20 Burst results for "John Cheever"

Blake Bailey on Writing His Life of Philip Roth

The Book Review

02:12 min | Last week

Blake Bailey on Writing His Life of Philip Roth

"Blake bailey joins us now from virginia. His new biography is phillip. Roth blake thanks for being here. Thanks for having me all right. So there's a long story to how you became. philip. Roth spago for you. Were not his first choice but you were his ultimate choice. You just give us some background on that process. I was having breakfast back in two thousand twelve with the late jim alice. Who is the biographer of saul bellow. And at one point we were talking shop. And he said you know that. Ross miller is no longer returning philip. Ross phone calls. We in the biographer. Business knew that. Ross that we didn't particularly know who ross was. We knew that for a long time. He had been phillips biographer. I was between projects. I just finished my third biography about charles jackson. Who wrote the last weekend. And i had communicated with philip previously about my cheever biography because they were pleasant acquaintances. I read a letter. So i had. I had his address. So i wrote him a letter and he invited me to new york and said why. Don't we talk so we did. And what was that conversation like. Well we had two conversations. The first time i came he was very pleasant very conversational. A friend of his julia goal your former girlfriend stop by. She's a psychiatrist. And he has absolute faith in her character judgments so i think he invited her over to check me out and we never got around to talking about the prospect of writing his biography per se and toward the end. I said i gotta go. And he said well. Why don't you come back saturday. And when i came back saturday it was a different phillip roth. He was far more grim. He was in a lot of pain. He just had another major back surgery. And so i- solicitously asked about his back and he said you didn't come here to talk about my back and motion for me to sit down. And he the sheaf of questions to ask and the first question was. Why should a tile from oklahoma right the biography of philip. Roth and i said well. I'm not you know bisexual alcoholic with an ancient jarrett and lineage. But i wrote a biography of john. Cheever

Blake Bailey Roth Blake Philip Roth Spago Jim Alice Ross Miller Charles Jackson Ross Saul Bellow Phillip Virginia Phillips Phillip Roth Julia New York Oklahoma Roth Jarrett John
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | 7 months ago

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
"john cheever" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

The Darren Smith Show

05:16 min | 9 months ago

"john cheever" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

"Wrap up show rolls on. Seven zero third more. Time react Sandiego hero John cheever, and Jim Russell. three-game series, of course, field in Colorado rockies six one today, the padres fall to six and three show. Knitting. two-thirds and takes the loss will reach your tax and respond to your texts coming up momentarily seven, zero, four, seven, zero starting message with x t r a right now though let's hear from the manager of the padres. Here's Jay Stigler postgame. Ju just the same stuff with.

padres Jay Stigler John cheever Colorado Jim Russell.
"john cheever" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"john cheever" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Computer virus just like in I was pissed about that for days I'm sure well you know John Cheever said that out of fiction writing is basically improv's etcetera and I I agree with that you know yeah it seems like quite often when I get to the end of the first draft I have to go back in like redo the whole beginning because it go yeah it was starting off in a certain way like I had an idea right and then yeah pager to and the story is if you feel you don't you know you don't need it I need to go to work yeah yeah and that's kind of what I I I strive to do I'm not always good at it the just starting with something I think the is kind of waiting for a good idea is one of the many subtle form of procrastination takes we're not even waiting for water just even the belief that you need one is in itself progressive group procrastination yes that's true and that's what makes when you're not writing makes you feel so guilty he's done speaking in me personally no I I know that well I I'm in seventy six that's exactly how I feel I'm a little right I just feel like my life is you know just throwing it away that's amazing you still have the yeah maybe learn to do it I mean I really do maybe more than.

John Cheever
"john cheever" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"john cheever" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"School five miles back and simple later I actually that weird that it was five miles there the funny thing it's amazing sometimes it was okay Erica so take a different route yeah but what I meant was that would not only walk to school but also right and one day I was running a little late and John Cheever came by in his Nash Rambler of the color of Pepto Bismol open the door and said Marco my because my name was mark on them he said what are you doing and I said well I'm walking to school he said we'll be late I assume you like a right to say okay so I got in the car we rode to school because he lived in the garage above the above the garage and in in the in on the school grounds with his family did you know at the time that he was a famous writer yeah we all knew and his kids went to the same school and people people who he was actually poor at the time and my parents to their friends with them so so I I got in the car and he said why do you walk and was telling and I told him that straight line next thing I know it was a small the story called the swimmer about Burt Lancaster who did a straight line but that's okay I mean people borrow in all seriousness your conversation with Cheever influenced him to write the swimmer yes for sure and then hold hold it.

