21 Burst results for "John Carpenter"

"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

08:42 min | Last month

"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"We'd continue with the theme of our John Carpenter chat by sharing some of our favorite spooky movie music. Now, these can be songs written for the film or songs that are recontextualized in a horror film used to heighten scary scenes or otherwise comment on the movie. And I'm gonna go first. Midsommar is one of my favorite horror movies ever. Certainly of the last 15 years or so. This great take about pagan rituals, the turn very bloody and violent. Closes. Now most of the music is instrumental and in the pagan Nordic kind of vein, right? And then it closes surprisingly with the sun ain't gonna shine anymore by Frankie valley. Originally, Frankie's first big solo hit in 1965. Also a killer version by the walker brothers, I will add, including this song, director Ari aster at the end, you know, it raises so many questions. Is the protagonist, the woman who becomes the queen of the pagans queen of the murderous pagans. Is she unhappy, the sun ain't gonna shine anymore? Or it being midsommer and winter falling upon us, you just walked in the door and said, jeez, it's too early to be this cold. Is it about the end of summer? What is it about? But, you know, after this very disturbing ending to the film, which is a great slow build throughout, hearing this song is a real ball peen hammer between the temples. I tell you. The sun ain't gonna shine anymore from Midsommar by Frankie valley. The moon ain't gonna rise to the sky accused of always the light in your eyes. When you're without. Faith. Man, I was so surprised when I heard that at the end of Midsommar. Well, you know, as you said, context is everything, you know? It can change the meaning of a song, you know, depending on what images are associated with it. Absolutely. And now I'm never going to hear it the same way again. In some cases, the music takes a secondary role. The movie is all. And the music just is background. In other cases, the music almost outlives the movie, and I think that might be the case in the case of goblin and the suspiria soundtrack. Goblin a progressive rock band from Italy considers the soundtrack at created for the suspiria movie to be its masterwork. And it is the one that put the band on the international map, it keeps getting played to this day. The band did a tour a couple years ago in the superior remake was made and they played the entire soundtrack again in live performance. Not that suspiria the original version is anything to sneer at it. Great, great horror movie. Yeah, the Italian horror king Dario argento. But this movie more than justifies argento's resume. I mean, it is a he and the band goblin and argento collaborated a number of times never greater than this particular soundtrack. The heavy metal, the goth elements, the soundscapes. It reminded me a lot of what suicide was doing around this year. This is like 1977. Yeah, with a lot of kraut rock in there too. I played this band on the show before I love goblin. Oh yeah, beautiful, amazing band. And the track I want to play is that the title theme, those vocals that get me every time I was that whispered vocal melody. Like you are being stalked. You are being watched. You are being hunted. This is goblin with suspiria on sound opinions. Suspiria from goblin, great soundtrack, great band. Yeah, absolutely. We could have played anything from their catalog virtually. Continuing with my theme of a song that you wouldn't think was scary. I'm going to go to the opening of director Jordan Peele's 2017 film get out. Get out, I don't know if it's horror. It was disturbing deeply to me. The entire movie, you know, this idea of a young black man visiting his white girlfriend's parents and the simmering unease and hostility. And eventually erupting, right? But the whole movie opens with the track redbone by childish Gambino, AKA Donald Glover. Apparently peel was a huge childish Gambino fan. He said, I had him in to see the movie. And I put the song there and was kind of looking at him and he loved it. Peel in particular was driven to the lyric stay woke, right? Because this family that wreaks havoc in get out is anything but woke. They're pretending to be, but they're not. It shines a light on much of ignorant white America's fear of people of color. And that's what peel was going for. It's a difficult movie to watch. I found, but a powerful and important movie made even better by the inclusion of redbone by childish Gambino. Here it is. We can make. You want to. Say oh redbone childish Gambino, man, his music really works well with different inventive visuals. Yeah, there you go. Very similar to what you were saying about the Frankie valley track. Suddenly it sounds really good. Suddenly you got chills. You know, the Texas chainsaw massacre in 1974, write a spawned whole legion of gore movies. It's a B movie. Obviously the budget was just minimal and they created this twisted, I guess you could call it a masterpiece. It's like everything that followed it has been influenced by this movie. Well, and the fact that it was made for like $15. Yeah, and the soundtrack was made for like less than that. I think the score was done by the director tobe hooper in collaboration with Wayne bell. Talk about low budget. They were basically picking up these instruments they had hanging around and upright double bass, a fender lap steel guitar, children's musical instruments, lots of metal objects. It was like wines are thin annoy about, you know? Going crazy in the studio, banging on stuff, animal noises, you know? And this melange of sound in the background of this movie, if you just sort of tune into what's happening in the background of that movie, you go, this is this creepy and terrifying is what's going on on the screen. You'll listen to what they created independent of the images. And it's still creeps you out. I mean, it's terrifying stuff. You know, because you don't quite know what these sounds are. No, you know, it's truly disturbing. And just as in the movie where you don't really know what's going to happen next, you just know it's going to be really bad. It's the same way with this soundtrack. It's like, I'm not sure what's going on here, but it's really creeping me out. It's really the next thing that's going to happen is going to be really bad. It's sort of a twisted masterpiece. Toby hooper and Wayne bell the soundtrack for the Texas chainsaw massacre.

