35 Burst results for "John Burnett"

Delta downgraded to tropical storm as it batters Louisiana

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:24 min | Last month

Delta downgraded to tropical storm as it batters Louisiana

"Hundreds of thousands of people are without power in the Gulf coast after Hurricane Delta slammed ashore in Louisiana last night. It hit with sustained winds of 100 MPH. And a 10 FT title Search. Delta made landfall in the same area ravaged by Hurricane Laura that pummeled the state just six weeks ago. NPR's John Burnett joins us from Lafayette, Louisiana, John, Thanks for being with us. When it's got You're hit hard where you were right? Any hard. Yeah. What was it like? What's the latest Delta came ashore right where forecasters said it would the Iowa across the little unincorporated Cajun village of Creole between like Charles and Lafayette. Thankfully, these air, mostly unpopulated areas known for their wildlife refuges in wetlands. We can't get out to see the damage yet, but it looks like the towns of like Arthur and Jennings and Crowley took a good whipping. And then there's like Charles, which took that directed from Hurricane in late August and was still recovering. And do we know anything about what it's like in Lake Charles today? Not yet. But thankfully, the storm took a course slightly east of Lake Charles and Delta was a Category two Still strong, but not a category four like Laura and like Charles was already in a world of trouble from that earlier hurricane Hundreds of houses had blue tarps on their rooftops where the earlier storm had blown away pieces of the house. Those were probably ripped off debris was piled in heaps on the curbs, and the wind could have scattered that all

Hurricane Delta Hurricane Laura Lake Charles Charles Hurricane Lafayette Louisiana John Burnett Delta Gulf NPR Arthur Iowa Crowley Jennings
Federal appeals court approves end to humanitarian protections for 300,000 immigrants

All Things Considered

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Federal appeals court approves end to humanitarian protections for 300,000 immigrants

"Court is clearing the way for the Trump administration to end humanitarian protections for some 300,000 immigrants living in the U. S who had fled dangerous conditions in their countries. NPR's John Burnett explains. The ruling could affect citizens from El Salvador, Haiti, Nicaragua in Sudan and possibly Honduras and Nepal.

El Salvador John Burnett NPR Haiti Nicaragua Honduras Sudan Nepal
Biden Pledges To Dismantle Trump's Sweeping Immigration Changes — But Can He Do That?

Morning Edition

05:24 min | 2 months ago

Biden Pledges To Dismantle Trump's Sweeping Immigration Changes — But Can He Do That?

"Joe Biden has pledged if he becomes president to dismantle the sweeping changes that President Trump has made to the US immigration system but could buy Don't do that. As NPR's John Burnett reports. It's easier said than done. People most closely watching to see if Biden defeats Trump and reverses. His immigration crackdown may be beyond our borders. Some 700 migrants languish in filthy tents pitched in a public park amid mud. Maps and clouds of mosquitoes. The encampment is in Matamoros, just across the Rio Grande from Brownsville, Texas. They're seeking asylum in the U. S. But stuck here under a Trump initiative known as remain in Mexico while they wait there closely following US presidential race, says Carlo Garcia, an asylum seeker from Honduras. They buy the place our hope in Joe Biden, who's the Democratic nominee because he would shoot the immigrants very differently than Trump has. We hope he will. And change is all of this Trump has created. This is discrimination and racism. Trump is touting that program's success here He is at a rally in Yuma, Arizona. Last tough. We don't want him here. We want him outside. We got sued all over the place. There. We won. So now they don't come into the United States taken Wait out. While the president claims to have restored a broken immigration system, human rights advocates are appalled that what they call the cruelty of his policies. Oh, Marge. Odd. Watt is director of the L Use Immigrants rights project. What the administration has sought to do is to simply turn off immigration and to do it unilaterally. By presidential edict without the approval of Congress. That project should be reversed. And that's exactly what Joe Biden pledges to do. His position paper on Immigration 51 bullet points over 22 pages seeks to roll back Trump's accomplishments and reenact Obama era policies. If I'm elected president, we're going to immediately and Trump's sold on dignity. Immigrant communities restore our moral state in the world are our historic rolls a safe haven for refugees and asylum seekers. Biden says no more border wall no more separating immigrant families, no more prolonged detentions or deportations of peaceable migrant workers. He would restore the asylum system and create a roadmap to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. It's a long to do list. I don't think it's realistic that Biden in four years could enroll everything that trump dead. Sarah Pierce and another analyst that the Migration Policy Institute, a nonpartisan thinktank recently catalog more than 400 executive actions Trump has taken on immigration. From heavier border and interior enforcement to restricting asylum to slashing refugee visas to creating remain in Mexico because of the intense volume and pace of change is the Trump administration enacted while in office. Even if we have a new administration, Trump will continue. Tio have had an impact on immigration for years to come. But Biden faces a host of obstacles that could slow his immigration counter revolution. First, there's the specter of renewed chaos at the southern border last year groups as large as 1000 Central Americans at a time. We're waiting across the Rio Grande into El Paso to request asylum. The Border Patrol was overwhelmed and ended up detaining families in primitive, unsanitary conditions. And no one wants a repeat of that. Ron Vitello, former deputy commissioner of customs and Border protection, worries that Biden will cancel bilateral agreements with Mexico that have dramatically slowed the migrant flow right now decided that they weren't going to continue to help us. You know, people would start coming through like we saw the caravans two springs ago. There's no reason that it wouldn't come back as fast as it Wass. NPR asked a senior advisor to the Biden campaign. What would happen if the new president gave migrants of Green light? The adviser said. They're cognizant of the pull factor. Then there's the issue of the enforcers. Immigration agents have enjoyed extraordinary support from the White House, the Trump administration has bragged about unshackling them to let them do their jobs more aggressively. What happens if Joe Biden tries to put the shackles back on? That isn't something that the lights which you can't change culture within an organization that best overnight. Angela Kelly is a senior advisor to the American Immigration Lawyers Association. So I agree that it's going to be a long long road. A Biden presidency would also find itself skirmishing with conservative lawyers over its reversals. The way Trump has been tied up in federal court fighting the R. J. Hamann is with the Federation for American Immigration Reform. If Biden is elected, and his administration starts rescinding executive actions that Trump had firm legal authority to Dio groups like us will sue. That is a fact. Finally, there's the Pandemic and NPR Ipsos poll showed a majority of Americans support Trump's decision to shut the borders to all types of immigrants to stop the spread of the Corona virus. Biden has not said if he would reverse that order. So it's anybody's guess when the virus will subside and the nation can welcome immigrants again. John Burnett NPR news

Joe Biden Donald Trump President Trump Mexico United States NPR Federation For American Immigr John Burnett American Immigration Lawyers A Rio Grande Senior Advisor L Use Immigrants Executive Border Patrol Matamoros Congress Brownsville Yuma
"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 3 months ago

"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Didn't take advantage of it so that we can properly position ourselves to be prepared for. Hurricane Laura authorities are urging coastal residents in the watch area from Galveston, Texas, to Morgan City, Louisiana, to shelter in place of necessary public shelters will only be opened as a last resort because of the threat of Corona virus. John Burnett, NPR NEWS New Orleans This is NPR news from Washington. Officials in Afghanistan are reporting a string of deadly attacks today. They include a truck bombing in the north of the country targeting a base used by Afghan forces. At least 12 people have been killed and dozens more wounded. The injured include more than 30 civilians, including women and Children. Efforts continue to achieve a peace agreement between the Afghan government and the Taliban following February's peace deal between the US and the militant group. Facebook is blocking access to a group in Thailand that's been critical of the time monarchy Michael Sullivan reports. The royalist marketplace page started by a Thai exile in Japan has over a million members. A number that swelled in the past few weeks as youth led protests against the military backed government have continued on a near daily basis. Some are also calling for reform of the politically powerful monarchy. A largely taboo subject in the kingdom because of laws that forbid defaming the king that can carry a jail term of up to 15 years. The pages administrator says Facebook's decision amounts to cooperating with the authoritarian regime to obstruct democracy and cultivate authoritarianism. Facebook's as it was compelled by the government to block access to the group. But we'll fight the order for NPR news on Michael Sullivan in Bangkok. Search teams in India say they have rescued more than 60 people from the rubble of a collapsed building near Mumbai. Five storey residential building toppled yesterday, killing at least one person rescue were say they're working to find more survivors amid heavy monsoon rains. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR News in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations..

