35 Burst results for "Johanns"

Israel Marks Memorial Day

People of the Pod

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Israel Marks Memorial Day

"It's almost trite at this point to talk. About how little. American memorial day an american independence day mean to. I don't want to say to every american. That's certainly not true. But too many maybe most americans so for our listeners who fall into that camp and you haven't had a chance to experience yamoussoukro and johann smooth in israel. Can you paint a picture for us of what those two days are like. So one of the things that i learned when i moved to israel in the early nineteen eighties was that the sadness day on the israeli calendar was actually not your show on holocaust memorial day. It was almost koran. And y'all mush law has great solemnity but y'all must be car on it's an open an ongoing wounds and think of it this way. I'm show we mourn the consequences of powerlessness and on yellow show. We mourn the consequences of our re empowerment and the price that we've paid for national software and y'all mostly clear on is a collective day of mourning. Everyone knows someone. Everyone knows a family. Everyone knows a kid who didn't come back and everyone has stories that were all cowry. This is a nation of soldiers. It's a nation of parents of soldiers and the ultimate israeli. Might nightmare is for a parent to bury a child and so even if you personally a fortunately not experienced that that's the deep fear that you've lived with

Israel Johann
"johanns" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:12 min | 4 months ago

"johanns" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"In the data center one ultimately a server what today's data center architectures another part of that same function somewhere else just to to optimize locality and the access to the data. So i think that that's certainly a takeaway for me that you can do exciting stuff when you just start from the the basic premise which is to say people are going to write some code. That code should be code. That is sort of a simple and easy to understand as possible. A code that is related to the business problem. Really that you're trying to solve. That doesn't have really that much information in it. About what does the underlying machine look like. Does it have servers. What is the sort of architecture of of those servers and how they're wired together are in racks. Do they have a whole lot of course or only a few cores. Just forget about all of that stuff. Just right my program in it friendly language and then figure out how to run it so i think if we take that perspective on the research that can really take us a long way. And maybe if you'll kind of indulge me. I'll i'll just share a little bit of additional perspective here on why it really is that taking servers out of the programming model really goes straight to the heart of the complexity and what makes cloud programming difficult and the analogy that i use here and really. I think it's more than an algae. It's a fairly direct connection is to fred brooks and at the work that he did in his seminal article no silver bullet where he really breaks down the complexity of programming and he talks about the central complexity that is that complexity which is inherent in whatever it is that you're doing the thing that i'm doing is is actually really complicated. Which is why have a complicated program. Because it's a finance trading application or or a very complex set of business rules for insurance or something like that right. that's that's complicated complexity. That's never going away. And then you have this other complexity which comes from your machine. And if you're writing in the nineteen seventies nineteen eighties and you wanna get high performance analog of high scale that today or taking advantage of cloud today what you really probably had to do is to write in assembly language because initially at least and then then what what change was of course that the high level languages caught up and they were able to do things like register allocation so figure out which data should go in which register memory. Layouts figure out that we want to lay out these these accesses to turner ray. It's going be in this part of memory and take that up away from the programmer. Worring about it so all of this complexity that used to be programs and certainly if you look at assembly language program today. There's still a reason for people still do it today. Right for very specific things but all that complexity that's accidental complexity and really. You wanna take that away now. In the cloud servers to me they represent basically pure accidental complexity servers. Have nothing at all to do with any business problem that anybody solving so server to me in programming or in a programming model is basically the same thing as register right. It's something that yeah it's there you really never want to think about what's going on. What and the same thing with what's going. What server or wires that server on. What is the locality and i think what this hints at that i think is really interesting and that is now becoming a focus of some of the work being done at berkeley including a lot of the work by joe heller. Steen whom i have worked with for a number of years his faculty advisor there as well as A number of other faculty. Now alvin charlie. Natasha crooks have are driving this direction on new directions and cloud program and they had a recent paper at cider which is a database conference. And really the idea there. I think connect to this notion which is to say that we need new ways of programming in the cloud. And my take on all of this. Is that the server. Being part of the programming model is sort of exactly the problem. And just like we've had What excites me about a lot of this work. That folks at berkeley are now. Starting to embark on is that it really recognizes that its language techniques that solved it for the registers right in the semi language program giving us these high level languages that those language techniques are going to likely be a big part of the future of service service now. There are a lot of other things that are happening at service that are very exciting to perhaps some of the most far out ones. But i think it's it's really fun to be around all at this work and i. It gives me really a lot of optimism and confidence that we will see much much easier ways of accessing the full power of cop computing. What are your predictions for. How service changes in the next five years five years is an interesting time scale. I certainly timescale where anything that's going to come out. And and be in. Production is probably in research today and people are already thinking about it. I think that the integration of state with With service run times. I think we're we're going to see that. I think we're going to see stateful solutions. Whether that's something like lambda store or something else. Perhaps more like cloudbursts that are offered as products that people are really using on it on a day to day basis. Perhaps they'll have interfaces that are more capable than key value stores. Perhaps even be running sequel. I think that these are things that we're going to see another thing that i think we're going to see is we're going to see that. The applications that work in service Continue to expand those not go zones. Those are really going to come down. They've already come down tremendously because of things like the you know. The colts start times because of things. Like the container image is being supported up too many gigabytes for the code deployment sizes. Run times getting longer being built on shorter intervals. All these things costs too. I think are going to be there already. Competitive for actually significant cost savings for almost all applications. But there were some exceptions. I think we're going to start seeing those things fall as well so i think that the excuse for saying you know we can't do it service. I think those are largely going to be going away. I think we're going to be seeing companies really being several. Is i another area. That i think we're going to see for sure is going to see more hardware supported in service right now. It's x eighty six architectures. We're going to see both different instruction sets as well as support for us. That's definitely coming in some form or another. We have folks at berkeley who are working on that. And my guess is that there are those in industry probably at compromise working on it and we just haven't heard about it yet and then i think sort of towards the end of that period. We're certainly going to be seeing in research to really compelling ways to to write programs that run at scale with very little of that accidental complexity. That is today associated with scale. Not quite sure. We're going to have that widely adopted. I don't expected to be widely adopted. But i expect us to really have clarity on that path so so so those are a few predictions. There are others that i could add as well. I think that the machine learning techniques are going to have a big role in optimizing server less computing and..

joe heller fred brooks Natasha alvin charlie five years berkeley both today nineteen seventies nineteen ei cores Steen next five years gigabytes eighty six
"johanns" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:10 min | 4 months ago

"johanns" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Definitely eight. Two of the problems. That vikram talked about my conversation. I think yon also referred to these Related but the problem of sharing state of aws lambda functions. As well as the problem of. I think what what you said also is like doing some sort of consensus operation between the different lambda functions. Can you explain why these these problems of sharing state and coming to an agreement on things why. Why is this particularly difficult with lambda functions. I mean can't we just use you know zookeeper or reddish or some kind of shared module to have the shared state that we need one of the things that makes shared state particularly difficult with lambda functions. Is that they are. You know it's in the name they're stateless that means that if their state that you care about that needs to be maintained that state is going to have to live somewhere else outside of the land of at least in today's mom and of course this stateless paradigm has a long history. You can go back to running a web server twenty five years ago and you would have had a similar model where you had a central repository of state and then a lot of stateless perl scripts back in the day. These days any one of a number of of languages and you know. Maybe i'll just say that managing state managing state while it's just here a difficult problem particularly at scale and server. Lewis has these fantastic scaling characteristics and a part of the way that the chiefs those is that it just completely dodges the state problem and just makes it someone else's problem now of course we do have stateful several of services things like object storage. We think about so amazon s. three google azure. They're similar offerings. We think about things like the databases that are billed per use. that is to say per operation. So that is i think something like for example azur cosmos db cloud data store on. Aws dynamo which is often used together with cloud functions and all of these. They work the challenges that if you have access particularly have any sort of frequenter fine grain access you have a big performance penalty because of the constant roundtrips and typically there is also a pretty significant costs associated with that as well that is to say it just gets expensive and again i think this is not just that the cloud provider is putting extraordinary pricing on. Its that that mechanism is just a heavyweight expensive thing to ron so this is definitely an area ripe for ongoing research. I know you talked to vikram about the cloudburst system that i also collaborated on and what we've done there. I think it's an interesting step is to really bring that data in close to the compute and so we did was we integrated cashing layer with the cloud functions. And the nice thing about cloud. I is that it has this causal consistency model which is a relatively weak consistency model compared to say what you would get from redness and that puts a little bit more burden on the programmer which is not really what we want to do in several lists computing. But you know we're working with trade offs here. What it does allow is it does allow the local caches to be really always up to date within the consistency model and it allows changes at different caches to be merged together very nicely at the back end so it really lets you run fast locally and then sort of slowly globally come to a consistent state state that's consistent with the semantics of your essentially your global shared memory model so that contrasts to other approaches so for example. I've been doing some work on file systems and looking to see how you can make something like a positive spouse system which you could compare to say faster s which is available in. Aws labra. Now how do you make that work with it. Strongly consistent semantics. How do you make that work in a context where you have clients that are really all over the place clients. That are sort of coming going all the time and frankly it's hard. There are some cases where we can accelerate things so for example. If we know that a function is going to have read only access to the file system we can play some tricks to take a snapshot and have a locally cached snapshot while you have concurrent rights happening other places and not needing coordinate but fundamentally these are these are hard problems if you have code and this is actually whether it's service or not several us if you have a model where you have one common view of state and you have programs that are manipulating that state. That are not in the same place just because of the speed of light basically. It makes a hard problem to have. Those programs bake progress quickly when you look at the the time for light to travel across. Data centers is many many cycles of a modern processor. So you as you mentioned. Collaborated with vikram on cloudbursts. Can you share any other learnings from that collaboration. One of the things that we did in cloudbursts is we decided to build the service stack the whole several stack from the ground up. And i think this is one line if research that contrasts with some other lines of research that are either bow understanding how the current cloud provider offerings work or taking the given what the current providers are doing and building on top of that another advantage of those approaches. Is that if you come up with something. It can likely go into industrial production and use relatively quickly at the same time. It also limits the types of questions that you can ask. And so i think one of the big takeaways for us is at least for research systems. It's really a good idea to build it from the ground up or perhaps using some other open source components but to really have a hackle platform where you can go and try things and really try and mix and match these components in different ways. And i think that without having the ability to integrate the cloud function run time with the storage we wouldn't have had that The ability to do this type of research. I think there are also opportunities in integrating the scheduling with a storage. Would the function run time. I think some of the things that are also particularly interesting are the potential for doing language level optimizations. That is to say if the cloud runtime knows that it's working with java scrip- program knows that it's working with a python program and sees those reads and writes to the storage and understands the storage. It opens up just this whole nother world of optimizations for pulling things apart running even part of a function on one place.