Frankie valley Ari aster argento John Carpenter childish Gambino Jordan Peele Frankie AKA Donald Glover Dario argento walker Italy Wayne bell Gambino tobe hooper gore America Texas Toby hooper
"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

03:52 min | Last month

"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Take on Herman on Bernard Herrmann on a synthesizer, played simply, and it was a synthesizer, not by choice. I guess that's what Greg was getting at. It was like this was the convenient, relatively inexpensive instrument that I can use and make noise with. That's correct. I'll pay our piano on a synthesizer. That's absolutely correct. You guys, you guys have me nailed. You have me nailed my ability is very limited. I don't have the talent, but I have the, I don't know the bull headedness, just to move forward. So and it's the stuff that you're writing, I wonder how that's evolved because I actually putting notes on paper or is it just strictly kind of in that kind of head arrangements, as they say. Guys, you know, you in a room inventing stuff on this instrument. And how is it working now with the trio format? Is it similar in approach kind of more improvisational in the moment or stuff actually written down? Is it composed? Nothing written down. It's all improv. All of it. What's your favorite piece of music that you've worked on? The stuff that you've composed if you had to point somebody, hey, you know, let's not talk about the movies. Let's talk about the soundtracks or the albums that you've made. What piece stands out for you? I have no idea. It was really fun to do it all, but it's not fun. It's hard, work. See, this is why I kind of stopped at all because oh jeez, I can't do this anymore. I was making a movie and then the sound track to it. It's outrageous. I don't have a particular favorite because the music for movies is inspired by the images. And each movie has unique images to it. So the music to Halloween kills is very different than the first Halloween I did. They all go along with what's up on the screen in terms of soundtracks. That does it matter to you if people only see a film at home versus are you one of these people, you know, so Greg and I listen to so much music as music critics, right? We don't have the luxury of talking about the $10,000 bang and olufsen stereo. First of all, music critics don't make that kind of money. Second of all, we're listening so much all the time. The high fidelity experience is in one of our. So I'm kind of torn. I mean, there's movies that I saw in a theater that couldn't that aren't the same seeing at home, but not always for the reasons you think. I remember, I saw Halloween at the Stanley theater in Jersey City, right? So the Stanley theater was a vaudeville palace that had fallen on hard days, you know. And it kind of was in a rough neighborhood. And people were smoking and drinking and bums would come in and sleep. I always remember that the African American kids would cheer whenever the white kids got killed in a movie like Halloween or Friday the 13th. And I'd be sitting there a little scared and every once in a while a rat would run across your feet. And this was all this was perfect. I didn't want to see it John Carpenter movie anywhere else. And you see this is what my entire career has been geared to that experience. And that is exactly exactly the kind of movie experience I want everyone to have. It was what you had to stand in here. So are we missing something by netflixing it at home? Unless you have the rats, well, first of all, you know, in a perfect world, we have a communal experience with an audience, which is you can't match that.

Bernard Herrmann Stanley theater Greg Herman Jersey City John Carpenter
"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:15 min | Last month

"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"So it became skeleton. Are you really though John, do you ever feel and do Cody and Dan feel that, you know, I mean, John Carpenter can put out skeleton and unclean spirit, the two tracks that we've gotten so far from lost themes. But could you put out happy smiley sunny day? Well, if you would pay me, I would be glad to. Put up a little money and you got a smiley, happy day. But you think people would want that for me. Oh, I don't think so, but I don't know what the hell. I don't know. Maybe I should try that, huh? Yeah, you know? Is there kind of an understanding that this would be on the darker side of in keeping with the most John Carpenter movies? Or is there like an open ended thing? Well, that's kind of the stuff that I gravitate towards. And so I forced my the kids to gravitate towards that too to come up with thematic stuff that sounds like that. Listen, with the right for the right money, we'll do you. We'll give you a little happy to go lucky, John Carpenter. For hire. Yeah, that's it. Oh hell yes. Are you kidding? Yeah. Well, and John, when you're making the soundtrack for something like Halloween, was this totally kind of your own imagination working or were you listening to different kinds of music, electronic music, for inspiration? Why did listen to some electronic music for inspiration? I listened to music in general. For inspiration, Bernard Hermann Dimitri Albin, I listened to. I listened to a lot of classical music. I listened

John Carpenter Cody John Dan Bernard Hermann Dimitri Albin
"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

04:39 min | Last month

"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Find they got to score two picture, which was just a whole different experience. And the technology just keeps growing. And keeps changing for the better. And keeps maturing and now the technologies unbelievable. So that's how it happens. So that's fascinating, John. When you're on the set then with Jamie Lee Curtis or Kurt Russell, it wasn't like you had the tune in your head. You left all of that until later. No, I would be singing a Beatles song or something. You know, 'cause I've heard other directors like Cameron Crowe, very different genre. You know, he would actually play music. He didn't have the rights to yet to the actors on set to try to get them in the sort of mood he wanted. He of course wasn't a musician and music critic. You know, you are a musician, but you didn't have this tunes in mind when you're making the movie. I make the movie, and then I put the music in the room. That's two separate jobs. That's right. The ultimate, the ultimate director who used music on the set was any or more Coney. He would have the music composed before he shot the movie. And then he would play the music to the actors. That's just unbelievable. John, you're noted for pioneering the use of synthesizers. Do you vary that kind of keyboards you use? Or is there a go to? Well, I vary them, and I'm glad it on a couple, one is the core I've been using that a lot recently. For the base sounds, the oberheim is just incredible. But even that's been supplanted by brand new programs. You can buy strings by armed Zimmer. It's unbelievable. You can get the BBC orchestra to play for you. It's incredible, stuff. And the movie technology also is amazing nowadays. Digitally. I mean, kids who want to make movies where you can do it. Just go do it. You've got the technology at your fingertips. No excuses. Create, go out and create. So you work a lot with your son, Cody. And godson, Daniel Davies, frequent collaborators, generation younger than you. What's that like getting to work with them and what's the back and forth like? It's a dream. I mean, look, when one of the reasons I wanted to go touring with the music from these albums is I got to play with them. Live. I mean, that's just an opportunity that I never imagined I'd have. And it's a dream come true. So they bring all sorts of gifts to the table. Daniel is by family by blood ties is an amazing guitar player. His dad was a lead guitar player, so he can play guitar like nobody. I mean, just incredible. And my son is a virtuoso keyboard player. He can play anything. So even these days, when we're doing scores like we did the score for Halloween kills, the new Halloween movie. I will sing something to Cody and he can play it. So I don't even have to play anymore. I can remote control. See, this is what I'm looking for. Yeah, that's very Brian Wilson of you there, John. Yeah. That's cool. You talk about these lost themes recordings. It's become a franchise as the third third volume. You talked about them as a soundtrack for the movies in your mind. So do you kind of do the titles come first or you make the music up and then say, oh, this sounds like, oh, this sounds like the dead walk, or this sounds like weeping ghost. I mean, how do you, how do you arrive at the themes? Well, I just, we make up the titles after the music is done. We started the law seems three albums. We started making up titles with one skeleton was originally called skeleton's penis. And my son and God sound suggested that that wouldn't be good for the album. I wanted it to be on the album. I thought we'd be all about guard and daring, but

