17 Burst results for "John C Lilly"

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:02 min | 2 d ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"I having a seizure now. Justice and also it's often ascribed or attributed to artistic types. Who have a those. Those kind of crossed wires in terms of being able to experience sound as texture. It kind of predisposes. You may be thinking of being able to almost like paint with sound. You know. Create sonic textures. Because that's just sort of how you interpret them differently than somebody may be has the regular wiring hs. I may have this. Because when i write songs i usually think of them in like a color scheme. I'm very visual. So and then when i sing sometimes i'll just accidentally closed my eyes and realize closing is and seeing all the emotions go with certain colors. So is that you're talking about yes. That is a type of that type of sin as asia. And this is you know as no said this is something that's often associated with with artists with musicians with sculptors. It's something that people have. Who have never thought of. This might experience when they are When they have ingested or encountered one of these substances that we're talking about and the thing the thing that's the most irritating about this. I'll say once. I'll leave it alone. There were studies on this kind of stuff in the sixties and seventies and those studies. Leary right yes. Yes and and those studies got shut down Because you know there's always a war on some sort of idea and and if those studies had not been shut down we could have made so much more progress. Already i in terms of treating. Ptsd depression anxiety. All these troubling conditions. But i i know a lot of our listeners are going to be thinking about that. I would say to those of us listening along at home you know. Don't don't lose too much time worrying. About what could have happened because we can't really change the past but we can change the future and we can make a difference for not just ourselves but the generations coming after us and i'm so glad so many doctors agree when we dive down into the science. Here we see we see very strange commonalities things that don't usually happen in medicine. You know speaking of diving down into science. I think one of my favorite deep deep slightly deep cut psychedelic was by john. C lilly Involving bottlenose dolphins and sensory deprivation tanks an inspired the films the day of the dolphin and altered states and he believed that through l. s. d. he could communicate with dolphins like psychically so that kind of thinking has been around for a long time. This idea that this opens you up and tunes you into frequencies you would otherwise be able to experience and yes. He came off as a bit of a quack. He i think he there was some talk of some low key dolphin. Sex perhaps wait if the dolphins sex guy the head dolphin hand job got. It wasn't his assistant. Oh well.

john. C lilly sixties asia one seventies once Leary
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:38 min | 8 months ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"The experience to help you with your problem and this is. Is True, this is what you would see any see this reflected in the western some the western research that we'll be discussing later you see it in some of the the the the counterculture and underground uses of it, but in the classic scenario, the Shaman was sometimes the one to ingest the substance alone and solve your problem for you, which seems kind of counterproductive counter intuitive at first right the idea that you would you would go to. The Shaman in the Shaman would take. Take a psychedelic in order to help you with your problem and you wouldn't take anything but this could well be the case in some of these situations you know. The the Shaman would step outside of of their own self in order to tackle your problem. Head on and help you solve it. Yeah, exactly so so to finish the story in the nineteen fifties. This J. P. Morgan banker. We mentioned right are Gordon Watson. He traveled to Oaxaca in Mexico and any met with an experienced SALOSSA. Shaman known as a cure enduro, or which meant like a healer, named Maria Sabina, who allowed him to participate in a suicide and healing and donation ritual, known as the Lada to the Mazda Tech people, and Walson wrote about this experience in that life magazine article we mentioned in nineteen, Fifty, seven and subsequently scientific interest in the mushroom skyrocketed. People eventually send samples of the fruiting bodies mushrooms to Albert Hoffman. The man who first isolated LSD twenty-five from Ergot. Ryan discovered its effects the decade. Decade before and Huffman and colleagues were able to isolate the psychoactive compounds in the mushroom, and of course Huffman had to try some out himself, and for a while before the Anti counterculture backlash in the drug war crackdown soul Sivan was researched by psychologists. Psychiatrists is a potential tool for understanding human cognition, expanding consciousness and treating addiction and mental illness, but of course then came the dark days right beginning in the nineteen seventies, where the Association of suicide and with Hippie culture and recreational drug use created. Created this stigma around research, legal barriers went up that made research more practically difficult and a Lotta mainstream research attention just turned away from suicide in particular and psychedelics in general, and I guess that's where we'll have to stop for this time until we come back next time. Yeah, so the journey continues. The trip is not over It will continue in episode three of of this journey so in the meantime if you want to check out more episodes of stuff to blow your mind, checkout past episodes that have dealt with psychedelics such as the Timothy Leary episode, the John C Lilly episodes or some of these other episodes. We've alluded to You'll find them there..

