made for Silicon Valley origin origin story the Carlson's hail from drama near an Irish village with a population of one hundred and two while still in high school patrick and John moved to the US in founded business that managed transactions on Ebay then they sold it for five million dollars at ages nineteen and seventeen and each had brief stints at College John at Harvard and Patrick at Mit but the entrepreneurial bug had taken hold and two years later in two thousand ten. They founded stripe the point of their start up to take the pain out of what was then a clunky complicated task for businesses and shoppers alike. It took off quickly. Mostly by word of Mouth College soon went by the wayside. One of their first funders was Peter Thiel. One of pay pal founders fast forward to today and stripe not only helps businesses process payments. It's expanding into other areas areas of finance last week announced a new lending arm called Stripe capital and stripe corporate credit card strike plans to use its new funding mm to continue expanding geographically. It has its ion eight new countries at its heart though the brothers want to enable new businesses to get off the ground by streamlining payments. Amos no matter where their customers are despite its fairytale like origin story stripe isn't without competition far from it. Its closest. Rival is square now. That's the company that offers those little square devices that lets you take credit card payments from your mobile device twitter founder. Jack Dorsey Co founded square both businesses now process hundreds of millions of transactions both companies forgo the monthly processing fees that banks charge businesses in charge flat rate fees instead and squares been making business loans for five years and boasts that it has lent more than five billion dollars so far still as of last Thursday stripe is now worth ten billion dollars more than square according to the New York Times back when Patrick can John Collison were still teenagers messing around trying to find their next business idea they found that the hardest thing about starting a new company was figuring out how to get paid paid. They seized on that problem as the right one to solve but today they say that less than eight percent of all commerce happens online so as big as they are and as big as their rivals square us to one thing seems certain when it comes to the growth of financial technology her you you ain't seen nothing yet from around wondering business worst do a quick favor and tell us more batch yourself visit one three dot com slash survey. We'd love learning more about I'm I'm David Brown. Thanks for listening and we'll be back. This episode is brought to you by send pro online from Pitney Bowes Shipping and mailing from your desk has has never been simpler than with San pro online from Pitney bowes with simple online is just click sand and save for as low as four dollars ninety nine cents. That's right at four dollars and ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats packages right from your PC and you are back to business in no time. Try It for free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale but only when you visit P B dot com slash B._w. Daily that's P._B. Dot Com slash B W daily.

John Collison Pitney Bowes Stripe Capital Patrick Pitney Leabeau Pitney Bowes Shipping David Brown United States Peter Thiel Bloomberg Silicon Valley Mouth College New York Times Carlson Ebay Harvard Amos Twitter
"john collison" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