Jamie Lee Curtis Kurt Russell Cameron Crowe John Daniel Davies Cody Zimmer godson BBC Daniel Brian Wilson
"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:08 min | Last month

"john carpenter" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Season, we share some of our favorite spooky movie music. I'm Jim Dee or goddess. And I'm Greg kott. But first, we revisit our conversation with horror legend, director and composer, John Carpenter. That's a little bit of the theme from the classic horror film Halloween. Directed and co written by our guest today, Jean Carpenter. In addition to being a great director of movies like Halloween, escape from New York, and they live my favorite. Carpenter composed the music to his films. And that music became iconic in its own right, even when removed from its original context. Carpenter recently released a new album, lost themes three, and he's joining us today to talk about that as well as his career as a composer and a filmmaker. What an honor. John, welcome to sound opinions. Thank you very much. Nice to be here. From the beginning of your career as a director, certainly an incredible list of films, many of them that formed my life from Halloween and they live assault on precinct 13, et cetera, et cetera. You always did the music. And I think I wasn't aware of that until the last couple of years when you began giving interviews more about the music and touring, my goodness. From early on, what was the impetus to do your own soundtracks? Well, originally, and I'll be really honest with you. Originally, it came out of necessity. Because when you're making a low budget film, when you have no money, you can't hire a composer or an orchestra, so if you have to do it yourself, a synthesizer is the best way to go because you can sound big. You can sound full with the synthesizer. And so that's the route I took. Well, you grew up in a musical family. And I

Jim Dee Greg kott Jean Carpenter Carpenter John Carpenter New York John
"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:21 min | 5 months ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

"It is my absolute honor to be joined by one of my favorite filmmakers, John Carpenter, John, thanks for doing the show today. My pleasure. John, congrats on your beloved warriors NBA championship. How are you feeling about that? I'm feeling so good. My whole summer is positive and beautiful.

"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:31 min | 5 months ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

"He also did not do the score of this movie. This movie was scored by, as you mentioned earlier, the great ennio morricone. And it's a magical thing. It's like, and you're more a kone trying to do a John Carpenter score. The story about them meeting is just incredible. So more economy is obviously one of the great cinema composers in movie history. Carpenter approaches him and I think Marco is like, I get asked a lot. Like, what's up? And Carpenter is like, I got married to your music. He was like, okay. Well, come show me the movie. And basically, more code I did all these pieces of music for Carpenter to choose from and carbohydrate shows the one that sounds most like carpenters music. So incredible. I think that's so great that he did that. It does make you wonder why. He said that when I asked him about this, he said that the studio just did not want him to do the music. Nobody asked him to do this music, which I find so interesting. It does come at this really unusual period where morricone is working very often for Hollywood. You know, like this is the era of the untouchables, it's the era of the mission, it's the era of a lot of it's sort of like his third act as a composer, but this one is a rare horror movie. He did not make a lot of horror movie scores, and he's just so perfect in the pocket if you listen to this episode. You heard the score right at the beginning of this conversation. I guess the other thing to talk about here is individual moments. Small things we liked. There are some great lines of dialog. There are some great set pieces we've talked about a couple of them already. What's the most memorable for you? You mentioned benning's and his tentacle fingers outside. Is that the scariest moment? I think that's the that and the spark test or my two favorite kind of like I now have gotten the part where it's more stuff like the shit that Palmer talks about is really like I really enjoy like where he's like chairs to the gods, man. I really really dig him. But the spark test is such a great, pure cinematic sequence. It's so good. I still, to this day when they do it, I forget it's Palmer. So I'm like waiting for it to be this guy waiting for it to be that guy. And then of course the reaction they have when Palmer starts changing is just an is unbelievable. Like, 'cause these guys are tied to this dude, literally tied to the guy who is transforming into the thing because his blood's been sparked on fire. And they can't get their flamethrowers to start. So meanwhile, Gary and child are looking at this guy the fuck off of me. That sequence which goes completely haywire and then the thing transforms and starts attacking windows and things go nutty. Then at the very end of it, after they've already torched these two other members. They can't have done Gary's test. They haven't done Gary's test. And then that leads to Donald Moffat's my favorite line reading in the whole movie, which is I know you gentlemen have been through a lot, but when you find the time, I'd rather not spend the rest of this winter.

Carpenter ennio morricone John Carpenter Palmer morricone Marco benning Hollywood Gary Donald Moffat
"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:33 min | 5 months ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

"And this is like one of the most interesting things about whether or not movies should be a reflection of the times or an antidote of the times. Do people want to see things that look like the world outside of the movie theater or do they want to be taken away and go and it's always been like a really interesting idea about hurt locker versus Titanic. How do you want to feel when you go to the movies and what's your tolerance level for reality? Well, how do you want to feel? What do you think about that? It's a mix. That's why I love the movies as I get to choose, you know? And I find that happening a lot with TV now today where, you know, if I watch some traumatizing hour long drama, like I need to watch mister mayor afterwards to kind of come down a little bit. Yeah, yeah. It's funny though. I feel like there's something profound about Blade Runner and the thing arriving on the same day and ultimately meaning more to movies, I think than ET meant. I think ET stands alone as like a signature commercial and emotional achievement from a guy who is constantly telling the story of broken childhoods. But I feel like Ridley and John Carpenter people think they can emulate more closely. I know that those guys are obviously wildly successful filmmakers in different ways, but it kind of reminds me of like ET is like The Beatles or the stones and then Blade Runner and the thing or like The Velvet Underground on the Stooges and the people like if you love those movies, you almost dedicate your life to movies. Like everybody who heard The Velvet Underground started a band. But like anybody can like The Beatles and like anybody you can like ET and it's just like I love ET but it doesn't necessarily mean that they want to be a part of cinema or like study movies like it's like us it's a great way of framing it and in the same way if you try to deconstruct Spielberg movies technically. They're like The Beatles.