Gordon Watson Huffman Timothy Leary Association of suicide Maria Sabina Oaxaca Albert Hoffman LSD Mazda Tech J. P. Morgan Mexico life magazine Walson Ryan Sivan SALOSSA John C
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:21 min | 8 months ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Numerous times in the past discussing, LSD suicide Ben as well as such counterculture figures as Tom is Timothy leary and John C Lilly, and we, we've been meaning to come back to psychedelics for a deeper dive for a while, but one of the real reasons that were reaching back into the subject right now is that we are living in very exciting time as far as these substances are concerned Yeah because talk in in research terms in research terms, yeah, because basically these are substances that modern Western medicine explored for a brief time in the mid twentieth century. And then, and then, and when they were looking at them, they were encountering many promising results, indicating how they might be used to treat addiction address psychological problems in even unlock a better understanding of the human mind. But due to political and societal pressures They were all in turn declared. Illegal Substances Schedule One drugs in the United States. I think suicide I think was made illegal in the united. States in nineteen, sixty eight, and then made a schedule. One substance in I think nineteen seventy. Yeah, I believe that was the timeline and and of course this also in in in you know involved LSD and various other substances, but basically the result was that decades of potential exploration were lost when modern science it scarcely explored more than what ancient peoples understood about the substances involved or you know. To a certain extent understood them less well. compared to ancient societies that I mean we're talking. Three plus decades, during which these powerful substances were purely the domains of counterculture and illegal activity in the West. And you know nobody was studying. Well there was some steady bill, it was sort of driven underground right or not taken very seriously in the academic community. Right it was. It was considered like risky to. Say A suicide and study for a while. Yeah, like if you're a pharmacologist psychopharmacologists pursuing civil aside, and it could be a bad career. Move Right. Yeah, I mean so. It was almost treated as if all of these substances were dead ends as if we would reach the point where it was like. Oh well, this is a this just a poison. The you know for that. Some people are going to dangerously use for recreational purposes You is explore is is is wrong. In two ways, I guess wrong in historical context when you see how substances like this have been used for thousands of years, and it's wrong on the the medical research front. Yeah, I mean one of the funny things is given our view of the very like square buttoned up nineteen fifties. The nineteen fifties were relatively A. A time of you know abundant our research in permissiveness, exploring these topics absolutely so yeah, there were some decades there as pretty dry decades as far as psychedelic research was concerned, but as we emerge from the nineteen ninety s, the culture began to shift, and we began to see new experimentation into how especially suicide and could be used to treat specific conditions. And you know this is what we've covered in the past on the show and what you've heard covered a lot elsewhere. The studies here and there that reveal new potential, and perhaps point the way for greater and renewed study and even decriminalization at least for clinical uses you know instead he and studies, if nothing else, and so as Michael Paulin points out in how to change your mind, you know we're living in a true renaissance of psychedelic study, and I don't think that's. An overstatement to say that I think especially since around the year two thousand six, when there was a a big seminal research paper out about suicide, and we will talk about in detail in the later episode in the series. Right and I'm not, and I'm not referring to say like what Colorado efforts in Colorado decriminalize them for perhaps with with recreational usage in mind I'm talking about like clinical uses the potential benefits here are profound, and if the trends you know, continue here, you know modern medical science has has a lot to gain from it. You know it's it's it's frustrating to. Those decades in which you know less was being done with them, but but you know we could easily remained in kind of a dark age in had several more decades in which these substances, if not being studied, so it's a remarkable time, really all right well, I think before we dive into especially suicide Ben, but the psychedelics in general May. Maybe we should do a little foundation work because I know one thing that you were talking to me about the Terence McKenna gets into. In! His work is the idea of like what is a drug. What are drugs? And what do people see as drugs? Yeah, yeah, he. He had a lot of Great thoughts on this on this matter that I think are really good at sort of disrupting the sort of like mental concrete ends up getting embedded in our head, regarding the different substances that we take into our body. So, yeah, let's I think we should talk about like what a drug is because for instance. If you look at just a basic say, Webster's definition, a drug is a medicine or other substance which has a physiological effect when ingested or otherwise introduced into the body. Now while the certainly applies to say cocaine or Ibuprofen, it also applies to coffee and alcohol. It applies to melatonin herbal supplements. Chocolate tea, wheat, grass, shots, camomile sugar, liquorice OATMEAL. You name it. Yeah, we were talking the other day. I know about it was it? WAS IT Melatonin supplements? You were looking at oh? No. I heard an ad on the radio for them. Yeah, we're calling them drug free all these drugs people take advertise themselves as drug free. which I think is just. I. I'm not sure what people mean by that. I think I. Mean maybe like not containing synthetically or lab isolated chemicals that you can't pronounce the names. Of Yeah it's you know all natural or something well. Yeah, it's weird how we use the term drug disorder refer to things that are either in the domain of the illegal is in the war on drugs or something that is in the domain of medical professionals. Yeah, maybe something that requires a prescription is produced by the pharmaceutical industry. Yeah, but yeah I. I don't see any reason why these all. All natural substances are not drugs. They certainly are I mean. I'm doing drugs right now. I've got my Coffee Cup next to me Oh yeah, the whole drug free thing kind of reminds me of like the people who say I. Don't put any chemicals in my body I know what they're talking about right? They you know they want to eat sort of like all natural whole foods. You know I I'll eat an apple I'm not going to eat an apple bar that was made in a factory and has all these chemical ingredients listed that I can't pronounce. What that stuff is so I I mean I understand that, and of course you know there. There are some reasons that you might be in truth. Want to avoid certain kinds of industrial food additives, but the whole idea that you don't put any chemicals in your body is ridiculous, and and of course we're not arguing that one should put everything into your body right tiny means you know ultimately we all have to draw lines in the sand, concerning the sort of thing and those those lines May. Not Make a whole lot of sense if you really analyze them, but I think one of the important things is to be able to realize where we're drawing the line in the sand, and where that line is being drawn for us, by you know other other parties in. But anyway this is one of the the the ideas that Terence McKenna discusses and food of the Gods, and I think before we go..