NPR News Facebook NPR Afghan government Michael Sullivan Washington Hurricane Laura Galveston Afghanistan Morgan City Dave Mattingly Louisiana Texas John Burnett administrator Taliban US Japan Mumbai
Trump Administration Prioritized Border Wall Construction Over Other Options in Flawed Process, Government Audit Says

All Things Considered

02:45 min | 3 months ago

Trump Administration Prioritized Border Wall Construction Over Other Options in Flawed Process, Government Audit Says

"Called President Trump's Border wall 1/14 century solution. They say artificial intelligence and new surveillance technology. Khun Secure the border without spending billions on steel and concrete. Now comes a government watchdog report that false customs and border protection for not considering alternatives to the wall. NPR's John Burnett reports. Trump's giant wall gets all the buzz. But customs and border protection is quietly testing a new generation of free standing surveillance towers on the Arizona border that could revolutionise border security. Telescoping towers are equipped with infrared and daytime cameras, along with laser range finders and illuminate er's that can zoom in on a target miles away for a close up there mounted in the bed of a Ford F 1 50 so they're completely mobile, and they can be operated remotely. They can tell an agent if the object moving north is a cow or a single migrant or a family camera. See, something is going to alert and send that information to an agent in the field. Directly. So if I have a phone now, my phone haven't app on it, And that information will come directly to me. That CBP is Kelly good as deputy executive director of the program Management Office. He's in charge of technology acquisition. I met him last march at the Border Security Expo in San Antonio, where domain awareness technology was the hottest gear with Trump's border wall Now approaching $25 million a mile, I asked Good. How much to the mobile towers cost, huh? The lesson 1,000,000 less than a 1,000,000. That's the same question the inspector general of the Homeland Security Department had last month, the watchdog released a report critical of the border patrols. Single minded fixation on a wall is the answer to border security. The inspector general wrote. Quote CBP is an ability to effectively guide this large scale effort poses significant risk of exponentially increasing costs. In fact, the audit said, Border Patrol insisted on a wall even though the agency's own internal analysis said technology and boots on the ground were smarter solutions in certain regions. Representative Henry Cuellar is a Texas Democrat from a border district where CBP proposes to build 121 miles of barriers. We now are in a time we can build this virtual border wall technology. We have that already. I mean, you got the autonomous surveillance powers. But there is a political pressure from the White House. They're saying build me the wall. Get me mild. Last week, Three landowners in the Laredo area filed legal documents in federal court trying to stop the government from condemning their riverside property for wall construction. One of their arguments is Thie Inspector general's report. Carlos Flores is an attorney representing the property owners. 10 years

Border Patrol CBP President Trump Henry Cuellar Kelly Homeland Security Department Khun Laredo Carlos Flores Arizona NPR John Burnett San Antonio Deputy Executive Director White House Attorney Program Management Office Representative
Judge blocks "public charge" immigration rule during pandemic

The World

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Judge blocks "public charge" immigration rule during pandemic

"A federal court has blocked the Trump administration from implementing its controversial public charge rule that denies legal status to an immigrant if they use any public benefits. NPR's John Burnett reports. The judge said the government should not do anything to deter the foreign born from seeking testing and treatment for covert 19 The White House rule had said that any immigrant who receives government assistance such as Medicaid, food stamps for public housing vouchers can be disqualified from getting lawful status. In an updated noticed the government said that seeking treatment for covert symptoms would not count as a federal benefit. A federal judge George Daniels in the Southern District of New York was unmoved. He ruled Wednesday that as the pandemic worsens, such a rule could discourage an immigrant from seeking medical care. And quote risks infecting another person

George Daniels John Burnett NPR White House Medicaid New York
Supreme Court blocks Trump from ending DACA

Morning Edition

01:21 min | 5 months ago

Supreme Court blocks Trump from ending DACA

"The U. S. Supreme Court has extended a lifeline to the Obama era deferred action for childhood arrivals program that has allowed about six hundred fifty thousand immigrants brought to the U. S. as children to stay and work here legally the five to four decision shields dreamers as their call from deportation for now after determining the administration's decision to rescind daca was quote arbitrary and capricious and here's John Burnett reports conservative Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the court's four liberals Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court's four liberals in and writing this opinion and what's remarkable is that back in November of last year when the Supreme Court heard oral arguments justice Roberts he cited his understanding that the trump administration would not deport daca recipients and suggested that it was mainly just up a program to grant work authorizations but then in January of this year Matt all bands head of immigration and customs enforcement announced that his agency plan to deport all the daca recipients whose renewals had expired and so he left no question they did this was not going to be a kind and gentle ramp down of the program NPR's John Burnett president trump reportedly is blasting the supreme court's decision apparently referencing the court's position on daca as well as workplace protections for LGBTQ

U. S. Supreme Court Daca John Burnett Chief Justice John Roberts NPR Donald Trump Barack Obama Matt President Trump
Trump Administration Proposes Rules To Sharply Restrict Asylum Claims

All Things Considered

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

Trump Administration Proposes Rules To Sharply Restrict Asylum Claims

"The trump administration is out with a draft of new rules that would sharply restrict how asylum is granted to immigrants who come to the U. S. seeking protection and PR's John Burnett explains critics said the proposed changes would effectively shut down the asylum system the new rules would narrow the categories of people who claim persecution for their race religion nationality political opinion or membership in a social group the sweeping new restrictions would allow immigration judges to reject asylum requests out of hand for three and a half years the trump administration has been trying to toss out what it considers frivolous claims by immigrants who say they're fleeing criminal gangs or an abusive spouse the rules to be published in the Federal Register next week would also streamline asylum hearings Democrats in Congress blasted the proposed changes as a port on American and

John Burnett Congress Donald Trump
Trump's Border Wall Would Go Through Laredo's Historic Downtown

Morning Edition

00:26 sec | 6 months ago

Trump's Border Wall Would Go Through Laredo's Historic Downtown

"President trump's border wall is coming to Laredo Texas the federal government plans to build sixty nine miles of the massive barrier through the city's historic downtown but not of opponents in Laredo have anything to do with it NPR's John Burnett reports that an unusual coalition of activists landowners city officials and business leaders are banding together to try and stop it when it became clear that trump's imposing border barrier would plow through

Donald Trump Laredo Texas Laredo NPR John Burnett President Trump
"john burnett" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KCRW

"Staying home so there's no traffic out there right wrong this is southern California we've got three six kilohertz to tell you about out there right now starting out in downtown LA north winds ten to the south wanna one that transition road is blocked because of a comic out semi just around the corner south one ten connected to the west ten that is closed because of a crash involving an overturned car and then in Placentia southbound fifty seven at orange Thorpe only the left lane open because of the trailer that became disconnected from a bakery support for NPR comes from a cloud based phone service for small businesses with an automated virtual receptionist and mobility features to run businesses from anywhere more it M. A. dot com from the Alfred P. Sloan foundation bridging science and the arts by supporting documentaries such as Mr tornado about meteorologist Ted Fujita premieres may nineteenth on PBS Sloan dot org and from fidelity wealth management were advisors work with their clients to develop flexible investment strategies that can evolve as their needs change learn more at fidelity dot com slash well fidelity brokerage services LLC it's a twenty two it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning people in the oil business are familiar with the cycle of boom and bust prices soar prices plunge but they've never seen anything like twenty twenty when the pandemic abruptly brought prices to record lows even below zero NPR's John Burnett reports.

California orange Thorpe NPR Mr tornado Ted Fujita services LLC Rachel Martin LA Placentia Alfred P. Sloan foundation Steve Inskeep twenty twenty John Burnett
Historic Oil Bust Delivers A Gut Punch To 1 High-Flying Texas County