Erica John Cheever Marco Burt Lancaster Pepto Bismol writer one day
"john cheever" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"john cheever" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"In all seriousness your conversational Cheever influenced him to write the swimmer yes for sure and then hold hold it right there that's amazing one of the greatest stories of the twentieth century and the fact that you may have had something to do with it apart from writing is is really something I bet if Susie and Benji a new about this they would probably attack me and say oh it's not true but it is true well in this story I remember Cheever better than I remember your fiction and he talks about taking a dog leg at some point well I never read the story so you show your your life you never know what it is I never read anything another story about when he wrote a book about my family called bullet park we lived in Brighton park when Martin Luther king was killed there were riots in Ossining and they were burning down the the the stores and stuff and people attacking people's houses so my father and I went we bought I mean issue and then for the Marion John Cheever and Howard with the guy who played the Benjamin Franklin in seventeen seventy six how is the soul of came to brunch and they said do you know that that this was a time limit this is the worst riots going on and we said yeah we we bought ammunition and and the and the two were said to watch every so would buy ammunition is why in case people come to try to burn our house down these you would shoot people who is going to kill you.

Susie bullet park Brighton park Ossining Marion John Cheever Howard Benjamin Franklin Benji Martin Luther
"john cheever" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"john cheever" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"School five miles back ten into later I actually that weird yeah that was five miles there the funny thing amazing sometimes it was okay so take a different route yeah but what I meant was that would not only walk to school but also right and one day I was running a little late and John Cheever came by in his Nash Rambler the color of Pepto Bismol open the door and said Marco because my name was mark on that he said were you doing and I said well I'm walking to school and so will you be late I so would you like to write to so okay so I got in the car we rode to school because he lived in the garage above the above the garage in in the in on the school grounds with his family did you know at the time that he was a famous writer yeah we all knew and his kids went to the same school and people people knew he was Leslie poor at the time and my parents to their friends with so so I I got in the car and he said why do you walk and was telling and I told him that straight line next thing I know there was a small this story called the swimmer about Burt Lancaster who did a straight line but that's okay I mean people borrow in all seriousness your conversational Cheever influenced him to write the swimmer yes for sure and then hold hold it.

John Cheever Marco Leslie Burt Lancaster Pepto Bismol one day
"john cheever" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"john cheever" Discussed on Hysteria