Terence McKenna LSD melatonin United States Colorado apple John C Lilly Timothy leary Michael Paulin Ben Tom Webster cocaine Ibuprofen
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:23 min | 8 months ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"You welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and I'm Joe. McCormack can stay. I wanted to start with one of those great Navel Gazers okay. Are you ready? Let's do it okay, so the question is. We know how to describe what we see. When we look at things, you know you can look at the room. You're in right now and right down the features or you can Try to describe a great. Great landscape that you remember from some trip you took, but when somebody asks you to look inside yourself well, how do you begin to describe what you see in your own mind? I mean how in a way you are forced to resort to metaphors. We talked about this a lot there like concrete metaphors for abstract mental properties, and so maybe you think of your mind, if you you try to examine it as something like a you. You, know like a castle or building a solid landscape. You can walk through. That has features you could describe, or maybe you think about it like a whether pattern that's constantly transient and changing, or maybe you can't really think of it. in in comparison to any physical object at all. In which case. How would you ever even be able to describe what you're looking at? And how different of a person would you be if you had the? The tools to see more clearly. What's inside your own mind? Well, even in this were using terms about seeing in individualization, yeah, and and certainly I think a lot of us fall back on cinematic interpretations of the inner minds, states and identity, and who we are but there's there's more going on there like I sometimes when I am more self conscious. What's going say is going on in my default mode network. It won't even be. Like, my visual world will be just wrapped up in whatever I'm doing. Say driving down the road but it's It's this non visual world that is wrapped up in like voices of the past and perceived you possible future. Would you like to think about death? And about all the ways in which you have failed exactly sort of thing you know and that, and they may be flashes of visualizations in there, but but but often not at least in my case, and of course in all the things. Things concerning the the inner mind. This is going to change from individual to individual. Yeah, totally and so today we are embarking on a multi part episodes series that we're going to be doing here on stuff to blow your mind looking at the general topic of psychedelics and most specifically I think with with a strong focus on the fungal domain there on on suicide and mushrooms and related species and compounds. Yeah, yeah, not only about two point earlier not only about what they to change and human perception. Perception and cognition, but what they reveal about human perception and cognition. Yeah, how they factor into our past how they factor into our present in how they may well factor into our future. Yeah, that's right now. I think maybe one thing that has pushed us in the direction as some books. We've been reading recently so maybe I should mention them at the top I know. We've both been reading Michael. Pollen's most recent book how to Change Your Mind. which is all about psychedelics about You know the the. The concept of of spirituality and mental life, and why this is so elucidated by an associated with psychedelic compounds right, and it is just an excellent book you know it's gotten rave reviews of for for for excellent reasons, it's one of these regan. Pick it up without knowing anything really about psychedelic culture or you know, or the know the nineteen sixties or or or botany, an ethnobotanist aid. You don't really have to have a background in any of these things and pollen as with his other major works. Really walks you through. It adds in personal experiences and is very much approaching it as an older individual who did not have a lot of experiences with psychedelic substance and I think it's very interesting and appropriate treatment, because a lot of what I've at least learned recently about psychedelics makes it seem like psychedelics, maybe of much greater use of much greater interest, actually to older, more mature people, dealing with thoughts of life and death in the meaning of life, and all that then as say as it is often presented as sort of a party drug to. Experience Teenagers Right Yeah I. Think Carolina was P-. Pollen said this or quoting somebody. Else's saying that psychedelics are wasted on the young. It might have been Carl Young was it? Carl Young said that okay. Politics countering with quoting young on that, but but yeah, I can see there being an argument that to a certain extent. However, that's not to discount the possible benefits to younger individuals as well but we'll get it all that as we proceed well I, just think it seems very plausible to me that it's actually much more useful in general for older people to be given. Given tools to win. They're doing that mental introspection looking through the window into their own mind to have the tools to see more clearly, what's inside and to go in and move the furniture around right or to sort of knock the barnacles off the hull of the ship? because that's that's one way of looking at it is just the the younger vessel may have fewer barnacles. or or at least a? People when you're younger, perhaps you were you fortunate enough privileged enough to not have that many psychic barnacles that need to be dislodged or could conceivably be dislodged, etc, yeah, though despite everything. We're saying right now. I, also want to make clear that are approach over these following episodes. It's going to be mainly a sort of like a descriptive and analytical discussion, not one where we are advocating any sort of personal course of action, so we're not gonNA. Tell you to take psychedelics. We're not going to tell you not to take psychedelics. That's not our goal instead. We want to talk about what they can do and what they mean right, but in addition to mentioning Pollen's book, another important book that I haven't read, but you have and I've read about is a book by terrence. McKenna that I know you've been enjoying greatly. Which I think is out in Maybe you might say on less solid footing or little squishy territory, but is also very interesting. Well. Yeah, one thing about about of the gods is first of all. It's nineteen ninety-three book, so a lot of time has passed since came out, and then also it is, it is kind. kind of a mixture so McKenna brings his background and Ethno Botany Ecology and an understanding of Shamanism into this this book and he's ultimately making a rather grand hypothesis that that all talk about here in a bit but yeah you, I feel like with with the food of the gods one has to be a little bit choosy, and what what you really like. Grab onto, but but he has a lot of very interesting things to say. Some wonderful insight still stands up to this day, but it is a book that I think needs to be appreciated alongside aside other sources especially today. Especially in the kind of perspective, we tend to present on the show I feel like there's a lot of great literature in the realm of Psychedelia that falls into this category where it's stuff written by people who are genuine experts. You know really do know what they're talking about. In the realm, of Psychic psychedelic compounds, the chemistry. The botany, the cultural practices, and all that and have great things to say on those subjects, but then also tend to be prone I would say much more often than people in other subject domains to kind of get out into highly speculative and even seemingly supernatural territory right, so you have that tendency, but also just the the the post nineteen sixties, taboo aspect of the subject where for for as well, we'll discuss for decades It was not something that was accepted area of study. He was left the fringes and the counter culture, and so there was a lot of baggage there. The both of those those things can sort of hurting individuals work in this area, but in other sort of compelling inspiration for these episodes when I attended the the recent World Science Festival in New York. There was a panel on psychedelics is well Oh. Yeah, when Eduardo cone was on. Yes, cone was on here. This is where I learned about him in his work, plus a few other individuals that will discuss as we proceed. So obviously, we've covered psychedelics unstoppable bill your mind. Numerous times in the past discussing, LSD suicide Ben as well as such counterculture figures as Tom is Timothy leary and John C Lilly,.

Pollen Carl Young McKenna Robert Lamb McCormack New York Eduardo cone Ethno Botany Ecology regan Carolina LSD Michael terrence John C Lilly Timothy leary Tom
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:16 min | 9 months ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"This term must have been around here in the sixties. And it apparently wasn't. The term is widely used now, but it didn't seem to emerge until German author, Ernst younger used it in nineteen in the one, thousand, nine, hundred seventy, and it was subsequently picked up by various occultist ethnobotanist, and now it's become you know sort of a standard and really quite useful term for describing various twentieth or twenty century. Individuals like say John C Lilly Terence McKenna people who were explorers in the realm of the mind..

John C Lilly Terence McKenna Ernst
"john c lilly" Discussed on The Best of Stuff

The Best of Stuff

06:41 min | 9 months ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on The Best of Stuff