Two amazon twenty five years ago today eight one line google Lewis one One python program one common vikram java takeaways one place the problems things azur azure
"johanns" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:14 min | 4 months ago

"johanns" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"What do we know about the implementation of functions as a service at gigantic cloud platforms. Like what do we know about how. Aws lambda is actually implemented. There are number of things that we can measure. We can measure the startup times. We can measure how quickly they scale so these are things that we can kind of learn from the outside they have provided us now with container images and their their. Api's they're run time api so we have a sense of how things work sort of from the application perspective and how that gets wired in for a long time. Aws was rather tight lipped about what they were doing. But they do have some patent filings that you can see that are from the early years from around the time when lambda launched and they walk through things like the life cycle of these events. And how recycle the containers. How they do predictive modeling in order to try to figure out when they should leave something. Running versus one should shut it down. And so. I don't know whether they've built everything. That's describing those patents. Probably they built. Some of it probably. They've built a number of other things that aren't describing the patents. But that's one place where we can learn things. There's also some work done Paper thousand eighteen paper peeking behind the curtains of service where the researchers academics went in and really tried to reverse engineer. What was happening by probing those environments and trying to get a sense for how the networking works. So we've learned some things that way and that's certainly work that i'd recommend for somebody who's really interested in the technology firecracker from aws is open source so that is the platform that allows these lightweight virtual machines to be launched very very quickly and i'm hopeful that will continue to be contributing to the open-source ecosystem. Now they're not the only ones who've been doing so the azure functions platform is largely or completely open source and has been from day one. So you know that's something that people can go and they can see. How microsoft does it. Ibm has opened whisk. I'm not sure whether the open source project is exactly the same thing that they run in production on their cloud. But i imagine it's similar and google has open sourced a number of pieces of their service infrastructure so for example provides isolation for cloud functions as well as for app engine. I believe and they also have open sourced k. Native which is the service platform that can run in a number of settings. It runs on top of cooper netties and it also runs as a hosted service in google's cloud in.

microsoft google day one one place thousand eighteen paper Aws cooper netties k. Native
"johanns" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:41 min | 4 months ago

"johanns" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Welcome to the show. Jeff super excited to be here. You've been looking at service computing from the vantage point of berkeley and talked to a number of other people from berkeley about service. Talk to john. Stoica and vikram. She conti from your point of view. Why has berkeley taken an interest. In service computing. Berkeley has a long history of prominent Research in computer science and systems in particular. Lots of really cutting edge work was done here and think the faculty are always looking for that next thing. That's coming down the pipe and can we be on top of an and ideally ahead of that trend and in the context of service computing. This is something that we latched onto people at berkeley. I wasn't actually the first one myself. Yaas okay eric. Jonas published pirate work back in so john's dog. Eric jonas. They published a pirate work back in two thousand sixteen. Two thousand seventeen were were really saying. Wow service allows us this access to supercomputer scale resources for basically anyone. So i think that people kind of latched onto. Hey there's something new. There's something really different that's happening in the cloud and we should really pay attention that we should try to understand what the implications of this new technology are what to service make easier. What does it make more complicated. What are the trade offs in using services from our perspective services computing is really about making life easier for programmers. That's the big change. Now it makes a number of changes so it certainly makes life easier for operators as well in some cases even completely removing the need for certain system administration responsibilities so everything that's complicated about servers and by that we mean things like setting them up making sure that they are patched for security Making sure that when they fail application is responding in the correct way so that continue to deliver service all of these concerns. Go away the handed to the cloud provider. Cloud provider has ways of automating them away. So that for them. It's also much much easier to manage. So they can imagine for many many companies at scale so the program are also has this ability to basically write code and their favorite programming language upload loaded to the cloud and then it just runs not have to worry about it anymore. And that is i. Think in many ways fulfilling kind of this promise of the cloud to give you that effortless access to scale so the downside of that is that you do have to change how you program a little bit so i think that lambda was successful because it allowed you to bring along your existing libraries logic bring along your existing languages so there's a fair degree of continuity on the other hand if you really are going to make programming simpler you're going to be writing simple programs and that means that you're probably going to be rewriting your programs at the same time so you do have to learn to think a little bit

Schleyer smith berkeley
Serverless Properties with Johann Schleier-Smith

Software Engineering Daily

03:41 min | 4 months ago

Serverless Properties with Johann Schleier-Smith

"Welcome to the show. Jeff super excited to be here. You've been looking at service computing from the vantage point of berkeley and talked to a number of other people from berkeley about service. Talk to john. Stoica and vikram. She conti from your point of view. Why has berkeley taken an interest. In service computing. Berkeley has a long history of prominent Research in computer science and systems in particular. Lots of really cutting edge work was done here and think the faculty are always looking for that next thing. That's coming down the pipe and can we be on top of an and ideally ahead of that trend and in the context of service computing. This is something that we latched onto people at berkeley. I wasn't actually the first one myself. Yaas okay eric. Jonas published pirate work back in so john's dog. Eric jonas. They published a pirate work back in two thousand sixteen. Two thousand seventeen were were really saying. Wow service allows us this access to supercomputer scale resources for basically anyone. So i think that people kind of latched onto. Hey there's something new. There's something really different that's happening in the cloud and we should really pay attention that we should try to understand what the implications of this new technology are what to service make easier. What does it make more complicated. What are the trade offs in using services from our perspective services computing is really about making life easier for programmers. That's the big change. Now it makes a number of changes so it certainly makes life easier for operators as well in some cases even completely removing the need for certain system administration responsibilities so everything that's complicated about servers and by that we mean things like setting them up making sure that they are patched for security Making sure that when they fail application is responding in the correct way so that continue to deliver service all of these concerns. Go away the handed to the cloud provider. Cloud provider has ways of automating them away. So that for them. It's also much much easier to manage. So they can imagine for many many companies at scale so the program are also has this ability to basically write code and their favorite programming language upload loaded to the cloud and then it just runs not have to worry about it anymore. And that is i. Think in many ways fulfilling kind of this promise of the cloud to give you that effortless access to scale so the downside of that is that you do have to change how you program a little bit so i think that lambda was successful because it allowed you to bring along your existing libraries logic bring along your existing languages so there's a fair degree of continuity on the other hand if you really are going to make programming simpler you're going to be writing simple programs and that means that you're probably going to be rewriting your programs at the same time so you do have to learn to think a little bit

Berkeley Jeff Super Stoica Eric Jonas Conti Vikram John Jonas Eric Lambda
The Traders Journey: Be Kind

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:43 min | 5 months ago

The Traders Journey: Be Kind

"Do not. The episode of the trade is journey and this was a little bit left. Fields is not quite as practical. Say record caving keeping emotions in check in that sort of thing. Today is all about a different subject. It's going to be equally powerful and important too but not as a checklist autumn. For that way. And it's it's about you and how you carry yourself sates congress but on is this you are going to have a couple of people in your business as a traitor. There's not many. Let's be honest usually as you yourself. Your internal thoughts and the shots in an office in johann wherever it may be before enough to be traveling at the time You've got opportunity to traffic pretty much anywhere as long as you have. An internet connection so Exercising communists. it's it's a. it's a win win. Now let me give you a direct reactions to white can be beneficial. One of the people in your team will be. You'll broker okay now. If you tried with the crypto broker chances on you're you're never gonna speak to anybody because the customer says terrible tight that had a dealing desk such you can't call up and have any form of customer service yet because they are just online behemoths and they basically just shown us but if you're traveling with traditional platforms offer crypto and there are plenty at the most of them most of them. These days are in bitcoin. The theorem so if you are in those areas you can actually call up and speak to somebody now. If you are with. The other crypto taught bravados. You still got enough support. You've got chat function this sort of thing. The bottom line is this. I can tell you right now. Many occasions this happened to me. Now you might. You might have something that you questioning. Maybe you entered into a try that you shouldn't have been entered into in your view. Maybe there was something happened. Like you got stopped out of a try. When you feel that you should have been maybe you're looking at the underlying mocking you trading. Something like a Safety or spread betting in the uk. And you shouldn't have been filled in that. There's no reason to price didn't actually get what i'm getting at is not. There was something that you want question. And if you ought to get your way you will have. It'd be entered into biking that trade or you'll have not made a loss or your model made a prophet bottom line is if you attack people. They're less likely to want to help. Pick it's pretty simple another exam. Look this across every area of life to be absolutely honest with you. Think about your internet provider. How annoying is it when you're internet goes out when it drops and it doesn't work it's patchy and you call up your internet provider. You speak to someone who then might not have english as a first language in many cases and for some reason a lot of people really angry and they get this condescending attitude towards the customer service representative now. Don't forget this customer service representative. Is there to help you. Despite that fact we feel like they are the enemy. It's their fault. They just copy of the brand now. It's not going to help. It was if your objective is to get somebody out to your house physically to to check your internet connection or have a free month on your internet connection. It's unlikely that you'll being rude to somebody that you're going to get your way now. It's a fairly blanket statement to suggest that being kind to everybody is something that is going to benefit you longtime but it really is We've got a philosophy here to kill people with kindness We have a guaranteeing place. We have a money back guarantee in place and we generally avoid any type of conflict. Now some people are gonna use it against us and that's fine because you know what goes around comes around. It's not gonna help them. It doesn't worry us because in our in our vision to this business and what we're doing and clients is to help you and to continue to be kind to. How does that work in this example. Well you think that we'd right you didn't you didn't get what you wanted applied for. Whatever might be and you decide you want your money back. Let's say as an example we give it back to you because it's within that ten day period fine no questions asked money back guarantee we offer you. Go good feelings about us now. When you're ready you come back and you work with us. You'll tell people ballots. It's an example of how things work coming back to the trading side of things. You wanna get put into a try you you being walking through it step by step. This customer service representative you knockin regular day. You're going to keep them happy. And digging to work for you on an outcome they become. You'll buddy buddy they listen jessica reading. You know this. I understand. Craig i get it. Let me just speak with my supervisor. Will try and get this resolved as soon as possible. And you know then if you've got them in the right place and you're being kind to them you do position yourself in the way that you can go okay. Well if if there's even any possibility of me getting the outcome that off to hear that. I'm going to get it because you have that person on side now in trading we don't have many people in our teams like i said we just don't have many people in our team's your broker is one of those people be kind to them. Have an a good dialogue with them. Work with them. And you'll get better outcomes for yourself and it doesn't mean that we look at this in a selfish way and so you know what being caught to people. That's a selfish thing. Well if that's the only way that you can become the paypal then galahad knock yourself out my selfish m. f. on the plot because it's going to help you it's going to serve you and it's going to help you going for the same thing can be said if you're at different events or in different chat groups. That's a big thing crypto traders. We're in groups right. See somebody who doesn't agree with you attack them if you see somebody who's making a mistake. Don't call map for being stupid if somebody needs. Help explain to them in a non condescending way how they can go about improving.