"Like you do not tell this thing to anyone, and I remember like in high school, high school party with this guy was dating and the cop showed up, and I just like took running into the backyard, like jumped the fence. He's like chasing after me. Like, why are you so freaked out? You know, like the worst they can happen is we get a ticket and to me. Me, it was like no. Like if I get caught I can get deported. Yeah. I couldn't tell him that. So then he just thought it was over reacting. Right. And of course, like, you know, men always think not always a lot of men women overreact. And so I just let him think I'm overreacting, right? Then in college I, I was like, maybe my mom is wrong. He knew I've been dating this guy for like two years. And like he just drove me thirty minutes to get dock os. And, and he's he he has his cute set is not trust them. You know, like I surely can trust this person. So I told him I don't have papers. What came out of my mouth, and then we talked for a long time, he held my hand, his very sweet. And he says, you know, I you're not alone anymore, and it was such a big sense of relief. Like, oh, Finally, I trust them one and the keep the secret in and then couple years later, we moved to New York. And I find out he's cheating on me. Yeah. So, you know, like any woman might react like I was like, I'm going to show him the true meaning of woman scorned, you know, like so angry and I called him and I found the woman's phone number on a suitcase in his apartment dumb ass. And so I called him and I'm like, I'm going to call her issue. And then he said the one thing I could never imagine anyone saying he said, if you call her I will call. Oh my God. Which was I s was the equivalent of ice now. God fucking off. Yeah. I mean, I'm I'm still like I told his story, my heart is starting to race again, you know, telling all these years later, and, and you better believe that I did not tell anyone else about being undocumented for the longest time, because my mom's voice was in my head being like I told you not to tell anyone and you know, I could just hear my mom's voice him I hadn't. So of course, like fucked me up for a long time. You know, and it's taken a long time to I, I was I was married before. And that's actually how I became a citizen. It was because my ex husband is a US. So obviously I opened up again and trusted again. And, and my trust was met with the right. It was it was it was cared for, and now a marriage wonderful, wonderful man, who I trust. And I love and I you know, he knows everything about me, but it took time to recover from that. And I think when you go through that it takes time to. Cover, and trust people again, and let people into your life again. This is probably cliche. But like when you when you're trust is broken by someone you love. It's even more devastating to like have someone. That was your partner us something against you. When they actually did something wrong, right? You had not done anything. It was like a double whammy, right? Because ones like you betrayed my trust of just like my love trust for you. And you're like cheating on me. But then on top of that, you willing to destroy my life. Can we destroy his? Yeah. What's his name? No. We'll talk harm has gotten him in some way. I don't think I think he's I think he's rich writing with kids. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Nobody ever said is rich married and has kids. Subject of all great works of American literature. I'm rich I'm married. I have kids and I'm set, John Cheever sorts short story is he is. Let's let's, let's put it onto university is sad. Just human now. I don't I don't wish bad. I really don't know because. I think that's part of self. Love is to like forgive and move on. And, you know, you, you can't it it's too much to carry with you whole life. Yeah..

US John Cheever New York partner thirty minutes two years
"john cheever" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To finish this race? I seriously thought that like this is in a weird way. And I've thought about this one of the things about writing a book is you have to think about things is you have to say them is. I really think that for me was part of it. Because I think it's it's sometimes it's incumbent. This is like John Cheever territory your living this comfortable life at that point. I had a wife and kids in the house in the suburbs, which I would commute to on the train and come back and have a glass of scotch, and you begin to feel numb. To life. And I kind of think that I wanted to go out and suffer. So that I knew I was alive. This doesn't sound healthy, and isn't and there's an old saying in running about running a mile the mile race in the nostrum goes the perfect mile race is one in which you lose consciousness on the other side of the finish line. Right. Just get over the finish line. And then you've collapse. So the idea is to suffer the maximum amount. And I did that for a while. And I can't say I enjoyed it. But I definitely remember coming home after one marathon. And I was like limping trying to negotiate the eight steps that lead to the Portugal my house, and my then wife said why do you do this? If it hurt so much, and I said because that's the point. You know, it was very Lawrence of Arabia was like the trick is not to mind. And. I I've come to believe that. That's. And one of the things I described in the book is maybe maturity, maybe enlightenment, but realizing that the discipline of it and the attempt of it is not to put yourself into pain. So that, you know, you're alive in a kind of weird middle aged crisis version of cutting..

John Cheever Portugal Arabia
Can You Ever Forgive Lee Israel?

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

11:32 min | 2 years ago

Can You Ever Forgive Lee Israel?