"Yeah you often see this in the the names of fictitious characters part of this has been a Harry Potter kick at the House. And so the the names. Jackie Rolling uses know. I feel like they line up with this rather well. You know like a severance snake just drips it. It feels and sounds like the the the individual it is it hisses like a slithering yeah slithering itself exactly. Yeah but I mean there is something going on here. I think like if you're not building in yellow journalism entirely out of root words that have semantic meanings. I mean it's a different thing to go with like malapropism where that's built out of root words from another language that have some kind of meaning already. You wouldn't be able to tell what deputy means just by looking at the word right right doesn't doesn't have a semantic suggestion unless you've heard it explained to you or hurt it. Used so to what extent is possible. Idia phonic residue guide the choice of words being linked to concepts like that. I mean thinking about it in my head. Idi Deep not the eighty part of it somehow. Sounds like the concept to me. What brings to mind. Itty-bitty brings months smallness so it's like a small small depth like that's kind of a stretch. It's not there's no you can't really get there by analyzing Actual Grammar right right. Because any BITTY itty bitty even in Webster's I don't know it's very much sling itsy-bitsy I'm not even sure where that comes. From itty-bitty I don't know deputy just in terms of in examples of have invented terminology This is what I was thinking about recently cycle. Not Oh that's great because when you when you hear it. I mean it's composed out of the out of the Greek so you. It's easy to assume that this has been with us a very long time but it is more like Malapropism. It's built out of routes that do have meanings that you could identify. Yes yeah because I clearly. It's drawing from the popular use of say astronaut which means starsailor cosmonaut universe sailor. And of course you have the the argonauts of Greek myth who were simply sailors in the vessel Argo. But not. When I was looking into it I was thinking okay. This term must have been around during the sixties and it apparently wasn't the term is widely used now but it didn't seem to emerge until German author Ernst younger used it in nineteen in the one thousand nine hundred seventy and it was subsequently picked up by various occultist ethnobotanist. And now it's become you know sort of a standard and really quite useful term for describing various twentieth or twenty first century individuals. Say John C Lilly or Terence McKenna. People who were explorers in the realm of the mind. Yeah Yeah but also but also drawing in that sort of astronaut Motif of one of one who goes out by going in and then Joe. I know you want to discuss the FAG miser. Oh right this comes for. This is one of our favorites. It's come up on stuff to blow your mind a lot So the FAGGOT. Miser is something that was coined as a joke in Gary Larson cartoon it refers to the arrangement of spikes on the tail of a Stegosaurus And it This others Gary Larson. Far Side cartoon where a caveman is apparently teaching a class in pointing to a picture like a slide projector slide of one of these things and says now this end is called the Faggot Fag Simmons which wonderful. Yeah so this was eventually picked up by actual paleontologists who found this hilarious because prior to this didn't have a name for the Spike Tao's just the spike tail of the SARS or some other type of Stegosaur. And when you when you start breaking down how Vaga miser would even work as a word in crazy because okay we have fad bag. Is the name of the Caveman victim of the dinosaur. Your proper Noun there right and then we come to a miser. Oem Is Er and this is just nonsense because yes you do have some English words that end with arm. Eiser but their words like random eiser economize customize your atomised and these all our root words that themselves Indian arm like Adam and then we get atomised there so where does the Um come in on the eiser. Part of makes more sense. Because I guess it's Kinda like with tenderizer brings is so if you'll allow us to further Is Here. It is just an old suffix Like a long established suffix that The turns That allows us to make a noun or adjective into a verb. And then this can in turn be made into a noun so I just Entomologist I am the Etymology is her which is not a real word but could be okay. Extrapolate into it and you could follow the trails back to real words FAG miser. If we are stretching would at best mean a thing that turns one into fag. Symon makes no sense and yet at the same time the joke still works like I mean clearly a worked it was picked up because unofficial name for this part of the dinosaur think official now. Is it official? Oh Yeah I mean. I think it's used in scientific publications. Oh well this sounds good enough to me so clearly. It works when we hear it even though it doesn't when you dissect it linguistically it's just nonsense but we buy into it. I guess fag was perhaps atomised or tinder is by the spiked tail and that is weirdly relayed in the term Vaga miser even though it's just kind of a distorted echo of actual language. Unfortunately I think we're GONNA have to call it here for today. We're we're running out of studio time But Yeah we We will be back with part two of our series on invented words here. I'm having a lot of fun. Yeah yeah this is. This.

Gary Larson Fag Simmons official Jackie Rolling Harry Potter Idi Deep Vaga John C Lilly Webster Stegosaur Ernst Terence McKenna Oem Joe Symon Adam
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Source. This is the books that were recovered from his stolen collection so we're gonna talk probably a lot throughout the course of these episodes about. He had this infamously huge library. Oh oh yeah and it was ransacked at one point in some of those books have been recovered and he wrote extensive annotations in their margin so some <hes> d- scholars i guess go and find these copies and read those annotations to try to learn more about him. Apparently much of that library now resides with the royal college of physicians. I think in england yes so it's it's kind of difficult to tell truth from fiction in some of these cases and robert we did our best when we read something that sounded really strange to corroborate with multiple sources and we did find that but then again like those oh sources were all mainly coming from these own writings that's right there of course the number of wonderful books out there on d. and his work <hes> some books with with with different focuses than others. <hes> one book that i kept looking at was the one by benjamin woolley yeah the queen's conjure excellent book very readable. I recommend that to anybody but yeah. This is a guy that is really in many ways and you're unbelievable character truly stranger than fiction like take it if alan moore wrote him into a story you chalk it up to well. That's just alan moore's wonders imagination and use of fictional and historic and pop culture hybridization the same if he had appeared in an umberto eco book might be tempted to think oh this is a fantastic creation this doctor but but no he this was a real oh real man he he lived he wrote and i'm not sure there has been anyone quite like him since we see parallels in some of the figures that we've covered on the show will and are planning to cover such as john c lilly or jack parsons right but the kind of stands alone yeah. It's funny that you mentioned allen more because one of the sources that i went to was a a history channel special that aired in two thousand and two and it was narrated by brian cox. Oh it's all about john dis life and alan. Moore is one of the go-to experts that someone you know they cut to him every once in a while and you hear that out in move voice face he really noses stuff about d. I imagined because because alan moore is really into sort of like the history of english magic and stuff like that outside of his own fiction but yeah he that i first of all i recommend like if you're really john. Check out this video i watched it on youtube and some of it's hilarious and some of it's really the <hes> illuminating but there's daylight do that thing that the history channel is to do where they like reenact scenes of a person's life with actors and they have like kind in a makeshift low budget like sets and stuff so like shadowy scenes of somebody dressed john d. shuffling papers around that thing like him looking into a crystal ball or i'm just walking across a field yeah so i think probably the best way for us to to really i introduce you to john d is let's just do a broad stroke overview of his life. We've given you sort of the the two sentence summary of who john d..

alan moore john d john c lilly john d. benjamin woolley youtube john england brian cox robert allen jack parsons
"john c lilly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"A depression recovery and therefore right now you have some people using demand you have some people using selous ivan what happens when they're six or seven available medicines that we can use and how do we skillfully <hes> identify which is the best likelihood for success for that that person to support the healing that they need. I have a very interesting question. I think it's just i know you'll find it interesting since you. <hes> are a regular <hes> participant just been of sensory deprivation. Do you think that flotation or sensory deprivation to <hes> will be used in this process to prepare the mind in these clinics a hundred percent. It has to be done well and it has to be done. Save <hes> you know we've talked about in the past that the flotation tank was developed by john c lilly was was using ketamine at the time he was exploring both and he put them together and then he realized well. You can really serve some really deep landscapes. That's not necessarily safe to. I put somebody in an altered state in a flotation tank straight away so what it would do is likely be used as a preparation tool so that people can get ready for that kind of experience <hes> explore the darkness so to speak that happens in a tank and then start to work with some of their core fears will also abused as an integration tools when people come out of an experience to be able to really integrated at understand <hes> what they experienced and what lessons they continue yeah well and i say dr you say darkness darkness and beautiful experiences because you know the flow tank is an amazing thing it really is. I don't want anyone to fear it. It's true yeah. The literal darkness experiences a really good delineation since so many people are afraid of the dark. I know i was that's one of the reasons i picked the tanks that i did. They were not the pods they were the more open ones from float away and you know you could even put two in the tank at a time if you wanted to which just to ease yourself into it. That was one of the reasons. I made that decision as well <hes> but let me ask you this. We only have about a minute. We're can people find credible information about psychedelics and get more information on psychedelic alike assisted psychotherapy great question great one to leave off on so that people can educate themselves and know what we're speaking about here so number one or the websites maps dot org dot org o._r._g. <hes> the hefty institute h. e. f. t. r. dot org <hes> the third wave. Steve is another good library of information in like ten to twelve different psychedelic medicines and that's the third wave dot c._o. And then i e sears is a european organisation. I e r s dot o._r._g. All right all right. That was perfect timing because we've gotta go. Thank you so much. Dr dan ingle always a pleasure. Everyone you get one body. You get one mind and you get one life. Get out there today and make the most of it..