Johann Congress Buddy Buddy UK Jessica Craig Paypal
Georges Bizet, Christmas Carols in Classical Music

Classics for Kids

05:13 min | 6 months ago

Georges Bizet, Christmas Carols in Classical Music

"Hello welcome to classics for kids. I'm naomi lewin. This week in celebration of the christmas season some classical compositions that involve christmas carols in the middle of the nineteenth century. An englishman named william chatterton dix came up with christmasy words. What child is this for the old folk song green sleeves years later when raytheon williams wrote his fantasia on green sleeves. He probably had a pretty good idea that the peace would get played a lot at christmas. Time the fantasia. Green sleeves was originally part of an opera but some pieces of christmas. Carol classical music written to be used in church johann sebastian bach was an excellent organised. Who spent years writing church music. Bach based a whole set of variations on the old german. Carol come mojo known in english as from heaven above earth. I come that same. Carol turns up in auto nikolas christmas overture which even has acquired to sing it. There's another german christmas. Carol in which. Mary sings joseph dearest joseph mine asking joseph for help rocking the baby. Jesus to sleep. Yohannes brahms used that in song. He wrote to honor another baby the son of his good friend joseph or josef in german. Walk him brahms. Like the inside. Joke of the to joseph's and he liked the wonderful tune which he gave to the biala A couple of centuries earlier than brahms was composing in germany mach. One chaperone ta was composing in france. Chaperone ta came up with a whole set of what he called. Carols for instruments. The title of this one is where are those cheerful shepherds headed. One of the top ten favorite christmas carols actually has music by classical composer even though that's not what he wrote it for felix mendelssohn composed a song to celebrate yohannes gutenberg. The man who invented the movable type printing press mendelssohn didn't like the words to that song and told his publisher. He thought the music could be recycled for something else. Maybe a wedding piece but nothing really religious. After mendelssohn died someone in england discovered that the music went perfectly with a poem by charles wesley. The brother of john. Wesley who founded methodism Pieces that use christmas carols were meant to be played at christmas time. Utter reno raspy composed a musical description of three paintings by italian renaissance artist. Sandro botticelli one of those paintings is the adoration of the maj. I in which maj i. The three kings are part of a huge crowd admiring the baby. Jesus resp- iggy sets the scene by quoting an old church chant anyb- any emmanuel which you know as the christmas. Carol o come o come emmanuel. The three kings feature in another piece that uses a christmas carol. The farren dole from the arlesienne sweet by george. Bc opens with an old french. Carol called the march of the kings

Carol Naomi Lewin William Chatterton Dix Raytheon Williams Mary Sings Joseph Dearest Jose Joseph Yohannes Brahms Johann Sebastian Bach Nikolas Yohannes Gutenberg Mendelssohn Josef Brahms Felix Mendelssohn Reno Raspy Germany France Charles Wesley Sandro Botticelli Wesley
Brittens Ceremony of Carols

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:36 min | 6 months ago

Brittens Ceremony of Carols

"The recent. Tom hanks movie greyhound. The captain of destroyer leads a convoy across the u boat infested north atlantic during world war. Two not say that the trip from the us to britain in nineteen forty two was dangerous is not only an understatement of epic proportion it offers the context for the extraordinary composition of benjamin britten's ceremony of carols britten was arguably the most important british composer of the twentieth century. After three years in north america. He found himself in the middle of the atlantic aboard a swedish cargo vessel trying to return to his native england instead of panicking midst. The harrowing circumstances were too dangerous crossing. He wrote two. Choral works the him to saint cecilia and the ceremony of carols and as the name suggests the ceremony of carols consists of ten carols frame by the chant. Hodie a christie's not to est- today christ is born both the beginning and the end the carol employed day from the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries and are sung in middle and early modern english as well as in latin one. Care all deo gratias. Thanks be to god. Sung a combination of middle english. And latin tells the story of genesis three while the texas primarily about the fall the carols musical energy and emphasis is on thankfulness specifically thankfulness to god for providing a savior who sets things right. The most beloved carol in the work is this little bay. And despite the sentimental sounding title of this carol the tax describes the all out battle that this babe of bethlehem wages against satan himself the tax was written by robert southwell catholic priest who was hanged drawn and quartered by queen elizabeth. The first. here's how it goes this little babes as old as come to rifle. Satan's fold all hell doth add his presence quake though he himself for cold do shake for in his week. Unarmored wise the gates of hell he will surprise. Jeff's version of new york's classical music station w. Q x are caused this little babe his favorite christmas carol in south wales words and britain's music's spurgeon the battle between good and evil is one by quote a baby born in obscure poverty and it's depicted quote not by a huge orchestra and massive voices but by harp in a choir of children will britain the man who pulled all of this off musically could hardly be described as an orthodox christian definitely not a devout one his personal life including his sexual proclivities where the source of numerous controversies during his life even after his death still he was at least if this work composed during a potentially deadly voyage any proof so christ haunted man. Believe it or not in this. Britain's not unusual see so much of the west great art is inspired by christian themes in fact it's impossible to imagine the west cultural heritage without christianity and though much of our greatest art was created by people of unquestionable. Fates johann sebastian. Bach others were produced by people whose faith is unknown known to be non-existent the power that these works hold to move us is at route the power of the story that makes the work possible. The story that explains where human creativity like fully evident in the amazing talent of benjamin britten comes from in the first place and in this case to use virgins words. The story of god sneak attack on the forces of evil. Something will soon celebrate

Carols Britten Benjamin Britten Britain Saint Cecilia Tom Hanks Robert Southwell North Atlantic Carol Christie North America Atlantic England Bethlehem Queen Elizabeth Satan Spurgeon Texas South Wales United States
Who Was George Fredrick Handel

5 Minutes in Church History

04:20 min | 8 months ago

Who Was George Fredrick Handel

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode, we're talking about a composer George, Frederic Handel and I resist the urge to have upon here and say that we going to get a handle on handle. But let's get a handle on hindle. He was born in sixteen, Eighty five in Hallo- Germany the importance of that year is it was the same year as the birth of Johann Sebastian Bach sixteen eighty five was a great year for the birth of composers apparently, and now Bach to handle and I promise. I'm done with punts. Well handle was originally set to be a lawyer but he loved music and he quickly showed his prowess as an organist and at composing, and so he said off to be a musician. He spent some time traveling around Italy and then he was musician for the elector of Hanover. Now, the importance of the elector of Hanover was that he was the heir to the throne of England and when Queen and died childless the elector of Hanover became King George the. First of England handle moved with him to London and the year was seventeen off and from then on hand spent the rest of his life in Britain, and he's while born in Germany and German descent is known as an English composer under George. The first t founded the Royal Academy of Music, which he directed for fifteen years early on in London Handel composed for King George the first his famous water music or as in handles beloved German Tongue vassar music. The first time it was performed for King George loved it so much. He ordered it played again and then he ordered it played again. So debuted three times in a row in seventeen seventeen. After. He finished his time handle finished his time at the Royal Academy of Music. He spent much of the Seventeenth Thirties writing operas, and then he said about to write what might be considered his magnum opus the Messiah. Handel. was by all accounts obsessed with work. We would say today a workaholic and he poured himself into his work as a composer as a musician. Sadly in seventeen fifty one he went blind and then in seventeen, fifty, nine, the age of seventy four he died in, London? He was buried in Westminster Abbey and of course, the grand organ of the Abbey and the choir played his beloved. Messiah. Handel one said I should be very sorry if I only entertained them referring to the people who listen to his music, he wanted people to not only be entertained but to beat moved by his music and that was certainly the case with the Messiah. The Messiah was first performed in Dublin on April thirteen, seventeen, forty two it was performed the next year in London and King George the second was in the audience attending and when he got to the chorus for part to the Hallelujah Chorus King George, the second was moved that he stood up, and of course, when the king stands everyone else stands in. So the whole theater stood alongside of the king and that started tradition of standing during the Hallelujah course. The Messiah is in three parts. Part one begins with prophecies of the. Coming Messiah from Isaiah and Psalms, and takes us right to the shepherds watching their flock at night on Bethlehem's hillsides. Then part two covers the passion, the suffering in-depth of Christ and ends with that Hallelujah course part three picks up with Christ's resurrection and continues with his ascension and what theologians call his present session in glory, and then it ends with the day of judgement to come as the Messiah the king comes in glory. Well, that is Handel's Messiah and when he was finished writing the musical score, he signed it s D. G. Solely Dale Gloria.