The Velvet Underground on the John Carpenter Ridley The Beatles Spielberg
"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:15 min | 5 months ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Sort of the exposition machine, and he realizes very quickly what the thing is and what it is doing. And he has a meltdown in this scene that is, I think, up there among the great meltdowns. You know, it's up there with Peter Finch and network. There are very few moments in movies where they can match Wilford Brimley swinging an axe around and smashing the comms Antarctica base station. Do you have a Brimley in you for this podcast? Well, my favorite Brimley moment in this movie is when he's performing the noises he makes when he performs the autopsy on the alien. He just, oh. It's just like

Peter Finch comms Antarctica base station Wilford Brimley Brimley
"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:11 min | 5 months ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

"After that saucer crashes, cut 2010 1100 thousand years later, we don't really know. We see this dog being chased by a helicopter, and they're shooting at the dog. And I remember the first time seeing this movie is probably in high school. I was baffled as to what was going on because I thought this was going to be a monster movie and not some sort of like sled dogs adventure film. And that's sort of what it sets up. The adventures of natty gan, you didn't sign up for that. I did not. And then ultimately we learned, of course, that these are Norwegians that are flying the helicopter and they have arrived at this base camp where these Americans are doing some kind of work would work, are they doing it? Doesn't matter. This is one of my favorite things. Are these guys even that good? Is this like the last chance saloon for scientists? Is it for like the washouts or is it like the best and the brightest? They don't seem to be like one of the things that's so great about it is that it's just stated in the beginning that they've lost contact with civilization essentially because winter is beginning, but they also seem to have like a bunch of burnouts doing certain jobs there. So it's unclear as to whether this is like the minor leagues of scientific exploration of the Antarctic or if this is just circumstances. But I love how you're never quite sure who these guys are and why they're there. Yeah, it's interesting too because Carpenter is of course hugely inspired by the hawks westerns. He talked about how assault on precinct 13, which is sort of his just real feature film. It's just real bravo. In some ways, this is kind of real bravo too, you know, men kind of stuck in a saloon shootout for two hours and he loves this approach. He loves tough talking guys who are awaiting a big bad.

natty gan bravo Carpenter hawks
"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:52 min | 5 months ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on The Big Picture

"This is the big picture a conversation show about the thing. Last month marked the 40th anniversary of John Carpenter's sci-fi horror masterpiece, a film that has endured and grown over the past four decades. Into one of the signature cult classics in American movies, it has been reconsidered reanalyzed and ultimately hailed as a chilling and unexpired vision of terror. It's a gory, disquieting, expertly constructed piece of work, and one of my favorite movies ever, so it was quite a thrill to talk to Carpenter on the show today. He is a genuine hero of mine and a real no bullshit customer. Our conversation holds true to that form. But before we welcome Carpenter, I want to set the table for this movie by talking to someone who might love the thing even more than me. It's Chris Ryan, see our hello. Hello, Sean. Thank you again for having me open up for one of the great directors of all time. I feel like this is one of my favorite bits that you do. Where it's like, Claire Denis, but first CR on horror from this year. Well, I think you're a solid opening act. You are the Jerry Lee Lewis to Carpenter's Elvis Presley today. And obviously I had to speak with you. As a movie we talked about a lot over the years, but we've never potted about. No. And we've never earned our keep by discussing this movie on Mike. What do you think of when you think of the thing? I think of a perfect movie. And I think of a movie that gets more and more perfect if that's possible. I guess perfection is the arrival of somewhere, but it grows in my estimation as the years go on for a number of reasons partially because of maybe the quality of movies like this now. And some of the mistakes that they make that thing kind of I wish they would have learned certain lessons from the thing, which we can talk about. And I think also because of the sort of four quadrant depth of the movie, the way it sounds the way it looks, the way it feels, the way it was written, you know, like everything about it, you can kind of let your eye look like wander when you're watching the thing. You can get into different aspects of it. You can just listen to the more cone soundtrack you can just notice all the funny little character ticks that aren't belabored, but are really, really awesome. It's a great ensemble movie, obviously. And sometimes you can just kick back and watch Kirk Kirk Russell with a sombrero in sunglasses, be a badass, which is one of my favorite things to do with these movies. Yeah, let's hit the table for it a little bit by just describing what this movie is. If you're listening to this episode and you haven't seen the thing. I would say just check it out, you know? Just fire up iTunes, you know? It's currently available via AMC on Amazon Prime. If you have an AMC subscription or anything like that, yeah. This is John Carpenter's 8th movie. It's not his 8th feature film. He did make a couple of TV movies, but this is you can see him fully realizing his powers and it's his first movie that is neither a TV movie nor an independent production. It's a studio movie made with Universal Pictures. And you can tell, you can tell that he's having some fun.

