9 Burst results for "John Chanel"

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

01:34 min | 3 weeks ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Our team includes senior producer Stephanie Levine, engineer and editor Tim Felton, production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weisler, and quiz guy John Chanel. We'd love to hear from you, no matter where you are in the world, go to wayward radio dot org slash contact. Subscribe to the podcast here hundreds of past episodes and get the newsletter at wayward radio dot org. Whenever you have a language story or question, our toll free line is open in the U.S. and Canada, one 8 7 7 9 two 9 9 6 7 three, or send your thoughts to words at wayward radio dot org. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Special thanks to Michael Brest Lauer, Josh eccles, Claire rotting Bruce rogo, Rick sight and worm and Betty Willis. Thanks for listening. I'm Martha Barnett. And I'm grant Barrett until next time, goodbye. Bye.

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

06:40 min | 4 months ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"We got an intriguing voicemail from will hasseltine, who was telling us about the first pep rally he ever attended. It was when he was in kindergarten, and he remembers his teacher getting the kids ready by saying, we're going to a pepper alley, or at least that's what he told his mom later that day that we all went to a pepper alley, and his mom, of course, thought that was really, really funny, that little misunderstanding. But he swears that that's what his teacher said, we're going to a pepper alley, and we'll want to know, is there such a thing? And of course, that's what I thought was an adorable childhood misunderstanding, but the truth is there is such a thing as pepper alley. But it's not the same thing as a pep rally, which you would do at school where everyone gathers to cheer on the team that's going to fight in the big game against their dreaded opponents. That's right. But if you look in slang dictionaries, you'll see that pepper alley is actually a state of being beaten up. It comes from boxing slang, where the verb to pepper, of course, means to hit somebody repeatedly. You pepper them with punches, but it's also a pun on a place in South London called pepper alley, where apparently a lot of this went on. So will is still convinced all these years that he heard correctly as a kindergartner. I mean, maybe his teacher was from Britain or something. But I suspect it's just a mishearing, but it's kind of adorable that he's still hanging on to the belief that he heard correctly. Absolutely. Will there's probably a really good chance that you misheard. But, you know, keep believing brother. Grant and I love to hear about those childhood misunderstandings, and you can share yours by calling us 877-929-9673. Hello, you have a way with words. Hi, my name is Amelia. And I'm calling from Arlington, Virginia. Welcome to the show. Hey, Amelia. Thank you. I have something that my wife said recently that I was wondering if you could help me out with. Well, yes, please. She and I have been married for a number of years now are both in our mid 30s and we're both from the Midwest. She's from Iowa and I'm from Ohio. Everyone she'll say something that I've never heard before never heard anyone else say before. So I get to figure out is it an Ohio thing or just something her family says or something she's made up herself. Most recently, she said she was talking about our neighbor who was wearing these sweatpants that had holes all the way through them and she said, oh wow, he's really getting the goodie out of that pair of pants. And I realized, yeah. See, I could tell that you met, she's getting the most out of them. She's like, get the goodie out of it. And I thought, you know, it kind of sounds like a phrase that people say, but then I realized I thought more about it. I don't know anyone else who says that. And her mom was in town recently, and she said it, and I asked her about it, she didn't know where it came from. And her sister also says it. So it's definitely in their family, but nobody knows where it came from and I tried looking it up online and there really isn't much out there about this phrase. So I was curious if you guys had any insight onto it. Well, I think that that's probably pretty straightforward is probably related to the idea of a goodie being the edible kernel of a nut, particularly Hickory nuts and walnuts. Since the late 18th century or so, the term goody has been used to mean something tasty or desirable, you know, like candy or even hard to get at crab meat, you know, get the goody out of a crab shell. Let's see. It's also been used for the yolk of an egg, so the good part, I guess, of an egg. And the flesh of an orange sometimes. Oh wow. Yeah. So all those words are kind of the same. They come from the same place, like the middle of something. Kind of. Yeah. Yeah, the middle, and also just the good part. You know, like a goody bag has goodies in it, or a goody picker. I love that term, goody picker. It's a pointed instrument for digging the meat out of a nut. Is it regional at all? All over. Goody is kind of scattered throughout much of the United States. The south and a little bit in the Midwest. So I'm not surprised that your wife picked that up there. That's interesting about the nut because her mother, my mother in law, grew up on a farm and her dad had a bunch of black walnut trees and would like harvest them and their stories about her the basement being full of walnuts. So I wonder if they know that we had a walnut tree, whatever house is, I know that feeling. Yeah. They are all about scarred about it. I think this is how much it's stained on. Oh, that's really interesting. Well, I'll pass it along to them. I think they'll be interested to hear. All right. Amelia, thank you for helping us get the goodie out of this question. Yeah, absolutely. Thanks so much. Thanks a lot. Best of your wife. Thanks. Bye. Bye bye. When you marry into a family, you don't just marry your spouse. You marry their language. And there's a lot that you might not understand. Martha and I can help you sort that out. 877-929-9673, or talk to us on Twitter at W ay WO RD. Our team includes senior producer Stephanie Levine, engineer and editor Tim Felton, production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler, and quiz guy John Chanel. We'd love to hear from you, no matter where you are in the world, go to wayward radio dot org slash contact. Subscribe to the podcast here hundreds of past episodes and get the newsletter at wayward radio dot ORG. Whenever you have a language story or question, our toll free line is open in the U.S. and Canada. One 8 7 7 9 two 9 9 6 7 three, or send your thoughts to words at wayward radio dot org. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Special thanks to Michael Brest Lauer, Josh eccles, Claire rotting Bruce rogo, Rick sidon worm and Betty Willis. Thanks for listening. I'm Martha Barnett. And I'm grant Barrett until next time, goodbye. Bye.

