18 Burst results for "John Casio"

"john casio" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

08:01 min | 3 months ago

"john casio" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Listen to where great conversation intriguing insights Mu check out the Jordan arbiter show and I got Jordan here, Jordan besides interviews. You also do these. Ask Me Anything's or just conversations with your team. And you did this one about how to ask for advice. Why did you do an episode about how to ask for advice? Would you talk about their? This episode is really popular. I kept getting questions like Hey will you mentor me or hey? Should I start a? A clothing line or Hayes should I quit my job and go into this business and I realized these weren't really people that wanted to know the answer to that question. They either wanted permission or encouragement, or they wanted me to validate their idea, and that's not a good reason for me to spend time helping someone because they can get that from anyone including themselves, so I talked about how to ask for advice both from the asking side so if you're looking to get help. Help from someone. How'd you ask in a way? That's compelling and gets a response and is helpful to you, and then also for those of us that get asked for advice all the time I created a bunch of tips and tactics for us to hone in drill down what these people might actually need because I was getting a lot of folks saying yeah. I spent three hours with this person. And then they just didn't even follow my advice into the other thing and I. I was like because they didn't really want your help. They just wanted to hear that they were right. And when you learn this, you save hundreds of hours over the course of your life getting an asking for advice, and also of course giving advice that might just go unheeded well. That's up to number three twenty one. It's called how to ask for advice. Go check it out. It's the Jordan harbour. Show Jordan. Thanks for coming on. Thanks for having me on then. And now back to the show was talk about why we have been seen a spike in loneliness, you read. Those I've seen those articles come out in the past five ten years. That more and more people are lonely. Fact I just saw an article the other day that more and more older Americans are dying alone. What's going on here? What are the factors contributing to that? Yeah so. In. Here's what we know about loneliness in terms of the numbers. We know that loneliness is exceedingly common. If you look at a two thousand Eighteen Kaiser Family Foundation, study. If. They came up with a number twenty two percent of adults in America. Who struggled with loneliness. Many would argue that's actually on the lower end of the scale. If you look at other studies have been done. More recently, the studied by the American health insurance CIGNA, a large population based study using the UCLA loneliness go. Did reliable scale found that the numbers were actually much higher and place him actually closer to half the population of not a bit more that struggles with loneliness. Interestingly, they found that unlike most people's assumptions that. Is probably most concentrated among the elderly. It turned out that young people had some of the highest rates of loneliness, and this has also been seen in other data as well. If you look at other countries you see that the numbers are not dissimilar the UK and Australia or struggling with around twenty five percent. Of adults in their in their country who admit to being lonely and many other countries around the world, and as through Europe and Latin. America are finding double digit percentages of loneliness. The question that is being asked is is loneliness, increasing or not, and we always been this lonely. And the truth is we don't a hundred percent. Know the answer to that question in part, because we don't have enough data some of the data that's out there in the studies that are done using different methodologies, which heart always compare apples to apples, but if you just look at this cygnus study that was run and twenty, eighteen and two thousand and twenty, using very similar methodology, they did find a modest increase in loneliness and. John Casio, who is Lila are widely regarded as the the father of modern loneliness research also believe that there was a modest increase in loneliness was taking place in society so I. think that for multiple reasons am in merits paying attention to and it. It's important to prioritize loneliness, because we know it's exceedingly common. We know it's consequential, not only for our health, but also for how we perform in the workplace and in school. And there is a chance given what we know in some limited anywhere seeing that it may, in fact, be increasing as well we do. We have idea the factors that have contributed to it. So I think there's several factors in the modern world that are contributing to loneliness that there, certainly the mobility factor which has given us. The opportunity to travel and move many times in our lifetime for jobs for opportunities, but has also. Uproots from the communities that we have come to know my other so clearly in my own parents who left India in the early nineteen seventies to build a better life for themselves, and for their kids. My sister and I and they moved to England and the United Kingdom and then eventually to the United States while they were blessed to have many opportunities with a missed and struggled with three years and years ago was losing the community that they had in India. A family and friends and so mobility is one factor. The second factor is how we use technology and notice. I didn't technology because technology. The end of the day is a tool and the question is. Can we use it to strengthen connection verses, weekend connection, and when we use technology to? Stay in touch with friends who otherwise may not be able to see when we use it to video conference with relative halfway around the world, or when we use it to post on social media that were coming into town and ask if any friends or free for dinner, and that we meet up and catch up person. These are all powerful ways that technology can help us stay. Stay connected others, but what I worry is that the way in which were predominantly using technology now may be in fact, contributing to greater disconnection, for example in this happens when when we do one of three things with technology when we allow our the amount of time that we're spending in front of screens to edge out in crowd out the in person time we have with. With others that can diminish relationships when we also allow technology to creep into our conversations, such that we are catching up with friends, while we're also checking our social media feed, or looking at our inbox or Googling, a question that came into our head are looking at the score on the game. All thinking that we can multitask until we can fully pay attention to our friend. Friend the truth is that our conversation suffer because the sciences very clear that we don't multitask as human beings, we task switch when I'm looking at my Inbox, I'm actually not able to fully pay attention and process. What someone is saying? But finally the way in which technology and hurt is also by how it impacts our perception of our self, and for many people who use. Social Media in particular. They know that there's this accelerated culture of comparison that technology has enabled. People have been comparing themselves. For for thousands of years, and you know asking my I have a car that's as Nice as my neighbor is my houses as big as my friends, but what happened on social media is that it is accelerated many many fold, and so when you're scrolling even through your instagram feed, or through your other social media feeds. You're constantly comparing somebody's curated pictures, really the best version of their life to your average moments, and you often come up feeling short. Social media also in media in general has accelerated messaging to us. That often tells us that were not enough there. There were not enough or not good looking enough. We're not smart enough. We're not rich enough. When popular enough, and when you hear that time and time again especially when you're young, and you're developing your sense of identity, it can really impact your sense of self worth and make you feel inadequate when you approach other people from a place of being inadequate and not feeling good enough,.