Carpenter John Carpenter Chris Ryan Claire Denis Jerry Lee Lewis Elvis Presley Sean Kirk Kirk Russell Mike AMC Amazon Universal Pictures
"john carpenter" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"Really fits with what we've been talking about the difference between being in the moment. Let's say the natural the kind of purely impulsive you know maybe the instinctual and the narrative in the story we tell this fighting dog is only violent. It's instincts are only geared towards the violence to kill when it's operating under a particular story narrative structure that is kind of forcing it to do the dastardly deeds right but when it's freed from that it actually loves and it goes over and lays its head On this kind of like bad guys arms right so there's something also about the kind of like simplicity and beauty of nature and the instinctual in the thing that seems violent. That is kind of hayden by the stories that we tell right so i think that is kind of lovely yet ryan had was. We're kind of here at the end. Though i mean like to to me All these things about you know. The nazis basically being these symbols and stuff. I think it's pertinent. But i do wish that if were going to get delve more into you. Know what makes a white nationalist. The white nationalist with i think it's good that they did it and they just kind of left that a little more open but i do think like like i think when you watch this movie. You don't really understand philosophy ideology you're supposed to nazi bad they. We're moving on. You know like yeah like there's a version of this movie where you know. And i feel he's been made to american history. X gets into the true psychology of a white nationalist. And what that means The i would have been interesting for you. Know another version. This were there would actually delve into that. What do you think this. This movie is kind of like dove-tailing off of one of my one of my favorite other movies in one of my favorite john carpenter films assault on precinct. Thirteen and similar to what you're saying ryan in assault on precinct thirteen because that is itself a riff on rio bravo. John carpenter is kind of like treating the gang and he's like the gang is written and photographed the way that old movies like this dicey political thing but really old westerns like rio bravo paint native americans as an uncomplicated evil. Obviously that is a very racist way to depict native americans but that's the fact of how they were portrayed in a lot of old westerns assault on precinct. Thirteen does the same thing with the fucking gang where it's like they're just relentless force of evil and then in green room. You're right they don't they don't like dig into like. What is the animating philosophy of these people. You kind of come into the movie. Understanding like yeah. I don't think good guys really check out there fucking nightclubs with all this shit like the good guys where fucking. Ss patches on their jacket like at a certain point at recalls that mitchell and webb. Look sketch. Where they you know..

ryan rio bravo hayden john carpenter John carpenter mitchell webb
"john carpenter" Discussed on Casuals: An Outsider Look at the Videogame Industry

Casuals: An Outsider Look at the Videogame Industry

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on Casuals: An Outsider Look at the Videogame Industry

"It's going to have a second blow up. I can see that happen. Yeah especially with the way you're describing some spoken amazing are there. Are there any horror characters or villains or monsters. That aren't in the game. That you wanna in the game you know what would you. What would you do with that character. I've always been curious as to how they're pull off a chucky thing because you have to run away and see the killer right okay. I think more places to hide. Yes i somebody who's not played the game. Yeah yeah i mean well. Yeah that's the thing. That killer isn't really supposed to hide from you. I'd be really interested to see how they pull off chucky. That's another like main horror movie character. i don't think they have. And they're high blake harder to seeks. He's telling job. Yeah look down more. Yeah maybe a smaller tail well. That's the thing that would be unfair though right because you're supposed to like be able to see them coming to hide in time right. That's yes that's why i'm wondering about. I feel like behavior in their hands like they could. They could do good with it so how. 'bout i'm just like my mind's racing right now how about the thing john carpenter's the thing that would be very interesting if they could transform into survivor right..

john carpenter second
"john carpenter" Discussed on Casuals: An Outsider Look at the Videogame Industry

Casuals: An Outsider Look at the Videogame Industry

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on Casuals: An Outsider Look at the Videogame Industry

"I'm i'm watching all of adventure time in reading a got emperor of dune which is fine with tastic. So i think when i come back from my little vacation i'm gonna i'm gonna probably get into another game. I know i have a couple here. I wanna play. I wanna do lost judgment. I wanna play not play judge me as they say judgement. So damn wild. Yeah well actually. We have a little something to mention about las judgment later but before we get to that. We have something close to the office games. We have a virtual fighter. Five kenny. Wanna take this one. I'm i'm pretty psyched for virtual fighter. Five just because i could add another finding game to my collection that it's so it's sega's fighting game it's their answer tech and right digital digital collection whatever digital shell still get to keep but that's neither here nor there sir but yeah no. It's it's nice but it's also not my favorite by do like to collect all the fighting games. like so have you ever went to the arcades. Coosa and mike tried to play that. Yes yes i love that. That's one of my favorite fucking parts of the of of that game. Virtual lenders typically yeah well virtual fighter and then just all the other games to i i love. I love games within games. Oh for sure. But like virtually with fighters specifically for me is so fucking slow..

Coosa mike one arcades Five kenny couple
The Failed Shangri-La Plaza

Ghost Town

04:18 min | 1 year ago

The Failed Shangri-La Plaza

"The star studded high production surrealistic musical sitcom shangri la plaza was originally produced as a pilot for b. nineteen ninety ninety one season but for one night only the network decided to air it as a summer fill in on july thirtieth nineteen ninety and that half hour made history. Well kind of in a really weird bad way. So we're gonna talk about the sitcom shangri la plaza. All of the weirdness that occurs around it to talk about cop rock. That was abc. Same year that this came out. It has a very cop rock field. But what is what are your reactions to this the intro. I could not tell you what it was about. If you pay me any amount of money it so abstract i guess and never mind the cheesiness. that's i expect that it's one thousand nine hundred ninety experimental. Things are a little bit weird. I was just saying that. Like i guess seinfeld came and say yeah television at that point but i could not tell. It seemed like a place. Where maybe there's food and abc live. I don't know what is highly. It's hard to tell it's it all began really with nineties. L. a. mall culture shangrila was inspired by that and it was filmed on location in north hollywood strip mall at the corner of vineland and burbank boulevard. In north hollywood california just went for it. This set a strip mall was built on top of an original strip mall which is where the problems really begin. This mall on mall design was the topic of a washington post story in nineteen ninety emmy award winning art director. Jeremy ray elton best known for his work on playhouse was responsible for the set sign. And that's not the only high-calibre name attached this very confused project. Broadway legend terrence man. Who played leads in. Layman's and cat stars as ira bondo machine mechanic who works with his brother. George jeff jaeger lanes musician love interest. John remain in seinfeld. Speaking of seinfeld at the mall's bodyshop. When amy molloy hardin yes jan on the office takes over her shitty husbands donut shop. I think after he dies. Both brothers are instantly. Smitten future smallville. Star nexium sex cult leader. Alice mac a very young l. Plays amy's precocious eight year old daughter in her only on screen acting role jazz. Great carmen lundy plays the donut shops. Only employees savion glover plays a wrapping teen commenting on. What's happening kind of greek chorus style. An oscar nominee. Chris sarandon plays the plazas landlord. It's for something where it's just a pilot of a throwaway like experimental pilot like pretty heavy hitting actors. The show itself was helmed by horror sci fi writer director nick castle. You may know him as the co writer of john. Carpenter's state from new york. And he played michael myers in the original halloween. The composers were craig sapphire or sedan known from his work. On cheers and mark mueller. Who wrote the theme song to duck tales and jennifer pages. Nine hundred ninety eight hit crush it just like there's a lot of talent involved in this project and it just gets lost along the way while working together on projects like the last starfighter tapped the trio discovered. They had a common passion. The three of us loved old musicals. Knicks dad was a choreographer who had done royal wedding and many other movies sephardim says and the opportunity to make a musical finally happened. When cassel's pal jeff sagansky became the head of cbs. He was looking for something new. Some fresh ideas for cbs program lineup castle savannah mueller who themselves the schmaltz kings were creating in la based rock opera and unique written and composed by credit on the pilot the or inspired like i said by the strip malls around the mall culture in the late eighties early nineties. Kind of creating something colorful and also their love of musicals. It's like a hat and a hat on a hat. The pitch to cbs was also pretty weird. The schmaltz kings cleared off sagansky desk and with the keyboard and two speakers. They perform songs from the show in character.