john c lilly selous Dr dan ingle sears ketamine Steve hundred percent
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Of cities and and everything you know is growing green again and we're Liz like a new Eden on earth. All you know sort of a you know the highly optimistic <hes> sort of hippy kind of ideas which one might expect but then he calls for a win year moratorium on L._S._D.. Usage and this is because of the changing legal status of of <hes> of L._S._D.. And <hes> on on the heels of all these various <hes> legal problems that he's encountering and in Greenfield points out that this was quote a calculated strategy to curry favor with the establishment with the current level of Elliott L._S._d.. Use In America America having reached epidemic proportions. Tim wanted to restore his own credibility by becoming the man with a solution to the problem. Yeah I mean I think this is really where we start seeing that he unfortunately made. Decisions for his own wellbeing over the decisions that may have you know helped highlight what these psychedelics were capable of any kind of medical or mental health prospect right in any really was self serving yeah now you mentioned how he said we can use all alternate methods right well. He told he told everyone well if you've used L._S._d.. Then you maybe don't need it anymore. You can use alternate methods and if you don't alternate methods I'll teach you you know this is a search. Is I bet scenario. where I feel like? LEARY is correct. You know we know that there are other ways to to have hallucinatory experiences including meditation including things like with Yoga so he's actually correct here. You know his whatever his <hes> his exact <hes> motivations aside. You know he's saying yeah you can you can have some sort of heightened sense of <hes> of being you can you can have a this alternate experience without the use of this substance. That's becoming problematic now. He even goes on to testify before the Senate in nineteen sixty six on the nature of L._S._D.. And but this turns out to be a rather lackluster performance so he he wasn't very assertive and there's it's I was reading them the into the back and forth here and there's just like a lot of stuff where he makes a statement and then they're asking him is that is being metaphorical or is that a little statement and they spend in time discussing that they talk about Hell L._S._d.. Might theoretically be controlled in some fashion <hes> but ev everyone was pretty disappointed with how it came out like he basically this was a point where leary could really stand up and be the the positive optimistic hosted voice of the of the counterculture and speak for four this substance and speak for its research potential and he wasn't able to come through. I just imagined like people like John C Lilly or Sasha Shotgun warlike just sitting at home. I'm like faced a palmed. Oh like man like you were supposed to be the one made this accessible for the rest of us and now we're all screwed. Also I'm really glad twitter wasn't around when Timothy Leary was alive. Can you imagine he he would have been insufferable on twitter problem all right. This is also around the time where he gives his infamous nineteen sixty six playboy interview this came up in every single article. I read about him so I went and I pulled the actual text. Read the interview. This was men playboy must've spent a lot of money on the sheets of paper that they printed this interview on because it was a novel <hes> He makes really outrageous..

Timothy Leary twitter Liz America Greenfield John C Lilly Senate Tim Elliott Yoga
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"In fact, you know, there are a lot of people who would make the case including somebody. We've had on the show in the past friends that evolved that a lot of the distinctions we try to make it really separate a humans and other animals by some hard line of division. The lines a lot blurrier than you might think. But one thing he sort of made allowances for is maybe language that we that is the closest thing we've got to like a real edge on other animals and. And so how come we can talk and other hominids can't well Morgan claims that the difference between a human and a gorilla is not in the speech producing organs of the throat and the lungs, but in the ability to consciously control the use of breath. And this is interesting to me because I think I've asked this on the show before, but why are some body processes controlled entirely by the unconscious nervous system, while others are conscious and others can be toggle on and off between conscious and unconscious control. Like, you can't consciously toggle on and off your digestion or your heartbeat or your metabolism. But even though most of the time, your breathing is unconscious and automatic. You can take it over with your executive control and consciously Talgo your breath on and off if you want to like what causes this difference. Yeah. I mean, if memory serves me correctly thinking back to our John C Lilly episode. Roads in the past dolphins have such manual control over their breathing that they can arguably decided to just shut it down and to drown themselves. Well, yeah. Well, I mean that would be an example that would sort of go with her hypothesis, right? The idea is that the only reason we would be able to evolve this conscious control of our breath is if our past ancestors were shaped by selection pressure that favored the ability to like, hold the breath and dive underwater, she says this would explain a lot. I do think that's a really interesting question of why we can do that. I'm not sure I'm going to go along with her on this being a an exclusively human and aquatic mammal trade because I don't know I've seen videos of dogs, diving deep underwater and other mammals doing that it seems that they have some kind of ability to hold their breath, and they're not semi-aquatic mammals. Yeah. I would agree with that. Okay. Another thing. She says how about hydrodynamics we are. Anatomically streamlined, you think about Why's the human body, basically a straight line. Why are we sort of dart shaped we can dive smoothly into the water? She says, quote, tried to imagine a guerilla diving into water. I I think I've seen it done in a cartoon. But that's about it..