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 7 months ago

Historic Oil Bust Delivers A Gut Punch To 1 High-Flying Texas County

"People in the oil business are familiar with the cycle of boom and bust prices. Soar prices plunge but they've never seen anything like twenty twenty when the pandemic abruptly brought prices to record lows even below zero. Npr's John Burnett reports from the Permian basin the heart of oil country in West Texas on a normal day in Andrews County look in any direction and stretching to the horizon. You'll see bobbing horseheads of pump. Jacks sucking up oil from deep in the earth but these are anything but normal days right. Now it's scary honestly Linden pertain. A well technician standing in Mesquite. Scrubland that overlays. What experts call a Monster Oilfield? We drove out here. Usually you'd see you with all these good wells. That historically have done a lot of production. They would usually all pumping and kind of looks like caterpillars all running across the landscape. You know and that's not happening right now. All across the vast permian that straddles West Texas and southeast New Mexico. Wells have been shut in in the Argot of the oil patch. American oil companies are pumping a million fewer barrels a day than were just two months ago. According to the Energy Information Administration all the big players out here Exxon Mobil Chevron conaco Phillips have slashed for Andrews County. The effect has been cataclysmic. The county is considering layoffs and the city of Andrews will hold off repairing streets and building a new city hall when you have a community that receives about eighty five to ninety percent of their tax revenue for minerals. It's a serious threat. County Judge Charlie Falcon follows the news. And here's about other cities. Taking a hit from closed. Businesses and Hospitalizations Andrews has had only twenty one cases of covert nineteen and most people have recovered. Nonetheless was Texas is getting a double dip of trouble. Not only do. We have all drop. We have corona virus. And we don't know how long it's going to stay around. You know what people not working not been able to shop not being able to you now sell oil Creates SERIOUS PROBLEM FOR US? Bob Stewart's welding and machine shop. His lost half its business amid the paralysis in the oil patch. A few jobs keep trickling in stewardess Paul and lumbering and jovial. He's done this for nearly forty years. He survived downturns before. But he says he's never seen demand if that rate like this whole world. There's no airplanes fly. There's No car driving cruise ships cruising. There's no summer vacations. Golic's we're producing a lot of oil for a world. That's not using not consuming Bob Stewart is grateful that he has not had to lay off any of his hundred ten employees. He got more than a million and a half dollars through the federal government's paycheck protection program. But that's not going to last forever. It's kind of nine eleven you over. You know what I don't know what it looks like. What comes out. The other side is going to be different with more than twelve thousand active whales in Andrews County. Hydrocarbons have been good to this community. There's an air conditioned Rodeo. Arena a waterpark and new little league baseball diamonds. The schools have a planetarium and an Olympic sized swimming pool. All over town. Grieving motorcycles and ski boats are parked in driveways and behemoth pickup trucks. Roar Down Main Street though the one two punch of the pandemic and the oil bust have left the region staggering. It should not have come as a complete surprise. Every oil addicted town has been before I've been interviewed by the media three times and every time it's when Andrews is on the map for some dubious reason with the Economy Russell Shannon President of the National Bank of Andrews says established companies. That saved for a rainy day. Will weather this bust a lot better than others as I. Try to tell some the younger ones when they try to get in the business. There's a storm cloud out there just because you don't see it today doesn't mean there's not one on the horizon. I mean we've just historically we've seen it too many times. The oilfield workers with six figure salaries thought it would never end. Even though it always does Mighty O. Fernandez was laid off three weeks ago. As a workover rig supervisor now he's realizing just how good he had it. While I've noticed so much didn't realize how much I spent when I was at work breakfast lunch. Taking guys out to buy food. You know of course you want to you know. Give your guys. Hey good job in here here. Some steaks baked potatoes or something for doing you know working to butts. Fernandez sits on his front stoop and Andrews having a smoke and catching the night air after a scorching hundred and four degree day. Now he stays home helps his teenage son with his homework and he tries to keep a positive attitude. I used to worry a lot The Bible says not to worry about what tomorrow because we don't even know we're GonNa make it more so I just have faith and just believing that it's GonNa come back together. The question is when and how long folks can hold out John Burnett. Npr News Andrews Texas.

Andrews County Andrews Bob Stewart John Burnett Texas O. Fernandez National Bank Of Andrews Mesquite Linden NPR West Texas Technician Twenty Twenty County Judge Energy Information Administrat Exxon Mobil Chevron
CBP Acting Commissioner Mark Morgan: immigration “daily encounters” in April decreased “more than 50%” from last month

All Of It

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

CBP Acting Commissioner Mark Morgan: immigration “daily encounters” in April decreased “more than 50%” from last month

"Immigration authorities say arrests at the southern border continue to fall in April down fifty percent from March as NPR's John Burnett reports that the decline comes amid broad measures to limit border crossings with the corona virus pandemic under an order from the CDC immigration agents now arrest and swiftly expel anyone who crosses the border without documents the idea is to keep migrants who may have the corona virus out of federal detention facilities that includes asylum seekers who can no longer ask for protection the U. S. Mexico border is closed to all but essential workers many foreign residents cannot see green cards and meanwhile construction has quickened on the massive border wall president trump is expected to highlight his tough immigration controls during his reelection campaign and observers say fears over coronavirus have played into his

NPR John Burnett Donald Trump CDC U. S. Mexico President Trump
Lines At Food Banks Grow Longer By The Week

Morning Edition

01:10 min | 7 months ago

Lines At Food Banks Grow Longer By The Week

"Ten thousand cars waited hours in line for emergency food assistance in San Antonio last week a drone photograph of the pack parking lot circulated across the country maybe solace I mean these were some of the more than twenty million unemployed Americans many of them recently laid off because of the pandemic and here's John Burnett reports that lines at food banks like this across the country are growing longer every week huge food warehouse on the outskirts of San Antonio is stacked four stories high with apples oranges and watermelons the taters tomatoes and onions chicken ground beef tater tots a quartet of forklifts working like soldier ants is filling a truck with Alex Berenson the stock refrigerated frozen and non perishable and non food items so it moves through our facility at a fairly rapid pace obviously now in the midst of covert nineteen the demand is far outpacing the supply CEO of the San Antonio

San Antonio John Burnett Alex Berenson CEO
As Jails And Prisons Reduce Populations, Advocates Call On ICE To Do The Same

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:38 min | 8 months ago

As Jails And Prisons Reduce Populations, Advocates Call On ICE To Do The Same

"There is a growing fear that a corona virus outbreak will tear through the federal government's crowded detention center for immigrants immigrant rights advocates are suing and detainees are on hunger strikes restrain immigration and customs enforcement or ice released detainees before it can French humanitarian catastrophe NPR's John Burnett has our story at present ice detained some thirty eight thousand immigrants in a network of private for profit facilities scattered around the country they're held in close quarters in jail like conditions while they await their fate in immigration court detainees are getting alarmed in the past week guards have pepper sprayed groups of detainees at two detention centers who refused to follow orders in a protest of their crowded surroundings I look at the book bundle three M. two meals on the plan worked out of Japan there's a lot of fear because we're not separated just to go to meals we have to line up in front of three separate doors all jam together we can't maintain six feet between this Tony Augustine is a Mexican national who is locked up at the rich would correctional center outside of Monroe Louisiana he was rounded up in an ice raid on a Mississippi chicken plant last August because he's in the country illegally like the majority of immigrants in federal custody Augustine has no criminal convictions a number for them if you want to finance in the list we have two televisions one is to the C. N. N. so we know more and more people are dying from this virus that's why were framed the guards tell us it's all lies you can't believe the T. V. but we know it's the truth a spokesman for lasalle corrections which runs rich wood says it has implemented a pandemic contingency plan which includes intense cleaning and disinfecting the living areas and monitoring detainees for illness but some federal judges have ordered ice to release a handful of sick inmates in Pennsylvania a judge said it would be quote unconscionable and possibly barbaric to keep them jammed in with other detainees a growing list of advocates from Amnesty International to the congressional Hispanic caucus are sending letters to parties complaining that more immigrants should be released on bond representative Joaquin Castro is chairman of the Hispanic caucus we Richard Gerson home on cruise ships now on a navy ship and it's no different with people were confined in a closed space in our detention centers where the corona virus can spread very quickly vice reporting at least eight detainees have tested positive for covert nineteen inside lock ups in New Jersey Pennsylvania Louisiana and Arizona the agency says the health and safety of immigrant detainees it's a top priority and to that end visitation has been suspended at all jails to prevent contagion but what about the guards ice reports at least six confirmed cases among employees at five different detention facilities Dr Chris barber is professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health in a call with reporters yesterday he said during an epidemic guards can easily introduce the disease into the facility as they have that right Chris island in New York most of these facilities have three eight hour shifts every twenty four hours people are in and out of all the time going back to their communities families human rights advocates point to other U. S. jails and prisons that are trying to reduce their populations to stop the spread of infections California has granted early release to thirty five hundred inmates in county jails in Ohio Iowa and New Jersey have done the same so far ice shows no sign of following the trend John Burnett NPR

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:02 min | 8 months ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"John Burnett reports although freight haulers and essential workers are still permitted to cross one U. S. border town is feeling the effects dramatically the downtown retail district in Laredo Texas is usually bustling with Mexican choppers ten thousand people a day cross out the north but the unprecedented closure of the international bridges that connect in the way the Laredo Mexico has left parts of Laredo of ghost towns father Antonio ya know a retired Catholic priest cross the normally crowded bridge to go visit his mother's grave in Mexico there's no people before there were lines and lines in line now Sam D. I mean that is going to be a disaster for both sides downtown merchants were already suffering from changing consumer tastes this border shut down will be hard to bounce back from John Burnett NPR news the radio on Wall Street today the single biggest point gain ever the Dow up more than twenty one hundred points as Congress nears a deal to object two trillion dollars into the U. S. economy the Dow jumped twenty one hundred thirteen points to close at twenty thousand seven oh for today the nasdaq rose five hundred fifty seven points the S. and P. was up two hundred and nine points this is NPR hi from KQED news I'm TerraCycle Solano county's health officer is taking criticism from county leaders for taking too long to issue a shelter in place order KQED's Kate wolf reports Solano was the last of the nine bay area counties to issue guidelines for people to remain in their homes doing so three days after their neighbor's health officer Bela montage told county supervisors he didn't want people to overreact I didn't like using the term shelter in place normally used in active shooter and air pollution emergencies the supervisor skip Thomson said the delay put people at risk three days how many more people got infected nursery days while we're figuring out shelter in place stayed home policies I appreciate everything that was done but I think it was too slow in getting it out montage agreed with the supervisor that his communication was lacking Solano county has twenty one confirmed cases I am Cait wolf KQED news California governor Gavin Newsom has ordered close to five hundred California National Guard members into action helping out at food banks and pantries in six counties across the state Leslie Bock Bock Show is the CEO of second harvest of Silicon Valley one of the bay area's largest food banks where seventy five guard members have been deployed it comes at a time of it incredible increase in need and a dramatic decline in our labor force as we are very dependent on volunteers L. having the national guardsmen and it's just a huge base for us a spokesperson from the National Guard says his troops will continue to help out as long as there is a need on terrace either KQED news support for NPR comes from the Carnegie corporation of New York supporting innovations in education democratic engagement and the advancement of international peace and security more.