"I came across this letter in a collection with the signature of one of my favorites, the writer and wit, Dorothy Parker and the letter is so her eighty three Norma place Hollywood, California, the Joshua Allen told me to write an apologize. I'm doing that. Now while he dresses for Turkey dinner with the boys across the road. I have a hangover that as a real museum piece. I'm sure that I must have said something terrible the year this kind of exertion in the future. I'm thinking of having little letters runoff saying can you ever forgive me? Dr. Except that Dorothy Parker didn't actually write or sign that letter Lee Israel, did her book called can you ever? Forgive me tells the story of her years as a literary con-artist forging letters by all sorts of famous writers, then selling the memoir was just Apted into terrific new film, also called can you ever forgive me. It stars Melissa McCarthy as Israel. This. One line. Here was particularly clever. Don't you think it's wonderful. I love his writing and Dorothy Parker's while caustic wit. Caustic wit is my religion. With the film. Now in theaters I wanted to revisit my conversation with the real Li Israel. She died in two thousand fourteen but I talked to her when her memoir came out in two thousand eight so that isn't by Dorothy Parker at all. Well, there's one line the best line. Can you guess which it is? That's really Dorothy this have hangover that as a real museum piece. So the title of your book is from this purported letter by Dorothy Parker, but it's a real realign. Yes, I imagine Dorothy apologizing her waif-like way for some misdeed, and and I sat down, and I wrote it's in the spirit of kind of Judah spree. So how did you get the idea for this this racket of forging famous people's letters and selling them to dealers started? It was incremental as most things are in life. I I was in the library where I spent most of my time foraging, and they gave me a group. Of of letters. And I thought perhaps even one or two of those could pay for from Mike my kitties tests, and I shoot it. I took it a walked out of the library. And I sold it. I was told by the the woman who bought my letters that which I didn't know anything about the business, but she would pay more for better content. So I went home, and I typed up some better content. And then when you started forging after that instead of stealing what was the first thing before actually, I don't remember where I started. I have a feeling let me think I know it wasn't. I think of the first things I fought would know account letters and you bought not just one but a whole series of antique typewriters on which to do. We'll finally if I had knoll type on one typewriter Dorothy on another and and EDNA Ferber on yet another and Finally I had about six or seven of them in locker I rented on Amsterdam have Aminu looked like a very classy porn shop, but his pawnshop not a porn shop. Not a foreign chef. And it's amazing. How little regulation there is. I mean, for instance, the Noel coward letters, some of them were published in an anthology of his correspondent. That's right recently in highly regarded, well, reviewed book, cool, the letters of no coward. And they were two of my lettuce showed up in that volume. Can we hear one of your letters? Okay. Gotta find it. All right. I'll just this. Dear Kevin Sunday. And at the the letterhead as lays of all sumo shoes. Pardon my French, dear Kevin, I who doesn't exist. I am feeling years younger having lose this morning over perfectly packed snow. There is no substitute for oxygen in the lungs. It seems to release something very like morphine Marlene Marlene as perhaps mentioned to you. When we spoke was here for almost two week. She will never change in Detroit a four service folly, she moans endlessly about the ravages of aging the betrayal of friends the lonely. Of celebrity the Silio crowd addresses each of these problems, if she were the only beautiful and celebrated creature to experience reversals, I intend to have her in my life until one of us crooks, but she is possibly the most June grandmother in the history of our planet. It's a very good thing that I love her. I laughed uproariously at show dog dog arrow yours ever know flea. Israel's version of no account, and they were among the best letters. I think of his well what you don't I'll tell you why? Because he Kurt guess he didn't have to be knoll coward. When he wrote letters. He was writing letters. I had to try hard. I had to be no coward. And so they were lay will cavorted they camped they jumped high jet Jade around. I mean, he didn't write letters like that. I was I was doing it to please dealers and to do an imitation of disturbed sick man who didn't have to try to be no coward. How did you? Did you have to try to get into character? How much did? Immerse yourself in their work. Did you put on a hat like they were support yourself drink? What did you do? I'd never put myself drink because who was it who said John Cheever that old womanising alcoholic said even Sipa Sherry shows in his prose. So I never I never drank. When I ride I just I immersed myself in that wonderful thing that happens grade of people kind of trance the creative transits it's as