Amelia Ohio South London Midwest goody picker boxing Arlington Britain Grant Iowa Virginia Goody Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler John Chanel U.S. Martha wayward Inc Twitter
"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

02:45 min | 5 months ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Everything in there that's conceivable, you know? Right, okay, because I've only ever heard that and then once I was watching, you know, English show, a British TV show recently. And they said that so and so thought he was all that and the plate of witch crackers. Yeah. Yeah, there are other people have played around with it, a plate of fries, a plate of chips, a plate of green beans, a plate of biscuits and gravy. They've done a variety of different things, but usually all that in a bag of chips is the more common. But yeah, it comes from black American English and like a lot of terms left the speech of black Americans and entered the mainstream to the usual channels of popular culture and it's a little dated now just so you know. And that used by the time. Of coming back around to some who knows. Maybe much younger people start saying it. Thanks to you. Maybe we're transcending right now. As we speak. Maybe. Maybe not. We are all that in a jumbo bag of chips. Thank you so much. I was very hopeful. All right, take care. All right, bye bye. Thanks for calling. Bye bye. Well, if you're slang is new, or you're slaying his old, we'd love to talk about it 877-929-9673. Our team includes senior producer Stephanie Levine, engineer and editor Tim Felton, production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler, and quiz guy John Chanel. We'd love to hear from you, no matter where you are in the world, go to wayward radio dot org slash contact. Subscribe to the podcast here hundreds of past episodes and get the newsletter at wayward radio dot ORG. Whenever you have a language story or question, our toll free line is open in the U.S. and Canada, one 8 7 7 9 two 9 9 6 7 three, or send your thoughts to words at wayward radio dot org. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language. Special thanks to Michael Brest Lauer, Josh eccles, Claire rotting Bruce rogo, Rick sidon worm and Betty Willis. Thanks for listening. I'm Martha Barnett. And I'm grant Barrett until next time, goodbye. Bye..

Stephanie Levine Tim Felton Rachel Elizabeth weissler John Chanel wayward Inc Michael Brest Lauer Josh eccles Canada Bruce rogo U.S. Rick sidon worm Betty Willis Claire Martha Barnett Barrett
"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Our team includes senior producer Stephanie Levine, engineer and editor Tim Felton, production assistant Rachel Elizabeth weissler, and quiz guy John Chanel. We'd love to hear from you, no matter where you are in the world, go to wayward radio dot org slash contact. Subscribe to the podcast here hundreds of past episodes and get the newsletter at wayward radio dot ORG. Whenever you have a language story or question, our toll free line is open in the U.S. and Canada, one 8 7 7 9 two 9 9 6 7 three, or send your thoughts to words at wayward radio dot org. Away with words is an independent production of wayward Inc, a nonprofit supported by listeners and organizations who are changing the way the world talks about language..