King George Frederic Handel Royal Academy Of Music London Handel Hallo- Germany London Hanover Hallelujah England Johann Sebastian Bach Westminster Abbey Seventeenth Thirties Isaiah Italy Bethlehem Dale Gloria Handel. Queen Britain Dublin
Johann Neem, Western Washington University: Higher Education Meta-Vocabularies

The Academic Minute

01:58 min | 9 months ago

Johann Neem, Western Washington University: Higher Education Meta-Vocabularies

"Today on the academic minute Johan Neem professor in the Department of History at western Washington University discusses three men vocabularies and why the least dominant could be the most important. My research argues that our debates over higher education have three better vocabularies, the utilitarian, the pragmatic and the virtue ethical. The first two are dominant especially among citizens and policymakers too utilitarian colleges must satisfy the preference of higher education's consumers to pragmatists including many elected leaders. Institutions must consistently evolve to meet the changing needs of society and the economy. To Virtue. At this on the other hand, colleges have internal goods of their own such as the cultivation of knowledge and curiosity about the world and these internal birds require practices to sustain them including, valuing basic over applied research and teaching. To virtual emphasis, colleges must change the world rather than just adapt to fit it. That's how university is structured and what faculty members and students do while in college shaped the ultimate educational and scholarly outcomes. Many of today's most popular form seek to make higher education faster cheaper standardized but threatened the kinds of academic practices that cultivate intellectual virtues. By understanding these Meta vocabularies, we can make sense of the ways in which participants in the public conversation around higher education talk past each other. We can recover a shared language for Liberal Education I. Hope my research will help college students, their parents, voters, and policymakers. Makers understand the different perspectives that we can use to think about the purposes of college. Ultimately, in my research I wanted to understand why professors like me are uncomfortable with reforms that to many others seem to make common sense. By identifying these Meta vocabularies. I was able to see what was at stake for all who care about higher education's future that was Johann name of western Washington University.

Western Washington University Johan Neem Professor Johann Department Of History
It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | 9 months ago

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
Clara Schumann

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:02 min | 10 months ago

Clara Schumann

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will manteca today's musician was a piano virtuoso and composer at a time when women rarely performed or wrote their own work although many of her compositions remain unknown her collaborations with her husband resulted in one of the most fruitful musical partnerships at the early nineteenth century. Let's talk about Clara Schumann. Clara Josephine was born in Eighteen nineteen in Leipzig Germany her father Frederik peak was a sought after piano instructor. Frederick married one of his students, Marianne and together they had five children, Clara and her four brothers. Is Five her parents divorced Clara, and her brothers became the legal property of their father. Clara's mother remarried and moved to Berlin which limited contact between them two letters, periodic visits. Frederick Recognize Clara's early musical talents and dedicated himself to her musical education. Under his tutelage she studied Violin Piano Music, theory, and business. Frederick even sent Clara around Germany to study with some of the finest composition teachers in Leipzig Dresden and Berlin. In eighteen twenty nine at the age of eleven, Clara made her performance debut in Leipzig Clara began touring in Germany France and Austria. She was one of the few pianists of her time who played by memory and she performed not only her own compositions but also those that were more well known by Johann Sebastian Bach Domenico Scarlatti. Ludwig. Van Beethoven and Robert Schumann. Robert Schumann due to a self inflicted injury to his right hand was the only composer among his contemporaries who did not play his own work. Clara took on his work for him. In nineteen thirty, one at the age of twelve she gave her first performance of his piano composition papillon. Over the course of the next five years, Clara, became wildly infatuated with Robert Schumann the match made her father very concerned at that point Clara was already famous and successful performer. Robert was a relatively unknown composer. Frederic. Saw The match as beneath Clara and so at the age of Seventeen Clara's father center to Dresden in hopes of severing ties between the two. But as is the case with many famed love stories. Parental intervention didn't go as planned. Despite, Clara's demanding performing and touring schedule. Clara and Robert wrote to each other in secret over many months using an intermediary to deliver their letters. When the two decided to wet. Strong resistance from Clara's father in nineteenth century Germany, a woman could not marry without her father's consent and Frederick refused to give it. Robert took Frederick to court over his refusal and Frederick countered with charges against Robert After nearly a year of legal battles the court finally sanctioned the marriage the couple married in September eighteen forty one day before Clare Clara's twenty first birthday and settled in Leipzig for years. Later, Robert suffered a severe breakdown and the couple relocated to Dresden at the recommendation of Roberts doctors. Over the course of their marriage Clara was pregnant ten times and had eight children despite having such a large family Clark continued to perform, compose, teach piano, and support Robert in his career. Despite Clare's existing professional success, it was Robert's career that was prioritized in the marriage nevertheless clar used the arrangement to her advantage. She performed her own arrangements of Roberts pieces during her concert tours and Robert in kind what insert phrases from Clarence compositions

Frederick Recognize Clara Clara Schumann Clara Josephine Leipzig Clara Robert Robert Schumann Leipzig Dresden And Berlin Germany Leipzig Robert After Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Frederik Peak Johann Sebastian Bach Domenico Berlin Van Beethoven Instructor Clare Ludwig Marianne
Music that Imitates Inanimate Objects

Classics for Kids

05:17 min | 10 months ago

Music that Imitates Inanimate Objects

"Hello. I'm Naomi Lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. It's pretty obvious that at the beginning of the second movement of Beethoven's Eighth Symphony The Orchestra is imitating something mechanical. That's not a clock ticking. It's a metronome, the machine that was invented to show exactly how fast or slow a piece of music should be played before the metronome. The only way to show the tempo of a piece was by writing fast slow, very fast or very slow usually in Italian on the music. But a composer had no way of telling you exactly how fast very fast was. That's where the. Comes in. In, the early eighteen hundreds Dutch inventor named Dietrich Nichols Vinko perfected a machine that could be adjusted to take at set speeds, but Vinko wasn't a good salesman. So he didn't get credit for it. A friend of Beethoven's Johann. NEPOMUK melt. Seoul was the one who took out the patent on the metronome and marketed it. So he gets the credit. When you see 'em m equals sixty on a piece of music. The M M's stands for metals. metronome equals sixty a metronome marking of sixty is one tic per second, which is about the speed if your pulse. battleplan was the only composer to write music imitating an inanimate object something that's not alive. He wasn't even the only one to write music takes composers love to put clocks into their music. That's the symphony number one, hundred, one by Franz Joseph Haydn, which is nicknamed the clock for pretty obvious reasons. Hungarian composers ultime Kodi put a musical clock into his opera Janos. There's also a famous fairy tale character for Houma clock striking midnight was very important and very scary Sergei. prokofiev wrote a ballet Cinderella including the clock. One last. A tick that slightly off balance, there's a piece by American composer. Leroy Anderson called the syncopated clock. In this piece, the clock goes tick Tock Tick Tock and then suddenly. It does something different syncopation in music is when you shift the accent from where you expect it. To, someplace you don't. Leroy Anderson loved inanimate objects. He wrote another piece imitating one that's just about disappeared these days before there were computers with printers, there was the typewriter. In music, it's not just instruments that imitate inanimate objects sometimes singers due to. That's from the first act of Jacques Offenbach, opera the tales of Hoffmann in which the hero Hoffman falls in love with a woman named Olympia or whether he thinks Olympia is a woman but she's really a mechanical doll in the middle of singing her mechanical music she runs out of steam and someone has to wind her back up. Played. Some wonderful jokes with their mechanical music

Leroy Anderson Beethoven Olympia Dietrich Nichols Vinko Naomi Lewin Seoul Franz Joseph Haydn Ultime Kodi Jacques Offenbach M M Salesman Houma Sergei. Prokofiev Hoffmann Hoffman
The Story of N0tail

theScore Esports Podcasts

08:18 min | 10 months ago

The Story of N0tail

"Heard of og you know how a rag tag group of discards Cinderella their way to not one but two of the biggest wins in the history of sports, how a pub star a quitter. A coach and a comedian. Defied every conceivable expectation and made history. Friendship. then. There's the long-suffering sweetheart who made it all happen the heart and soul of Oji the God in whose image it was created. The Flower, the rainbow, the river, the big daddy himself. Johann Soon Stein. The Feisty adorable little. Viking. You know is no tail was born and raised in the East sports powerhouse. That is Denmark like a lot of Doda grates he got his start in heroes of new worth where at the age of fifteen he met his future best friend and brother in arms fly it feels it feels great winning winning for a fourth time. Be. Easy Really great man? Say together fly in no tail took Hawn by storm. Once that scene began to die down, they transitioned to Doda to. Set their sights on a new challenge. The biggest event is sports had ever seen the international twenty thirteen. Let's say, no, till was confidence I'll agree I like. Best they get maybe a little too confidence double guilty by Dr. Five. Days destroy the triple, all trump annual tighten the top wrecks and g G. Come down fanatic. At being limited by the Malaysians Orange bullivant, themselves would unfortunately fly in no tail never managed to cement themselves as the kings of this new game like they wanted. Unable to find a group of truly like minded players once valued loyalty and synergy over raw individualistic talent. They spent years hovering just below the top tier Gareth snow. This tournament it didn't go the way you guys wanted it to go what what do you think? The reasons were. All in all. I. Think there's been a bunch of things coming to this disappointing result and. There's not so much could have done about it i. think we did try our best of somehow they'd always find themselves at the butt end of a disappointment a- disbanding. Kick team secret. We did feel like a super team, but then there all this letter tournament. Throat they got secret by the jugular and they take ended up losing. That hills really hard. After I kind of saw it coming just months to the next ti fly. No tells found themselves kicked from the very team. They had just joined. The crazy thing is that more than perhaps any other player? The community loved no tail. He was funny out of all the things you could have decided to call yourself. Why Big Daddy. You fiery. Give me. Bottle war. And above all friendly at the end of the day no matter where you were from or who you cheered for. It was hard not to love this little motherfucker. My biggest inspiration is cease from the dog whisperer a lot of people laugh when I say it goes it is kind of a funny nickname that he has but then again, people are the one of my nicknames. So we got that in common. Out of yours big daddy everyone wanted nothing but the best for no tail to see him win the Big One. Unfortunately, it just didn't seem to be in the cards when I picked him up last year after the first thing he told me that I make my decision next year I will be. Very rough because it is there's so much built towards his no matter no matter how much I tried to look from that every year the biggest tournament in you spores is made out to be such a big thing falling short of what you you're aiming for in terms of placement. Has Been Very harsh lesson, but it's always been one that I've been very great for Ford. Dan shows hits always sucks. It felt as if he and fly were being systematically screwed over by the e sport they adored. As if no roster could ever be what they really wanted a team that wasn't just a business but a group of friends a family, it can bring out the worst in people and forces you to be a good teammate because team game you only succeed together and you lose together if you're not a good teammate, but you're a great player. Probably. Not Going to get where he far vice versa. So they said fuck it and founded their own organization Oh. Gee thing idea behind the O. J. is a mindset of friendship but also wants to win. We just wanted to do things right? Like do things our way what did it stand for? You ask well as it turns out a lot of things. or nothing what does it stand for her? Some people say Ranga Ganga I say I don't fucking know. Wasn't exactly clear what G was supposed to signify, but in embodied an obvious. And pithy comes with if you're if you're by nature. Not. Somebody. WHO's very empathic and you gotta you gotta learn which is a great thing learning empathy is. Very. Good for people at, but Doda kind of forces you to do it if you don't do it. You're most likely going to run into some trouble in team and his maybe GONNA lose your this game. That's GONNA lose your disqualified. You're not going to get where you want. Then you're going to sit there like why didn't work by prioritizing confidence and come robbery over results fly in no tail built a juggernaut from the ground up. One? That Iran solidified itself as the most consistently accomplished roster Doda has ever