Shangri La Plaza Seinfeld North Hollywood ABC Jeremy Ray Elton Ira Bondo George Jeff Jaeger Amy Molloy Hardin Alice Mac Carmen Lundy Vineland Chris Sarandon Strip Mall Emmy Award Nick Castle Craig Sapphire Terrence Savion Glover Mark Mueller Layman
"john carpenter" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

Around the World in 80s Movies

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

"The build up of this film is masterful. The quality of the characterizations are the short but very effective. And when it all boils over. There's a lot of power in these performances. And while nitpickers can certainly have a field day over thing i mean it. It does have some plot holes that has some implausible developments here and there. I don't think it really matters because of what you might be looking for going in because the thing is of movie that hooks you in doesn't let go even when you think you can't look you can't turn away either. And that's what people want in their horror. Even though it is graphic horror film. I do think ultimately is succeed more because of its psychological horror than it does in its graphic horror. And that's why. I'm going to give the thing. Four stars out of four four stars on ice keo meas. I think the thing is an excellent movie. I it's a movie that's infinitely real watchable for me. I've watched it probably a dozen times over the years. And i like it more each time. There's just so much going on there and the more distance. I think it is from the time that he came out the more that you you can appreciate the thing. This is a movie that you don't even have to be a lover of the nineteen eighties to appreciate it. And that's why. I think the thing really holds up enough to give it four stars out of four now. The thing did take awhile to for patients to happen. In two thousand five there was a miniseries sequel contemplated to be made for the scifi channel by universal called. Return of the thing. Frank darabont was going to produce but it didn't quite make it to production. There was a big budget remake. Prequel theatrical feature.

keo meas Frank darabont
"john carpenter" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

Around the World in 80s Movies

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

"They'll the loneliness of being there without women. It was kind of a humorous scene where mcgrady is shown to have a sex doll that was later removed as something. That was too distracting by carpenter. Now one of the pre carpenter screenwriters. I don't know who john carpenter didn't want to name the person but try to frame the alien in the end as he positive symbiotic force rather than a destructive force carpenter. Happy to be a nonconformist. He was kind of a lifelong loner. He wasn't fond of a message of symbiosis. But if you want to see a version of that concept and you want to see women in version of the thing there's a twenty eighteen film called the nile. Elation that has a mostly female cast that does explore these symbiosis theme that this other screenwriter tried to present but was rejected by carpenter. Now getting back to things. Shooting took place primarily in juneau alaska as well as stewart british columbia and carpenter and his crew endured harsh cold lack visibility at various times carpenter and several members of the second crew went without heat or electricity or running water for several days at a time while they were scouting locations and filming exteriors using acting doubles warming sheds and vats of soup were needed at pretty much all times especially because the trailer heating was inadequate. Everybody pretty much got sick. Interiors were done mostly at universal studios but they refrigerated the studios as much as he could to keep things cold. Not quite a freezing. But they did have to contend with things like chemicals in the air and kerosene smoke filling their lungs so it wasn't any picnic either if you're a carpenter. Fan does have his theme of people trapped and having to fight their way out. It's very familiar in that respect than this speaks to carpenters own years of being confined physically or in his career. His love of horror is kind of entrapment. As well. Fear of he feels that. That's a universal. Fear that all audiences the world over can relate to you carpenter in particularly though has a fear of being controlled by other people because he feels that losing that autonomy that he has means losing his identity or the identity of the art that he's trying to create carpenter always seen as kind of an outsider looking in he's not somebody who's able to assimilate very freely. He resists a conformity in favor of maintaining his individuality which is why the thing is something that makes him personally. Afraid now. it's not always easy for carpenter to make this movie. They reduced campbell's characters from thirty seven to twelve for the screenplay but carpenter still felt challenged because there are too many personalities to have to give direction to for particular scenes too difficult to photograph all of them especially when they called for all of them to appear. In a specific room indoors carpenter felt that the middle of the film is also to talky so we started to restructure it. He decided to reshoot several scenes outdoors taking up to the snowy locations to provide more outdoor experience with.

carpenter mcgrady john carpenter juneau universal studios stewart alaska columbia campbell
"john carpenter" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

Around the World in 80s Movies

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"john carpenter" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

"Equiped stir dot net today. I'm going to be getting into a film that has been largely anticipated by listeners. Of this podcast at least a few have reached out to me and put it on their list of ones. They want me to cover the thing from nineteen eighty two also known as john. Carpenter's the thing. Because john carpenter did direct. This film it's r. rated. It does have pervasive gore a lot of gore for its time violence and language. The run time is an hour forty nine minutes. I guess kurt russell's the main star is more of an ensemble piece. it does have wolford bramley. Keith david richard meser. Tk carter and a whole bunch of other john carpenter of course is the director and the screenplay is credited to bill.

john carpenter gore Carpenter wolford bramley kurt russell Keith david richard meser john Tk carter
The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