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

01:32 min | 8 months ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"At wayward <Speech_Music_Male> radio <SpeakerChange> dot org. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Our team <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> includes senior producer <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Stephanie Levine, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> engineer and editor <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Tim Felton, <Speech_Female> production assistant <Speech_Female> Rachel Elizabeth <Speech_Female> weisler, <Speech_Music_Male> and quiz <SpeakerChange> guy <Speech_Music_Male> John Chanel. <Speech_Male> We'd love <Speech_Music_Male> to hear from you, no <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> matter where you are in the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world, go to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wayward radio <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot <SpeakerChange> org slash <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> contact. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Subscribe to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the podcast <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> here hundreds of past <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> episodes and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> get the newsletter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at wayward <SpeakerChange> radio. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> have a language <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> story or question <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our toll free line <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is open in the <Speech_Music_Male> U.S. and Canada, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> one 8 <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> 7 7 9 <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> two 9 9 <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> 6 7 three <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or send <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your thoughts to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> words <SpeakerChange> at wayward <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> radio dot org. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Away with words <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is an independent <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> production of <Speech_Music_Female> wayward Inc, <Speech_Female> a nonprofit <Speech_Female> supported by listeners <Speech_Female> and organizations <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> who are changing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the way <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world talks about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> language. Special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks to Michael breslauer, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Josh eccles, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Claire rotting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bruce rogo, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Rick <SpeakerChange> sighting worm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and Betty Willis. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks for listening. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Martha <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Barnett. And I'm <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> grant Barrett <Speech_Male> until next <SpeakerChange> time, <Speech_Music_Male> goodbye. <Music>

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

04:49 min | 8 months ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words. The show about language and how we use it. I'm Martha Barnett. And I'm grant Barrett and on the line from New York City is our quiz guy. John Chanel. Hi, John. Hi, grant. Hi, Martha. You know, I so miss going to the movies. It's been such a long time since I've been in the movie theater. I'm really looking forward to doing that again soon. I have a great respect for screenwriters and directors. And besides having mastery of plotting and characterization and such, they have to know when they're going down the wrong path and when to make a course correction. For example, it's not very well known that in the original version of a beloved Pixar film about an old widower in a young boy, their adventurers take them into caverns deep below the surface of the earth, it was probably a good idea that they changed the concept of the movie down to the movie up. Got it. Okay. That's what we're going to do. I'm going to give you a movie opposites. How many of these movie opposites can you figure out from the descriptions? Okay? Okay. All right. All right. Cary Grant is chased by good guys and bad guys, but instead of ending up at a national monument in the dakotas, he ends up at Disney World. South by southeast. South by southeast. That's right. Instead of north by northwest. It's 1957 and on a comfortable temperate day, a jury sits and quickly decides a simple and easy court case. Everybody goes home to their families. 12 happy men. 12 have you met? Short movie. They changed it to 12 angry men and it was much longer. In an alternate universe, to reporters are unable to find any evidence that anyone in the Nixon administration had anything to do with the break in at the Watergate complex. None of the president's men. None of the president's absolutely none of them instead of all the president's men, right? Jimmy Stewart has an uneventful two week recovery spying on people coming and going on this on his Greenwich Village street completely ignoring anything that happens in the backyard. Front window. Front window instead of rear window, the classic Hitchcock film? Yes. He should mind his own business. A disparate group of high schoolers really get to know each other at a fancy restaurant. Dinner club. Yes, the dinner club, as opposed to, of course, The Breakfast Club. Finally, this 2010 film tells how Facebook allowed misanthropes to distance themselves from everyone throughout 2020. The antisocial network. Yes, the antisocial network instead of the social network. Of course. Thanks, John, really appreciate it. Thank you guys talk to you next time. Thanks, John. And we invite you to get in on the conversation. Just call us 877-929-9673 or send your emails to words at wayward radio dot ORG. Hi there, you have away with words. I got hi. This is so exciting. And surreal. My name is toshi. I'm currently in Dallas, but I lived in New York for like ever one of those globe hoppers. I'm 27. And so I was like pretty much raised on the Internet and I'm a millennial, as you could say. And so a lot of my friends and I just people in general notice that not to be ageist or anything, but people of different generations tend to use like an ellipsis or they use like dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, at the end of their text messages. And to us, it seems like they're upset and they're being passive aggressive and it really freaks us out and we're like, what did we do wrong? Oh my God. But to them, you know what I mean? To them, they just put it in every single text message. So I was wondering, you know, what's up with that? The only guest that I had is that maybe it comes from when people were writing letters and it takes a long time to get back, you know, you put an ellipsis because there's that whole to be continued kind of feeling. But in a text message, it's instant. So it just seems like you're mad at me, and I don't like that. So, you know, where did that come from? And I've been folded for using an ellipsis wrong in school, but then you'll are going to use it.