Doda Johann Soon Stein Hawn Robbery Dr. Five Denmark Ford Iran DAN
"johanns" Discussed on The Drug Science Podcast

The Drug Science Podcast

08:06 min | 10 months ago

"johanns" Discussed on The Drug Science Podcast

"Went and tried to still have Butler vodka if the shop that sells it catches, you can bring. The police and the police will come and take you away. So that shop doesn't need to be violent it need to be intimidating. They've got the power of the law to uphold their property rights. Okay. Now imagine you steal a bag cannabis or bag next zero bag of cocaine, right? Obviously the guys yourself and your neighborhood, and they certainly will be someone selling it in your neighbor. Those guys can't call the police the police would come and arrest you. So they have to Fi-. Now, if you're a dealer, you don't want me having a fight every day. See you want to establish a reputation for being such a bad ass that no one's GonNa fuck with the the the war on drugs creates a war for drugs as Charles Bowden Pettit right and if you want to know how much of that and that's what a large partner or a large part of what we're seeing play these kids fighting to control. Drug distribution rates right and to have a reputation for being so frightening that you won't try and fuck with drug trade. Right the French sociologist Philippe Bourgeoisie says the prohibition creates a culture of terror because you never cost the law, you have to create a culture terry to be frightening right and if you want to know how much of that violence is caused by prohibition, just to ask yourself, where are the violent alcohol dealers? Just, ahead of going shoot of Heineken in the face now costs. No but exactly that happened to alcohol prohibition and it ended the day alcohol was legalized, right? I mean one of the fascinating people read my bitcoin spent time with in Buenos Iras was. Sebastian American who's better known by his name Easter Hab which was Pablo Escobar Junior. And I remember. Sebastian. He should also have in your podcast. What are Intelligent. Thoughtful. Person is by remember him saints me you know the only thing my father ever truly feared was the legalization of drugs. Drugs have been legal. My Dad would have been a used car salesman and you would have never heard of him. I remember him saying this to me. It was really weird experience because first time we met. He said Oh come meet me there's a Burger King Niro I. Live Psycho to this Burger In suburban Boorda's Iras. Empty except for me seeing in. Meet me in the quarter so it was just by the kind of soft play. Those balls kids. So say that at this. Burger King. It seems to be there to the world the world at he walks in any look so much like his dad. It was just such a surreal like a weird stress free where you're begging Pablo Escobar comes in but he's a really remarkable and again you think about that dynamic the plays out on the streets of London that war four drugs is catastrophic enough on the streets of London when it takes over whole cities like see that ours where I spent time in in Mexico. It is unimaginably terrible. This is the single biggest cause of death in the world that we simply end. One of the things I find what what's great about your book that you go the history and the history of alcohol prohibition and Harry? Is Fascinating not only because it is the origins of the beginning of the war on drugs with his. Reformulating Cannabis is a dangerous drug to keep his army going. To. The fact that has nothing to lessen. Every or everyone says in the war on alcohol prohibition was a disaster and then you say, well. Why. Would we carry on pro prohibiting other drugs and politicians just dick away they glaze over they seem to be happy to have this complete. Paradox the head of. Robinson's work. Every other prohibition does and a lot of that is got to be under answering or and he's creating the model that we still live by today's tell people about him. You're not sure everyone knows how detrimental his legacy is being, but there's a line that Harry. Harrison. GOVERNMENT BUREAUCRAT WHO's the first person to use the phrase war on drugs in the nineteen thirties veteran invented the modern war on drugs. Nine Harry answering US said the. Thought Relation to David in nineteen, forty, six, he was at the you add at the United Nations and they were the US effectively forcing every country in the world to ban drugs using its new `regnum power into the second world. War. and. The government of Thailand's represents is government of Thailand said, well, we don't. We don't want to do that hasn't worked in your country at working hours. They had legal pm for forever right and Harry answering this is an exact quote said to them. I Made Up. My mind tried to confuse me with the facts. I thought that's effectively what Jackie Smith said she was bothering you right it's like I've met my mind charge fees, mood the facts that's the slogan for the drug war but particularly about her answering, a inside fires, I thought about all before I did the research for chasing the scream I thaw if you'd asked me well, okay why would drugs banned? I would have thought it was for basically the reasons that an average person would give on the streets day. If you said to the drugs ban, they'd probably say, well. We don't want kids to use drugs. We don't want people to become addicted. Now, the wrong drug war chiefs, those calls, but I think those the reasons they would get what was fascinating going back was to realize that stuff barely came up when they were banning drugs right to de almost never read the transcripts I went through hurrying. It's all carbs in great detail at the University of Pennsylvania. So translate was a government bureaucrat and he took. The Department of Prohibition Justice Alcohol Prohibition is ending. So he's got this big government department. This person can have nothing to do in fact has been discredited. The worn alcohol has been of course disaster. And Harry answering invented the modern war on drugs to keep his department. Now, he absolutely sincerely believed in it as well. It's important to stress. It wasn't a purely cynical in that sense, but he bill the war on drugs around too intense hatreds that he had. One was an intense hatred of African Americans and Latinos. He was so racist. He was regarded as a crazy racist in the one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety S. Senator said it should have to resign because he used the N. word. So often inefficient memos and the other great intensity hated was people with addiction problems could farming grown up on in altoona. Pennsylvania there was a woman, the farmer's wife from the Nixon problem he was terrified of obsessed by. Live nearby and she had an addiction problem. So he builds this modern drug war and of thinking about a lot about this. Again, the LAS is we've just made A. Movie that's coming out in November, which is about this story interrupted by Lee Daniels precious in the Butler and those by the great phones I'm really thrilled. Actually I think it's come out really well the film so. Burke with this moment, I think sometimes people that wise about drugs starting like this, and then it becomes clear this moment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, nine, Billie holiday walked onto a stage in a hotel in midtown Manhattan they didn't even let her go through the front door because she was African American the Medicare through the elevator and she sang a song called strange free I'm sure your listeners know it's a song against lynching. Not everyone knows that yes. So it's it's a song against lynching. It's this idea that in the south, there's a strange for the hangs from. The trees and as the song goes on, you realize it's the mutilated bodies of African American men who been lynched and that Ny after she sang that Song Billie holiday got a warning from the agents of this man Harry and slinger and the warning effectively said stop singing the song. You might think why would it begin their right but I think it's tells you so much about the drug war and then what happened next house even more. So Billie Holiday said effectively fuck you I'm an American citizen are single damn. Well, please and at that point Harry slinger resolve to destroy her. So, he hated employing African American agents, but you couldn't really send a White Guy to follow holiday rat Harlem for. Obvious. So he employed an African American agent named. Jimmy Fletcher. And he said to him look follow hope everywhere she goes track her document had drug east. We're going to bust her bust all these jazz singers jazz was evil PRI as he put it primitive African music hypnotized. into. Of course, the worst nightmare was the creation of mixed race babies that was his. Mix I wouldn't use the word he used, but wasn't makes race am so. Jimmy Fletcher follows Billie holiday around. For more than a year. And Billie holiday was so amazing to reflect fell in love with her and his.

Harry slinger Billie Holiday Pablo Escobar Department of Prohibition Jimmy Fletcher Sebastian American Charles Bowden Pettit cannabis GOVERNMENT Burger King Buenos Iras US Philippe Bourgeoisie cocaine Harlem University of Pennsylvania partner Jackie Smith Thailand Cannabis
Makeup for (the Fantasy) Tour!

Full Coverage

06:32 min | 11 months ago

Makeup for (the Fantasy) Tour!