John Burnett
"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 10 months ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The White House and halts the border wall John Burnett NPR news this is NPR news white women in Utah with the first in the nation to vote under an equal suffrage law hundred fifty years ago now there's an unusual plan brewing in the state to get more women elected to public office Utah's history is complicated it is because of polygamy and it's a part of our past they were embarrassed about that we don't like it's really uncomfortable that story this afternoon on All Things Considered from NPR news from five to six thirty this afternoon right here KQED a better news in San Jose the north eighty seven ramp leading to north bound to eighty has now been re opened C. H. P. and Caltrans has wrapped up the investigation of the earlier fatal collisions so you can now get there from here our system similar to that north eighty seven wrapped the north bound to eighty has been reopened in San Jose morning edition is just ahead coming up in this half hour conversation with will Ferrell and you really are Julia Louis Dreyfus about their new film down hill current time I KQ eighty four thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly China is reporting more confirmed cases of the coronavirus the number of infections in that country's nearing sixty four thousand the death toll in China is close to fourteen hundred the B. B. C.'s Michael Bristol says among those who have contracted the virus for more than seventeen hundred health workers in China the figures reveal the price being paid by China's doctors nurses vice minister for health said they were literally putting their lives on the line S. sacrifice was encapsulated by the deaths from the virus of doctor Lee when a man who was told to keep quiet after warning about cove in nineteen before it became public knowledge of recent weeks have been many reports of dedicated hospital staff working long hours without a break sometimes without the proper protective equipment the centers for disease control and prevention says there are fifteen confirmed cases of the virus in the US the house has approved a resolution that removes the nineteen eighty two deadline for states to ratify the equal rights amendment it is shameful reality that the equal rights amendment still has not been enshrined in the constitution that's house speaker Nancy Pelosi yesterday the resolution is not expected to be taken up by the Senate where Republicans are in the majority the deadline thirty eight years ago required ratification of the amendment by three quarters of states this is NPR news from Washington the Nevada caucuses are little more than a week away ahead of the vote the state's culinary union says it won't be endorsing a democratic presidential candidate its endorsement is traditionally sought by the candidates as NPR's Danielle Kurtz Lehman reports the union's decision centers on healthcare at a press conference Thursday afternoon union secretary treasurer geo condo are going Klein explained the choice to make no choice I'll let our goals that's always going to endorse we know Colin Powell endorses eight county the members receive health insurance through a culinary union health fund union flyers said members would lose that coverage under the single payer plan backed by Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren single payer healthcare would virtually eliminate private health insurance after those flyers were reported on our way client had said that Sanders supporters quote viciously attacked the union Sanders subsequently tweeted that he supported the union the back and forth highlights health care is important to Nevada ahead of its February twenty second caucuses and your card sleeve an NPR news prosecutors in New York or schedule to give their closing arguments today in the rape and sexual assault trial of former Hollywood film producer Harvey Weinstein jury deliberations are expected.

White House John Burnett NPR
Between President Trump's Border Wall And The Rio Grande Lies A 'No Man's Land'

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:57 min | 10 months ago

Between President Trump's Border Wall And The Rio Grande Lies A 'No Man's Land'

"President trump is moving ahead with his border wall yesterday. He signaled that he wants to divert three point eight billion dollars from the Pentagon's budget and set it. Aside for border wall construction that is on top of the eleven billion dollars already planned but down on the border of the project is wreaking havoc for landowners in Texas. It's being built right. Through the middle of many properties leaving thousands of acres in a kind of no man's land between the barriers and the Rio Grande and John Burnett reports this overgrown thorn scrub is the Nether world between the United States and Mexico to the north border fence to the south the muddy meandering Rio Grande. This was Fort Brown Memorial Golf Course on the side of the historic fortification. That gave the city. Its name but with the US government. I started building border. Barriers under President George W. Bush. The entire eighteen hole course ended up on the south side of the fence. Golfers didn't like having to drive through a gate and being walled off from the rest of the city. This spit of land suddenly felt unsafe. None of us come over here. You don't feel protected in any part of the land is south of the wall. Who'll yet Garcia is former president of the University of Texas Brownsville which used to operate the skull course but when the golfers stopped coming it went bankrupt today the clubhouse shuttered and the wants manicured Greens have returned to nature. What used to be a very active place very friendly place for students and far golf team and for Winter Texans has become a deserted sad desolate. No Man's land. President trump has pledged to build more than five hundred miles of new border. Wall out west. It runs along the straight land boundary with Mexico but in Texas that line is the curvy Rio Grande and because of flooding concerns. The Wall is often built some distance away as much as a mile north of the river. The defunct Fort Brown Memorial Golf. Course is a cautionary tale landowners fear. The Wall will effectively sever their acreage from the United States leading. It abandoned lawless and unprofitable so far fifty. Five property owners have gone to court to try to block construction to hear their concerns. I headed West on military highway. First stop is the River Bend Resort and golf club where the owners were planning a major expansion worth. Millions of dollars then came the border wall. The thirty foot wall through the middle of the property kills our project completely kills our project. Jeremy Bernard is part of the family that owns river band. Nearly seven hundred Americans and Canadians from the frigid north moved down here during the winter to enjoy. Short sleeves and Margaritas Bernard Parks his golf cart on the Levy. That overlooks the curved streets. Lined with fancy mobile homes and palm trees. This is where the proposed alignment is from Border Patrol. The problem with that is seventy percent of our property is south of the Levy that includes the REC center the pool tennis courts and fifteen of eighteen holes. All of it would be cut off by the wall. The frustrating thing Bernard says is they rarely see unauthorized immigrants and drug smugglers passing through here. His family is negotiating urgently with customs and Border Protection to move the wall slightly north. So it won't slice their property in half and yet Jeremy Bernard's politics haven't changed he remains loyal to President trump. And I've got friends that disagree with me and they say how could you vote for this man? What his wall wants to tear apart your community. The main thing I tell them look the thought that I'm going to agree. One hundred percent with somebody especially a politician is just outrageous. I just have an issue with the blanket. Let's build a wall everywhere as you continue on military highway urbanized. Brownsville gives way to fields of onions. Cotton and corn here. I find Richard Roy at his farm headquarters leaning on his pickup truck. He's this rich Delta soil all of his life I'm seventy years old and It just it's GonNa ruin my lifestyle here of been living in the country. I've never lived in town and To have that wall. There's just GonNa really disturb me but drawing Nosey can't beat Washington DC so last fall. He reluctantly SOLD THE GOVERNMENT. Aruban of land so they could erect the wall across his crop. Rose like Jeremy Bernard Richard draw supports trump and his all four increasing border security. He just doesn't want the wall in his property. I told him you know this stupid wall is going to have lights on it. It's GONNA be like being in prison while lights and everything and I said You put them lives up on me on my house. You know more. Shoot him out. Of course I have time to calm down. Joy has seen what's happened over the past decade to Riverside land that's isolated by the border wall weeds. Takeover and people are afraid to go there anymore on his farm. He's worried that bad hombres will cross the river from Mexico and threatened his farm hands. He says the wall seeds has property down by the river to Mexico. Like Tola Board. Joe I said look you know goodwill how you build a wall. All agents will done trolling up and down the law. They're never going to go on down to the river anymore. He yield back into the Rio. Grande is the first line of Defense Baloney. You just wait a few years. I shared these misgivings with C. Bp a spokesman responded the Border Patrol will continue to operate on both sides of the barrier to include the riverine environment further. They'll install electric gates with security codes to give landowners access to the south side of the wall. My Westward John. Across the valley terminates at the rustic campground of the Cavazos family. Fred is seventy and in a wheelchair. They were race here. My Dad taught me how to fish. Here OUTTA. Get a shovel and dig worms. He says they run a few cows but the main income is from tenants who built weekend shanties along the water's edge. A lot of time on boats a lot of own jet skis so they come down with us and sausages Saturdays and Sundays and barbecue. It's a hundred four and five so they feel great where you're out there jet skiing. The government wants to put the wall and a wide patrol zone. Along the north end of their property. Cavazos worries it will drive away. His tenants who may not want to be walled off from the rest of Texas like many large families down here the Cavazos clan is split someone to accept what they think is a generous offer from the government. Nearly four hundred thousand dollars for SIX ACRES BUT COUSIN. Ray who seventy-five wonders what happens? If one day they put the land up for sale. The problem is the devaluation of the property. Nobody wants to buy property. That's on the Riverside of the wall. So this is what the fight is going to be about ray. Infrared are fighting the government in federal court. They want to drag it out until election day hoping that the Democrat wins the White House and halts the border wall