Martha Barnett John Chanel Nixon administration Barrett John dakotas Cary Grant Pixar Martha New York City Jimmy Stewart Disney World dinner club The Breakfast Club toshi Facebook Dallas New York
"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

08:24 min | 9 months ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words this show about language and how we use it. I'm Martha Barnett. I'm grant Barrett and out of the darkness comes that man of mystery, John Chanel, our quiz guy, hi, John. Hey, grant a Martha no mystery here. It's a quiz as usual. And now I know what you're going to ask me. John, what personal obsession of years are you going to use as a flimsy excuse to hang on a quiz this week? Well, will it be superheroes, puppies, British game shows? Thank you for asking. I am a frequent blood donor and recently gave blood, and from that, believe it or not, I got the idea for this quiz. I will give you two words. For example, ruble and debris. Now, one of them needs a type of blood to become synonymous with the other. As you know, the four blood types are a, B, O, and AB. Now for ruble and debris, do you know what you should add to one of those? To get the other. Yeah, ruble should get a bead to become rubble. Exactly. At B to ruble, you get rubble, which is synonymous with debris. Nice. Now, alternatively, some words may need to donate blood. For example, if I said, colonel and seabed, what would you say? This is kernel as kernel of corn, right? Oh, okay. Colonel. Seabed. Right. How about if you donate AB? Right. What do you get? You get kernel and seed. Seed, yes, very good. You remove, you take the blood, the AB from seabed to get seed for kernel. And also remember the blood types, a, B, O, or a, B you'll have to add or remove one of those types to one of the two words to get a synonym of the other. Here we go. Awaken and ruse awaken and ruse. Gets an O. It becomes roused. Right. We call that I call that O positive because you're adding the rouse, very good. Again, this will be sometimes recommend a piece of paper and a pencil might help you with this. Let's see, here's the next one. Container and cartoon container. And oh, take one of the O's out of cartoony. You get a carton. Yes, you do. It's an O negative. We remove the O, all right. Let's try this one. Coached and hidden. Coach. Oh, take the O out of coach and you get cached cached for hidden yes, very good. Doable and allocate. Doable and allocate. Take that AB out. You get stolen allocate. Don't dull something out to allocate ourselves. Martha's on the AB trip. Her blood is on fire. Here's the last one. Decayed and rotated. Decayed and rotated. Oh, rotated becomes rotted by taking out an L yes. Very good. Rotted nicely done. Thank you very much. This is always a pleasure to have you on the show. We really appreciate it. It's really my pleasure, guys. Thank you so much. We have great fun on the show. We talk about all things related to language, but you know what we love to do. We'd love to hear your stories. What's a funny word that the kids came up with and everybody uses and has for decades. Tell us that story. Or what's something that grandma and grandpa used to say that it's been passed down for generations. We'd like to hear that one too. 877-929-9673 or email us words wayward radio dot org or if you found something funny on the Internet, share it on Twitter at W ay WOR D hi there you have a way with words. Hi, this is Claire stadland from Durham North Carolina. Hey Claire, welcome. Hi there. Welcome to the show. What's up? The thing that came to my mind was you did a show, I'm not sure exactly when it was, but it was on the topic of leave taking. And someone called in and shared this wonderful story about moving to the south and hearing the expression y'all come go home with us. And you had this whole conversation where you used the term leave takings and I was just listening like sometimes I'll be doing my dishes or something while I'm listening and I just stand still. And I just like this is a great topic. I had never heard the term leaf takings. I come from a Jewish family in New York City and we never say goodbye. We say goodbye, but we never leave. And we say goodbye and we stand at the door and we just keep talking and talking and so when I was a teenager, I spent a lot of time in Mexico. My dad and my uncle had a home there and so my sister and my cousin and I, we made a lot of local friends and we had some boyfriends and we just had a lot of fun. And when it was time for everybody to separate in the evenings, we never wanted to part. And so we would say goodbye and then never leave. They found it so funny. And they shared with us a popular song that spoke to. It wasn't really about that, but it completely spoke to it. And the song goes like this. Your story is better than the march. And the song basically means why do you go and you go, and you go, and you go, and still you haven't gone. And here I am waiting for you to leave me waiting for you to leave me waiting to forget you. So that's how your family says, goodbye. That's what you're telling us. That's what they told us that we were exactly what that song was saying. Oh, that's so perfect. Yeah, I think it was originally done by a Jose Alfredo humanist. Yeah, that's great. And his then wife Alicia Juarez, who died just a few years ago. He died tragically young in the 1970s, but it was huge. He had so many hits, but it's an incredibly long song. I can just hear the guitars, you know? Yeah, me too, yeah. I can't believe you know this stuff. This is why I love your food so much. I don't know what year it was though, but that's gotta be a while back because if he died in the 1970s, so that would have to be what late 60s, early 70s, something like that. Well, the years, you know, it could have been popularized before we were there, but we were there like in the late 70s, you know, like 17 years. Yeah, but the thing is about 8 wholesale. It's huge and still huge. He's kind of legendary. I don't know if Sinatra level, but big time. So some of his songs are such classics that you still play them at birthday parties and quinceaneras. And baptisms and weddings and stuff like that. They're just like the songs that you expect to hear. Yeah, this song is so sad. It's so cool. It is, it's a very sad song. It's really sad because the other person has chosen it to go look for a new life..