"Our main feature today will be tool related now every year and Harry go through everything buying at all. You know I love to buy something for tour and we always talk about the makeup. I'm taking on, too. Because there was no tore this year dastardly Colbrad. I thought it would be fun to talk through the things that I would be taking with me the new things because now having been doing this podcast for three years and having been touring forever. It's interesting to see what does and does make it in. That's new and goes out and What stays like what remains? That's really interesting for me. Hopefully, it's GonNa be interesting you, but you think about it as I can is my travel kit, but it's my most important makeup of the whole years tool. Make up an event makeup, so it's a makeup I. Trust the most that I love the most, and I know is the most reliable so my tool. Makeup Kit is always. Big Priority for me. Slap wise, so we're going to look at what's made it into my talk. It my non existent toolkit. That will be major before that we've got loads of new news absolutely bucketloads first up. I know everyone's so excited about this launch is the fantasy skin launch? They have announced their first three items and predictably fantasy skin skincare. We starting with a cleanser. Atone annoys. I mean basic three steps God bless round of keeping it simple. Now. We're going to look at the individual items. We haven't tried these yet. We haven't got our samples yet. They will be launching at the end of this week. So by the time we've tried them. You could have tried them, but let's all stay in touch and discuss as we know, so. We start off with the total cleanser. There's no east as a cleanser, so it's a cleanser to be technical is to in one cleanser makeup remover. Just cleansers. You'd better wash your face. Morning and night y'all this I'm reading directly from INSTAGRAM? Post! This is not my. These are not my feelings. So the ingredients are Baba. Bob Babo Spa. US Jesus. Christ Lindsey rounders from Barbados, but we just cherry an ingredient with antioxidants, each cherry pat with vitamin C. than an orange, but that doesn't really tell you how much fitness is in this product, but anyway it's got vitamin C in there. It's GOT GINGKO BILOBA checking. Never say to control oil and clarify shine green tea again. Rich in antioxidants, fake, a desert, loving fruit that entire oxidants does a lot of antioxidants, and it's got quince in that era. Fruit infused minerals. I mean. I guess quences right, is it? You can get it in the supermarket in jam form. But I don't know so yeah lots of antioxidants. Some vitamin, C in here an cleanser now the one thing I want to point out because this is what you're GonNa, see throughout the range is as a lot of talk of pause. So this is it purifies pause and helps fight shine long after rinsed off I. Don't know how it's doing that I. Don't know how it lands is helping to fight shy long after your off apart from that it's removed any possible oil causing shine when you using it. But we'll see we'll find out step to the skin. Routine is the fat water, poor refining, toner and serum. Fat Water, so it's called fat water, 'cause it's thick, double see, but also I think just thick with a K. would cover it to unique textures. You can pour in Johann to apply. No cottam pads needed so I think rather than this actually being a traditional toner as we would know it. This is actually more of an. It's thick liquid that you porn. Johanna apply directly to your skin, so you don't need to use cotton pads it's it's an essence. Isn't it? Not really a toner? It's alcohol free. That's fantastic. It's a tone of Serum Combo is an essence that targets targets. Pause improves the look of. Sorts Brighton smooth and fights shine, so it's got nice in a might in. We Love Niacin more Baba's Cherry Cool, Australian, Lemon Myrtle and Hazel water interesting, which is all is is a commonly used ingredient. Some people just use which as long its own good see that here Japanese raisin tree to help detoxify. I don't know what Japanese raising tree is. It, isn't it? Isn't it a grapevine? No, it probably is. Maybe there is a tree. I'm going to Google it. I should have done this before I talked to you about it, but I just saw. These posts are set down to record. I thought it was very important news to share with you. Japanese raisin tree to help deflect. I believe you cactus flower to help hydrate and green tea and fig again Richon toxins, so man antioxidants in here which I love the only thing I don't love about this. Think, that's a tone because attorney plus serum I think they're trying to make it sound like something new, and actually just an essence a that's marketing. Sure whatever the poor refining par don't like I. Don't like when things imply that they can change the size of your pores because they can't. They can just clean them. They can't shrink them. They don't open or close open. Close component goes you put closure policy open. They do not have a door on them. You can just clean them I feel like. Maybe it's of hints at that which I love, but it does look like an interesting product with lots of yummy ingredients. I can't wait to see the full inky I can't wait to see the Highlands Review on this I'm sure we will talk about it next week on our event step. Three of the fifties can sorta step. Is A moisturizer obviously, Hydra visor invisible MOISTURIZER SPF. You know awesome. It's again nice in highland acid. Melon Wild Moat. Watermelon more antioxidants. This is lovely. I love. All these things says there's no chalking USC pink tinted applies on all skin tones. That's no flashback. It says has no pilling says it boosts and brightens skin that makes pause. Fine lines wrinkles less visible instantly on overtime. I. I don't know because I haven't tried yet. It's coral reef friendly for the SPF in there, which is fantastic, it's also earth, conscious and refillable. Now I love that it's refillable. and. It looks like it's an awesome airtight pump. Love

Harry Bob Babo Spa Google Niacin Pilling Melon Wild Moat Brighton Johanna Johann Lindsey Highlands Review Barbados Attorney
How Does Uranus Work?

BrainStuff

06:32 min | 1 year ago

How Does Uranus Work?

"Scientists have coined an appropriate term for the large chilly bodies like Uranus ice giants. Neptune falls into the same category. But you're in. This is quite an odd duck compared to its neighboring planet. For starters you're a spins on an extreme tilt resulting in some truly wild seasons around the polls even the ice giants name is a bit peculiar and not just because it makes school kids chuckle. Okay let's not kid ourselves. You're never too old to enjoy good year in joke. Headline Writers certainly don't thinks so if article titles like NASA wants to probe urinate in search of gas and Uranus. Smells like farts are any indication. These jokes if you're not getting them hinge on the spelling of Uranus you are an US allowing for an english-speaking mispronunciation as your anus meaning rectum that where classy puns. Aside you're in his represents a break with nomenclature old tradition mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn and Neptune all took their names from Roman gods or deities however uranus uniquely was named after a Greek God in the religion of Ancient Greece. You're an was revered as the primordial God of the sky he had a son named Cronos and a perhaps more famous grandson notice Zeus. Those two figures were later conflated with two Roman Deities Saturn and Jupiter though the planet Uranus was discovered by Stromer William Herschel March thirteenth of seventeen eighty one. He didn't give it the name we use today. A loyal Britain Herschel wanted to call this far away. World Georgie 'EM CD's or Georgia Star. In honor of King George the third but by nature. That name was politically charged to avoid. Alienating non-british Stargazers German astronomer Johann Alert Buddha suggested calling the planet uranus in seventeen eighty three eventually his alternative Monica one out but back to that axial tilt a planets rotate around an axis. Which is the imaginary line connecting their northern and southern polls and they simultaneously orbit on an imaginary plane around the Sun now Earth has an axial tilt of twenty three point five degrees. This means there's a twenty three point five degree angle between Earth's axis and its plane of orbit around the Sun without the tilt our home world wouldn't have seasons or possibly life. Uranus is skewed to but to a much greater extent in relation to its orbital plane. The ice giants access has been tilted at a chopping ninety seven point seven degree angle next to Saturn and Neptune. Urine looks like it's lying on its side so what we are orientation. A computer simulation published two thousand eighteen suggests your was hit by a huge Proto Planet. Around four billion years ago then again there may have been multiple impacts or a long gone circum. Planetary Disk could have played a role however it happened. The tilt subjects both polls too long dark winters long. Bright Summer's on Uranus was orbit around the Sun or one year lasts for roughly eighty four earth years. Each poll is aimed almost directly at the Sun for about twenty one St Earth years during its summer season. Meanwhile the other pole faces the opposite direction. Enduring Alliance Dark Winter. Despite the extreme tilt urine is warmer at the equator than it is either poll. Nobody knows why. And this isn't the planets only mystery. Jupiter Saturn and Neptune already radiate more than twice as much heat as they received from the Sun. Yet you're innocence. Heat output is significantly lower. This disparity has long baffled planetary scientists as we already mentioned. You're innocent. Neptune are both ice giants planets of this sort have rocky cores covered by mantles rich. An icy half frozen slush of ammonia methane and water next up there's the atmosphere whose outer level is full of hydrogen helium and even more methane researchers found that urinalysis atmospheric clouds contain hydrogen sulfide. A compound responsible for the rotten egg stench. We all know in hate so yes. You're in literally stinks to the densest part of its atmospheric sees brutal temperatures of negative two hundred forty three to negative three hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit. That's negative one fifty three to negative to eighteen degrees Celsius. That's hardly a welcoming environment for any future astronauts but at least the color scheme would be familiar. Earth isn't the only blue planet in the solar system. Methane absorbs red light giving Uranus and Neptune deep blue complexions of the two worlds. You're in a slightly greener since nineteen seventy seven. We've known that Ernest has a ring system around its equator to date. Astronomers have counted thirteen rings encircling the planet the structures are relatively dim and lack the fine particles observed and other rings systems like Saturn's each one is composed of debris chunks that are golf ball sized at minimum for some reason smaller material gets exiled and space between these rings in also has twenty seven known moons twenty five of which renamed after Shakespeare characters like affiliate Juliet. There's Dimona puck and Miranda who's namesake appears in the tempest geologically complex. Miranda contains the single policy cliff known to humankind dubbed Verona repays. It has an estimated height of twelve point four miles. That's twenty kilometers. Meaning that if you happened to be walking along its peak and you happened to fall off. You would plummet for twelve minutes straight before hitting the ground. Others satellites of note include sicker acts and Caliban while most of your Ennis's moons spin in the same direction as the planet does these to revolve the other way. Scientists think they were once independent objects that the ice giants gravity in snared by the way how ban is another tempest character and sicker. Iraq's was said to be his mother from it's weird rings. It's puzzling climate. You're Ennis's found plenty of ways surprises. Only time will tell what further mysteries the planet holds until then although it's very dim your is visible to the naked eye on some dark clear nights if you have sharp vision if not so much. It's easily visible with noculars or a telescope.

Ennis Stromer William Herschel Miranda Britain Herschel Nasa United States Ancient Greece Iraq Johann Alert Buddha Cronos King George Georgia Star Verona Monica Ernest Shakespeare Dimona Puck
Antonio Vivaldi 3: Violin Concertos Through the Ages

Classics for Kids

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Antonio Vivaldi 3: Violin Concertos Through the Ages

"Some people love to show off or perform in front of other people. A concerto is a piece of music. Which one or more solo instruments get to show off in front of a larger group of instruments and also in front of an audience? The starring instrument in Vivaldi's Four Seasons concertos is the violin. The violin was invented over a hundred years before Vivaldi came along but not the concerto concertos for Solo instruments were born in Italy in the late. Sixteen hundreds soon composers in other countries wanted to write concertos in the Italian style. Johann Sebastian Bach Pot himself to compose concertos by copying out the Valdis music as he copied out the parts box. Study what he had done and how he had done it based on that. Bach wrote his own concertos for most of his life. Franz-josef Haydn held a job that involved composing music for the Court Orchestra that he conducted in Haydn's Day conductors didn't stand in front of the orchestra waving their arms. The way they do today back then. The head Honcho violinist or concert master. Who is a member of the orchestra was also the conductor so heighten was also a very good violinist and wrote concertos for his instrument by the Time Felix? Mendelssohn came along. The conductor of an orchestra didn't play in it anymore. When Mendelssohn became conductor of one of the best orchestras in Europe. He hired his good friend segment. Davi to be the concert master head. Honcho violinist then. Mendelssohn wrote a concerto for his friend to play. Mimbo Cement Dhabi also helped popularize an earlier violin concerto. One by Ludwig van Beethoven Beethoven's Concerto never caught on during his lifetime which may have been because at the first performance of the piece. The violinist hadn't bothered to learn his music. He was sight reading seeing the music. For the first time. Which you're not supposed to do in concert. People don't sight read Beethoven's Concerto in performance anymore some violin concertos got labeled unplayable. Because they haven't found the right violinists to play them. The first violinist Tchaykovsky asked to perform his Concerto. Said it couldn't be done turns out he was thrown. It makes sense that the history of Violin concertos follows. The history of great violinists Joseph. Yokneam was the greatest violinist in Europe in the last half of the nineteenth century was happy to give advice on how to get around the violin to composers. Who wanted to write concertos for him? Like Max Bro. Up until recently most great violinists also wrote concertos for themselves to play. Not many of them do that anymore today. But Mark O'connor does you can definitely hear bits of folk music which is what. Mark O'Connor grew up playing in the PC calls his fiddle concerto. Fiddle is what folk and country musicians call the