good as it gets. We'll have more of my interview with Lee Israel in just a minute. But first I wanted to take this opportunity to remind you to follow us on Twitter and Instagram at studio three sixty show. And now back to the podcast now, let's let's rewind before you ever got into this. You were of successful bog refer when I was in my early thirties. I wrote a book about Dorothy Kilgallen, I wrote a book about to Lula Bankhead. I did finally book that wasn't so good about Estee Lauder after the Lord of book, my lights dimmed a bit, and they stopped taking me to Lynch, and and you were on welfare. And and it was it was really rough. It wasn't. It wasn't just that. You were no longer a bestseller. What is rough? I mean, I wasn't eating roots and Niger, but in terms of my life. It was bad. It was I was alone. She was alone. And you and you had a sick cat as well. I had. Sick the romance of the whole thing, and how much did you get for that those? I I think the forty dollars a piece something like that. So it wasn't a lot of money per letter. Forty bucks, forty bucks. Allowed me to take my cat to the vet and find out baby. What was wrong with her? It was enough to keep me as I say finally in in lunch and cigarettes and rent. It was not a lot of money in terms of the letters you forge a part from the marketability of a given author or figure how how did you choose who you wanted to do? I've been thinking about that. I I know that I have certain hide certain criteria which had to be bet they the signature mostly had to be doable, easy, so EDNA, for instance, EDNA Ferber or some EDNA Ferber. She signed her letters with a period. Very simple writing. No, no loops. No swirls. No, no were jumps. Same thing. Knowles was a little harder. Dorothy, Parker had an easy signature. They had to present a challenge to me. They had to have literary epistolary styles that I thought I could duplicate and have fun doing. And I guess those are the criteria fun is interesting to me because they are also nearly all sort of swan. You naughty, people of a certain period and certain certain habits with alcohol and certain age, which meant that if I shook a little in the signature, it wouldn't tell so much, but they would all you. No, one would want to go to the cocktail party with all most of these people all of them, maybe EDNA Ferber. I was gonna say. How many letters did you right now? I think about four hundred really, yeah. You can see you can see as we sit. There's a loosely with copies basically two or three a week for the three years something like that. I guess I didn't you do the math. I did. I did whatever I needed to do them. There was one deal in New Hampshire who would call and say, do you have something Greta Garbo will have you something which George q-car is mentioned. Now, I always satisfied is demands that what did he think I mean, really? And where would you say? Yeah. Maybe I do I have a feeling maybe they may be in the country. You know, like I had a country home. I'll check and I o. I always I wasn't. I not even smart enough to say, oh, no. I couldn't I always was eighty ninety one hundred dollars. Ed was the Noel coward letters that finally done me in because I overdid and because one of the one of his friends who was in the market to buy Noel coward. That is was shown some of mine in new. Full. Well, that know having lived at a time when homosexuality was jailing offense never would've put so many campy funny allusions in his letters and the stuff that's homoerotic etcetera. I got from his his diaries, but Noah would have been much too careful to disclose his. I did what happened. Finally is that one. Once the man friend of Knowles discerned that there was something rotten in Denmark. He told the dealer who told other dealers and finally the well was toxic, and I could no longer sale. And then as soon as the the federal agents showed themselves didn't arrest you mmediately. You went off trying to thinking we're going to get rid of the typewriters destroy the guy rid of everything I could get my hands on scissored everything. I I took the typewriters from the locker one by one and they were very heavy. You know, we're talking nineteen forties. Nineteen fifties at I place them up and down various trash receptacles on Amsterdam avenue. So you were you were. Finally nabbed prosecuted went to trial. You got off pretty easy. I did. Well, I had I got six months house arrest, which is not so easy. If you saw my apartment at the time, not only did you not go to jail. You you have this lovely book. That's come out. That is getting good reviews and kind of kind attention, nobody that I've seen seems to be saying how dare this thief and forger getaway with this. I know, and I'm really, but I I have a knowledge that what I did was was wrong. But I don't I don't feel that in the pit of my stomach the bloggers not being so so kind blinders do, yeah, I know one of them called twit, and I hope he spelled it right? Somebody else called me, an intellectual terrorist. I beat so that happens, but mostly the the community of writers and not so much scholars of writers. And peers of of a liking it and are being very kind to me non-judgmental. I know what I did was for honest, Ana.

