22 Burst results for "John Cage"

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

21:30 min | Last month

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"Sir. Oh. Book. Home. School. Sleep. please. Off! Hundred originals. Took! raised. uh-huh!.

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

09:36 min | 2 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"The sounds of the nights. And the spaceship fridge. From Pinky McClure. Next. Thirty three seconds comes from the Czech Republic. From Thomas Sinking. Cells Meriva. On this is a recording of a very busy garden. His. Use. World. The. End. Talk. Took Him. Increased. Sleep. Interest. Swear. Prince. Your. Interest. That's. Nice to hear some unfamiliar birds on their from. Self Maria. In the Czech.

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

04:57 min | 2 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"Now took took.

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

02:43 min | 2 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"With a nickel hops performing full minutes. Thirty three seconds.

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"Giovanni <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> 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"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

05:50 min | 2 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

05:17 min | 2 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

09:48 min | 2 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"Bucharest. Awesome Catalina Kgab Andrew from Bucharest in Romania sonic postcards. Miss Traveling Lot. We're going to see site now to south of England Tomorrow Gate Beach and this is Adam. Bolton walking along the beach collecting plastic and litter picking on a Sunday afternoon in April this year.

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

02:21 min | 2 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

02:26 min | 3 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

04:36 min | 3 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"From Edinburgh. Mean just listening and you know whatever looses side.

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

04:32 min | 3 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"Josh. Talk Church Syrians Teachers Change Twins Tsk excuse sweet James Street into restricted researchers. Use.

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

05:39 min | 3 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"<Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> That <Speech_Male> was four minutes and thirty <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> three seconds from <Speech_Male> southern Italy. <Speech_Male> There from Allesandro <Speech_Music_Male> Cassano. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I hope this <Speech_Male> is inspired you to <Speech_Music_Male> send your <Speech_Music_Male> recording lasting <Speech_Male> for four minutes and <Speech_Music_Male> thirty three seconds <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to do. It's quite simple <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you send it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to great. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jc PROJECT <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> AT <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> MAIL DOT COM <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that's great JC <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> projects <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at G. <Music> <Advertisement> DOT com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The final <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sounds a bit different. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Musical Gio Koo <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Koo <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Simon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and ex. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Simon is in London <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and an <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> exodus from Shasha <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> United <SpeakerChange> Arab Emirates. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> produce a monthly reconstructed <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> radio mix <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for Moscow base <Speech_Male> station cooled <Speech_Music_Male> new new world radio <Speech_Male> and this <Speech_Music_Male> is inspired by <Speech_Music_Male> some <Speech_Music_Male> cuts up vocals <Music> supplied <Speech_Music_Male> by X. <Music> <Advertisement> and <Music> <Advertisement> scored. Omg <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Next <Speech_Male> week. We're going to Siberia <Speech_Male> in Poland. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for listening. <Music> <Advertisement> Goodbye <Music> <Advertisement>

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

13:26 min | 3 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"Keeping fits so nice sound texture said that from Ruth Franson in Lincolnshire. Coatings really lovely relaxed tone to it from Hamburg in Germany. And it's being sent in by dogs. Ow Yeah really enjoyed that sound. I wonder how that contrast with with life before lockdown is incredibly peaceful sound after South Italy now on another recording from a garden. But it's very interesting to listen to the different by often. The different voices of birds. This has being sent him by. Alessandro Cassano Yea.