The Big Picture

13:11 min | 3 years ago

The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

"Later in the show. I'll have an interview with Lebron L. The writer director of the new updated edition of the invisible man. A movie that shifts the perspective of the classic horror movie to the victim in this case played by the Amazing Elizabeth Moss when Elsa Clever Jonah craftsman and we had a fun chat about how he's reinventing the work of the historic universal monster movies and some of his aides filmaker. Heroes like James Cameron and Paul Hogan and John Carpenter but I I am joined by ringer contributor and one of the best film minds around Adam Neiman. Thanks for joining me Adam. Thanks for having me Adam. We're here to build another wing in the movie hall of fame. Today we said post and beam on the monster movie hall of fame. Now you know monster. Movies are tricky because there are two distinctions between them. One is your classical scare movie that enrapture audiences but maybe doesn't really mean very much and then. The other is the load-bearing bearing metaphorical monster that communicate something to the world about maybe it's ills or human psychology or things of that nature I assume that you are more fan of the latter. But May maybe that's not the case. I think I'm a fan of the ladder when it's less calculated You know the the joke I liked to tell his one day. Someone's GonNa make really good specific movie about a social problem like documentary and then at a press conference the director. She's going to be like this movie's a metaphor for zombies and just waiting for someone to do but I mean I think that in the last couple years because you have some like Jordan. Peele who has spoken not in terms of monster movies but in terms of horror movies. He's talked about you. Know his office for those social thrillers or Social Horror Movies and the metaphorical dimension to them. And so you know because monsters are a subset of horror movies as you say a delivery device for for scares those streams often do cross but yeah. I think some of the best monster movies of all time are definitely ones where monsters represent something whether it's something inside or outside society or something inside or outside people but I'm also just a a big fan of movies. Where like spooky things jump out at people in eat them? So it's a IT'S A. It's a fine balance before we get started on constructing this this list that we've put together here. Do you remember your first monster movie experience at the movie. That felt like a monster movie to me and I mean it it is a monster is when Pinocchio gets swallowed by the whale. Oh yeah which is. Obviously you know I mean there's a biblical reference there to to Joan in the whale and it's You know like for for for kids. Who Who who see Pinocchio? That whale is just nightmarish and terrifying and and gigantic. I mean my dad. I think that's the first movie he ever told you to. Took me to it. Just absolutely scared the hell out of me that and the giant squid in Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. Same thing oh great both Some Disney spun con there. Well done by in and and you. Well I'm thinking about Pinocchio as you say it and the thing that scared me more than the whale is the sequence in which the boys turn into donkeys boys which is just absolutely disturbing and also kind of metaphorical in its way Not to put too fine a parasite point on it I'm trying to think of my first true scary movie experience. I feel like what I got two young Frankenstein before I got to Frankenstein in. It's funny. How when something like that happens how it can obscure your relationship to movies and I think it actually made me Not so much scared movie theaters but just just sort of happy and smiling and laughing. I tend to laugh at horror movies and monster movies because I get kind of perverse thrill out of them and I so I if young Frankenstein. Ken Count that would be. That would be my number one. I mean obviously. I saw a bunch movies that we'll talk about here on this list that a very young age. And maybe that's an opportunity to just go right into it. So here's what we're going to do. We'RE GOING TO GO CHRONOLOGICALLY. So there's a long history. I would say monster. Movies are essentially as old as movies themselves. So we're going to try to walk through. Essentially I don't know eighty ninety years of movie history and try to capture. What are the absolute most representative interesting compelling fascinating monster movies ever made and the monsters? I think the conversation should really be about the monsters inside of the movies and why they're so effective as devices for either sending those messages or just scaring the shit out of us. So you chosen five. I've chosen five. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA Ariffin vamp little bit. Why don't you give me your first pick going all the way back to the nineteen thirties? Sure and you know it's interesting because now when we've got it arranged chronologically we've got this this interesting blindspot which. Kinda be filled in as we go along. Which is we've both bypassed. The true initial cohort of Universal Monster. Movies right the very late twenties very early thirties because the first movie on my list is King Kong. So I have bypassed Dracula Frankenstein you know bride of Frankenstein Which are all these enduring literary properties that have been made and remade for a long time and I think the thing about King Kong. It just feels like the primal scene for me of monster as spectacle because he's not human sized right. He's not an actor costume he's not You know someone doing an accent or wearing makeup. He's a special effects creation and the thing about the original King Kong. Every time I watch it is. It is just so spectacular visually. In an analog era. You know the the integration of those stop motion special effects into old sets and the exaggerated camera angles on the actors and just the the surrealism of it. I've read that. The actual surrealists the the practicing artists within that within that movement re huge fans of King Kong for one thing. 'cause monster just keeps changing size. You know it's inconsistent it's inconsistent but it's also just stunning because from scene to scene you know when he's just represented by giant hander giants foot or the close ups on the is and then you can also still cut backing these establishing shots and seeing him in these different environments and. I think it's the way also that it goes from this primal island to this urban city. The monster in his home context. And then sort of you know thrashing around in the middle of maternity causing chaos. It's just like the deepest the deepest core horror fantasy. You know that that that I can think of I. I just think it's absolutely astonishing and I never tire of watching it. It's funny I think a lot of the monsters on our list Get repeated and reused and re contextualize over and over again the thing with King Kong is is the actual character of King Kong comes up over and over and over and over again. We're getting another King Kong movie this year. And for whatever reason I would say between King Kong and Godzilla. Those are really the only two significant monsters that we never tire of somehow. That don't don't expire. You know I think that the idea behind what King Kong represents and there's obviously been an extraordinary amount of both academic critical just fun writing about What happens when colonialists enter a less developed world and attempt to steal things from it But in addition to that it is this grand spectacle and we talk a lot on the show about is. It doesn't move. You have a reason to be seen in a movie theater. Then I feel like the original King. Kong is is one of the landmark achievements and you have to see this on a giant screen. There's nowhere else for to be seen. We'll for sure. I maybe just in terms of bridging King Kong with those other brand name monsters of the period he in genders the same kind of complex sympathy. That you have with Boris. Karloff Frankenstein. Right I mean you even have a rhyme in those two movies wherein Frankenstein. He picks the little girl up by the river without doing what he's doing. And you know drowns her accidentally and certainly king kongs intentions towards Aren't violent. They're they're in his sort of chivalrous or desirous or somewhere in between there. I think the reason he endures an even the point that God's Zilla as a character eventually got bent in King kongs direction because the original godzillas dot anthropomorphized sympathetic at all. And then over the years. And they made Godzilla more like King Kong. I think being inside that sort of like destructive force but you're also misunderstood and you're more a victim of circumstance than anything else that's a really appealing escapist fantasy for filmgoers even thinking the original King Kong as terrifying as it is and as brutal as the violences like a people have never seen it. He smush is people into Goo on screen. You know You're still with him and I think that that's a really great monster. Movie needs on some kinds of great monster movies that you need that possible level of identification or sympathy. So it's not just purely a nightmare. I think the original King Kong does that just just amazingly well. So you're next pick actually doesn't do the former thing that you were just describing which is there's no crushing there's no Gu. There's no absolute violence of a kind in your next week. What's your next movie? The next movie I have is is cap. People which is part of a cycle of really low key atmospheric horror movies produced in the mostly in the nineteen forties. Bhai guy named Val Luton and I would say that if you get a chance to see Ken. Jones documentary thou loot man in the shadows. I think it's the best documentary I've ever seen about a filmmaker at particularly about how Luton changed horror movies by using the lack of a budget. And the lack of franchise -able characters. You Know He. He didn't have the roster that universal was working with all these all star. You know horror icons so he made it less more. It's the it's the the the the cinema of of of suggestion and scary around the edges. But it's also movie about people transforming into cats I. It's a booby that plays the the ambiguity of is this or isn't this real up. You know for for a long time but it really does give over to the idea that the main character the heroin does when stimulated or afraid you know actually transform into A cat due to this this this Eastern European mysticism and it's also a movie. I'm sure they'll come later. That gets remade in the eighties and completely liberalised because instead of just talking with someone turning into a cat or remembering someone turning into a cat you actually see it on screen with with special effects and it's It's less effective to me. Do you do you like the Paul schrader version that you're describing the eighties version. I like the Paul schrader version. Because it's wild acid trippy. Paul schrader horror movie. And it's it's glory and it's actually not as full-on like latex hydraulic special effects. His other movies from the period. But I I love the original are you are you. Are you fond of the delude films directed by Jacques Turner? Who did a bunch of the other ones is it a? Is it a a a source of Phantom for you it is? I saw cat people and the Leopard men in a couple of them many many years ago and then actually over Halloween this year my wife and I were looking and you know as I get older Halloween. Getting more and more difficult to program. If we're not gonNA rewatch something. But we watched a couple movies. We watched The criterion collection had the ghost ship which I had never seen which I thought had. It has a very similar approach to kind of What's happening in the shadows? Which is most of his films are using that strategy of not showing the thing and then I watched by myself. The body snatcher and both of them. I thought were pretty great. I mean I this is also a case where I I. I probably saw Kent Jones's documentary before seeing any of the films and while that was a great thing for my film education it also kind of warped perception of the movie because I was seeing it as a kind of intellectual exercise in a way where I understood technique as opposed to some of these other movies that we're GonNa talk about here where I just happened to be nine years old when I saw it in a completely reorganized my brain chemistry in a way but I do like his movies. And especially this one that you've chosen well and then also just the last thing to say but it may be that because it's not special effects and spectacle it anticipates where horror movies would go in the sixties with the idea of the monster within right. I mean here. It's not a an invading apor vampire. It's the idea of a woman who's subconscious and her inner life motivates this transformations client about the link between monstrous and desire and monstrous and repression. Which is why it tends to be. You Know Pretty Beloved Academically but I mean by the sixties. Neither US talk about these movies. But you start having the idea of the human monster in movies like psycho or whatever else and you can kind of trace aligned from the way cat. People stages horror towards that stuff. I think I think that's right. And I think it's probably a capitals nifty double feature with the peg for this film the invisible man because that movie is also as much about.