Jordan America Jordan harbour United Kingdom India Eighteen Kaiser Family Foundat CIGNA Europe Hayes United States England John Casio UCLA Lila Australia
"john casio" Discussed on SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

11:47 min | 4 months ago

"john casio" Discussed on SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

"Hey all you sober people hand anyone else. Who is interested in listening to me talk about mental wellness? Some of you might remember that my word for the year is clarity and especially with. Cova did that word has not changed my journey. This year is very much about taking the noise out of my daily life and boy has that been difficult in this time of lockdown and isolation and loneliness which is why. I'm GonNa talk about loneliness today and what it means. Not only to me but to you all as well. The statistics are growing. Not only because of covet but prior to Cova. We are becoming more and more lonely. And why is that and more importantly what can we do about it? I live alone and if I am feeling the loneliness even though I have people built into my daily work. I can't imagine how other people are feeling who don't work any longer or don't necessarily engage with people daily in their line of work before Kovin. I liked living alone. I enjoy the peace and quiet and frankly I like my relationship with myself but now that I'm confined an had been confined by the way. I'm still very much. Laki myself down except for a walk that I take almost daily with some friends Monday through Friday but we social distance or physical distance during the walk. I carry a mask with me so although I'm getting Interaction I still spend most of my downtime. My non work time by myself and it's become more difficult. I only imagine how difficult it is for some of you who live in bigger cities and can't get out to walk every day on walking past like I do. It has to be really tough. Interestingly the rate in which we are living alone has been on the increase for the last fifty years Grand Julie Aching up to about twenty eight percent in two thousand nineteen of our total population here in the US which means at thirty five point seven million people here in the US live by themselves in a recent study by CIGNA which is a health insurance company here in the US of twenty thousand people. Us adults they found that half of Americans feel like they are alone. Only slightly more than fifty percent of the respondents said they had meaningful in person. Social interactions on a daily basis and fifty percent said that sometimes or always they feel that the relationships are not meaningful and that they're isolated from a smaller but still surprising number of people. Twenty percent of the twenty thousand said they never or rarely feel close to people and eighteen percent felt like they have no one to talk to and this same study by Cigna revealed that Young People Age Eighteen to twenty two are far more likely than senior citizens to report being lonely and Import Health. Making them the loneliest generation and well loneliness itself is not an diagnoses or a mental health disorder. It goes hand in hand with many of the diagnostic criteria in the DSM. Five diagnostic statistical manual. That most of us in the mental health professionals zone us. Furthermore there's no accepted definition of loneliness. Sometimes it gets jumbled together with social isolation but the two concepts are very different social isolationism indicator of how much contact. Somebody has with other people. Whereas loneliness is the subjective feelings of isolation and there is no agreed. Tipping Point at which acute loneliness transitions into a chronic problem with long term mental health and physical health ramifications. Alone doesn't necessarily mean that you're lonely nor does being around people mean that you're not loneliness is a very subjective. Feeling loneliness is a feeling that only you the person experiencing it can truly identify the fancy schmancy definition of loneliness is the distress that results from discrepancies between ideal and perceived social relationships. That's according to the Encyclopedia of human relationships. What that means is that loneliness is a feeling and a perception. It involves a wave seen ourselves and the world around us. We can feel lonely. In a wide variety of social settings and circumstances. It doesn't take being alone. Some studies have shown that people who struggle with loneliness may actually perceive the world differently. Does that sound familiar to some of us. I know it sounds very similar to the world that I grew up in the world that I created for myself through my perceptions and certainly when I was drinking boy did I create A world within a world one researcher even found structural and biochemical differences in what he labeled the lonely brain. Okay and I'm going to murder his name. I'm sure John Casio Gosh. His research revealed that a lonely person can experience more difficulty recognizing positive events and have more trouble picturing the thoughts of others known as mental ising. Another University of Chicago study found. That lonely inviduals are more likely to construe the world as threatening hold more negative expectations and interpret and respond to him. Big You a social behavior in a more negative off-putting fashion while when I read that that is trauma to me. Viewing the world as threatening and beyond our control and for most of us that meant we tried to control what we did have in our hula-hoop and beyond were twenty-foot hula-hoop if you know what I mean that huge expanse between that feeling so different from the person next to in the classroom growing up or outside playing feeling as though we were incredibly weird compared to our neighbors. Here's where I get really excited. If loneliness is a state of our mind state of our thinking can we change it? Can we change the experience of feeling lonely? The answer is yes. This is exactly what self esteem does for us. And how do we achieve self esteem? We do things like pay attention to that. Inner critic voice in our head and separate at separated out from who we are and what we believe and what we think improving our relationship with ourselves for those of you who are in recovery or thinking about getting sober or maybe have pockets of sobriety in your lives. This is. I think what you're after leaving the ideal that a substance can make you feel. Colmer is imperative because it is short lived it takes us away from our relationship with ourselves therefore diminishing our self esteem and it pumps up the volume of our inner critic in my book. Five weeks self-confidence a guide to confronting your inner critic and controlling your relationship with your thoughts available anywhere you buy books or swizzle what I talk about is this relationship with this voice in your head who is giving you really bad advice. The critical inner voice mine negative. Nellie that voice. The inner critical voice is a well integrated pattern of negative thoughts toward ourselves and others. That is at the root of much of our self limiting and self destructive behaviors. This voice makes us feel like we're different. Apart undeserving unworthy when we feel the loneliest. We are in the company. We are Simpatico with this inner critic. We listen and believe when they tell us. No one really cares about you. You are such a burden. Don't tell people that who wants to be around somebody who thinks and says those things don't put yourself out there. You're only going to be rejected. No one ever understands you. So don't try you're going to embarrass yourself and so on and so forth this attack invoice. This spiral of critical thoughts discourages. Us hurts our self confidence and turns our self esteem to Marsh. Instead of doing things that will help us. We create more disk ease in ourselves and were inclined then to be more awkward in social interactions. And then we're going to avoid them altogether or drink through them or pop pill before we go out the more attention. We give this inner critical voice. The louder it gets in order to counter this inner critic we have to do the opposite of what he or she or they are saying when you stop or reduce the amount of time you're listening to this inner critic.

US CIGNA social isolation Cova Kovin Encyclopedia of human relation Import Health University of Chicago Marsh DSM researcher murder John Casio Grand Julie Nellie Simpatico
Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