Innovation and the Clich

LensWork

09:35 min | 3 months ago

Innovation and the Clich

"Years the editor of Lens Work Publishing Brooks Jensen as an introduction to this topic. Let me begin with a little bit of inside baseball as they say. Did describe how it is that these podcasts come about. Oftentimes they're sparks from something. I read or something someone says to me or an idea. Get an e mail. Sometimes it's ideas that just bubble up out of nowhere. As I've often mentioned this happens a lot in the shower for some reason so I actually have a divers where I can jot down ideas before I forget them while. I'm still in the shower. And that's what happened this morning at phrase occurred to me out of the clear. Blue Sky jotted down. I had no idea where it was going. But I've been thinking about it all day in it's led to a very interesting train of thought. I WANNA share with you. The phrase is as a pursuit in life. The creation of art seems to be a dance between innovation an execution dance between innovation and execution. And here's what occurred to me while I was thinking about this. I've been listening to two different kinds of music of late. I've for reasons I can't explain really gotten into the piano concertos of Rachmaninoff. And I've mentioned that these are available on Youtube Etcetera. Play by this brilliant Chinese Pena's named Eugene and by sheer coincidence. I've also discovered a composer. Young woman who is very talented at composing classical music. And she's been exploring lots of other genres of music are names Nari Soul and she has been discussing of late in some of her Youtube Videos John Cage and his work. With what's called a prepared piano. He would take an open up a piano and attach things to the strings. like paper clips and whatnot and and the piano would make very funny noises and oftentimes. He would not really play music. He would just play notes and things and very innovative very creative. Very modern very sort of avant garde out there and she's been exploring some of his ideas so I I had these two things that are clashing in my brain the extreme precision and accomplishment of the execution of Rachmaninoff by Eugene Dong and John Cage and is prepared piano as explored by Nari Soul. I think these two extremes are what got me thinking about the dance between innovation and execution. LemMe ask the question. This way in terms of piano music which is a higher form of accomplishment. The extreme innovation of John Cage thinking way outside the box not only thinking outside of meter and normal harmonies and progressions but thinking about outside normal instruments. And how they can be modified in played with talk about innovation way out there so we applaud that to some degree and then at the other end of the scale is you. Juwan and her unbelievably precise playing Rachmaninoff. And the the execution that she brings to his scores are not only extremely high in terms of technical proficiency but also in terms of emotional content. So that's a very high measure of success. But can't we agree that these two are at essentially completely opposite ends of the creative spectrum? Both forms of music can bring out emotions. Strong positive and negative is zoom and both of them can be seen to fall in some sort of competition or scale of things. And which do we appreciate more? Well obviously the reason I bring all this up is because I'm thinking about this relative to photography to what's more important in photography extreme innovation here. I'm thinking of the inventive work from the imagination of photographers like Jerry. You'll Zeman or John Paul Capela Negro or Huntington Witherell or dominic rouse or the incredibly precise execution on very traditional lines. And here on thinking of Bruce Marne bomb and John Sexton and and even people like Steve McCurry. Which do we value more? The key idea here seems to me to revolve around our expectations. If we go into a piece of artwork with the assumption that what we're looking for is incredibly talented sensitive execution and we see something like the prepared piano of John Cage or the innovative of Jerry yells men or someone we might say. Well that's not what I call a picture because it doesn't look like what we expect a fine art photograph to look like on the other hand if we go in assuming that what we value. Is something really innovative? Something we've never seen before then we can look at work like. Oh maybe even Louis Balsam Robert Atoms and Lee friedlander Gary Winner. Grand and say well. That's that's not what I call a picture. But wow is that fantastic. Because it doesn't look at all like we expect a fine art photograph to look. I think it's easy for us to appreciate the fact that there are two camps. It's perhaps even easier to fall into one of those two camps without even realizing it if we're a traditionalist we're gonNA look at the innovative and the Avant Garde is being weird and certainly when people look at oh do sharp or Mcgraw eat they might look at those paintings and say that's weird. That's you know. Because it doesn't look like Rembrandt Raphael. On the other hand if greet and duchamp painted like Rembrandt and Rafael. We might look at it and say well. That's boring because it's not innovative so therefore it doesn't seem to add much to the history of painting and so we're not interested in it. Well we can do exactly the same thing in photography. How do you evaluate work when you look at it? Do you evaluate it based on its execution and how well it conforms to the cliche or do you evaluate it based on its innovation and how different and unique it is. There is a position in the Middle. Which gives me pause for concern. Because if what we're trying to do is have the best of both worlds have innovation and traditional execution for example. Then the only thing that's left is what you point your camera at that is to say trying to find something that hasn't been photographed as artwork before and turn that into your bailiwick or your creative vision. In hopes that people would look at it and say beautifully done traditionally printed man fantastic execution of something. That's never been photographed before and isn't that Nice. Do you realize that that's exactly what happened? In the early history of painting this has been discussed by lots. And lots of people. Certainly not a unique idea. And certainly not my own but basically the idea's this for generations for literally. Hundreds of years painting was of the human figure primarily religious pictures descent from the cross kinds of things but usually what happened in those paintings as they had to be set in some kind of scene and so there would be introduced in the background. Some little bit of a tree or a little stream or a building or something and with enough passage of time and hundreds of years. Painters started saying to the figure move over. We're we're more interested in what's going on in the background than we are in the human figure or the story and landscape painting was born but when landscape painting was born that way there were probably lots and lots of people around who said well. That's not what I call a painting because whereas the people this is just a bunch trees that's not very interesting so it was innovative but it wasn't traditional and it certainly didn't measure up to the kinds of execution that were expected in a portrait of a person or the painting of a of a story seen or some such thing