Dorothy Parker Edna Ferber Dorothy Noel Coward Lee Israel Israel Dorothy Kilgallen Kevin Sunday Li Israel Amsterdam Knowles Melissa Mccarthy Joshua Allen Writer Twitter Detroit Kurt John Cheever Niger
"john cheever" Discussed on The Awkward Human Survival Guide

The Awkward Human Survival Guide

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on The Awkward Human Survival Guide

"Never seen like they had sex and making kids so i thought maybe this seems like a companion marriage no idea don't care yeah you have the one closer to your pinkies longer if you're gay usually well my nigga minus shorter it's opposite for women oh that hand hand like this it looks longer like this look shorter actually kind of the same length thing you're by sexual than i guess what's going on you can also like make it look like what if this isn't a national geographic if we're their studies on this was a study and it was blown out of proportion indicate of a joke than real thing but when that came out when i was in high school before we realized that sciences and done properly the the i was looking at these fingers out like are there any secret gay people in my family and it was my grandpa right right which grandpa grandpa episode of seinfeld with walt whitman who's a guy john cheever where the gr the father of georgia's fiance had a cabin susan's susan had who's the love affair with was at walt whitman john cheever oh i think it might have been either because that's for that sounds correct because i think men was the that was the breaking bad one i mean no fair but that's the walter white confusion that's the reference that comes to mind with walt whitman okay i wasn't thinking that so john cheever then i cheer i remember from seinfeld for some reason i think susan was found john cheever interest yeah that's pretty i could just google but it's more fun than just not no i think just talk about it.

seinfeld walt whitman georgia susan john cheever google
"john cheever" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on KGO 810

"Most interesting aspects of la's approach to this is your get getting or or at least talking about getting a uh a public bank up and running so that these guys that the dispensaries aren't just dealing in cash all the time and actually we can have the backing of of a financial network that would make sense and that this is the problem with the at the federal level we still have refer madness happening um and and jeff sessions appears to be fully on board with that 1937 insanity since the continuous acting i always wonder about jeff sessions to did i mean is this kind of guy who enjoys a nice drink at the end of the day i mean if you'd like out of a john cheever story i suspect that he is i've seen nothing that says he's a teetotaler so his his rabid opposition to marijuana just make no sense whatsoever because you know if as many men of his generation he is perfectly comfortable unwinding with a glass of bourbon or a glass of whisky or whatever what is your problem here i mean there is no science wrong and we'll and we're all gonna die if somebody smokes by any now go to hell yeah okay all of the above its exit alcohols okay uh let's talk about more laws though lazarus in 2018 your this one i gotta tell you i'm torn i'm not i mean i'm also a business owner and i've also you know in an employee position where i have to negotiate for salaries and everything else i'm not sure i'm a fan of this the new law about salary history i like in 2010 i i think it's an important one because it imposes too much needed transparency on the process no what up until yesterday here in california if you went in for a job interview the employer was in their rights to say well how much did you make your other job or white but syria saying i said why is that not okay because now i'm trying to gauge hey if i'm an import i don't want to overpay you either because what but at the it's all about the the balance of power first of all uh any any potential employer who said well what are you making now if you say you know i'd rather not tell you you.

business owner california syria la jeff john cheever marijuana
"john cheever" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I am hope davis john cheever was a master at capturing tricky family dynamics reunion tells the whole story of a fatherson relationship in less time than it takes to order a cocktail bruce altman reads for you the last time i saw my father was in grand central station as going from my grandmothers and the run ducts to a cottage on the cape that my mother had rented and i wrote my father that i would be in new york between trains for a an hour and a half and ashed if we could have lunch together his secretary wrote to say that he would meet me at the information booths at noon and at twelve o'clock sharp i saw i'm coming through the crowd it was a stranger to me my mother divorced them three years ago and i hadn't been with them sense but as soon as i saw him i felt that he was my father my flesh and blood my future and my duel a new that when i was grown i would be something like him i would have to plan my campaign jr within his limitations it was a big goodlooking man and i was terribly happy to see him again it struck me on the back and aaa hand i truly he said a boy i'd like to take you up to my club but it's in the '60s and if you have to catch an early train i guess with better get something to eat around here it put his arm around me and i smelled my father the way my mother sniffs rose it was a rich compound of whisky aftershave lotion shoe polish woolens and the rank this of a mature male i hoped that someone would see us together i wish that we could be photographed i wanted some record of our having been together we went out of the station and upper surgery terrestrial it was still early in the place was empty the bartender was quarrelling with a delivery boy and there was.