06:55 min | 2 years ago

"john collison" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"They're not going out there not trying to win every game home feel it I mean you saw in the playoffs and seventeen would have with the Yankees masters home team won every game they can win a big game Houston look with everything the way this season is played out for the New York Yankees. was one order of business and that's it one order of business get this team healthy and prepared for the post season a distinct distant second. is figure out a way to get home field and then try it they're trying to win the manager got thrown out today our global strikes this still fire. this still Tennessee they're not going out there throwing these games but they're gonna get guys rest they're gonna sit guys they're gonna DH judge they're going to play you know for they're going to play you. these these bands guys they're gonna play freezer okay played help field they're gonna play these guys because they need to rest the guys get everybody healthy and he sought but even so the Tories yesterday really going into today there were three check marks three check marks going today for the Yankees all three came up positive one is chorus healthy thankfully yes didn't MRI seems like that's not gonna be an issue it's going to move on you'll probably rest two or three of the last eight games but still. he's fine everything's ready to go for him the other check mark taxing and he checked it again for the tenth consecutive time he has now over taken to knock as my number one starter from the eighties we talked about it all year with the ups and downs of the rotation Tanaka's the one guy no matter how he pitches in the regular season you feel confident in giving the ball on a post season starts and I still feel that way. but when they traded for James Paxton they were trading for their second ace behind Severino they were trading for a guy who can dominate lineups they were trading for a guy you can go out there and just don't care who the opponent is he's gonna go out there and dominate and you've seen it now for ten consecutive starts and you're going to see it in the post season or at least they're going to give him an opportunity to do it and they're going to do it with game one I think he is now their guy they've talked about it for due to talk about it in his article in the way they're gonna match up their starting rotation and do things differently except for taxes. because when you watch this guy he's got dominating stuff and he's and is now ten in a row general. this isn't a fluke this is in a couple of games he had a very up and down season at best an up and down season until we figure out a way to turn it on. and I was heading into the postseason with steam. and despite what's going on with her mom and despite what's going on with the rest of the pitching staff whether happy self you'll be looked okay. despite all of it. you feel confident now that you have the gene packs in that the Yankees the Yankees traded for and had hoped for all season long he's going in with a head of steam and you feel good about. and then the other check mark. was John Collison. and this guy is going to play a major role in one of the more bizarre Yankee season so we talked about at infinitum about the different match rations and injuries and next man up in all all the stuff that went on with his Yankee team a hundred one win so far what cake walk to the division despite all the injuries everything. this guy's played twelve games and he is going to be a huge factor in the postseason that's how we had the seasons come. and I'm telling you. it's one of it's the gift and the curse of being Yankee at least during the the ninety stretch especially when they were making the postseason when division every it's been a little different the last five or six but the gift and the curse is all the pressures on the post season no one will care that Stan played twelve games no one will care that he was poor in the post season last year and that he didn't come up clutch when judge went out all the other nonsense it is a is an alpha Yankee defining moment all vehicles out the window if he plays well in the post season. Hey it's just enough of a weird season have someone step in after twelve games all year long have a big time post season and you know what watching the game earlier today he looked good I liked everything I saw them everything I saw I liked obviously the double obviously the home runs I like the the way he took the pictures when he got pulled out which led to bone getting thrown out he took a slight a write off the plate. he took those pictures down they were down is called out yes but he looks like he's comfortable to play he looks like he's taking pictures that you should be taking because when you see stand any struggling he's flailing flailing at that's lighter outside he took a couple of them today plus he did major damage the baseball a double up the alley in about a home run to left field he looks good now to game yes I'm playing a long time I'm not telling you you know I'm sure about sin but I just get this feeling and Yankee fans I know you don't want to root for this guy for whatever reason. for whatever reason the money he makes the way he he played in the post season last year the way he's been brutal this year. you hear a lot. he got booed opening day last year when when big money players come here they're expected to perform immediately or we don't like them. but all of it goes away with a big time performance in the postseason and I just get the feeling he's going to give it. I really like the way you looked. he will comfortably item they had a mustache going on it's it's like he's a new man. and if this guy can play left field and be in the middle of the lineup and be the impact player he can be we forget he won MVP we get hit fifty nine almonds. let's be honest with the way the baseball the finance stadium this year he picked one hell of you to miss every game. who knows how many home runs you could hit. to cap off one of the weirder seasons in Yankee history and certainly in recent history in my memory. it would be just ironic for a guy who they bring in pay all this money to fans never get behind Mrs an entire season for injury. comes back it has a big time post season and they're going to need. they're going to need it. can they get by the first round without him can they get by the first round out anyone and really with this Yankee team you think they can get by anything without anyone. the way they perform the next man up your shell is and everyone else the talk means in the may bins and everyone else who stepped up in a great years but I'm telling you right now I just get the feeling Stan is going to be needed in the post season and he's going to come through I said this weird feeling. then it's time to get behind him Jackie fans. so that's where we are on the New York area with baseball. one season over but promise another season just beginning as he exited the postseason looks like it's gonna be Minnesota Twins VS me we obviously got all the football eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six along show five hours all the way to two AM right now Erika.