John Cage Rachmaninoff Avant Garde Youtube Baseball Eugene Dong Lens Work Publishing Editor Jerry Nari Soul Brooks Jensen John Paul Capela Negro Juwan Steve Mccurry John Sexton Pena Dominic Rouse Bruce Marne Mcgraw
"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

04:07 min | 3 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

04:59 min | 3 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

07:49 min | 3 months ago

"john cage" Discussed on The Great John Cage Project - in Lockdown

Trump says he will raise U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods

Anderson Cooper 360

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Trump says he will raise U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods

"You have no choice but to vote for me because your 4._0._1._k. John cage down the tubes. Everything's gonna be down. The why is the market went down the tubes today. The president joked today suggesting reading in a tweet that they were reacting to democratic candidates seth moulton leaving the presidential race whoever that may be he said in his tweet seth moulton by the way volunteered to serve this country in war and risked his life doing so risk of course the president refused to bear during the vietnam war. We're not sure how many millions of americans americans watching their 4._0._1._k.'s today. We're laughing more on all of this now from c. n. N.'s abby philip who joins us from the white house abbey what is going on today with this president. Is there concern inside that building about a series of decisions that do not see even to serve the president's interests or the country's interests well. The president at the moment seems to be committed to this trade war with china in fact so much so that he is doubling down on a strategy that a lot of people including shooting some within the white house believe is contributing to the economic uncertainty but it's also clear jim that president trump is worried about the economy he has been lashing out <music> at jay powell the federal law federal reserve chairman who he appointed to that job insisting that powell is responsible for the fact that the economy seems to be slowing and his economic aids are also warning him that by twenty twenty there could be an economic slowdown we've had g._d._p. And and job growth numbers that have not been as <unk> as rosy as the president would like and some of the comments that we've been seeing on social media <hes> his comments about democrats egging on a recession are due to his concerns concerns that this could become a political problem for him and perhaps looking for others to blame it on than himself. What more specifically are you learning about. The terrorists that the president's announced announced late today against china these are significant they are and they add onto what already exists out onto what is coming in the near future now white house house aides the president and his advisors met and huddled in the oval office today to try to come up with some kind of retaliatory plan in response to these chinese tariffs chris and what we're seeing now is that some of the existing tariffs are going to go up from twenty five percent to thirty percent and tariffs that were planned. They planned to go into place on september number. First a three hundred billion dollars worth those tariffs are going to go from ten to fifteen percent so all told the five hundred fifty billion dollars in goods from a chinese companies coming into the united states are going to be tariff or taxed and those taxes are increasingly being borne by american

President Trump Seth Moulton Jay Powell White House John Cage White House Abbey China United States Abby Philip Donald Trump N. Chairman JIM Twenty Twenty
In the Footsteps of Merce Cunningham