bruce altman grand central station new york secretary john cheever three years
"john cheever" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"As his wife than norma said make one for the bank and one for art so he would make like gunfight at the ok corral for you know the bank and then he would make sweet smell of success for the art uh he didn't care if they fail the care since he hoped they make money but he wanted to make films that matched his time he always wanted to do that he was always pushing to be a part of the of the conversation as we would say now through the movies so he sets out to make the swimmer and um you know it's funny when i watched mad and as we all have i kept thinking that's nettie meryl don draper isn't it meryl and i kept hoping that wiener you know would make at the end that the last episode of men would be done draper swimming home through the swimming pools to is empty abandoned house um there were so many echos in madmen and in the character of don draper and he's admitted this winter the the brighter um so many echoes of this alienated waas supposedly adleman we're not too sure what he is we think he's a madison avenue adman um and so lancaster shows up for the shoot and uh the shoot itself becomes highly problematic and john cheever um and i go into this in some detail on the book and his son benjamin cheever was very helpful for me in this book and has since become a friend john cheever was in the movie briefly and so there are these wonderful letters that john cheever's writing to a friend john weaver about his encounters with lancaster and his perceptions about this.

norma nettie meryl don draper wiener john cheever john weaver lancaster benjamin cheever
"john cheever" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Oh well people say hi and i say i and nothing are you doing as is their nature insists there nature it's a different isn't entirely different culture and it's very interesting for me i think because they have lived there as long as any american has lived in america and the culture is so distinctly there's a sense of isolation i mean there there's community but it's really about the individual interests is so there's a sense of of taciturn ity and individuals suffering it always makes me think john cheever the writer john cheever who also came from new england further down in massachusetts but he his mother wrote to him one day and she said johnny how come you haven't told me that you've been winning all these prizes everything and he wrote back and he said because i thought you'd be ashamed of me and he said i thought you think i was bragging and i read that and i i get that i understand that why is this is rubber you're probably most known for all of kibumba provia became a television series and so on and it's about his can tankers of as you haven't have read it just spent but it seemed to me like kuala book hating gardagolf alert you know if i were the husband the run away either by now then suddenly i like salt wended struck do that yeah how did you always present i always loved her as going to say i knew she was badly behaved i was aware of that struggle she does to her do offering laws right wedding on the wedding day of her son and daughterinlaw she steals her daughterinlaw's bra and one xu so that the daughterinlaw can feel crazy when she doesn't finally other shoot and she marks her sweater and that was really fun day at work i have to tell you really liz i wasn't i had no idea that was going to happen but which which is she does it because she says she does it because the daughterinlaw has insulted her dress and allah was so excited about this draft she may address by hand it was floral it was pretty she thought it was lovely and she over here's the daughterinlaw insulting the dress and.

john cheever massachusetts kibumba provia xu america writer johnny one day
"john cheever" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Oh well people say hi and i say i and nothing how you doing i just their nature insisted answer nature isn't different isn't entirely different culture and it's very interesting for me i think because they have lived there as long as any american has lived in america and the culture is so distinctly there's a sense of isolation i mean there there's community but it's really about the individual interests is so there's a sense of of taciturn ity and individuals stephane it always makes me think of cianci where the writer john cheever who also came from new england further down in massachusetts but he his mother wrote to him one day and she said johnny how come you haven't told me that you've been winning all these promises everything and he wrote back in he said because i thought you'd be ashamed of me and he said i thought you think i was bragging and i read that and i i get that i understand that i don't know if this is ravi you're probably most well known for all of kaddam blow yup a television series and so on and it's about his can tankers of as you have have the largest spent two but while it seemed to me like kuala book hating cardi's awful if i way the husband away though by now and then suddenly i like salt wended struck do that yeah so how did that doha you always frazee is loved her the going to say i knew she was badly behaved as aware of that well she scrambled she does to her during offering laws right of her wedding on the wedding day of her son and daughterinlaw she steals for daughterinlaw's bra and.