Morgan John C Lilly executive
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"A fascinating figure who's also come up on the on the podcast before because he worked briefly with John C Lilly, but varies. Yeah. Is crazy story there? Go back and listen to that episode. If you want the details on that. But he was also tied to Wiki watchi- and really had quite a career outside of of the creature from the black lagoon yet, did you know that Rico Browning directed the underwater scenes that go on for thirty seven hours in Thunderball. I read that the other day, but I I wasn't aware of it previously. No, oh my God. What was the last time? You saw Thunderball. I was a child watching on TV. Okay. Yes. One of those Sean Connery bond. So it has parts that are kind of fun. But the underwater fight scenes are just in term in of bull. Go on forever. But they're I'm sure they're very well choreographed, especially for the time. I mean shooting underwater back in the fifties and sixties it was not easy. Yeah. I mean, if you accept them on their own terms, they're kinda marvelous. It's just they don't necessarily match up to. To modern, cinematic, pacing standards. I guess another thing that's kind of interesting to me about the creature from the black lagoon that Weaver mentions in his commentaries the creature has a lot of monsters. I view shots. And this is contrasted to some of the earlier universal monster movies and some of the other movies that Allen Jack Arnold had done. I'm not sure if that's as anything interesting about how they thought of the creature, but there is a lot in how the story was created. And in how it's filmed that does to me make the creature kind of a sad melancholy sympathetic sort of character. Unlike say, Dracula who is a predatory demon right arrives to you know, to to consume people's souls and kill them and turn them into his servants the creature from the black lagoon is a is a sad creature. Who Denver really I mean like he lives in the black lagoon people come in invade his territory. And then they start messing with him and attacking him, and and he fights bag. No. Of course, he does try to kidnap. Julia Dems, the leading lady in the movie presumably because he's wild by her beauty. And so it's King Kong kind of thing. You know, he he falls in love and wants to carry her off to his cave. But you often get the sense in the creature from the black lagoon movies that the real villains are like the human heroes. Oh, yeah. Definitely. I mean, I think this is something I picked up on as a kid is, especially the more. I learned about an ultimately when I saw the third film, the creature walks among us because in this one they've captured the creature horribly burned it in the process, and then they treat the creature and there's this. There's this hokey scientific explanation basically Lamarque in evolution where the the the creatures scales. Follow and it has human flesh underneath and it's becoming more, ma'am. Like, and they're all these disad scenes of the this now land creature St.. Standing in this little enclosed area surrounded by barbed wire longing for the sea. But he can't even go back to the because it will drown does and all these films. The especially the the white leads in the film like there never really imperil like they're always in control the creature just lumbers about. And the only reason I it's able to to grab the ladies because she just stands there and screams instead of like walking away from it right yet. Generally, the the human lead characters in these films are just not very sympathetic. They're usually just coming into this, monsters domain or not. I mean, it's a creature. They're coming into the creature's domain and there in the second movie, they even they fish for the creature with dynamite the dynamite in the black lagoon it blows him up. And he floats to the surface stunned, then they take him and they put him in a tank at SeaWorld and chain him to the bottom. And there's a great scene where somebody goes, I hope that chain holds and the other guy goes, I wouldn't worry about that chain. So you see him like suffering and struggling and pulling it chain. Eventually he gets free. And this is in then runs around and yet again, it's like the heroes of the movie or the real villains. It reminds me a lot of the late..

John C Lilly Julia Dems Denver Allen Jack Arnold Sean Connery bond Rico Browning SeaWorld Weaver Dracula King Kong thirty seven hours
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Perhaps they even know something about the LSD and they're definitely talking about the flooded dolphin cohabitation apartment that becomes a major project toward the end of cri says, this is actually, I don't know about this particularly, but I know that he pitched an idea that basically there needed to be some kind of living space that humans and dolphins could coexist within the communicate. Is this his attempt at that? Yeah, it's, I mean, in a lot of credit has to go to scientists Margaret, how love it, who was actually the woman who lived with the dolphins and she, she later wrote a book are. Articles came out about her experience, a great guardian article actually title dolphin, who loved me. Okay. And she comes up to lily with the idea like she's already researching dolphins, so she's drawn his activities here and according to her in the guardian p she says, maybe it was because I was living so close to the lab. It just seems so simple. Why let the water get in the way? So I said to John Lilly, I want to plaster everything and fill this place with water. I want to live here so it was she of scuba suit on or was it just was a shallow enough that she could wait around basically waterproof this whole living area. They made a flexible apartment. Okay, so that she could live there with the dolphin? Oh, four months of eventu-. Eventually I talked about it being a three month period that I, it ended up being a six month period where she was living with this stall in handpick dolphin named Peter in an attempt to teach him Inc. She was going to teach him to speak English. The idea here in that lily bought into was that she would be there just constantly as this kind of mother figure that they would have this chance to to bond in a way that human dolphin had not previously am assuming like she must have approached this linguistic effort, I guess, like using the same basis for which we teach young humans language, right? Yeah, that's my understanding very much. It was like a an adult human attempting to child human, how to speak. Okay. With the some added complications that end up being important later on in that they helped scandalise the work here, right? But dolphins are pretty can be pretty sexual creatures. So yeah. Yeah, I've heard story. This is probably where a lot of people are familiar with the story. Okay. Because she would occasionally have to help relieve help dispense Peter of his sexual urges. Let's say in order to keep the work going. Okay. She says, that's the way she approached approaching anon- from a sexual vantage point, but it was this is a part of how Peter bays is a dolphin. Uh-huh. We needed to sort of get that out of the way so we can continue working on language. Okay. Well, yeah, I could see where that would be quite scandalous. It's one thing to posit that a dolphin is on a sort of equal identity status, individ individualistic status with human being. It's another thing to start engaging with them what people would consider bestiality. Yeah, to get into a weird area here, we have to sort of explain yourself out of that attempt to explain yourself out of that to your backers or by nineteen seventy. Five. Actually, hustler magazine comes out with an article about it. Didn't they completely scandalized. Love it in and the experiment. They had some sort of provocative illustration and made it sound like like, love it and lily were just engaged in a, you know, a pan species free for all their something. Criticisms of this experiment aside clearly wasn't the point they were. They were trying to teach this creature to speak English. They were trying to to bridge this gap between the species and it, but it did get into some pretty weird area. This sounds like another like we should add this to our our little document of ideas. The sounds like a great thing that we should cover for a future episode is like how much animal sexuality gets in the way of human animal experimentation and end like this can't be the first time or only time that's happened. Yeah. Or the last. So what's a u turn when it's a y. o. u. turn. It's a moment of life transformations, which sounds exciting and it is. But if we're being honest transformation is also scary and uncomfortable, switching careers, leaving a relationship. Relocating having your first kid becoming an empty nester just starting or just starting over no matter the change..