06:56 min | 4 months ago

Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

"Hey all you sober people hand anyone else. Who is interested in listening to me talk about mental wellness? Some of you might remember that my word for the year is clarity and especially with. Cova did that word has not changed my journey. This year is very much about taking the noise out of my daily life and boy has that been difficult in this time of lockdown and isolation and loneliness which is why. I'm GonNa talk about loneliness today and what it means. Not only to me but to you all as well. The statistics are growing. Not only because of covet but prior to Cova. We are becoming more and more lonely. And why is that and more importantly what can we do about it? I live alone and if I am feeling the loneliness even though I have people built into my daily work. I can't imagine how other people are feeling who don't work any longer or don't necessarily engage with people daily in their line of work before Kovin. I liked living alone. I enjoy the peace and quiet and frankly I like my relationship with myself but now that I'm confined an had been confined by the way. I'm still very much. Laki myself down except for a walk that I take almost daily with some friends Monday through Friday but we social distance or physical distance during the walk. I carry a mask with me so although I'm getting Interaction I still spend most of my downtime. My non work time by myself and it's become more difficult. I only imagine how difficult it is for some of you who live in bigger cities and can't get out to walk every day on walking past like I do. It has to be really tough. Interestingly the rate in which we are living alone has been on the increase for the last fifty years Grand Julie Aching up to about twenty eight percent in two thousand nineteen of our total population here in the US which means at thirty five point seven million people here in the US live by themselves in a recent study by CIGNA which is a health insurance company here in the US of twenty thousand people. Us adults they found that half of Americans feel like they are alone. Only slightly more than fifty percent of the respondents said they had meaningful in person. Social interactions on a daily basis and fifty percent said that sometimes or always they feel that the relationships are not meaningful and that they're isolated from a smaller but still surprising number of people. Twenty percent of the twenty thousand said they never or rarely feel close to people and eighteen percent felt like they have no one to talk to and this same study by Cigna revealed that Young People Age Eighteen to twenty two are far more likely than senior citizens to report being lonely and Import Health. Making them the loneliest generation and well loneliness itself is not an diagnoses or a mental health disorder. It goes hand in hand with many of the diagnostic criteria in the DSM. Five diagnostic statistical manual. That most of us in the mental health professionals zone us. Furthermore there's no accepted definition of loneliness. Sometimes it gets jumbled together with social isolation but the two concepts are very different social isolationism indicator of how much contact. Somebody has with other people. Whereas loneliness is the subjective feelings of isolation and there is no agreed. Tipping Point at which acute loneliness transitions into a chronic problem with long term mental health and physical health ramifications. Alone doesn't necessarily mean that you're lonely nor does being around people mean that you're not loneliness is a very subjective. Feeling loneliness is a feeling that only you the person experiencing it can truly identify the fancy schmancy definition of loneliness is the distress that results from discrepancies between ideal and perceived social relationships. That's according to the Encyclopedia of human relationships. What that means is that loneliness is a feeling and a perception. It involves a wave seen ourselves and the world around us. We can feel lonely. In a wide variety of social settings and circumstances. It doesn't take being alone. Some studies have shown that people who struggle with loneliness may actually perceive the world differently. Does that sound familiar to some of us. I know it sounds very similar to the world that I grew up in the world that I created for myself through my perceptions and certainly when I was drinking boy did I create A world within a world one researcher even found structural and biochemical differences in what he labeled the lonely brain. Okay and I'm going to murder his name. I'm sure John Casio Gosh. His research revealed that a lonely person can experience more difficulty recognizing positive events and have more trouble picturing the thoughts of others known as mental ising.

Cova United States Social Isolation Cigna Kovin Encyclopedia Of Human Relation Import Health Researcher Murder DSM John Casio Grand Julie
"john casio" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:50 min | 8 months ago

"john casio" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Could take the moors of exit go into Morrison and then hang a right that'll take you down the hill right back to see for seventy to eighty five is also close between fair play that deal judges are both record that because the wind if you were sick what live as well because of snow no no big Basil like that around here they have the debris on top of a twenty five at ridge gate the jam you up that's been cleared out you're still heavy to the tech center north but I twenty five approaching university that crashes gone as yourself out but you're backed up still the downtown at Parker road in Hampton Park Road Southampton loaded up big because of a wreck box thirty one bit boy weather partly cloudy tonight of the twenty two fifty tomorrow is thirty eight right now this reporter sponsored by national western stock show celebrate the bill sixty days in January for the nationalist and stock show January eleventh through the twenty six best competitions rodeo action at best doctors will get you to get the national weather dot com at all king soopers locations I'm Joe Morrissey K. away our top story on K. away dramatic testimony at the state capitol today from a father who lost his son in the stem highlands ranch shooting Kendrick as Teo died a hero confronting one of the shooters John Casio testifying for a bill to allow concealed Kerry for teachers and staff I have to be my son's voice said to be Kendricks voice Kendrick loved everybody trusted everyone now we need to do things for him John Casio telling a house committee gun free zones do not make us safer the bill is expected to be defeated along party lines smash and grab thirty nine year old Andrew Jones arrested at three thirty this morning in Jefferson County after using a car to ram into a gas station and a bank building on west coal mine the cops say to steal stuff Jeff co trying to figure out of Jones committed other similar crimes all possible coronavirus.

Morrison Hampton Park Road Southampton reporter Joe Morrissey K. Kendrick Teo Kerry John Casio Andrew Jones Jefferson County Jeff co
"john casio" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"john casio" Discussed on Here & Now

"Say that their goal is to not only stop loneliness but to regulate the way it affects the mind and the body. I'd like to know from you. <hes> what what are your thoughts on this idea. Do you feel like loneliness requires a medical intervention like this well. I think like most people when i very first i heard about it. <hes> there was a little bit of of skepticism <hes> because i think we don't necessarily associate our relationships with something <hes> that that a pill could fix but yet perceptions of loneliness are something that <hes> maybe related to biological signals explain how you mean by yeah so most scientists agree that <hes> that humans are social species much like other animals. It's more adaptive to be in groups and adapted to survival will that similarly humans are social species in fact the late <hes> john casio argued that loneliness is much like hunger hunger or thirst <hes> whereas hunger and thirst our biological motives that motivate us to seek out food or water <hes> that loneliness komo motivates us to reconnect socially in so in that sense loneliness is something that is adaptive and something that we actually actually wouldn't really want to get rid of <hes> because it helps us to reconnect okay the problem however is when when when we experienced loneliness chronically and that's where i think many of the negative health effects can occur and where we need to you really focus. Our intervention efforts okay so i see what you're saying. You're saying that loneliness like hunger can be a signal okay. You're hungry not go eat. If you're lonely you you know to be in a social situation so you can quell that loneliness but in some people they may be chronically lonely and not going out to get that stimuli from other folks in so this pill might offer a solution for them to be able to step outside of themselves and do that is is that what you're saying yeah and so in some cases providing more opportunities for those social connections chins may be the best option but for others despite being around others may still feel profoundly lonely and so if we think of of loneliness almost like a a social barometer in some instances that may be off <hes> may need to be recalibrated and in in those instances perhaps a solution such as the one they are suggesting hosting <hes> may be appropriate but in other circumstances other kinds of approaches may be more appropriate. I guess this goes back to what you were saying about all of us at some point <hes> feel that it's a natural thing that happens but this chronic loneliness. Do you feel like we're seeing more of this in society diety and what might be the reasons for that though it's difficult to know whether it's actually increasing or if we're simply more aware of it but there is some evidence also to suggest that perhaps people are becoming more disconnected now if we think about out loneliness specifically that is perhaps less routinely collected on a national level so it's hard to know whether it's actually increasing or not but we do have evidence that in terms of demographic trends <hes> that we have more people living alone than ever before <hes> fewer people are getting married. Fewer people are having children so there is some evidence to suggest that people blur becoming more socially disconnected and the big question..

casio komo
"john casio" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"john casio" Discussed on The TED Interview