Mendelssohn Ludwig Van Beethoven Beethoven Johann Sebastian Bach Pot Court Orchestra Mark O'connor Franz-Josef Haydn Vivaldi Europe Head Honcho Mimbo Cement Dhabi Yokneam Davi Tchaykovsky Max Bro Italy Felix Joseph
Johann Sebastian Bach 4: The Story of the Brandenburg Concertos

Classics for Kids

04:32 min | 1 year ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 4: The Story of the Brandenburg Concertos

"That's the opening to the fifth of six Brandenburg Concertos by Johann Sebastian Bach. Why start with number five well first of all the concerto numbers don't really have anything to do with the order in which. Bach wrote them. The Fifth Brandenburg Concerto features a Harpsichord and the story of the Brandenburg concertos begins with a trip. That Johann Sebastian Bach took to pick out a new HARPSICHORD for the prince whose court orchestra he conducted. There are actually three solo instruments in the Brandenburg Concerto number five Harpsichord violin and flute. The harpsichord is an ancestor of the piano. But as you can hear it doesn't sound the same. That's because Harpsichord strings are plucked by teeny tiny. Quills in a piano. The sound is made by hitting the strings with small felt covered hammers. Here's a spot where the harpsichord plays alone. So you can hear it while he was on his trip looking at Harpsichord he met Chris. Jon Ludvig the Margrave of the province. That's like a state of Brandenburg. Margrave is a fancy title. They used to give to military governors of German provinces. The margrave of Brandenburg had his own orchestra and when he found out. Bach was a composer. He said he wouldn't mind hearing some of his work. Only own okay. There's the Brandenburg Concerto number one. It has a really huge group of Solo instruments. Seven in all Bach was thrilled that the Margrave was interested in his music. He thought there might be a good job prospect for him in Brandenburg so he pulled together a set of concertos mostly stuff he'd already written for the orchestra he conducted and sent them off with a very flowery letter to the Margrave the Brandenburg Concerto Number. Three IS FOR THREE SETS OF STRING. Instruments Violins violas and cellos. It's a good thing. Bach didn't hold his breath waiting for an answer from the margrave because he never got one in fact the margrave probably never even looked at these beautiful concertos. What A DOOFUS. Part of the problem may have been that his orchestra wasn't as big as the one baulk road them for so the Margaret didn't have the musicians to play them but he could have at least sent a thank you note. That's the six Brandenburg Concerto. It's also just for strings given the Margrave of Brandenburg's rudeness. You can bet that. Bach didn't name his concertos Brandenburg years. After he died one of Bach's biographers attached the name to them and obviously it stuck Bach called his pieces concertos for a variety of instruments which is a pretty good description since each one is written a

Johann Sebastian Bach Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Margrave Brandenburg Concerto Number Fifth Brandenburg Concerto Jon Ludvig Chris Margaret
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"Kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Vinnie Emmanuel Refund Williams Tuba Wolfgang Official
Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

"Johann. Sebastian Bach was the greatest member of a musical dynasty beginning in sixteenth century Germany. Three Hundred Years. Worth of box held jobs as town. Musicians organist and choir directors Johann Sebastian's. Father was a musician. His grandfather was a musician and his great grandfather was a musician. All the male members of the family were trained by their fathers uncles and older brothers to carry on the tradition. That's by no handsome. Asean box Uncle Johann Michio or John. Michael Bah his daughter. Maria Barbara Married Johann Sebastian. Who was her second cousin? I guess that made her Maria. Barbara Bach. Pa IN GERMAN WORD MEANS STREAM BUT JOHANN. Sebastian produced a whole ocean of box. He and Maria Barbara had seven kids when Maria Barbara Died Balk married. A singer named Anna Magdalena and had thirteen more children twenty in all J S. That's short for Johann. Sebastian Bach expected his sons to follow in his footsteps and several of them became well known composers. Box oldest son bill him. Freedom on or W. F. Baugh worked mostly as an organist. He never quite lived up to everybody's great expectations even though he wrote some Nice music the fifth child the third son of J S Baugh was Carl Philipp Emanuel Norse EP. Aw He was very successful. Cpi box spent years working for the flute. Playing King of Prussia. Frederick Great Frederick. The great never went anywhere without his flute. Not even into battle so. Cpa Bach wrote a lot of music both CPI and W. F. were sons of J s Bach's first wife Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena Baw. Second wife was the mother of his youngest son. Johann Christian J C Bach was the most radical member of the clan for starters. He left Germany and went to study and work in Italy in order to get a job at the cathedral in Milan Italy. This Bach did something. Nobody had done before he changed. Religion converting from Lutheran Catholic and J C Bach. Did something else. His father had never done. He wrote operas after Italy. He moved to one of the hottest cities in Europe for Italian opera and became known as the London Bach. That's right people in London. England were crazy about Italian opera even or especially if it was written by Germans. There's a man named Peter Shakily who claims to know about yet another box son P Q. According to Peter Shakily until he discovered P Q. No one wanted to admit that he existed. Peterson says that's because PD Q. Box Stole Music from other composers and came up with things so outrageous that they make people laugh because it makes people laugh. Peter Shakily keeps right on composing. I mean discovering music Cuba that's from PD Q. Bach piece called Kanaya in Brooklyn. That's written for Double Reeds. When a COMPOSER SAYS MUSIC IS FOR DOUBLE REEDS? He means oboe. Zampa Soons instruments that have double reeds sticking out of the top of them. Blowing into the reads is what makes the instruments sound but PD. Cuba wrote for double reeds without Hobos and bassoon. Attached the words pretty funny to watch it to us to be home you know moves run grounding knows

Johann Sebastian Bach 1: About Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 1: About Johann Sebastian Bach

"One of your parents doctor or lawyer and maybe as far back as they can remember everyone in their family has gone into the same profession while that's how it was with the Bach family all of them were musicians Johann. That's German for John. Sebastian Bach was born in sixteen eighty. Five in the German town of is enough. His father was the official town musician. There by the time was ten. Both his parents had died so he went to live with his older brother. Who was also a musician? Of course Johann Sebastian. Bach turned out to have very fleet fingers. He played a mean violin and by the time he was eighteen. He had a job as an organist. Bach held three main jobs over the course of his life. You can tell where he was working by. What kind of music? He wrote the first box. Big Jobs was official. Court organist for the Duke of Weimar so a lot of box great organ. Music comes from early on in his career. That Weimar job also had box serving as concert master. The head Honcho violinist of the Duke's orchestra when the Duke of Weimar decided not to make him conductor of the Orchestra. Bach was pretty unhappy. Then a visiting prince offered a job directing his orchestra but when Bach tried to quit his job in Weimar. The dukes said no way he even threw in jail for a month to try and make its point but it didn't work when Bach got out of jail. He headed straight to the town of curtain to work for the prince the prince had a wonderful orchestra so Bach wrote lots of instrumental music. While he was in curtain eventually balk moved onto his last job at the Saint. Thomas Lutheran Church. In the city of Leipzig. His title was cantor. That's what they called the choir and music director and it was a huge job box trained singers organized music for several churches in town and for the University of Leipzig and he composed new music every week for services at the Saint Thomas Church most of Bach's great choral music was written in Leipzig the choir at the Saint Thomas. Church still performs box music every week. One of the coolest things I ever got to do was sit in the church where Bach worked and listen to the choir sing. His music while Bach was alive. No one outside the towns in Germany where he worked had heard of him and people thought of him as just another working musician after he died people pretty much forgot about him until a century later when another composer Felix Mendelssohn dug out some of Bach's music and performed it after that the whole world recognized what a genius had been and Faulk may even be recognized beyond this world in nineteen seventy seven scientists sent the unmanned voyager spacecraft off to explore the galaxy. They put examples of the best that planet Earth had to offer on board and one of those examples was a recording of Johann Sebastian box. Brandenburg Concerto number.

Sebastian Bach Weimar Johann Sebastian Saint Thomas Church University Of Leipzig Leipzig Official Thomas Lutheran Church Felix Mendelssohn Germany Head Honcho Saint Thomas Cantor Faulk Director
"johanns" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Okay. If I ask for it. So I met a bitch and said, you know, my one ask is that you put Johanns, and he and Mike we're old friends. So it wasn't like a big sell. But I think I think Mitch was always kind of confused. Why was there? Fighting for my Joe Joe heads for this appointment. Mitch Mitch is does what he says he's going to do. The bit of hypocrisy. I will say that is there is when he when we came. There was a lot of discussion about filibuster reform, and his whole first speech was all about this is the cooling off, you know, the tea tea Cup in the saucer you've heard this analogy, and you it's kinda like, okay. And then the first thing he does is is not only doesn't reverse what Harry did he he exacerbates it. And so I think there's there's a lot of hypocrisy in in that move. But the one thing I would tell you is. I like if if somebody is going to be a leader, I liked them to say and do what they say they're gonna do. And no one should be surprised by what Mitch says. Because he usually does what he says he's gonna do you won narrowly six years ago. Did you feel that you had a big target on your back? Oh, yeah. I knew that. That this was this. But I Ronnie siklie probably and foolishly I thought that if I had a list of accomplishments, if I did all these things that that I said, I was going to do that. I would in fact that that mattered. It didn't matter. By the campaign. Could you get anything differently? Well, you always make mistakes and campaigns. You know, there's things that looking back on I wish they hadn't happened. But at the end of the day, I think that that it it after the cavenaugh voted just got to be too big of a big of a left. What led to that decision? I worked the process and had to make a determination on whether this person was qualified to sit on supreme court. I watched and it's been well documented why why did what I did. And the vote that I took and there's not a moment in my life that I regret that vote. Could the Democrats have done anything differently in terms of the process? Absolutely. And socially, the Republicans. Mean everybody forgets that this was a two sided two sides of the same coin in terms of process. You gotta remember that. So the next time someone wants to examine every piece of archived record. Are we going to do that? What the Democrats are in charge. They're going to say we don't have to give you any of those records..