Peter Margaret LSD John Lilly Peter bays cri hustler magazine eventu y. o. u. turn four months three month six month
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Cybernetic concepts in pursuit of his his breakthrough communicate. With dolphins. He employed quote, information theory bound up with first order Cybernetics operated with the heuristic computational metaphors alongside the actual computers of his era. So that actually speaks to my my question from earlier about bring computer interfaces. It sounds like he did have quite a bit of influence on BCI. Yes, it sounds like he did. Yeah, he was, you know, basically any area he applied himself to. He managed to influence that discipline sometimes in a positive reaction sometimes in a negative direction as well as well as gust, but but in all this to were getting into this problem of projection. Right. Oh, yeah. You mean like actual vocal projection? No, no, actually like projecting well, maybe to a certain extent, but also, you know, projecting your consciousness onto another creature. Oh, okay. Okay. As Clark points out in his paper projection short circuits, a proper understanding of what others are thinking or meaning. Convey when they make a community communicated offer. So that projection goes, it's a problem when we try and communicate with each other. Oh yeah, I'm not. I'm not communicating solely with you. I'm communicating with a version of you have in my mind, my expectations of you, and then the kind of feedback you provide as well. It's the inherent problem of of human communication. Yeah, and through a series of feedback and feed forward, we try to clear up like various psychological noise that gets in the middle there, understanding of what one another saying. But yeah, it's it's kind of like the human dilemma. Right? Is that like we're, we're never going to fully be able to, at least you know, with just our voices communicate what's going on inside our head to one another. Yeah, Lilly really wanted to get past that. Yeah, and but one of the problems of course is that he the spied scientific background and all of the the vigorous throwing into this, he's seems to always be working with the certainty that can. Communication can truly be established that not only is he reaching out, but they're reaching out to us. He said, quote, we must keep the working hypothesis in mind that they are highly intelligent and are just as interested in communicating with us is we are with them. So that's a potential stumbling block to your your efforts here because you already have it firmly established in your mind that this can be done. This connection is there to me made. I mean, the again, the intelligence of dolphins is in doubt, but to work with that kind of certainty with the kind of certainty that they reflect our desire to communicate as well. That's problematic. Yeah. And certainly I can imagine where that is where he starts to have some bling blocks with funders like the navy, for instance, in the air force or just any like even them right. Like when you start postulating that your test subjects are on an equal playing field with humanity and should be. Treated as such that's going to be immediately problematic for them, right? Because it's outside of their world understanding, but it also doesn't fit their agenda. Yeah, in word of these experiments and some of his methods and ideas, they're leaking out. He has some researchers that are leaving him and working exclusively for the navy, perhaps whispering about his his excessive use of the 'isolation tank..

navy BCI Clark Lilly
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"He turns increasingly to the flotation tank and intend to to achieve this pipes in hydrophone recordings of their sounds, and eventually to he starts using LSD and this is where it's all coming together. Right? Yeah. They seem like very disparate things. When you say dolphins isolation, tanks, LSD, but he's combining all of these things together. Yeah, ended the time, it's legal. He's able to get it through his, his connections, his clearance. He's getting totally on the board and beginning nineteen sixty four. He also is injecting it into the dolphins to see what kind of a fact it will. It will how didn't know that really? And this is pretty standard for the time. This is the time when there were a lot of LSD experiments going on, and we were putting LSD into the bodies of various animals and test of us to see how they responded. And apparently they did not really respond to LSD which he was kind of disappointed with, but he kept taking it. He kept going, yeah, he could. He could understand their minds. Yeah. So one of the things that I read when researching him and I hadn't really realized this, you do remember video game called echo the dolphin. Yeah, I do fatally remember it. I didn't play it. I talked to Joe about it, our co host and he did play it. Apparently the whole game was centered around lily his research in his sort of philosophy. Yeah, it had no idea. It apparently gets really psychedelic as it continues. I only ever played the. I level. So I have a very service level understanding of something. Joe said it was something to the effect that like there's even like an alien sort of over mind that causes the events on earth that make echo the dolphin half to try to go through this gammit of psychedelic levels. Save the world. That's cool. Yeah. So it cri we continue to see him doing what he's always done. He's using the best technology, various methodologies and attempt to achieve is his goal here. So for instance, he uses state of the art code, breaking computers attempt to crack the code of dolphin vocals, ation patterns, and as as Bruce Clark points out in his communication plus one paper from two thousand fourteen John, Lilly the mind of the dolphin and communication out of bounds. He says, lily mobilized the best available tools, a cutting edge array of.

LSD Joe Bruce Clark John lily Lilly
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Gregory Bateson and the US navy and an him and lily were all kind of influenced by the research that was going on at the center in Lilly pitched human dolphin communication to NASA at the time saying that if they were going to encounter aliens, this is the perfect way for them to sort of come up with a model of communication standards with an alien intelligence yet to to make sense, right. If you're attempting to communicate with a has a different yet equal form of consciousness. Yeah. And this could conceivably be an experiment in that, and you can see now where they have the dolphin came from. I don't know what year that came out. I want to say it was early seventies, maybe, but if you've never seen the movie before it involves the George C, Scott as John C, Lilly. They both had season middle character teaching dolphins to speak English. They can speak English, and I believe it's on behalf of the US government. And you know, they say things like fall of Pau, right? Like. Pau pawn, and I think he names them all things that rhyme with Pau because it's easier for them to pronounce or whatever. It's kind of silly movie, but it's also a little bit touching away. So yeah, the the book is a huge success inspires these movies. It's the idea to spills spreads like wildfire. And this was a period again, the fifties and sixties during which fascination with the underwater world is really taking off. This is the time of the scuba really, really exploding. Jacques Cousteau is making a big name for himself. Yeah, it's the time of c hunt and in nineteen sixty three. Of course. You see the television show flipper. Yeah, a mainstream television show about an intelligent dolphin that communicates human. Yeah, and this is where we come back to our connections to the creature from the black lagoon. Oh, yeah, hit me. So I kind of forgotten this, but that TV series flipper. Yeah, was based on a nineteen sixty three film of the same name. Okay. A film co create. Hated by recu Browning. Okay. Recoup Browning worth at marine studios, which we mentioned earlier where where lily initially went down to study dolphins and Browning actually portrayed the creature from the black lagoon in the first two films. So lillies actually the guy wearing the rubber suit. He was a guy in the earth's to creature. Okay. And and again, he co created flipper and lily is actually thanked in the credits to the nineteen sixty three film flipper. So that's nuts. Wow. Okay. Well, yeah, and it also makes me think of the film version of twenty thousand leagues into the sea was made around that time to probably right. I don't know the specific date on that. But yeah, there is that fascination with sort of undersea adventure. Yeah, it's opening up to us in ways that it just had not been previously available. And so we're, we're fascinated with this new world down there and then to to to also have this potential revelation late on our plate that there is an Intel. Silence down there more or less on par with our own. I wonder what John C Lilly thought of the abyss. I don't know. That would have been interesting. Yeah, that's probably in a way that's very lily movie isn't in so studies at the centre continue again, lillies approached gradually moves away from the sort of creepy world of them is work and into less invasive techniques, abandons the use of electrodes, and instead attempts to essentially meld minds with the dolphins to understand the shape of their consciousness..