"With leading scientists and doctors inquest of a better understanding of it. Some of his conclusions have been controversial. We discussed that too. I found the whole conversation absolutely compelling. If your hands right there are numerous things we can all due to improve lives and are what places and our relationships ships and documentaries Johann Hari Welcome. I'm so happy to be really Chris. Thank you so this is going to be such an interesting conversation. The tedtalk gave a few years ago as his about the war on drugs and how we were really not understanding addiction properly and to understand addiction. You just really had to pay attention to the lust connection that a lot of addicts feel you took that idea that notion of us connection and I started thinking about it much more broadly as a way of thinking about depression this lead to more recent book last connections which is becoming big bestseller and it's a very personal book right yourself have suffered from depression. What you you talked about in? That book is incredibly moving. It's profound. It's it's in places controversial. We're GONNA talk about all of this. I just want to say to people listening. This competition isn't just relevant to you as someone who might have at some point been depressed or knowing someone lived with someone who's who's been depressed but really I think anyone who's just interested in personal happiness and as you will hear many of the ideas that you and I think we'll speak about apply to all of us in in different ways in in prospect at least maybe we'll screw it up. I interested in happiness. I want to be a happier person at an depot and I want to make it possible for others to be so as well just even on that level <music>. I'm super interested in this so Johanna I mean I think what I'd love to do is just to hear a bit of your story. Just tell us about your life. I guess one of the reasons I wanted to think about this subject is because there were these two you mysteries that were really hanging over me kind of personal mysteries in some ways that if I'm honest I was really afraid to look into off actually wanting to write this book before I'm a book about addiction chasing the screaming. I was too frightened to do it. The first mystery is I'm forty. Not is old and every year I've been alive. Depression and anxiety have increased here in the United States and across the Western world and I wanted to understand why why is so many of us finding it so much harder to get through the day and you know we speaking just shortly after the Center for Disease Control here in the U._S.. Announced that suicide is at its highest level they've ever recorded in this country and that doesn't include the deaths so that's separate them. Start was one mystery and that was connected as you imply too much more personal mystery for me. which is you know I remember when I was a teenager going to my doctor and saying that I had this feeling like pain was leaking out of me? I couldn't control it. I didn't understand what was going on. <hes> I felt ashamed of it. A my doctor told me a story a lot of people. This is the late nineties loads of people listening to this. We're told this story which I never realized was really over-simplified. It's not that it's got no truth in it but it was really simplified my my doctor said well. We know why people feel like this. Some people just naturally have something wrong with that brain to have a chemical imbalance often. They're lacking chemical called Serotonin which makes people feel good. All you need to do is take these drugs and you're GONNA be fine. I'm a tremendous amount relief at being told this and I started taking a drug co Paxil or so roxy in Britain and I thought much better I got really significant boost and then a few months distilling a pain started to come back so when back to my doctor doctor told you get high enough does clearly need high does again. I more more again. I I felt a really significant boost than this feeling pain came back again so it's really in this cycle taking higher and higher doses until for thirteen years. I was taking the maximum impossible days at the end of which I still felt awful and I was asking myself well. What's going on here because I'm doing everything I'm told to do by the story? This culture is telling it doesn't seem to be helping me and I look around me or give me some relief. I didn't ultimately solvable problem and I could see that I was surrounded by many people in the same situation and many more who antidepressants work giving some relief but not ultimately solving the problem so I wanted to use my my training in the social sciences at Cambridge to really try to understand this so I went on a big journey over forty thousand miles I wanted to sit with the leading experts in the world about what causes depression anxiety and crucially what solves them and just people with really different perspectives actives from an Amish Village Indiana because the amish have low levels depression to a city in Brazil and advertising to see if that would make people feel better to a lab in Baltimore where they were giving people psychedelics to see that would help and I land leads the things but the of wildland and it's very related to what you said about happiness as well. The heart of what I learned is this scientific evidence benign causes of depression and anxiety two of them are indeed biological and we get to talk about them but most of the factors causing depression depression and anxiety and not in our biology most of them are factors in the way relive some of which are all have been had been rising which helps us to understand why there's been this big increase in despair in all all its forms and that was kind of shocking shocking and revelatory to me and then I learned that once you understand these causes which is much more complicated pitcher than what I was told opens up a whole different solutions that should be offered to people alongside the option of chemicals persons so before we get to deep into. Let's get a few definitions. I guess on the table I mean depression in our people do it is widely used <hes> some people just to see him. It just means some unfeeling a bit down out. How would you find fresh? The best definition I got was from Dr Harris Wonderful Person. He made a real breakthrough about depression in the seventies. She said everyone has feelings of hopelessness. Sometimes depression is when that fitting of hopelessness spreads like an oil slick. I the most of your mind or most of your life thought that was a pretty good definition. I mean it becomes the many people completely debilitating you literally can't get out of bed. I mean I've lived with people who are depressed and it small awful to experience than pretty much any other sort of disease familiar with it's because it just it it. It stops you having any pleasure in anything depression at that level I mean I wonder whether that that story that you're told what will come into this in a bit more detail but one of the people I was living with who suffered severely from depression. A doctor told her a similar story and part of the motivation it felt for that was to say to her. You know stop blaming himself. This is not your fault by taking away the blame it took away for her at least for awhile part of the set of self-healing Cycle of Oh. This isn't about the awful things I've done to myself. I'm just unlucky saying is really important and I think the word cookies is really important as well. I used to say an and believed exactly that argument that there was two choices does either the kind of full saw argument if you're depressed you're just week. You need to pull yourself together. All there's the biological overwhelmingly biological argument is just a problem in your brain and of course if those are the two choices we would choose the biological stories. Tell to depress person. The truth is more complex and actually this interesting evidence that touting this heavily biological story while totally well intentioned as you say is not actually the best part our stigma stigma so there's a very broad agreement many of the things we'll talk about those arguments about this a very broad agreement among scientists to this there are three kinds of course of depression and anxiety there are biological causes which have very real. There's things like your genes. Eugene's can make you more sensitive to these problems in the same way. Everyone knows some people find easier to on weight than other people one of those people he finds incredibly easy away those people who find it really hard to away but equally that doesn't doesn't write your destiny right. If you're somebody easy to on way that doesn't mean you're preordained pohmay similarly. There are also real changes in your brain. Applemans become depressed that can make it harder to get out alongside those biological causes there are psychological causes such as expense logical courses but it's literally the beliefs you have can make a defense as to how you feel about yourself <hes> so relation to your psyche so for example if you were abused as a child and you internalize the voice of the abusive to give an extreme example does a psychological causes depression and that's where <hes> cognitive behavioral therapy can make a difference whereby by changing what you believe you can you can shift some of that feeling exactly that's a good bread poignant and then they'll alongside. There's two sets of causes biological psychological. There are also social causes. There are factors in the way we live together for which is very strong evidence can increase depression anxiety so the truth is complicated but not so complicated the ordinary buzzing car does not by any remains. This is called the bio psychosocial model in theory. This is what everyone believes just really important thing he said about your friend so like I say for a long time I thought okay there's this choices either the condemnation of personal weakness which is obviously grace or there's telling people don't worry we'll I was told and did find like your friend found initial relief in Oh. It's just a biological problem but I think there's several problems with that firstly. If you don't understand the broad range of complex causes the I'm making you depressed. You can't find a meaningful solution so let me give you a concrete is on book. Is that Cassandra bit fancy and abstract this here in the United States we are in the lowliest society has ever been. There's a study the Americans. How many close friends do you have you could turn to in a crisis and when they started doing it years ago? The most common answer was five today. The most common answer is none sought the average but it's the most common answer. There's a study more recent since study the asked Americans how many people know you well and fifty percent of Americans said nobody. I spent a lot of time interviewing an incredible Mangku Professor John Casio who is in Chicago. Something just died. He was the leading heating expert in the world on online INNIS. Remember him saying to me. Why are we alive by wise? Everyone listening to the show alive one key reason is our ancestors in the Savannah's of Africa will really good at one thing they often went bigger than the animals they took down. They often went faster than the animals they took them but they were much better. Banding Together into tribes and cooperating this was a superpower is a species just like bees evolve to live in a hive. Humans Volta live in a tribe. We are literally the first humans ever to try to disband are tribes and is making us feel terrible. If you sat for be from its hive it will go crazy right if you think about the circumstances where we evolved if you off from the tribunal depressed anxious for really good a good reason you in terrible danger now that can seem like a very big thing this overwhelming evidence that loneliness has gone up and there's overwhelming evidence that learning is causes depression and anxiety. It's one of the factors that helps us to understand why this crisis is growing. We'll dig in some of the the causes because you've got lots of. I think they're all really interesting worth exploring but the broader point seems like you're making here. Is that look if depression is supposed to be signaling something real about the environment to just take a biological response it is this foolish as to say someone who's his finger enough candle flame. Don't worry we've got pain. Reliever medicine take it and you know the pain will go away and it will but your finger slutty smoke. I think that's a beach away putting it and crucially if you think about that algae what it stops you from doing is finding the solution which is let's in that case. Let's take finger out the candle but let's think about loneliness. One of the heroism about las connections is an amazing doctor in east London and poor part of East London umbrella for a long time called Sam Everington and Sam is general practitioner and he was really uncomfortable because he had loads of patients coming to him terrible depression anxiety and like me. He's not post come Clinton to person sitting still have some role to play. He could see two things firstly. His patients were depressed anxious the perfectly understandable and actually quite obvious reasons like loneliness in most cases and secondly most of the people he gave chemical antidepressants to got some some relief but it didn't solve the problem one day a patient came to see Sam could Lisa Cunningham and I got to know her pretty well later but Lisa had been a nurse and she'd actually been showing our home it just the most was terrible depression and anxiety for seven years and Sam said to Lisa don't worry I'm going to carry on giving you these drugs..