Yankees baseball Houston MVP Erika New York Stan Mrs Jackie football five hours
"john collison" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

11:30 min | 3 years ago

"john collison" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Now, a couple of things about this Forbes list, and I don't think it's fair that I'm called a crabby old man all day, maybe a feminist, Alex. Was very far from being a feminist today from launching a personal attack at a young woman who started her own cosmetics company, and you're making her sound like she's some kind of street Hooker. Yeah. Kind of. Oh my gosh. Yeah. Ladies and gentlemen, and I'm not blazing prude. I'm just saying that you're making. I wanna say you only care about somebody makes money, and that's all that matters is how they make money. Okay. I think it's demeaning for. I think it's demeaning for women. My case in point is this. Here we go. This is Kylie Jenner is now the youngest self made billionaire of all time, she's twenty one years old. I picture I've admittedly ever seen her. Okay. You've never seen. You've never seen her whether father Kaitlyn. No, okay, she's hot. Obviously, I'm not going to go down that areas. I said I respect her for business acumen. I don't that's a nice Pat on the back. She tells Forbes she credits her success to her enormous social media followings just what I said. Yeah. It is what it is. Yeah. It's really something to be proud of. It's the power of social media. She says then I was looking at the other self made billionaires the youngest, and this is what should disturb all of us who are parents of daughters that this would be the path to wealth. Really the list of young billionaires is Snapchat founder Evan Spiegel ironic here that the youngest billionaires the female just lives on the looks. And the dude's making the money created it. That's disturbing. Evan Spiegel, created Snapchat. And the other is a guy by the name of John collison who is twenty eight years old. He's not showing his but to get rich. He created the payment companies stripe. Right. Seven of the ten richest people in the world are American all our men. Let me just say Jeff go ahead to say have different talents. And I think you're discounting the talent that Kylie Jenner has with marketing herself on social media being an influence influential person to the millennials I think you're counting that plus again, you are an old bitter, man. Bitter. I'm just concerned. I just think this is really in everybody talks about techno women in technology. Yeah. You get rich. So you get a great time in this world can get wealthy. Technology. Jeff. Well, let me look at Kendra Scott. Kendra Scott from here in town. Okay. Used to be a hat salesman on sixth street. Now, she sells jewelry she may jewelry. He creates the product, right, right? Being a creator takes skill and talents. Would you not that say the same thing of Kylie Jenner whether cosmetics line, I know I wouldn't say say that because she said she got she got where she is because of social media because she was designing and coding software or designing coding jewelry. She's showing people her, but she's a dysfunctional personal life and a hot body confused. Her sister shows her but more than she shows her. But what is shredded Kylie has been in some very compromising positions. I see Rayleigh, right? That's how they get rich. How they increase their social media. It's being dysfunctional and hot. That's it. I think you're going to have a Big Eye opener. When you go home tonight and lineup the children and say. Who is Kylie Jenner and from age nineteen to eight seventeen months. I know daddy, I know who Kylie Jenner is called an influence her. And I would say I hope don't be that. They'll be something more. The money's never worth it. Just to be a total sell-out be something more. Wow. Sorry here. He is. Yeah. You now Pope Benedict over here. Oh, man. Yeah. I'll accept all that. And I want to give the money back. Oh, no. I've got to give the money back. Now. I used my body and social media to get rich. Yeah. I don't like. Oh, no. Oh, no. That is a prude. I I'm gonna stare at her thinks she's hot. I just think it's really demeaning, and and it's kind of a sad thing. I'm sorry. But she's made the money. She owns it. I suspect she would say sure show skin big deal. Okay. Yeah. I just think it's a little it's a little upside down. It's a little disappointing that we're not talking about a twenty one year old female coder. We're not talking about the twenty one year old version female version of Evan Spiegel. We're talking about a woman who only ways you would make money is to show some skin. That's disturbing. I that line. She's in the cosmetic lines where you sell your ties Matic's cosmetic, try harder you've ever seen the TV show. And I really I've seen I've turned over there and quickly moved away from them because it's just a much of women gabbing. That's all it is right and their personal problems with being wealthy, or this is bad all the way around a story out of Midland, Texas. So the alarm is going off in a house. I don't know if it was a alarm that goes off in the house or its alarm that goes it goes off to the police say, they get it. Right. The police in two officers went to this house right in the middle of the night. One is a five year veteran, and apparently