King Kong Dracula Frankenstein Pinocchio Adam Neiman Paul Schrader Kent Jones King Kongs Ken Count Elizabeth Moss Godzilla James Cameron Lebron L. Director United States Disney Karloff Frankenstein Peele John Carpenter Joan
The New Halloween Movie Is Great. And You Don't Have To Watch the 10 Other Movies To Enjoy It.

The No Film School Podcast

00:58 sec | 4 years ago

The New Halloween Movie Is Great. And You Don't Have To Watch the 10 Other Movies To Enjoy It.

"Michael Myers is back. David Gordon green is behind the wheel while the Halloween franchise has gone through many sequels and remakes. This one seems to be special due to its talented team behind the camera and an endorsement from John carpenter himself who owns an executive producer credit on the film to seal including seventy. Think of it, they say, skip it. Yeah. Yeah, but they haven't seen the other ones. So you know, I, I feel by his word. Jimmy Lee. Curtis also an executive producer credit in his back playing Laurie strode as she comes to her final confrontation yet. Right final come on. It's never the final with the aforementioned Myers, a masked figure who has haunted her since she narrowly escaped his killing spree on Halloween night for decades ago. The film premiered at tiff last month to extremely positive reactions, and it's one of the most intimidated films of the year for a lot of people. I'm going to be going on Friday night. Actually. It's going to be spooky and hopefully a lot of fun. I just watched the original and now forget all the other sequels. This one is a direct sequel

Michael Myers Executive Producer David Gordon Green John Carpenter Jimmy Lee Tiff Curtis Laurie
last movie justin saw in a dream

Doug Loves Movies

04:41 min | 4 years ago

last movie justin saw in a dream

Ernest Howard Joe At David National Treasure Karate Lanta Atl Indiana Jones Boehner Indiana Witch Mountain Kim Richards Ben Affleck Mets John Carpenter G Lee Jennifer Lopez David