depression Johann Hari United States Chris Sam Everington Center for Disease Control Cambridge Britain Lisa Cunningham east London Savannah Dr Harris Africa Clinton Baltimore Eugene Oh Chicago
"john casio" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"john casio" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"So non of an unofficial controllable conscious and intentional intentional. So and and just the way they start out by saying, look, if you if you even just agree that those are the only kind of those are the proper categories. There's no reason to think that all four of them. Four of them are grew. In one place in four of them are grouped in the other in just two quadrants. Like, there's sixteen possible quadrants six possible. And so why would you think that they would all be grouped together? That's actually a pretty striking claim that you that would need a lot of evidence in support of it. And it doesn't have that. Right. Right. So so it's like sort of a the dual process has just proceeded by largely by an agreement that this assumption was okay. And I have to say John barge, even though he's writing this. Critique he's he's the person who put sort of automatic behavior on the map, he's the name associated with automatic City College. And but that's okay. If this. Yeah, it's great that that he's actually writing this paper. So yeah. And I remember early on before before this system, they call it type one type two, but the comment averse. Sqi ways system wants to. So forgive me. If I float between the two forget. But you know, early on. I remember this when I was talking about these persuasion models. There's one called the elaboration likelihood model by Richard petty, and John Casio, and it seemed like really complicated, right? Has all these boxes and EROs, and it just all boil down to sometimes you think and sometimes you don't like it's like all of these theories boil down to that. And what it means specifically too hard and not think hard and. Like, it took it took such a hold of the field that I remember when I was in grad school, like an edited volume came out that was called dual process theories in social psychology. And I I remember. Being like like, even at that point. This is like why would you categorize theories by the number of things in the theory? It was literally like, hey, the number two seems to pop up across a whole bunch of different theories. Like, let's people together. And right right about the number two has some magic magic hold people. So this article the mythical number two is as you said trying to argue that it is a bad thing to continue to talk about two systems or two types for the very reason that you said because you can have things that are say. Intentional and also automatic which I think is obvious. Right. So so, you know, you learn to drive when I drive I am doing so intentionally, but it's pretty automatic like me turning the steering wheel or shifting gears or whatever they might right? It's almost I don't know you as an outsider, you tell me is. But it's always seemed to me like so obvious that I don't know why took hold like. No. I mean, I think that's right. Like, it's it seems very faith-based like just like a religion where people never really think to questions some of the totally implausible almost insane claims that from the outside it seems like and from the enzyme it's like, no these are starting premises. We've grown up with these like, this is our world. Right. I think that part of it is a result of conceptual sloppiness on the part of social psychologists because I I don't think that it was that that they were so insensitive to the facts of the matter. It's just that they very easily were comfortable with libary definitions of what oughta Matic means, and what unconscious means, and this isn't cited because it was a paper that nobody read but Paul Bloomberg Ullman, and I once wrote a paper called the varieties of unconscious, social, cognition. Where we were trying to point out that like oftentimes are. You you might be there's different kinds of unconscious and the authors of this pointed out to you can be unconscious of the influence that caused you to have a preference say, so like, why do I like coffee? I don't know for all. I know it's because somebody in my youth drink coffee, and I liked them in the smell like made me kind of like it..