john cheever massachusetts daughterinlaw america writer johnny frazee one day
"john cheever" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"He went down the steps with hurt his back a dozen or so cars were waiting by the station with their motors running a few people got off from each of the other coaches he recognize most of them but none of them offered to give him a ride they walked separately or in pairs purposefully out of the rain to the shelter of the platform or the car horns call to them it was time to go home time for a drink time for love time for supper and he could see the lights on the hill lights by which children were being bathed meat cooked dishes washed shining in the rain one by one cars picked up the heads of families until they're only four left two of the stranded passengers drove off in the only taxi the village had i'm sorry darling a woman said tenderly to her husband when she drove up a few minutes later all our clocks are slow the lasman looked at his watch looked at the rain and then walked off into it and bleak seoul him goes if they had some reason to say goodbye not as we say goodbye to friends after a party but as we say goodbye when we are faced with an inexorable an unwanted parting of the spirit and the heart the man's footsteps sounded as he crossed the parking lot to the sidewalk and then they were lost in the station a telephoned began to ring.

seoul
"john cheever" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"He tried to summon the calculated self deceptions with which she sometimes cheered himself but he was left without energy for hope or selfdeception the conductor put his head in the door and said shady hill next shady hill now she said no you get out ahead of me mr watkins which suddenly put on his coat and hat and smiled at mrs compton who was gathering her parcels to her in a series of maternal gestures they went to the door blake join them but neither of them spoke to him or seem to notice the woman at is back the conductor threw open the door and on the platform of the next car a few other neighbors would miss the express waiting patiently entirely in the one light for their trip to end he raised his head to see through the open door the abandoned mansion outside of tone her notrespassing signed nailed to a tree and then the oil tanks the concrete abutment said the bridge past so close to the open door that he could have touch them then he saw the first of the lamp posts on the northbound platform the sign shady hill in black and gold and the little lawn and flowerbed kept up by the improvement association and then the cavs stand and a corner of the old fashioned depot there was raining again it was pouring he could hear the splash of water and see the lights reflected in puddles in in the shining pavement and the idol sound splashing and dripping formed in his mind a conception of shelter so light and strange that it seem to belong to a ton of his life that he could not remember.

mr watkins mrs compton cavs
"john cheever" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"Help would come blake thought it was only a question of minutes some one noticing the look on his face or her peculiar posture would stop and interfere and it would all be over all he had to do was wait until someone noticed his predicament out of the window he saw the river in the sky the rain clouds were rolling down like a shudder and while he watched a streak of orange light on the horizon became brilliant it's brilliant spread he could see it move across the waves until it raked the banks of the river with a dim firelight than it was put out help would come in amenity thought help would come before they stopped again but the train stopped there were some comings and goings and blake still lived on at the mercy of the woman beside him the possibility that help might not come was one that he could not face the possibility that his predicament was not noticeable that mrs compton would guess that he was taking a poor relation out to dinner at shady hill with something that he would think about later the new saliva came back into his mouth and he was able to speak mr fund yes what do you want i want to talk with you you can come to my office oh no i went there every day for two weeks you could make an appointment no she said i think we can talk here i wrote you a letter but i've been too sick to go out and mail it.

blake mrs compton two weeks
"john cheever" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"john cheever" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"The watkins's rented mr watkins broke the sumptuous laws day after day he wants went to the eight fourteen in a pair of sandals and he made his living as a commercial artist blake's oldest son charlie was fourteen had made friends with the watkins boy he had spent a lot of time in the sloppy rented house where the watkins's lived the friendship had affected his manners and his neatness then he had begun to take some meals with the watkins's and to spend saturday nights there when he had moved most of his possessions over to the watkins's and had begun to spend more than half his nights their blake had been forced to act he had spoken not to charlie but to mr watkins and had of necessity said a number of things that must have sounded critical mr watkins long and dirty hair and his quarter a jacket reassured blake that he had been in the right but mrs compton dying smile and mr watkins dirty hair did not lessen the pleasure blake took in settling himself in an uncomfortable seat on the 548 deep underground the coach was old and smelled oddly like a bomb shelter in which whole families had spent the night the liked that spread from the ceiling down onto their heads and shoulders wisdom the filth on the window glass was streaked with rain from some other journey and clouds of rank pipe and cigarette smoke had begun to rise from behind each newspaper but it was a scene that meant to blake that he was on the safe path.

mr watkins blake charlie mrs compton