President Trump Rio Grande Border Patrol Jeremy Bernard Government Texas United States Mexico Levy President George W. Bush Fort Brown Memorial Golf Cours Jeremy Bernard Richard Fort Brown Memorial Golf RAY Pentagon River Bend Resort Richard Roy University Of Texas Brownsvill
Trump's Border Wall To Be The World's Most Expensive

All Things Considered

00:36 sec | 11 months ago

Trump's Border Wall To Be The World's Most Expensive

"Kelley president trump often tells his supporters he is delivering on his signature campaign promise here Hughes at a rally in Milwaukee this week you're gonna have a wall like no other it's going to be a powerful terrific wall that promise comes at a cost as NPR's John Burnett reports it is already the most expensive border wall in the world and the bills keep piling up to get an idea why we're spending a fortune on trump's border wall I've come out here to one of the construction sites down in the re grand valley of Texas on one side of a caliche

Hughes Milwaukee NPR John Burnett Donald Trump Texas
At $11 Billion And Counting, Trump's Border Wall Would Be The World's Most Expensive

All Things Considered

00:47 sec | 11 months ago

At $11 Billion And Counting, Trump's Border Wall Would Be The World's Most Expensive

"Kelley president trump often tells his supporters he is delivering on his signature campaign promise here Hughes at a rally in Milwaukee this week you're gonna have a wall like no other it's going to be a powerful to refer tool that promise comes at a cost as NPR's John Burnett reports it is already the most expensive border wall in the world and the bills keep piling up to get an idea why we're spending a fortune on trump's border wall I've come out here to one of the construction sites down in the re Grande Valley of Texas on one side of a caliche road you could see the pedestrian fence that was directed more than a decade ago at eighteen feet that looks downright beauty on the other side of the road our massive steel panels rising thirty

Hughes Milwaukee NPR John Burnett Donald Trump Grande Valley Texas
Supreme Court weighs fate of DACA program

Morning Edition

03:52 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court weighs fate of DACA program

"What is the future for hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought to this country illegally by their parents that is the question for the Supreme Court today the case focuses on the deferred action for childhood arrivals program known as doc a president Obama first approve this plan it offers temporary protections to people who are often called dreamers president trump tried revoke the program only to have the lower courts temporarily block his action in a case that the highest court now decides in beer is John Burnett covers immigration and he's been watching this case closely good morning John morning well so give us a little history of Dhaka if you wouldn't mind is what it is exactly sure it was enacted by Obama in the summer of twenty twelve and it's called deferred action for childhood arrivals it does just that it protects these people from deportation and it lets them work and go to school to qualify immigrants had to have arrived before they were sixteen be a high school graduate or a veteran and have committed no serious crimes replies to more than seven hundred thousand young people some of started families they have jobs there are nurses and teachers and many don't remember their birth countries they consider themselves thoroughly American what happened to the docket ended up now in front of the Supreme Court so the trump administration says that Obama never had the executive authority to create doc in the first place it's illegal and immigration hardliners believe the program is really nothing more than a dressed up amnesty for people who came to the country unlawfully and so trumps homeland security secretary rescinded it in twenty seventeen but the dreamers have lots of defenders and immigration attorneys counts they sued the administration saying trump didn't cancel the program the right way and three set but federal judges have agreed with them once said to kill off the doctor was arbitrary and capricious the government appealed and today it's before the High Court where trump believes conservative justices will see things his way so what we know about what each side is going to argue in front of the court right well the attorney for the dreamers will say that the government broke administrative rules when it pulled the plug on Dhaka and it should be reinstated the government attorney will defend the program's cancellation is lawful and justified and meanwhile the future of hundreds of thousands of young people in the U. S. hangs in the balance one of them is Michelle Segura she's a twenty five year old grad student in business administration and she works as a college counselor in Los Angeles you know there's ninety four and the Supreme Court largely fighting the fate of seven hundred thousand people myself included I've been living thank you thousand seventeen the comfort ministration birth and the doctor I've fallen into depression and and everything is just on the line and she told me that she's been camping out in the line that formed outside so green court in the cold to get a seat in the public gallery to watch these historic oral arguments today in temperatures were it like in the twenties last thank god I shiver just to think of it so John the Supreme Court will issue an opinion next year if it doesn't rule in favor of the daca recipients of the dreamers what happens to them well the Supreme Court could tell the administration if you want to end Dhaka you have to go about it a different way but it gets into politics the because the program the program is very popular because briefs in support of doc I have come in from business groups and universities and law enforcement religious leaders and polls show big majorities of Democrats and Republicans sympathetic to these young people who are mostly from Latin America an analyst told me what ultimately has to happen if doctors to be reserved Congress needs to enact the law okay NPR's John Burnett Tom thanks so

Twenty Five Year
U.S. extends work permits for Salvadorans with protected status

NPR News Now

00:59 min | 1 year ago

U.S. extends work permits for Salvadorans with protected status

"The federal government is announcing a year long extension of temporary protected status for more than two hundred thousand Salvadorans who've been living in the US is NPR's John Burnett explains the announcement comes as El Salvador has been cooperating with aggressive us and actives took her tail immigration from Central America the reprieve will allow nearly two hundred and fifty thousand Salvadorans to continue living and working in the US until January twenty twenty one the move comes despite president trump's frequent diatribes against Salvadoran immigrants as murderous ms thirteen gang members the tiny Central American republic has we signed agreements to limit asylum-seekers passing through its territory on the way to the US border another agreement directs US federal immigration agents to train their Salvadoran counter Parts Salvadoran official said their citizens in the US now have another year to secure lawful residency or citizenship but the trump administration cautions the agreement is not an indefinite extension rather it's an orderly wind down period John Burnett NPR

Federal Government United States NPR John Burnett El Salvador Central America Donald Trump Official Salvadorans President Trump John Burnett Npr
US, El Salvador to boost cooperation on security, migration

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

US, El Salvador to boost cooperation on security, migration

"The the US US and and el el Salvadoran Salvadoran have have signed signed an an agreement agreement promising promising to to help help the the central central American American country country deal deal with with gang gang violence violence and and unemployment unemployment and and here's here's John Burnett reports from San Salvador it's part of the trump administration's regional approach to cutting illegal immigration in the letter of intent L. Salvador pledges to strengthen its border security and continue to crackdown on ruthless street gangs like MS thirteen for its part Washington will be amenable to providing more agricultural guest worker visas and protecting certain Salvadoran asylum seekers acting homeland security secretary Kevin mac lean and held a joint press conference with Salvadoran president naive book Kelly who say he would measure success by this metric not people fleeing our country because they feel unsafe or eat all day being threatened by gangs or because they cannot find a job or because of of both reasons so very happy with this agreement John Burnett NPR news San Salvador

United States John Burnett San Salvador L. Salvador Washington Kevin Mac President Trump Secretary Kelly
"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Finally starting to pay off interesting and peers John Burnett thanks John the pleasure each quote a widespread in dangerous heat wave is building in the central and eastern U. S. support comes from the National Weather Service temperatures over much of the country today are expected to be in the nineties if not hotter and the heat will last through the weekend extremely high temperatures like this don't just happen we're told there is science behind it went here to walk us through the sciences and piercer Becker her sure hi Becky hi there all right so you are a science correspondent not a weather reporter are you with us this morning to talk about whether we can link this massive heat wave with climate change what is the research shows that what's going on yeah sort of average temperatures are rising the hottest these are getting hotter so he was getting longer and weather like this is more likely so you know part of that is obviously the entire planet is getting warmer overall hence global warming and that's already happened you know it can be hard to remember this sometimes because we talk so much about the future whether in the future comment but the average surface temperature here on our planet is already about two degrees Fahrenheit higher than it was in the late eighteen hundreds so this is happening now but here's the thing what's more relevant for understanding how climate change plays into something like this a weathervane tiki wave it's that extremes are getting more extremes of the earth is getting hotter that means hotter hots it means colder colds it means whether or wax so I have some examples for you from just this year one all over the central U. S. this year there was extreme range you might remember this the Mississippi and all of its tributaries flooded terribly now why is that that's because hotter air can hold more moisture so they're not falls is extreme rain or going back to this winter remember the polar vortex sure part of the thing yeah so that type of weather is actually more likely because climate change is allowing call there to see down from the arctic war go head out so just one more this is crazy outside the US in the city of Chennai in India it flooded really terribly a couple years ago this year if so little ring they're running out of water that's how extreme as the National Weather Service is warning us with this current heat wave that it's going to stay hot at night and that is significant because that's normally when we get a respite yeah yeah and here's the thing moist air holds more heat so that's kind of intuitive like tropical places they don't get as cold at night is like the desert so as these longer longer heat waves get really hot we're seeing as high overnight temperatures especially in cities and that's because like roads and buildings look at Pete and they're like furnaces overnight they put out that heat but that can be dangerous for people you know if you're already ill if you're older young kids your body just doesn't have the time to cool off and increases the risk from heat related illness from things ready have just quickly something like two thirds of the country's gonna be feeling this heat wave but I wonder bigger picture are some parts of the country getting hotter faster yes so as a rule the farther north you live the bigger the temperature increase so that means Alaska's getting hotter than like Texas and that's not good news because it means places that are getting the hottest the fastest or least prepared there the least likely to have buildings that are designed stay cool that have air conditioning.