Mitch Mitch Joe Joe Ronnie siklie Johanns Harry six years
"johanns" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Get maybe maybe you've always look back and think it was better than it was maybe these are the moments maybe missing with us about this about the past we've come so far you wooded four three my fm this was johanns saw for the via last last house these joan baby hey kids even three you.

johanns
"johanns" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

05:24 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Swallow straw news my alongside sustain much flat fix mine ma from my my fm johanns body for the last three house baby three know thank it three yeah we both.

johanns
"johanns" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

#WeThePeople LIVE

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

"Oh i don't know this week's episode is really interesting one johann hari i've interviewed him a couple of times before once in march of two thousand fifteen and then again in april twenty sixteen i was going back and trying to find where the episodes of the people live that i'd interviewed him were and we'll bowl me over with a feather now you don't ball feathers blow me over with a feather he hasn't been on this show this is his debut performance on we the people live he was on another podcast about used to host this is this is just becoming judge steps podcast our now you got the people vs on our end you got out of the loop on abc's judy as you go way the people live and then the old one was called point of inquiry and that was produced by what is now the richard dawkins foundation and that was a show about science and secularism and reason and all of that good stuff the the the reason i was interviewing him was because johan is a british journalist who wrote a book called chasing the scream which was just as a damning indictment of the war on drugs he did a tedtalk in two thousand fifteen about his his basic premise premise being that addictions are not just biological phenomena they're not about needing the substance they're actually they're a functional response to experiences and their their consequence of a lack of healthy and supportive relationships he did this ted talk in two thousand fifteen entitled everything you think you know about addiction is wrong it's been viewed almost ten million times and his latest book is in some ways a follow up to that way he's taking the same kind of principle of his own skepticism about the pharmacologic allies ation of mental health in the context of substance abuse and he's now applying it to anxiety and depression and his new book.

johann hari abc judy richard dawkins foundation johan ted depression
"johanns" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

07:36 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Johanns all for the you couldn't handle baby hey kids now even hey it's valentine the morning monday morning except twentyfive it's back to conscious we call what's that noise a lot of money on the table banana peel this time a promise he didn't you i shall monday on valentine in the morning stay back twenty right now four becca tickets into our park takeover at six flags magic mountain eight six six five four four.

Johanns valentine six flags
"johanns" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Sixty minutes nonstop four three johanns own for the for yes me baby good three both noise kids now even three we both four three.

johanns Sixty minutes
"johanns" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Up the white waiting for joel hanson johanns it comes into the calgary's own goals wide on handle the stick that onestop arbor to try and rid it falls on top of it oh that's of nasty patients from biallo beautiful pass from ryan johan's he goes down such a onehanded play a down the right side is a right handed shot put student front y'all gets that pass realizes this nothing to do that as israeli great on top of takes his time in changes yangel ever so slightly to get a shot off and they save but some really good patients there to try to move that part taking his time in space that given through on just couldn't find a way to burial but ainhoa base off to the right of written wins the pboc back and you'll see makes a move coming down one handle the stick on the right half board comes offer a bird left side that shocked by ellis big rebound given up again now the flames furlan down the right side rose at law on the nashville in two forty seven remaining yo she hasn't for the predators over for ryan alice from the right circle up right side tipped in by air bird roles on goal and british decided be better the covered up this time and try to make a move with abor coming on that is bridge has been pretty good these makes a big saves that one mehran ryan allison z.

joel hanson calgary ryan johan pboc ellis nashville ryan alice biallo
"johanns" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"And drew stafford just oh terrific goal and he started to come alive matt seventh of the season sacchi in the last three games he scored at the end of the philadelphia game after not having adultery teach three shows marcus johanns it with the free pass off occurred overnight here's a chancellor washington had backstroke in tight good sit out of lou who antigreen i will just a little bit of a rocky start here the tisza painted twogoal behind the net in when he did the pontiff was turned over a cap mall backstrom all alone in front but what happened was the passed by a vet skin had to be elevated so bounced backstrom got it when it was on the bounce mad so we threw it right up over the net and over the glass so the faceoff came out seems center rice and here's what then with it in front of the devil's bench goes rightwing side for sokha looks around applies the brakes to divide and won't timer that's off of hope fee and it goes to the corner caps will quickly cleared a center ice backstrom between the benches spins away from zalka is it off to procure pick he'll dump it in washington will make a change qian that go by staff brutal about what he went to his back and he got the plaque up it was overlooked blocker a goalie could only stretch so far wooden makes that play would you get at lowyield royal mounted of hit his pad back but to get your blogger up high is really a hard stretch so drew executed when he does best that big four add to the back and lifted up hi eddie is given the devils the one nothing lead icing called on the devil's faceoff too keen cage right soko wins it bought then clears it here's paul mary at center ice controls at the pool i had a wait just a bit otherwise he would have been offside out just dump sit in and the devil's we'll make it change 1040 to go with the.

stafford matt washington lou backstrom zalka devils paul mary philadelphia marcus johanns chancellor lowyield royal eddie
"johanns" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

LA Talk Radio Channel 1

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

"The irreverent two the man and again johanns you down in the laying down what amounts of phnom ipad on do you imagine that old inbounded the law oh he's coming down on i'm dude amy jo moore in an odd when no among male new it on men known as bad loan bono lanham maryland man they had a men now is oh here in the will of a nam nam nam nam i am that moment we man bang land play again no criminal ran on the radio lana weigh in on the day limit on the web of lome bailey aid and on a mole you.

ipad johanns amy jo moore maryland lana
"johanns" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Blue light time winding down on the minor to johanns had taken away by he'll carried into colorado territory and so that save actually was the first of the game for corey schneider because the devil's at one point were outshooting avalanche was only five nothing but they were the territorial a territorially better team yeah the first period really there were many threats may be the only good scoring chance by either team in the first there was an opportunity for long in that period but nathan mckinnon heard the ring of the post they have kind of a video game character that makes in noise that the kill is done when the offending powerplayer comes out of the box just make candidate deepening rings went off the outside of oppose nathan mckinnon came in red howdy at twenty points in the month of november december is not gotten off to a good answer no no it's a game of inches and he lost that edge battle on that shot scoreless after one period to play colorado started to get its like a little bit had 5 shots before the period came to an end the devil's had seven there were a lot of penalties called in that first period the devil's over three colorado for three on the power play into the second period we would go and this is the guy co collision to the game driven by geico and official partner of the nhl fall in love with gerard speeding swirling move it up blue allies other pre kid as pork rocks pre shaken out forbid me was and a little slow to get to the bench with andy sometimes will absorb that big kick look like oh my goodness he's gonna miss the shift but he came back out for his next shift but that was gabriel board with the vacate on the devils captain the gaiko collision of the game in the hits department twenty four hits for the colorado avalanche four from anton lintong and three from bork they were among the leaders bork the overall leader with those four hits all right so we continue looking for our first goal we'd have to wait a little bit for that chico rash but we did get the pse g save at the game presented by pse g helping you save energy and money at ps eg dot com slash save energy bored old projects you've got.

johanns corey schneider nathan mckinnon colorado geico partner devils anton lintong bork rash official nhl gerard andy gabriel chico
"johanns" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Second round you have ryan johanns and go down in the third round of the guy that we just heard from colton systems was thrown into a burst lyon roleplaying at sydney crosby in the stanley cup final the stanley cup final citizens didn't look out of place and you know it's disappointing for the prize that day nick benino has gone down here with with a bit of an injury but colton citizens white like you said with with what pk said that last year helps them this year in terms of knowing how to deal with injuries coexistence has the confidence now that he can step up into a a second line role and fit in admirably without without any you know drop in play for with the team and citizens now has back in has goals and backed bat games in two games that nichelino has missed while it was pretty interesting kind of going back to what peter lobby let said you don't know how to fix something or what's wrong until basically you tinker and you see it right you're right see it and then tinker with it i mean certainly they've done that they've going back to last year with some of years abbas forget right now fredro he centering the what life the fourthonfourth lied yeah remember last year the playoffs where was he while he was not even on the roster until wives that other way the western conference finals dellagha final where was he fourth on no he he played other he moved up he loo he moved out he was all over isaiah these guys move all around really other than that first line you know of the the usual joe hanson the force berg right in the arvidsson outside of that everybody's mover and they have the versatility of some guys sliding over to the wing summarize plane in the metal mmhmm it's so when things are happening what the roster when and eighty twogame regular season injury sometimes most of the time are inevitable you're gonna have to deal with it even if it's for a couple of games or if it's for ten or twelve games who knows how long nick but he knows gotta be out but they have been accustomed to moving guys around and playing differ for positions and so i think it really has helped them.

ryan johanns colton systems sydney crosby stanley cup nick benino pk joe hanson berg colton abbas western conference
"johanns" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"johanns" Discussed on KELO

"A tumbling end over and kicked that's going to be taken back at the want it goes into the end zone for the such backovic kapadia let that one go through is hands who's trying to catch it in an awkward position over his shoulder and the ball goes into the end zone for a touch back so no time comes off the clock waited byrne a second off the clock 39 seconds but i what's what's the difference when you're sufaat washington you can just go up the top two of the likes of utech heinzer flanagan and and score in a hurry gorman's going to have to provide a little bit of pass raj sheer the try to make the quarterback for washington johanns and a little uncomfortable but so you definitely gotta make sure you keep an account all these dangerous wide receivers they've got out there looks like four wide receivers in a running back right now this is definitely a home run strike type of offense out there for the warriors fake the give all the give is to compare excuse me across the twenty now anklelength the nearsighted 25 all her goes underneath a defender at the twenty seven yardline end ankles towards the sideline across the thirty finally brought down at the thirty four i don't know what you call that movie just tucks his head the defender goes right over and trying to tackle aim high and it gets another three or four yards after that watching the replay there were three defenders who touch to pay up from the waist down that were unable to wrap it up before the final battled nods about a balanced he just make sober event missing the open field again this time to the right side across the 35 and he's going to be wrapped up by trade showns you've got to the.

washington heinzer flanagan gorman johanns byrne washington 39 seconds four yards