20 Episode results for "Johannesburg"

Anglo American Considers Spinning Off South African Coal Operations

Newscast - Africa

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Anglo American Considers Spinning Off South African Coal Operations

"You're listening to the news. Our Africa Business Radio. I've lost minor and American said on Thursday. Eight profess unbundling enlist in its thermal coal operations in South Africa on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange in the next two to three years so other available options in the region response is a shareholders. Anglo said Damara was preferred method of big sit in from the business but that it was considering other possibilities and that was the news at this time. Africa Business Radio. You can't continue to this in life online at. Www Africa business radio. That's come off. I'm -able APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa South Africa Johannesburg Stock Exchange Damara Anglo three years
South Africa ministry OKs AngloGold Asset Sale But Blocks De-listing

Newscast - Africa

01:34 min | 10 months ago

South Africa ministry OKs AngloGold Asset Sale But Blocks De-listing

"The affiliate podcast shares the stories of multifaceted Africans. One episode at a time the podcast aims to uncover the untold stories of modern and millennial applicants based in various parts of the world. Each episode gives listeners an opportunity to learn and experience conversations that showcase who they are and global perspectives in our ever changing world fish also listen and subscribe to the Athlete podcast on spotify or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. You can also follow at athletes podcast on all social media platforms. He'll listening to the news office hour on Africa Business Radio South. Africa's ministry has given the green light for the sale of Anglogold Ashanti's last remaining assets in the. Country to how many gold on condition that he does not list from the Johannesburg Stock Exchange in an email the department of mineral resources in energy set up occasion in terms of section eleven of the MPR DA has been received and was approved onto before July. The ministry said the grant off the application must based on an understanding between AngloGold Ashanti and the Department that the company would not disinvest from the South Africa economy bonds listing from the Johannesburg Exchange or relocate its headquarters, and that wasn't news at this time when Africa. Business Radio, you can continue to this in life online at www dot Africa, business radio, DOT COM, or via a mobile. APP. I am Rachel she do thank you for listening.

Anglogold Ashanti Africa Johannesburg Stock Exchange www dot Africa Africa South Africa Rachel MPR spotify
Actionable intelligence, and the difficulty of cutting through noise. Extortion hits Johannesburg. Criminal-to-criminal markets. Whos more vulnerable to phishing, the old or the young?

The CyberWire

16:04 min | 1 year ago

Actionable intelligence, and the difficulty of cutting through noise. Extortion hits Johannesburg. Criminal-to-criminal markets. Whos more vulnerable to phishing, the old or the young?