John Burnett two degrees Fahrenheit
"john burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"john burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"One KFI K. I'm John Burnett Z at eleven oh to with your top local stories Sacramento fire responding to a car crash near fourteenth avenue and forty third street. C H B information showed an overturned vehicle and a person still inside as of ten thirty. The crash took out a power pole. In lines are down in the area, smudge outage. Showed about thirteen hundred customers with no power in the area. But that number is now coming down as crews respond for several years. Lawmakers have debated a proposal to let some California bars. Stay open until four AM. It's backed by democratic state Senator Scott wiener of San Francisco. He says only a few cities would be part of the pilot project, which he says has bipartisan support all the Bill does is create local control. So that cities can decide for themselves whether to remain with the current closing time of two AM or whether to extend until four am a previous version of the Bill was vetoed by former governor Jerry Brown. Governor Gavin Newsom hasn't taken a position and the death penalty case involving a deadly shooting in turlock is being upheld. The Stanislas county district attorney announced on social media yesterday. Michael Leon Bell's conviction and death sentence was upheld by the California Supreme Court last week he shot and killed Simon Francis. During a convenience store robbery in nineteen Ninety-seven and made off with two hundred sixty one dollars, traffic and weather together. Let's check in with Brian. Noble rot this time around by road. Ruder? We do have that accident. John mentioned at fourteenth avenue at forty third street offered and cruiser still on the scene there working to get that cleared out of their speed tends to show a little slowing in both directions in that spot, freeways or incident. Freenet the limit all the way around need help with your plumbing drains, water cleanup wrote runner will put their eighty years of experience to work for you. Twenty four seven three sixty five visit wrote a ruder online or call them today for free in-home consultation Nobil until you need the work. Visit rota ruder dot com. Traffic on the tens every ten minutes. Mornings and afternoons. Ryan nobles news ninety three point one KFC K. Cool today with intervals of clouds and sunshine will have a high of seventy one then.

Senator Scott wiener John Burnett Governor Gavin Newsom Michael Leon Bell California Supreme Court Jerry Brown Ryan nobles California Sacramento turlock robbery Stanislas county San Francisco Brian Simon Francis two hundred sixty one dollars eighty years ten minutes
"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Mary Louise Kelley there are no more than ten thousand migrant children who arrived in the country illegally being held in US government custody the system that cares for these children has come under intense scrutiny. Now, a number of federal law suits allege. The Trump administration is using that system to punish and deport the kids in their families and peers John Burnett joins me now from Austin. Hey, John Heimer Louise to a number of federal lawsuits how what what's the number? And what exactly are they alleging by at least four federal lawsuits filed since last March and many of them challenged the way the government confines these children, they allege the Trump administration is acknowledging a federal mandate to release the immigrant kids to sponsors as soon as possible the lawsuits claim the kids are being locked up for months when they're a loving family members ready to take them into their homes and remember these are mostly teenagers who trekked to the US border. From Central America. They say they are fleeing violence street gangs and most of them are asking for asylum. I gather one of the issues in play here is that sponsors who maybe step forward and say they can take these kids that if they are in danger of deportation to the lawsuits get into that exactly. In one lawsuit filed by the southern poverty Law Center, it alleges the administration is sort of weaponized an agency called the office of refugee resettlement, or are are it's the entity in charge of caring for these underage migrants. The lawsuit says when family members step forward to take a migrant child into their household, which is what the law intens deportation agents will arrest those sponsors, if they're here illegally lawyers say so far a hundred and seventy willing sponsors have been arrested and put into deportation proceedings, and it's had the effect of scaring other family members from coming forward, which means the kids end up staying longer in these controversial our shelters some have now been there since last summer. And will watch and see how the Trump administration plays this in court. But, but what is their response to the central allegation that a system that's supposed to be set up to care for children is being used to punish and deport them. Well, homeland security says it will round up unlawful immigrants even if they happen to be sponsors stepping forward to claim a child migrant. There was actually an internal homeland security memo that was revealed last week, and it confirms that the administration plan back in December twenty seventeen to make an agreement between our are an immigration and customs enforcement where ice in it says right there in black and white the arrest of sponsors would result in a deterrent effect on human trafficking. Mary Bauer is jeopardy legal director for the southern poverty Law Center. There is no doubt that or are an ice are working closely together to use children as bait to catch sponsors and put them into removal proceedings. We know that because they put it in writing and said that they're doing it another really. Point in the lawsuit is that our is allegedly holding children until they can be deported on their eighteenth birthday. They actually put one of the plaintiffs on a call with reporters Kayla Bosca's. She was trying to sponsor her seventeen year old Honduran cousin by marriage was in one of these shelters. She says the social worker who works for our keeps changing the rules on her. She's worried the government wants to keep him confined until his eighteenth birthday when they can come in and arrest him. I feel like they're playing a game. They're just keeping him there to have the family supper, which is wrong because the ones that are suffering. Most either children what does the or the office of refugee resettlement say in response to stories like that the agency says it's reviewing the court filing and doesn't have any comment at this time, but I should say that in mid-december a government official told me that children should be home with their parents. The government makes lousy parents the agency then streamline the way it screens the sponsors. And today the number of kids in custody has dropped from. Just shy of fifteen thousand to under eleven thousand. So I think the agencies numbers indicate contrary to what the lawsuit is claiming that it's releasing more kids more quickly to sponsors than it has in the past NPR's, John Burnett reporting from Austin, thanks, John to pleasure. Louise..

John Burnett southern poverty Law Center US Mary Louise Kelley John Heimer Louise Austin Audie Cornish Kayla Bosca NPR Central America Mary Bauer John official director seventeen year
"john burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Democrats are stopping us, and they're stopping a lot of great people from getting paid all say we want border security that automatically means a wall or a barrier. The president speaking as he left the White House for New Orleans and new ABC news. Washington Post poll finds fifty three percent of Americans blame him and congressional Republicans for the shutdown. Twenty nine percent blamed Democrats attorney general nominee William bar goes before the Senate Judiciary committee for a confirmation hearing tomorrow and his prepared remarks that have been released bar. Is expected to say he believes it's in the best interest of everyone for special counsel Robert Muller to finish his Russia investigation. More than six hundred thousand students in Los Angeles don't have regular teachers today as educators strike a teacher's union saying they need several issues resolved here including their salaries reduced class size. Some teacher saying they have classes with forty kids in them. They also when nurses hired and the district saying they simply cannot afford the Union's demands ABC's Qena Whitworth in Los Angeles. British Prime Minister Theresa may is in front of the house of Commons making her final pitch for her Brexit plan. Lawmakers are expected to vote on it tomorrow. On Wall Street, the Dow is down sixty eight points. You're listening to ABC news. From the twenty four seven KFB digital new center. I'm John Burnett at ten oh. With your top local stories Pacific Gas and electric CEO geisha Williams resigned on Sunday in the company has announced they're preparing to file for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. The board is named John. Simon is the interim replacement. Simon has been the executive vice president since two thousand seventeen and is also a company attorney PGA is facing billions.

ABC William bar Los Angeles Democrats White House Simon attorney New Orleans president Washington Post Senate Judiciary committee executive vice president Robert Muller John Burnett Union Prime Minister Qena Whitworth geisha Williams special counsel
"john burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"That marks black and white police visible presence. I think in the neighborhoods is making some amount of impact here. Stockton police chief Eric Jones tells Casey array three there nearly four hundred seventy officers on the force and all time high. He says police can't do it alone. Neither can community groups. But when people work together change can happen. It simply comes down to relationships and building collaborations nonfatal. Shootings also fell from one hundred ninety in two thousand seventeen to one thirty one last year Jones and mayor Michael tubs, also herald, the work of community organizers, and helping to decrease violence in the city, John Burnett Z, NewsRadio KFB K, the California Supreme Court has denied a challenge to the state law that keeps police records open to you. The law was passed in response to national distress over a series of fatal police shootings of unarmed minority men, but only applies when officers are found to be improperly used force or discharged firearms committed sexual assaults or have been dishonest in official duties police. Union's petition contends the law should only release records for incidents that happened after the law took effect Tuesday. They did not give an explanation for the denial. Order Nick, this NewsRadio KP PK Democrats are set to take control of the US house today with their sights set on ending a government shutdown without funding a border wall congressional Democrats plan to immediately pass measures to fund the government, but their bills don't meet President Trump's demands for border security. Well, certainly. The public has no appetite for government shutdown in the long-term. But the president has bet that at least when it comes to border security. This may be a winning issue. KFC K political analyst Gary Dietrich expects Republican response to be based on the individual situations of lawmakers already beginning to posture for twenty twenty and how does this set of both parties leading into what's now going to be clearly a very hotly contested presidential rates starting.