John barge Paul Bloomberg Ullman Richard petty City College John Casio
"john casio" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"john casio" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"They also have this sense of of inequality in what's also fasting after that worked on by Sarah, others went on did it with dogs and with chimpanzees. I don't remember the details on it. But the chimpanzees were much more similar in the ways that they dealt with that to humans under a variety of of circumstances. Even more similar than the the monkeys. But the dogs were basically like is long as they get a reward there. Okay. Think of your dogs. They're not so much looking at it. But they'll take it from the other guy, but they're not throwing it back at you. Give them a Scooby snack. It's fine to give them a filet Mignon. It's fine. You give Pat on the head. It's fine. If you don't give them anything they're going to be not so keen. But like they're not going to be jealous. Right. There's not that same kind of sensitivity. But it's more the Chelsea we will harm ourselves to express our outrage. And again, I think this is Saint telling us something about the roller entity because outrageous such a it's such a currency is just it's just what everyone's doing all the time. They to me they everyone's throwing their cucumbers back all the time. And it goes at the happiness research too. Which is that we can be very happy until we see somebody else with more and then magically were unhappy. Yeah. Same found, right? Yeah. And we see this again, this idea of the negative partisanship. And the what is no also affect if partisanship in a relatively recent phenomenon American politics, where we just, you know, people on the left and people in the right hate each other in seem to get more out of the hating of each other than they do out of anything else. It's much more driven by these extreme intense negative emotional phenomena that are that are pretty destructive to the democratic emperor enterprise. All right. So I I want to circle back a couple of things you you speak in very precise terms, and I want to shine a light on each time. You do it to people understand packed in. We talked about the chimpanzees and the monkeys. We are not involved from chimpanzees and monkeys share a common ancestor. So I if luminary wisher common genetic link, but back to the narcissism of small difference in the affect of partisanship, the affect partisanship is is an amplification of small difference. Yes. Yep. Okay. I've been wondering and it's fascinating. I didn't know about Freud's contract with narcissism of small differences. But it has felt like to me that there was a narcissistic basis to all of this because narcissist for very prone to envy, and they're very prone to aggression, and they're very prone to otherness and and believing there, right? Is is there literally narcissism is narcissistic disorder of small differences. He I'm not sure if I would maybe take the analogy quite to the level of clinical precision. I do think that there is this in group out group dynamic, and I think I have this thing black wide. Yes. No all this wheel that way. That's they're prone to that. I think that there is maybe some of that. But again like to save all partisans are narcissist. Certainly is not the data that I have put it this way. You're right. That would be a gross overstatement. But I believe there's been a narcissistic turn if you certainly look at the data than look at the access to diagnoses and psychiatric hospitals. It's all cluster be all of a sudden. So at least on the path under the pathological banner. We've suddenly become more of the narcissistic zone. Now, you there could be many explanations for. That. But it makes me wonder have we all had a kind of a turn that way. Yeah. I mean, certainly I would say there's tremendous evidence that we have become disconnected. Okay. And so this great work by the the the lake research, scientists John Casio Baen his book on loneliness, and I got to meet him a number of years ago. And just he was like one of I've met a lot of amazing minds in. I was blown away by by him. Because he looked at this issue of loneliness from the molecular level all the way to the social network data to to like epidemiology. He's one of his famous kind of claims was that loneliness was as toxic for us is smoking in German, all it's it's a really important claim..

Freud Sarah John Casio Pat
"john casio" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"john casio" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Now, spend less time outdoors than the average maximum security prisoner because by law, Matt screwdrivers and a half of seventeen minutes day and most kids don't get that. Getting is like a kind of parody of those things right began to think is speaking to her in the the relationship between social media and social life is a bit like the relationship between porn and sex. Right. I'm not anti porn, but if you're entire sex life consisted, looking at porn, you going to be going around pissed off at airtight, the whole time because you didn't evolve domestic over screen, you have sex and the same way this place to screen based interaction, of course, some we'd let, but that's not what we have if you and I were having this conversation of Skype. I wouldn't feel you were hearing me, and you wouldn't feel you hearing all the way around in the way that we feel we're hearing and seeing each other now, right? And that'd be to think about what you think about when did the internet. Arrive, right. You can get just simplistic dollar. We you say this is just the internet's full internet's horror shy. Actually think about it. And you look at the evidence on this the internet rice for most of us in the late nineteen the thousands. I sent my steam out in the two thousand and a lot of the causes depression, anxiety about connections had actually already been supercharged by that point. So we've talked about loneliness meaningless work. But junk valley's what happens is the internet arrives. And it looks a lot like the things we've lost right? You've lost friends. His a whole range of face. But friends lost status does many status updates as he won't right? But again, he's it's like a parody of the thing we've lost and the x online professor John Casio said to me give me good kind of rule of thumb which is. If you're tending to the internet as a way station to meet people offline great, if it's the last nation on the line, generally something's gone wrong. Yeah. It's. It's it's a tricky thing because this is the lexicon. You know, this is how more and more people are communicating and the solution isn't to completely put the phone away and never use it and become a Luddite. But these devices are specifically designed to create that addictive response. I mean, I think this is a perfect example of where the work that you've done in addiction depression dovetail directly into each other because you have a highly addictive device in the hands of an undeveloped young mind with apps on it that are specifically created to create that, you know, serotonin response. That makes it almost impossible for that kid put that phone away. So short of completely putting it away. How do we as a parent? Like, this is something I think about all the time. Like, how do we create structures around it to foster a healthy relationship with the best of what it can do which is like they communicate with their friends and they see their friends at school. So there is that offline component to it. But it very easily if left unchecked can devolve, and I think it doesn't has with douse of not millions of teenagers into a compulsive behavior pattern that is truly an addiction that. Leads these young people to very very dark place, and it's not necessarily just young people. I think that's true. And I go to look at it like going to poke that diction because in context, right? I think it's worth expense. People the way we all raising children is deeply wit and has never been tried by any group groupie beings. But we have no idea the long-term just without phones. If you think about the nuclear family, right where the child remains indoors with two to adults the lucky one the no. That's no more chartering. Evan tried by human beings. Right. Human beings have always been raised by villagers by groups by tribes, right? It's very recent thing that we would imprison children in the Heim and getting tried to get them to get older emotional most of their emotional needs from just one to adults who by the way, a working fifty hours a week, whatever it is..

John Casio Matt screwdrivers Skype Heim Evan professor seventeen minutes fifty hours
"john casio" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"john casio" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Live this life of luxury of convenience, and we have lost sight of what it is that that truly makes us human in the most beautiful way, which is our relationship with each other with our families the networks that we create the connectivity. The cooperation that. Allowed this species that you know, if you ask you all know Harari should've never survived yet. We were able to do so simply because of this genetic predisposition that we have to be connected with each other. And that's what we've lost. And I think we're now seeing on a mass epidemic scale the results of what happens when the human being is removed from that basic requirement that we have and or feel contented fulfilled purposeful engaged with life. And and the sense that that the lives that were pursuing have. Meaning it is a crisis of consciousness, it's a spiritual crisis as much as anything else, and it really boils down to the way that we we've structured the society in which we live. There's a low things wages said totally rise. So. I learned a lot about this from Amanda, professor, John Casio Sadler just died. But he was the leading expert on line in the world. It was the university of Chicago. He's playing a few things to me that really important the touch of what you said. So he told about him saints me. Why are we alive? Why do we exist? One key reason is ancestors on the savannahs of Africa were really good at one thing. They usually were not faster than the animals. They track down. They usually want bigger than the animals. They tried down. What they were was much better banding together into groups in cooperating so just like bees evolve to Nita hive humans Volta native tribe in humans who had wanted off on their own would have died out. Right. They species inclined to do that. Would would not be continued to exist. And actually, if you think about second stances, if he was separated from the tribe in the circumstances, where we you would be depressed anxious for really good reason. You will probably about to die those instincts. We have right. If you separate be from its hif-. It will go crazy look at it will lose his mind right panico free count. It'd be founded distressed and eventually it would just give up in a similar way. We all the first humans to ever tried to disband tribes to chart live alone. And this is a disaster for a real disaster. I'm one of the things I wanted to think about is. Given the of whelming of that is a cause of depression. What is the anti-depressant for that? Right. And I learned one of the heroism connections is this amazing mangled delta. Sam Everington his doctrine east. London Papa vs London rounded for a long time. And Sam was really uncomfortable. Because like me he thinks some Rover chemical depressants, but he was just very conscious of things festively most of the people. He was giving chemical into persons to becoming depressed again, it was giving relief. And Secondly, they would depress the perfectly good reason. So one of the nine calls we're talking about Harry's loss connection. Laziness so one day he decided to pioneer different apart. A woman came to see him got some quite well could Lisa Cunningham. Lisa have been aware home with just crippling depression and anxiety seven years and Sam set to Lisa Doug Maury. I'm gonna carry on giving you the struck. I'm also going to prescribe something else that was an. Area behind the doctor's surgery. That was known as Doke alley which gives you a sense of what it was like, it's just kind of scrubland and some set. Lisa what line to do is come and ten out a couple of times a week. I'm gonna come to because I've been quite anxious and group of other depressed anxious people would get attend dog..