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:28 min | 1 year ago

In the Footsteps of Merce Cunningham

"Time. I'm courteous. Studio. Three sixty podcast extra. We're celebrating the life and work of one of the great American choreographers. Merce Cunningham who was born one hundred years ago this week he danced starting as a member of Martha Graham's troop and then maye dances for seventy years and embraced innovation from start to finish new dance forms, new technology. New music new collaborators. Win four he worked with Radiohead and Siga rose on a beautiful piece that you're hearing called split sides. Cunningham dancers were famous for seeming to defy the laws of physics leaping high and suddenly switching direction in mid air. When Cunningham spoke with us in two thousand one he was using computers to try to make his dances, even more complex. Take always been interested in movement. There's no reason for that is just it seems to be it should interest everybody. We're we're so involved with all the time. I think of course of animals and birds watching their movements of always been totally fascinating to me. Movement is so much a part of our daily experience that we don't think of it as a thing, we don't even think we sort of do it. But if you thought about it say, how do you walk? How do you just the mechanics, but if we all walk the same why is it we all walk differently and that struck me years ago, and I thought well that was a way to think about movement that we were doing the same thing. But we all did it differently. My name is Daniel Roberts. I have a member of the Merce Cunningham dance company. I always feel that my legs are like. Needles of sewing machine when I'm doing cutting him they have to be very sharp and very articulate, and I feel that the torso has to be free on top of that on. So there's a strain that comes along with doing the work in the technique. And there's a clarity about the work in general, the use of space and the articulation of the torso limbs that I've never experienced before in any other dance form. I'm interested obviously in complexity which is to buy disadvantaged probably because it's made it difficult often for the public to really comprehend live with what we do. I think uses chance to avoid his own typical habits of making movement. And that's what's really interesting because he's even making it difficult for himself. It's not whatever feels natural. It's usually what deals completely unnatural. Chance operations came about in the nineteen fifties. There was wrist of an institute of random numbers where the decided scientists had decided that rather than using logic for numbers they could just as well use chance John cage. Took course, we're using it in his music composition. And I thought it would work with moving. I would say devise you sort of speaker series of movements. But then through chance means in the beginning, it was tossing coins. So that instead of you just using your own what you remembered about how things go you came up with this stunt. Up things which were. Sometimes impossible. But if you tried them, even though what it was was impossible something else came up to had experienced or I hadn't experienced before. I had the opportunity to begin to work with dad's computer it's called life forms, and it has mainly three screens with which you work one is what they call the stage on which you can place tiny figures, which move there's a screen with the larger figure called the figure editor on which you can make movements on the figure then there is a third screen called the time line, which is moving in time. You can put the the body and what say flat on the floor Prome. Okay. Then a few spaces later in the time. You could put it up in the air. Now, it will do that it will rise up on its feet and go up in the air. Of course, you can't do that in the way. It does it. But you look at it. I do and I think oh, but I could do it this way. Now if I hadn't seen this. I wouldn't think that way and and I. My work with it has grown more complex because I see more possibilities all the

Merce Cunningham Cunningham Martha Graham Daniel Roberts Maye John Cage Radiohead DAD Editor One Hundred Years Seventy Years
Ravens plan to start rookie QB Lamar Jackson against Bengals and Chargers' Joey Bosa expected to make season debut vs. Broncos

CBS Sports Radio

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Ravens plan to start rookie QB Lamar Jackson against Bengals and Chargers' Joey Bosa expected to make season debut vs. Broncos

"This is the John cage. Joe, and he's happy you're here. Thank you so much for being a part of the John cage show every single week coast to coast here on CBS sports radio. He knows he doesn't always know what he's talking about memo to you. As a listener. I'm not always right? I'm wrong. A lot just asked my wife. There's things we're going to agree on this things. We're gonna disagree on. But we're always going to have spirited debate. While was gonna have some fun. And he's full of opinions say something that may not be popular. But it's my observation. It's my as Oprah would say, I need to speak my truth seriously, over here's your host, John Kincaid had enough of Oprah Winfrey. Good morning, everybody. Wherever you are. If you're up early or you're getting in late. We do not judge you here on the jonky cage show on CBS sports radio. I'm coming to you live from the Quicken Loans studios. National mortgage lender, Quicken Loans,

John Cage Quicken Loans Oprah Winfrey CBS JOE John Kincaid
Ohio Gov. John Kasich reacts to President Trump slam on LeBron James: 'We should be celebrating him'

America's Dining and Travel Guide

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Ohio Gov. John Kasich reacts to President Trump slam on LeBron James: 'We should be celebrating him'

"Twenty five some good news in the fight against. Wildfires in northern California Shasta county sheriff? Tom Cinco I'm. Glad to say that now the city of reading has all the areas, open it, has. Been repopulated and we're working. On some of those more difficult. Areas of the. County to get people back in fuel battling. Twin wildfires, with fifty five. Homes burn up and thousands of residents evacuated the. Two fires covering a larger area than the deadly wildfire in reading the car flare the largest and most destructive in, county history Ohio's governor John cage. Came to the defensive home LeBron James in his Twitter feud with President Trump that today the president tweeted insults about James intelligence hitting. He's Michael Jordan fan the tweet came days after James opened. A school in Akron providing food uniform transportation and college tuition for at risk children on ABC's this. Week case it says he. Supports James he's got forty one million dollars set aside to help kids go to college plus a. Bunch of other. Schools but I also disagreed with. The president because. You know what all around LeBron. I think a. Little better than MJ. Cincinnati biology teachers become the first American to Rossello across the North Atlantic Bryce, Carlson landed..

Lebron James President Trump California Shasta County Tom Cinco John Cage Akron Rossello Cincinnati Twitter Ohio ABC Carlson Forty One Million Dollars