John C Lilly Pau lily recu Browning US Jacques Cousteau Gregory Bateson Recoup Browning NASA Intel George C John C marine studios Scott twenty thousand leagues
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Yes, there's this feeling that he's getting here that the not only is he reaching out to them to make communication, but they are reaching out to us and he has to meet them in the middle. He has to find a way to make this connection. In towards that end he starts documenting what he thinks is dolphin language. And you know, I think that it's it's fairly well-documented at this point that we know that there is such a thing. He learned one phrase in dolphin language that he reported back to time in nineteen sixty, and it was what he called. There May Day distress call and he describes it as sounding like a wolf whistling, which I don't. I don't know that that's necessarily a description that immediately calls a sound to my mind, but maybe Lilley was in countering more wolves than I do on a daily basis. But he specifically noted that this happened when he put a paralyzed dolphin in a pool. So one thing I wanna stop and ask is why would you do that? He puts this paralyzed dolphin in the pool, right? The dolphin sinks to the bottom and immediately starts crying out with this midday distress call while lily says the other dolphins all came to its rescue and pushed it back to the surface so that it could continue breathing. Maybe he, he speculated that that was gonna. Happen in this kind of test of their, I guess, like bond together, but it just again, I was like, wow, like. Despite his fascination in love for these animals, he's willing to let one potentially drown. Yeah. I mean, part of this I think is that he's, he's certainly working within the the scientific atmosphere of the day towards test animals of the day, and you can probably talk a bit of it to his. You know, his, his laser focused of vision, which we certainly saw during his days and continues to a certain extent with the dolphins it, it sounds from from the research, I was reading the his, his work with the dolphins, definitely got less invasive. He got further and further away from the sort of the the harder stuff of the nimh days, but but he was still at time sort of accused of of having an occasional cavalier attitude towards the test dolphins. I think though that that sort of phases out over time, but not a year later after this time thing, that's when he published his big dolphin. Book, right? Yes, nineteen sixty one man in dolphin adventures of a new scientific frontier. And this book just really becomes a big deal. Not only researchers not only scientists in the neck next, but just the general public are eating this book up, and I'm just gonna read you a quick sample from so you can get just an idea of some of the things he's talking about in his book. He's documenting his work with dolphins thus far, but he's also talking about where he thinks this work can take us. He said, quote, eventually it may be possible for humans to speak with another species. I've come to this conclusion after careful consideration of evidence game through my research experiments with dolphins, if new scientific developments are to be made in this direction. However, certain changes in our basic orientation orientation and philosophy will be necessary. So he's talking about just a game changing development here. He's talking about. He discusses us reaching the point where we, we teach dolphins to speak English to speak English. Yeah. And to even have. To create a chair for them on the United Nations. So you know, this is talking about finding an alien intelligence here on our planet and and and communing with them communicating with them and actually inviting them into our rule of the world. And he's clearly going into his own soul searching to. We like compare this with the history of his life. You know? I mean, I think he he had like a very personal reason for feeling so strongly about this given the way that he had experimented on these animals. Previously, he goes from that to thinking that they should be part of the United Nations end end up by the sixties. This is when he's publishing academic papers, galore showing the dolphins can mimic all kinds of human speech patterns by clicking squeaking in rasping, and he even talked. There's this British, I got the impression from the article. I read that this British anthropologist was a big deal at the time is name is gr-..

Lilley United Nations lily
"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"john c lilly" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"This, we're going to turn back to dolphins. I feel like we've, we've set everything up to continue Lilly's journey. We're going to around nineteen fifty eight. This is when lily presents a paper before the American psychiatric association. Any makes some rather dramatic claims about the intelligence and abilities of the bottlenose dolphins. Specifically, the evidence that he cites apparent is arguably scant and anecdotal, but it resonated pretty strongly and resonated with the right people. So soon you had prestigious federal research awards rolling in and he uses these funds to build a dedicated dolphin laboratory on Saint Thomas in the US Virgin Islands, the communication research institute or cri. Yeah. In the most fascinating thing that you added to these notes is that at its height, this institute under lillies guy. Guidance was receiving half a million dollars a year in grant money exploded Razi, especially when you consider what half a million dollars was worth back then. Right? That's nuts that he was getting that much support. And it sounds like during this time he he had a home in Miami, sounded like he'd become fairly acclimated to Florida and right liked it a lot there, but he had the lab in Saint Thomas, and there is this really interesting nineteen sixty time magazine piece that I was able to pull. And it's this kind of fascinating like feature piece on on him. They describe him as a deep chested suntanned neurophysiologist. I like that that that must be where the idea for the George C, Scott character dolphin came from. But at the time that they came to visit him time magazine, that is he was working on an elaborate system of jetties pools at the center. The idea was that he was trying to learn about dolphin sonar for the navy. They were paying for the expenses of this construction in the idea was that they, they felt that dolphin's sonar was better than their own capabilities at the time. They wanted to figure out a way to. Verse engineer and mimic, yes, the the navy was definitely one of the interested parties that was won over by his his arguments for dolphin intelligence, dolphin abilities. I mean, he had some some convincing evidence, like you said, it wasn't all like a perfect, but when he he must have been a very charismatic guy. I'm oh, yeah. Because when he he gives these presentations people just fall head over heels for it. I mean, you hear it in his voice and you'll actually hear his voice at the end of this podcast. Like one of the things that I think he convinced the navy with was by dissecting dolphin brains. You know, we talked about this earlier. They're bigger than human brains obviously, but they also have as complicated cerebral cortex. And so this is when he starts planting electrodes in the dolphin brains, kind of along the same lines of what we were talking about the Monkees earlier, trying to stimulate their pleasure centers specifically with electric city. And this is the weirdest like this. Grossed me out this quote from the time magazine article. He said, when he first stimulated their pleasure centers with electrodes, the muscles around their blowhole smiled. That is the weirdest like, I don't know why just squeaks me out like the idea of a little smile for around and the, but the dolphins got like its head, peel scalp peeled back with all these electrodes wired into it, whatever the case, the dolphins loved it. In fact, there's an apparatus that he used to sort of train them with it. They could give themselves the electrical jolt and they did it so much that they became addicted to it. And this is this is this is a different story from what I you. You mentioned earlier, I in this nineteen sixty piece. They say, this is where he first encountered the dolphins mimicking human speech. He says that apparently maybe he's just, you know, the s them during an interview or something, but he says an apparatus broke down one day at the Saint Thomas laboratory, and he had left a tape recorder running and he heard a Donald Duck, like voice on tape recorder. Later on that was imitating him saying the words, three hundred twenty three over and over again. And then he also said that the dolphins imitated the buzz of a transformer in the rattle of a movie camera that we're in the atmosphere in the same laboratory space..

navy time magazine Saint Thomas Donald Duck Saint Thomas laboratory American psychiatric associati Lilly lily Virgin Islands US Monkees Florida engineer Miami George C Scott million dollars one day