Eric Jones Democrats president California Supreme Court Stockton political analyst John Burnett Z President Trump Gary Dietrich US Union Nick Michael tubs Casey official
"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro Elsa chain with midterm elections days away and Central American migrants. Plotting northward President Trump is deploying more than seven thousand active-duty troops to support border agents. He's also vowed to further limit asylum and put up massive tents to detain asylum seekers who get caught crossing illegally NPR's. John Burnett sent us. This report from south, Texas. The president's dire warnings of an imminent invasion of dangerous Central American immigrants has gotten people's attention here. The gritty bordertown of Progresso Texas this week. Big steel gates were installed on the international bridge leading to new waiver Progresso Mexico. They can swing shut in case immigrants try to storm. The US port of entry something that's never happened before I've been coming here for twenty years, and they have never ever been any gates like that. When we want my day. We saw the gates. We were in shock. That's Ruben Trevino walking home from Progresso after he and his wife visited a dentist in Mexico. Most of a dozen bridge crossers interviewed say they're glad the authorities putting gates to keep out unwanted immigrants. Bob and Sharon Taylor moved to south Texas from Michigan. They were also seeing a Mexican dentist and buying meds. Yeah. That's a good idea. But I I don't think the caravans going to make it. Well, they got nine hundred more miles to go. They're going to wear their shoes out. They're getting sick. Crocodiles in the river. Al earlier this week the Pentagon released details of its deployment more than seven thousand troops are coming from across the country helicopter companies to move homeland security personnel engineer battalions to build vehicle barriers and fencing medical teams to treat casualties. Trump already sent more than two thousand national guard to the border earlier this year tobacco federal agents at the Brownsville VFW hall. A twenty year navy veteran named Juan Palomo wonders why active duty, and why now you have reserves and you have national guard. They use them every time that there's hurricanes flooding. What's the difference? Now, why don't they use them instead of taking people for active duty who have an a job to do? All ready to come down here and police the borders. The main caravan is estimated to have dropped from seven thousand to fewer than four thousand currently and it's still in southern Mexico but border agents. Say they'd been swamped with migrant families for months, Chris Cabrera is a local spokesman for the agents union. Everybody's making this huge deal about a caravan coming in caravans coming it's coming. We're getting five thousand a week in a real grand valley a week. That's a caravan in no self it's already here the problems here Cabrera is on the fence about whether the troops will help. He says the real problem is the asylum process that let's applicants linger inside the US for years, while their cases work through the overloaded court system yesterday. Trump said he plans to issue an executive order that would deny asylum to anyone who crosses unlawfully that would mean all immigrants seeking asylum. Must cross it illegal port of entry. But there's already a bottleneck at border crossings from San Diego to Brownsville a new crush of applicants could make things. Worse says Michael Siefert who works with the ACLU in south, Texas. He says they watched the Brownsville Matamoros international bridge every day. Even if you wanted to come in the right way, you're going to be prepared to wait. Eight to ten days out in the open in a place where there's no restroom facilities on the side of the bridge that right now is not safe because of the the drug wars. This unusually blustery political season has put US border towns. Front and center Brownsville mayor. Tony Martinez hears about the caravan supposedly coming to Russia's bridges but politicians saying they need to militarize his community to protect it. And if Democrats accused of being for open borders or tina's himself as a democrat running for re election next year. And he says he's just it's not about open borders. It's about secure borders, and we have secure borders. We've had border walls for twenty years. You know, this rhetoric is just beyond the pale. It is so absurd. And I know that some people will will believe it because they don't live here. They don't know it the mayor says come and visit after the election the borders, not such a scary place. John burnett. NPR news Brownsville..

Trump Brownsville Matamoros internat Progresso Mexico Texas Chris Cabrera NPR John Burnett US president Progresso Texas Brownsville Ari Shapiro Brownsville VFW hall Tony Martinez Progresso Mexico crossers Michael Siefert Ruben Trevino
"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Guatemala followed in order by Honduras, El Salvador, Haiti the Dominican Republic, Brazil Ecuador and Colombia ice air. Also flies detainees between US cities as jail populations. Evan flow, it charters smaller Gulfstream jets for deportations of high risk immigrants and it buys tickets on commercial flights when there aren't enough deportees to fill up. A charter flight though, this summer several major carriers refused to fly children who'd been separated from their parents by the government ice did not have a breakdown for the cost of a typical charter flight. But these international trips are expensive and inspector general's report three years ago calculated the cost of charter flights at about eight. Eighty five hundred dollars per hour regardless the number of passengers ice air relies on a network of contractors. The biggest is CSI aviation of Albuquerque whose contract with homeland security swelled from eighty eight to ninety six million dollars this year. The CEO is Alan way who was interviewed here on business podcast called president. And CEO, we move people out of the country and often we will move people in the country, and they will be in handcuffs way has run for several statewide offices in New Mexico as a Republican. He's a longtime donor two GOP causes including the Trump victory campaign. These are not the only federal contractors that provide services to ice for profit detention giants geo group and core civic run immigrant detention centers, scattered across the country further evidence that immigration enforcement is big business. John Burnett NPR news, Guatemala City the over budget spending on ice air. John justice. Is just one of the extra costs of the immigration crackdown throughout the federal government and NPR's Joel rose has been tracking that spending. Hi there. Joel. Hi, Steve what other extra costs are there? Well, if you think about the planes that John was describing in that piece as sort of the end of the process, there's a lot that happens before you get to that point. Right. More immigrants are being detained inside the US migrants are still showing up at the southwest border in big numbers and all of those immigrants and migrants are being detained by the department of homeland security and many are being deported back to their home countries all of that costs money and the budget for D H S, which includes immigration and customs enforcement is upwards of forty seven billion dollars. Isis budget included a record three billion just for custody operations. But that's still has not been enough. The administration is asking for a similar amount of money for this year in a Bill that is currently being debated on Capitol Hill, whereas is getting this extra money when they've clearly spent more than. In congress had allocated for this. Well, in the short term, they're just moving money around last month DHS said that they've reallocated about two hundred million dollars from their current year budget away from things like the coastguard and FEMA operations in order to cover ice, and it's over budget removal operations FEMA, that's the Federal Emergency Management agency, which responds to things like hurricane Florence the other day is it unusual that you would rob FEMA so to speak to pay for immigration, actually, it's not I mean agencies do things like this all the time. Right. The Obama administration did the same thing. When a surge of unaccompanied children arrived from Central America without their parents at the border in two thousand fourteen border agents can't turn them away under the loss of the administration had this unexpected expense of caring for these kids. And now something similar is happening. Again, the department of health and human services is carrying for a record number of unaccompanied children in government funded shelters and HHS has had to move about two hundred and sixty million. Dollars from other parts of its budget to cover that that includes money that was originally intended for the centers for disease control and the National Cancer Institute. Cancer research is being slighted for this. So can agencies continue. Improvising. Their way to the end of this policy. Maybe in the short run. But in the long run there are some major costs that you can't just reallocate your way out of. I mean, we've heard about the children who are separated from their parents at the border. Now, the department of homeland security wants to detain family units together indefinitely while their legal cases play out there may be legal hurdles to doing that. But leaving that aside it's going to cost a lot of money to detain those families, and it's the kind of money, you may not be able to find by just reallocating it from somewhere else in the budget. It's something that congress may be really will have to authorize more money for Joel. Thanks, very much you walk. That's NPR's. Joel rose. This is NPR news. DJ skeleton is the most severely wounded soldier to ever return to combat after a blasted Iraq, damaged his leg arm. I in pallet he had an instant credibility with the young man that he was leading at the time. This is leadership, by example. I'm Audie Cornish. Now, fourteen years after his injuries major DJ skeleton has retired his story this afternoon on all things considered from NPR news. Program.