Sam Everington John Casio Sadler Harari Lisa Lisa Cunningham university of Chicago Lisa Doug Maury Doke alley Africa Amanda Harry London Papa professor London seven years one day
"john casio" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"john casio" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Well, some of those things are clearly causally related. So if you are depressed, and you're being prescribed antidepressants or your addicted to opioids and suffering the consequences of that. That's a cluster of problems and subsequent dysfunction clinical depression gets all kinds of other dysfunction in your career and your relationships. So it is that you do have a chicken and the egg phenomenon that you have to tease apart there. That's a really important point. I think it helps if we see in. Context clustering with something else. And this is something that unites a lot of the causes depression anxiety that right by in Las connection. So. Everyone listening to poke knows they have natural physical needs right, obviously, you need food. You need water. You need shelter you need cleaner. I took these things away from you being real trouble real fast, but this equally strong evidence. The OMON beings have natural psychological needs. Right. You need to fill you belong. You need to be a life has meaning and purpose in needs fill it people. See you value year in speak a future that makes sense, and I'll cultures lots of things. I'm extremely glad to be alive today. I love dentistry. I love game marriage fell range of things that I'm thrilled to be alive. Now. My my ancestors in many ways is Irish peasants and respondents you significantly west lives in all sorts of ways. But we've been getting less and less good. And being these deep underlying psychological needs. I think there's good evidence for that. And while it certainly not the only thing that's going on. I think it's the thing that is driving these crises that Cassatt a bit weird in the give a specific example. This is the loneliest society has been as a study that asks Merrick. Cnn's how many close friends do you have you could turn to in a crisis? When they started doing it years ago. The most common answer was five today, the most common and all the average. But the most common answer is none right? There are more people have nobody to turn to than any other option is part of an enormous array of social science that shows it's been an explosion in loneliness 'isolation, an spent a lot of time talking about this with a an amazing man professor John Casio university, Chicago who's the leading. He was the Saudi just died. He was the leading expert in the world on on loneliness. And he I'm of his saints. Meet you know, why are we alive? Why do we exist implies because Iran sisters on the savannahs of Africa were really good at one thing? They win in a lot cases bigger than the animals. They took down. They went in cases faster than the animals. They down they were much better banding together into tribes on cooperating just like bees, volt Anita hive humans Volta Nita tribe. And if you think about those circumstances where we evolved if he was. Separated from the tribe anxious depressed per really good reason. Right. You probably about to die. You were in terrible danger. Those are the physical responses we still have to feeling isolated get the defers humans ever to try to disband our tribes and tell ourselves that we can do it all alone in that. It's a key factor. Why was distressed one issues as there? No, bright lines between biology and psychology and social phenomenon and culture at every point. It is coherent to think about a an individual as being entirely, the inheritor of whatever neurophysiological states are being kindled on his brain. As a result of all of the influences and the underline genetic propensity, he's got to respond to those influences. So you what you have is your brain. And it states in each moment producing the character of your mind.

Cnn Merrick professor John Casio Iran Chicago Africa
"john casio" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

#WeThePeople LIVE

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"john casio" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

"Kind of engaged in this vague flotsam and jetsam of modern life that feels a little bit like anime and a little bit like generic i suppose emptiness if that's a different thing what lessons we can learn from what you've been looking into so what are we missing yes i go through these seven seven of these factors you're totally right the factors that are making some of those acutely depressed or anxious are diminishing the lives of most people in our culture now clearly nor most people fortunately done become fully depressed anxious by diminishing most people so give you a couple of examples so actually australia is really off the scale on this one internationally and we'll the loneliest culture that has ever being this study that awesome americans how many close friends do you have or you could call on an crisis when they started doing years ago the most common answer was fine today the most common answer is none there are more than average is most common answer there are more people have nobody to turn to you than any other option and i think about this a lot in the last few weeks actually because one of the people who taught me most about this at amazing man could professor john casio at the university should conquer suddenly just died the ibi he made a series of really important breakthroughs in this so he showed that for human being being acutely lonely releases as much of the stress hormone cortisol as being punched in the face by stranger this is a catastrophe fuel physical and mental health being lonely is bad for smoking fifteen cigarettes a day and he had a theory about why he said it will why do we exist right one of the reasons we exist is because our ancestors on the savannahs laugher really good at one thing they went bigger than the animals they took down they went faster than the animals they took battle all the time they were much better banding together to tribes and cooperating just like bees need a high humans need a try that's what we evolved to be and if you think about their circumstances if he was separated from the tribe you know you might anxious and depressed for a really good reason you're about to.

cortisol australia professor john casio
"john casio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"john casio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And how people can give it a try so you know todd when you look at the science of happiness there one of the and sociologists and psychologists had been writing about this for a long time which is what what really jumps out is people feel like they don't have as much closeness and connection in their lives as they would like you know thirty percent of americans report is john casio's found that they're really lonely we we feel a little bit distant from people that we live in and you know were working harder than ever before and teens are stressed out in alike and so what the thirty six questions does in who has developed by psychologist art erin is you just pause you take forty minutes and it's almost like a parlor game where you you asked the person that you're with the friend a romantic partner a family member there's new research doing this with people are just becoming friends you ask them a bunch of questions like you know and they start off kind of sort of fun and lighthearted and then they get really serious like nobody ever seeing yourself do todd constantly down are all the time so there we go we're often running right ananta gets into these existential questions like do you have a secret hunch about how you might die hi right so there are thirty six of these questions and they just get people to start revealing themselves learning about others and laughing and looking at each other in the eye in and feeling compassion and so forth and the studies show that you know just doing this exercise makes you feel closer to romantic partners strangers people of different ethnic backgrounds um it just brings it closer in the way that great conversation in listening tends to do well it just might be the perfect exercise for the mid february time it here people can get all the information on our website at the takeaway dot org to participate in the thirty six questions and the next installment of the.