Martha Barnett John Chanel Martha John Claire stadland Barrett Colonel grandpa Durham Claire Jose Alfredo Alicia Juarez North Carolina Twitter New York City Mexico Sinatra
"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

04:16 min | 10 months ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to a way with words, the show about language and how we use it. I'm Martha Barnett. And I'm grant Barrett and we're joined by that dashing quizmaster. John Chanel. Hey John, how's New York? John, come back. Hey, grant. Yes, I'm dashing all over the place. I gotta stop myself. And bring myself back to tell you that I have quite a quiz for you today. You know, I've mentioned before that I consider cryptic crosswords what the British call crosswords to be the golden standard of word puzzles, and it's gonna be cryptic class again today. Now in each cryptic puzzle, each clue is a distinct puzzle in and of itself. It contains both a definition of the answer and a description of it through wordplay. Part of the puzzle is figuring out which part is the definition, which part is the wordplay, and also what specific type of wordplay is in use. Today, we're going to look at charade clues. In a charade cryptic clue, the wordplay clues different parts of the word. Now here's an example. Scarlet single is overhauled. This is a 6 letter word. Now that would charade the word, redone. Scarlet is anybody. Red, single is one. One, one. So scarlet single red one put together is overhauled, redone. All right? Now sometimes in a crypto clue the indefinite article a just stands for itself. Here's an example. A barrier for first man now can you guess what that might charade first a dam Adam? Right. They use just a barrier is damn a damn you get first man, which is Adam. Right. Now, in the following clues, just remember two things. I'll always put the wordplay first to make it simple, and the article a will always stand for the letter a here we go. A boxing match is concerning. About AB yes, about how did you get that grant a boxing match is about bout and concerning something is concerning something else. It is about it. Right, so the a and the clue is a and then boxing matches bout. Very good. Here's the next one. A Catholic ritual to bring together. A mass. I'm gonna ask, yeah, how'd you get that? So you amass wealth, you bring it together, you bring your money together and mass is a religious ceremony and a Catholic Church. Right, proceeded with the article a right..

Martha Barnett John Chanel Hey John Barrett New York boxing John Adam Catholic Church
"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"john chanel" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words. The show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett and joining us now is the one and only sui generous John Chanel..