Joel rose NPR department of homeland US Federal Emergency Management a congress CEO federal government Evan flow HHS Guatemala Audie Cornish geo group Guatemala City Haiti Cancer New Mexico El Salvador
"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The border so the government's looking everywhere for additional space even on military facilities which likely will be near as nice as the shelter i visited that's npr's john burnett john thanks for your reporting you that audie new york's attorney general has sued president trump and his three eldest children the says they used the trump foundation charity to help his presidential campaign and cover personal expenses as bobby allen reports new york prosecutors want to dissolve the foundation and force trump to pay nearly three million dollars there are strict rules about what charity money can and cannot be used for and according to new york attorney general barbara underwood civil suit president trump's foundation routinely flouted many of them pamela man formerly led the charities bureau and the new york attorney general's office it is absolutely for for private foundation like the term foundation to bend any of its assets on anything related to political activity and the suit says that is exactly what trump's charity was doing allegedly using his dacian as almost a personal atm for business expenses legal bills and to boost his presidential campaign if profound perversion of any charity to use it for private purposes for self aggrandizement as opposed to serving the public interest that's norm eisen a senior fellow at the brookings institution but could do it for a political campaign is the lowest of the low underwood's legal action calls for the trump foundation to be completely dissolved and that the president pay at least two point eight million dollars in restitution for what the state prosecutor calls persistent illegal activity on twitter trump called the lawsuit a quote ridiculous case brought by quote the sleazy new york democrats the trump foundation said the suit represents politics quote at its very worst claiming the group has donated nineteen million dollars toward the causes the investigation was first launched by former new york attorney general and fierce trump critic eric schneiderman who resigned last month amid a sexual misconduct scandal underwood who's been on the job for just about a month told cnn this type of action is not unusual but what makes it unique is the person at the center of it but there's no reason why a foundation owned and operated by sitting president should be exempt from the laws that we routinely apply to other foundations in its statement the foundation.

trump foundation cnn twitter norm eisen barbara underwood new york bobby allen attorney john burnett eric schneiderman npr prosecutor president brookings institution senior fellow charities bureau trump york nineteen million dollars
"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rain showers today a slight chance of thunderstorms this after noon watch out some of those thunderstorms could produce small hail this afternoon highs in the mid sixties mid to upper sixties actually quite warm today look for rain the evening rain after midnight rain after midnight may be heavy at times this is morning edition from npr news i'm david greene in culver city california and i'm rachel martin in washington dc we are following breaking news this morning out of austin texas where police say the suspect in a string of deadly bombings is dead here's austin police chief brian manley speaking earlier at a press conference he says the suspect died after a chase and standoff with police as members of the austin police department swat team approached the vehicle the suspect detonated a bomb inside the vehicle knocking one of our swat officers back and one of our swat officers fired at the suspect as well the suspect is deceased and has significant injuries from a blast that occurred from detonating a bomb inside his vehicle despite the significant development chief manley encouraged austin residents to stay cautious because we don't know where this suspect has spent his last twenty four hours and therefore we still need to remain vigilant to ensure that no other packages are devices have been left through the community austin police chief brian manley there for more we are joined by npr's john burnett reporting from austin this morning john whatever thirties said about this suspect what do we know about well it's an extraordinary mourning rachel thanks have really come to a conclusion so quickly we've learned that police chief acting police chief brian manley said he's a twenty four year old white male they believe responsible for all five bombings four that happened in austin one in shirts north of san antonio they're not identifying them yet they're waiting for the medical examiner his conclusion as well as notifying next of kin but you know he started out as a person of interest and in the.

david greene california rachel martin austin brian manley npr john burnett san antonio culver city washington texas austin police department swat twenty four hours twenty four year
"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from npr news i'm david greens and i'm rachel martin the trump administration is cracking down on a legal immigration which means some undocumented immigrants in this country have been reluctant to come out of the shadows for fear of getting deported by the immigration and customs enforcement agency or ice others say they have felt the need to speak out and that is what has gotten them in trouble with authorities a number of cases across the country have immigrant activists crying foul and claiming their first amendment rights are being violated npr's john burnett joins us now from austin he john hi rachel so what's going on here will the aclu an immigration lawyers say a couple dozen activists in volunteers around the country have been arrested or face fines for their work they claim the reason is retaliation though the government says if they're undocumented they're fair game all right so give us an example what evidence is there that federal immigration agents are targeting activists well one high profile case is that of maru more veal pondo she came from mexico city to the us on a tourist visa in nineteen ninetysix and then overstayed she turned into a wellknown activist in the northwest peeking out against isis detention policies in december those she she had been here for twenty two years with no criminal record is told her she's facing deportation they said she came to their attention when she was quoted in the media saying she's undocumented and it says right there in her charging document quote it should also be noted that she has extensive involvement with an aunt with antius protests and latino advocacy programs her reach field pondo at her home in bellingham washington i sense was that is what me a signal to to stop my work day public needs to know what's going on now the united nations office of human rights has spotlighted her case they're calling on ice not to retaliate against her because of her advocacy work and today she scheduled to be an immigration court in seattle to make this defense before a judge i mean this is a serious accusation right accusing ice of political retaliation is is the.

david greens john burnett austin us washington seattle npr rachel martin mexico antius bellingham united nations twenty two years
"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The trump administration is cracking down on illegal immigration which means some undocumented immigrants in this country have been reluctant to come out of the shadows for fear of getting deported by the immigration and customs enforcement agency or ice other say they have felt the need to speak out and that is what has gotten them in trouble with authorities a number of cases across the country have immigrant activists crying foul and claiming their first amendment rights are being violated npr's john burnett joins us now from austin he john hi rachel so what's going on here we'll be aclu an immigration lawyers say a couple dozen activists in volunteers around the country have been arrested or face fines for their work they claim the reason is retaliation though the government says if they're undocumented they're fair game all right so give us an example what evidence is there that federal immigration agents are are targeting activists well one high profile case is that of maru moravia pondo she came from mexico city to the us on a tourist visa in nineteen ninetysix and then overstayed she turned into a wellknown activist in the northwest speaking out against isis detention policies in december those she had been here for twenty two years with no criminal record is told her she's facing deportation they said she came to their attention when she was quoted in the media saying she's undocumented and it says right there in her charging document quote it should also be noted that she has extensive involvement with an aunt with anti ice protests and latino advocacy programs her reach field pondo at her home in bellingham washington i sounds was that is what's a signal to stop my work day public needs to know what's going on now the united nations office of human rights has spotlighted their case they're calling on ice not to retaliate against her because of her advocacy work and today she scheduled to be an immigration court in seattle to make this defense before a judge i mean this is a serious accusation right accusing ice of political retaliation is is the agency saying anything about this right the government thinks it's all hogwash and i says it does not retaliate against people for their political activity and disag just otherwise is irresponsible a spokesman emailed me and said the allegations are just wrong ice agents are too busy with their work to.

john burnett austin rachel us washington seattle maru moravia mexico bellingham united nations twenty two years
"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The trump administration is cracking down on a legal immigration which means some undocumented immigrants in this country have been reluctant to come out of the shadows for fear of getting deported by the immigration and customs enforcement agency or ice others say they have felt the need to speak out and that is what has gotten them in trouble with authorities a number of cases across the country have immigrant activists crying foul and claiming their first amendment rights are being violated npr's john burnett joins us now from austin he john hi rachel so what's going on here we'll be aclu an immigration lawyers say a couple dozen activists and volunteers around the country had been arrested or face fines for their work they claim the reason is retaliation though the government says if they're undocumented they're fair game all right so give us an example what evidence is there the federal immigration agents are targeting activists well one high profile case is that of meru moravia pondo she came from mexico city to the us on a tourist visa in nineteen ninetysix and then overstayed she turned into a wellknown activist in the northwest became out against isis detention policies in december those she she had been here for twenty two years with no criminal record is told her she's facing deportation they said she came to their attention when she was quoted in the media saying she's undocumented and it says right there in her charging document quote it should also be noted that she has extensive involvement with an aunt with anti protests and latino advocacy programs i reach field pondo at her home in bellingham washington percents was that is what sending me a signal to to stop my work public needs to know what's going on now.

john burnett austin rachel us meru moravia mexico washington twenty two years
"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"john burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Npr news i'm david green and i'm rachel martin the trump administration is cracking down on a legal immigration which means some undocumented immigrants in this country have been reluctant to come out of the shadows for fear of getting deported by the immigration and customs enforcement agency or ice others say they have felt the need to speak out and that is what has gotten them in trouble with authorities a number of cases across the country have immigrant activists crying foul and claiming their first amendment rights are being violated npr's john burnett joins us now from austin john hi rachel so what's going on here we'll be aclu an immigration lawyers say a couple dozen activists in volunteers around the country have been arrested or face fines for their work they claim the reason is retaliation though the government says if they're undocumented they're fair game all right so give us an example what evidence is there the federal immigration agents are are targeting activists well one high profile case is that of maru moravia pondo she came from mexico city to the us on a tourist visa in one thousand nine hundred ninety six and then overstayed she turned into a wellknown activist in the northwest speaking out against isis detention policies in december those she had been here for twenty two years with no criminal record is told her she's facing deportation they said she came to their attention when she was quoted in the media saying she's undocumented and it says right there in her charging document quote it should also be noted that she has extensive involvement with an aunt with anti ice protests and latino advocacy programs are reach field pondo at her home in bellingham washington i sense was that is less than mia signal to to stop my work day public needs to know what's going on now the united nations office of human rights has spotlighted her case they're calling on ice not to retaliate against her because of her advocacy work and today she's scheduled to be an immigration court in seattle to make this defense before a judge i mean this is a serious accusation right accusing ice of political retaliation is is the agency saying anything about this right the government thinks it's all hogwash and i says it does not retaliate against people for their political activity and disa.

Npr john burnett us washington seattle david green rachel martin austin maru moravia mexico bellingham united nations twenty two years