todd john casio erin partner thirty percent forty minutes
"john casio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"john casio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now i am in jacksonville florida thing that would you be happy today just one is last year if they just a beautiful spray go fragrant daphne could blooming here to my sister i thought that would give her hope that my friend came and helped me because my alternators bad in my old car my wife and i share three things that were brave or every night when we go to and do big things a little things but we always uh make an effort and that my landlord is going to let me hold my check so that i can get the alternator replaced in my car spring is coming well is good thing sounds like a success for a lot of u n decker we want to invite listen is once again to take part in another one of your happiness exercises a next week we're looking at 36 questions for increasing closeness now this is going to err on valentine's day can you tell us a little bit about these 36 questions and how people can give it a try so you know todd when you look at the science of happiness there one and sociologists and psychologists have been writing about this for a long time which is what we're rulli jumps out is people feel like they don't have as much closeness and connection in their lives as they would like know thirty percent of americans report is john casio's found that they're really lonely we feel a little bit distant from people that we live in and you know were working harder than ever before and teens are stressed out in alike and so with a thirty six questions does in who has developed by psychologist art aaron is you just pause you take forty minutes and it's almost like a partner game where you you asked the person that you're with the friend a romantic partner of family member there's new research doing this with people are just becoming friends you ask them a bunch of questions like you know and they start off kind of sort of fun and lighthearted and then they get really serious like you'll ever seeing yourself utah cal constantly that her all the time so there we go we're often running right and then he gets into these existential questions like.

todd john casio aaron partner jacksonville florida valentine utah thirty percent forty minutes
"john casio" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"john casio" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Has based on this idea of had donna cata tation that we start to take for granted the things that are good she's scientifically studied all these ways in which you can counter he'd on a got up patient you can you know practice three good things you can say thank you to people who matter to you you can practice loving kindness right just little discipline practices that countervail that the forces of he'd on academy patient will this is just fascinating decker the science of training your brain for happiness i love it while we put some of our listeners on the case here and we asked you listeners to try the three good things exercise here's how it went for some of you my name's rene hernandez morgantown west virginia hi my name is catherine from portland oregon who patrick my now i am in jacksonville florida three things that helped you be happy today just one is last year if that just send a beautiful sprig of fragrant daphne that blooming here to my sister i cut that would give her hope that my friend came and helped me because my alternators that in my old car my wife and i share three things that with rifle for every night when we go to and the big things a little things but we always uh make an effort and that my landlord is going to let me hold my rent check so that i can get an alternator replaced in my car spring is coming well the three good thing sounds like a success for a lot of u n decker we want to invite listen is once again to take part in another one of your happiness exercises a next week we're looking at thirty six questions for increasing closeness now this is going to err on valentine's day can you tell us a little bit about these 36 questions and how people can give it a try so you know todd when you look at the science of happiness there one of the and sociologists and psychologists have been writing about this for a long time which is what we're rulli jumps out is people feel like they don't have as much closeness and connection in their lives as they would like thirty percent of americans report is john casio's found that they're really lonely um we feel a little bit distant.

oregon florida todd john casio donna cata rene hernandez virginia portland patrick valentine thirty percent
"john casio" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"john casio" Discussed on KELO

"Changing throughout your life so bills frame will that different how it did when when his wife was a nice that doesn't mean he's got brain disease right and he's brain will change again if he's able to socially reconnect two key reconnect with meaning and purpose with the things you know that i am so your brain changes so i think face justin of course in the brain of the same way you know i'd be cities in the stomach but it's still sitting kfc right um the the your brain changes to the the guy professor john casio public universities should call guy says we should talk about we should just took about neuroscience which took about social new i sites your brain changes according to how you live let's go next the keys in rochester new york high keith go ahead hey i'm going to buy at least four copies of your books or uh herds others to buy from you in previous years i've known some i'm and work with mennonites doing heart physical work i have you mentioned there group cohesion and uh that the group uh helped to uh downplay and keep at bay any depressions they might have uh a what i've noticed about them and i have been around them is that uh they are encouraged to be not part of this world that the rest of us have to be in and that very insulation keeps down uh negatively that they would say that they are free from i am the exact opposite uh i'm gonna just explain this quickly and i mean it i'm like a radio power i am a self admitted news junkie i take and everything like a vacuum uh i guess you could say that are by i allowed myself i could could be a depressed personality but without reagan i just refuse to succumb to any of that and just wish other people would it would have the inner strength that i know that i've built up over many years i've never used drugs i've never smoked i've never uh been neabry aided i i've even offered and this is not a live even offered several times over the years to be uh even a human guinea pig in clinical research studies uh i've set the.

professor rochester new york reagan
"john casio" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"john casio" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Brain is that we're all this is occurring well we biological creatures so absolutely everything about as happens in spain at some level i think we need to stay to the degree to which this is caused by problems in the brain so your brain everyone knows about their 40th changes how you use it by at least wait semiautonomous a pretty kinda week cry if i started lifting weights my arms would get pick up i'm sitting there going to do that in the same way if you use your brain different legal claim changes so for example london taxi drivers to do an extremely difficult passed to get their licence school the knowledge they have to memorise the mouth of london it takes the average taxi drivers three years flooding uh you can't do a brain scan a london taxi drivers it looks very different to have my brain or your brain would look really yeah go to pass the fiscal policy hip the campus that relates to special awareness will be much bigger just like your roms were get bigger if he lifted weights that doesn't mean they bring disease i'm part of the problem is um often whoa whoa whoa some people will be critically no good scientists but what some people will de crignis they'll say well this is what the brain of a depressed passing on a dick pic passing looks like and keeps different that's true your brain is always changing threat you'll nice so bills frame will that different how it did when when his wife was a nice that doesn't mean he's gonna bring disease right and he's frame will change again if he's able to socially reconnect to reconnect with meaning and purpose we just things you know uh i and so your brain changes so i think faced justin that of course in the brain and the same way you know i'd be cities in the stomach but it's still sitting kfc right um the the a your brain changes to the big eye chris john casio public universities call guy says we should talk about we should just took about neuroscience we spoke about social media site's sites you'll brain changes according to how you live let's go next to keep the.

spain justin london social media site three years
"john casio" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"john casio" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"Having less meaningful social interaction with people and having less deep friendships with the people that we do have social interactions with and that there there's been some research for example of very very esteemed neuropsychologist in america who we've had the luck to work with the harming him john casio actually part his life's work has been looking at loneliness and the and the the neuropsychological effects of loneliness and there's health outcomes of having no one to share confidence with that are strictly in terms of hormones being released in your body and and the progression of of various physical developments on this as so yeah i do think there's a downside to social media i do think that part of it is the lack of of intimate such contact with their circle friends or having a meaningful circle france i don't think it's targeted so much on finding a romantic partner i think most impacts the social media on funding romantic partners has actually been positive in terms of people beyond the find others that are a great distance from themselves which is especially grave issue for people who are both older and living in smaller communities right we've seen lots of relationships occur eddie harmony that are between people that would never have possibly met if it weren't for the internet and yet a lot of the interaction's that we are dealing with it at exchanging photos with one another or a shortlived videos or swiping in an app like tinder maybe that type of thing just taps into our desire to see a lot of faces or to have our attractiveness validated but it can very quickly get divorced from the goal of finding someone you want a date to do like that joke i detect a relationship i would swiped right the algorithm said yes but yeah i think that's the route ten is like a game now i actually know people who use on the lou but i also knew people who have married that tend to date so you can't completely rule out it's much making potentials.

america social media partner lou