what's reported now by K W, T X, an internal Email obtained by multiple media. Sources reports the officer plus two additional officers responded to a burglar alarm a burglar alarm at a Midland home. Email says the officer made a loud announcement. Yes. We're at the front door with his flashlight and said police police police and he walked in. But the hope well, but they announced it I did this is what their position is. Yeah. But the homeowner believed that his house was being broken into correct? Shot toward the flashlight. The officer was holding. Right. He'd hit him above his bulletproof vest, and he died and now he's family. I know the family name Heiberg my in Midland, but come on, man. Shooting in the dark shooting in the dark. With police going at least, I I don't know where this goes. I don't know where it should go. I mean, I. I don't know where this should go. I'm gonna say at best. It's a tragic accident at best. I would say that to Jeff but pretty negligent to me. The blast away towards the flashlight. That's sad. You got scared as hell in your house. There's a lot of crime in middle. Now, there's I could see the argument. Hey. And I think of I wanna jury of everything reported is true. I the guy says I freaked out. Yeah. I guess I gave shots just at a flashlight a flashlight. It's breaks all the rules air. You're not supposed to shoot unless you know, what shoot at man, I. But I can't imagine that in your sleep. And you you sort of hear something. And then the next thing, you know, someone is there with a light. And you're scared for your life. You would think someone would say who is it? What is it? And they say police rice police right police police police, which they apparently did I did. Joseph you're on K LBJ. Hello joseph. I was gonna comment on the Jenner girl. Yeah. Are you going to the other? Billionaires have to take pictures in their underwear to get revenue. It's a wonderful point. That's right. I don't want to see some of those other billionaires and their skiffs, not even the young ones. They make it on skill. But would you not agree caller that she? If you deal with this now that she does have skill to amass that nine hundred million dollar company. There is some skill. She has Jeff is discounted dollar Oliver's automobile somebody else invents her perfume somebody else designed her make up, and then she goes and tells her followers. Hey, I got a new picture out with my bra showing gets a million hits. And then she has free advertising. That's what it is. I would call her a skills skilled advertiser, my friend. Still you. Right. I mean, so if you're chubby or yet a hook nose, you can't be a skilled advertiser, but she doesn't know saying that that show everybody else that you're not skilled if you have a hooked nose any product mills your. Evan Spiegel has a hooked nose, and he may three billion dollars. But but. Personally is what she you're saying. She's a business Mongol. Well, she's really not he has a huge following. And she herself off mobile. He doesn't do like he's not inventing brand new make all this is the new makeup lipstick day. Hey. At a second. I'll tell you what tell her to go in that lab. And I want her to make a product. I bet she can't make once I know nothing about except she's hot disarmed picture. She's hot. I wanted to go in that lab. And I want to see her make one product and the chairman of Budweiser, go mixed beer. No doubtful. No, they can't. They can't Evan Spiegel. Who's twenty four design the whole software the platform. Okay. Good forever. And I'm happy. That's the way. It should be g. Wiz. Yeah. G again, I'm sorry. If you're a supermodel listening this afternoon on Kilby James sorry to Lee, please call in very much guys. Thank you for the call. Thanks very much wrong. She's not a Mongol picture that is not a Mongol Jesus smoking Hogle this moguls. Why hope she makes it all pretty soon because I guess when she gets the hook nose in the belly. It's all over. Well, you know what? Legal can do it the rest of his life. He can invent because he's not he's not awarded on his looks alone. I guess those athletes who get old they can't do it on their own. They can they. No, no, I'm sorry. An athlete display skill. They don't tell you. If it's a touchdown because you have a hot Iraq's high grab an ice skaters in your world now that without stripping. Okay. There you go again, ladies, but a phone call feminist ice skaters now, I'm knocking people who who are pretending. No, they're not even pretending. I'll say this for this young woman. She knows exactly what she's doing her whole life is going to be in our onto where showing off for men and women you're trying to argue that she's the same as this. The guy that designed the platform or comparing it to an athlete and athletes isn't given a touchdown because he or she is hot the given a touchdown because they display skill. What about those supermodels? They're getting paid to be hot. And you you're you're damning them to if they need not unwarranted of wealth and recognition Pablo, blah, blah, blah. It's disappointing. It's disappointing that this is the path to wealth for young women. Jeff Ward and edged Clements..

Kylie Jenner Evan Spiegel Jeff Ward Midland officer Kendra Scott Kaitlyn Alex John collison Iraq Rayleigh Forbes Joseph Texas Snapchat salesman Pope Benedict