"A legal case management system the city of Johannesburg continues its recovery from an online extortion attempt. The raccoon information steeler looks like a disruptive product actionable intelligence calling signal from noise and the online resilience of threat groups ransomware hits of course spent quite properly left unclear but developing target indicators into targets can be a difficult process and indicators are often missed during our show funding for this cyber wire podcast is made possible in part by McAfee security it's complicated then now a word from our sponsor on such set of indicators seems to have surrounded one of the last high profile massacres El Baghdadi claimed for Isis the Easter massacres in Sri Lanka this April according to the Voice of America US Defense Secretary Espy said late breaking actionable intelligence develop that morning enabled the attack to be executed they've certified the leading global cloud service providers and can help you migrate data to the cloud securely find out more from coal fire the high trust cloud assessor a parliamentary select committee convened to review the attack concluded that Sri Lanka's intelligence leaders missed reports that should have alerted them to an imminent attack expect any regrouping to be foreshadowed by information operations what sort of late breaking actionable intelligence defense secretary espy referred to as coal fire when organizations stand up new services or move existing applications to the cloud it security efforts need to be coordinated with business units and partner within hours Reuters says Al Baghdadi was located with the assistance of captured Isis leaders. Whatever its accuracy this report and others like it will at coal-fired dot com slash high trust that's coal fire dot com slash hitrust and we thank coal fire for spots built by the power of harnessing one billion threat sensors from device to cloud intelligence that enables you to respond to your environment and insights that empower you to change it he program there's now a solid path to address the misunderstandings risks and complexities when partnering with Cloud Service Providers Coal Fire has delivered hundreds or strike hours after the raid the Times reports a Bloomberg op-ed argues that terrorist groups like Isis have proven resilient to leaders deaths the security you must clearly articulate who owns what identifies security gaps and determine who will close those gaps with the introduction of the High Trust Shared Responsibility Bittner with your cyber wire summary for Monday October twenty eighth twenty nineteen Isis leader Abu Bacher al-Baghdadi died Saturday erode the terrorist groups relationships of trust one of al-Baghdadi principal lieutenants spokesman Abu Hassan al-muhagir was killed in a US air is of high trust CSF certification since two thousand eleven and they help organizations clarify the roles and responsibilities of security controls that protect information chatter which can be notoriously noisy the security forces are said to have failed to act on domestic police warnings and alerts fed to them by Indian intelligence services those reports began arriving as early as April fourth seventeen days before the April twenty first attack apart from direct observation of online terrorist McAfee the device declawed cybersecurity company go to McAfee dot com slash insights from the cyber wire studios at data tribe I'm d yes the common question inevitably arises is security the cloud platform providers responsibility or is it the customers responsibility to optimize in Syria's province killing himself and sadly three of his children as US special operations forces cornered the terrorist leader in a tunnel missing signal is an old problem the US certainly did the same during the run up to nine eleven this weekend as the celebrations arrived authorities in India raised the alert level in several cities as the Pakistan based terror group Josh Allen Muhammad threatened attacks against those celebrating the Hindu fest level of lights those attacks seem not to have materialized and that's another instance of chatter being disruptive noise a ransomware attack against trial works a widely used legal case management system has caused disruption of trials and schedules as trial works recovers and as the law firms that use the product look for work arounds and alternatives bleeping computer says the ransomware strain involved so far unknown but the attack resembles in some respects August incidents ransom the city of Johannesburg sustained breach Thursday that led to suspend most online services the group claiming responsibility the shadow kill hackers has said they'll publicly dumped all the stolen data if they weren't paid for Bitcoin by five PM Johannesburg Time today that was eleven am US eastern time so the deadline has come and gone we don't have any word yet on whether the shadow kill hackers have done what they threatened to do or whether Johannesburg has paid up here's what Johannesburg city staffers told? Sea magazine was in the note they received quote. Hello Joe Berg City here are shadow kill hackers speaking all of your servers and data have been hacked we have dozens of back doors inside your city we have control of everything in your city we can shut off everything with a button that involved Gan crab successor are evil so dina key be trial work says it's decrypt the affected files which has led to speculation that they went ahead and paid we also compromised all passwords and sensitive data such as finance and personal population information. Your city must pay us for bitcoins if you don't pay on time we will scriptwriters conception of broken English we confess we continue to miss the attack was initially described as ransomware but that may be misleading blow the whole data available to anyone in the Internet we note in passing that their style is like a somewhat less over the top version of shadow broker ease option of services were consequences of the investigation the city said that customers will not be able to transact on e services or log queries the of the city doc researchers at security firm cyber reason have offered their take on the raccoon information steeler that's gaining black market share and the criminals criminal markets it's not sophisticated but it's relatively cheap and easy to use which makes it a classic example of Disruptive Product Raccoon is available call center or customer service centers most services were restored over the weekend the shadow kill hackers made to threats in addition to dumping the information on does indeed appear to be an extortion demand but the disruption to city services appears to have been largely a precautionary measure taken by the city government itself which tweeted that Inter underground it began as a password steeler but has expanded into other forms of data theft and finally who's most gullible with respect to line and telling everyone how they got it they also threaten to delete all the data permanently if that's more than an empty threat it suggests they dropped a wiper into Johannesburg's network online scams specifically which age cohort is likely to take the fish bait and who's more predisposed to spit the hook well the US Federal Wolf for one hundred seventy five to two hundred dollars and it's usually delivered via the fallout or rig exploit kits raccoons native home seems to be the Russian criminal old flick with caution and read with appropriate openminded skepticism which is good advice at any age phishing scams than others but no actually people over sixty are less likely to take the fish bait then our younger adults particularly millennials the FTC's recent report on protecting older consumers reach that conclusion there is a downside however while older adults are less likely to fall for scams than trade commission has reached what will be for many a surprising counter intuitive conclusion on the matter you may think that the proverbial GRANDPA and grandma are likely to fall victims terrorism mission center row smothers knows the INS and outs of leading cyber operations against terrorists and nation state adversaries she's seen firsthand how the bad guys and now a word from our sponsor no before having spent over a decade as part of the CIA Center for Cyber Intelligence and the counter hey and we thank no before sponsoring our show and joining me once again as Joe Kerrigan he's from the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute also my co host on the hacking been find out why Rosa now no before s VP of cyber operations encourages organizations like yours to maintain a healthy sense of paranoia go to are the young adults when seniors do bite on the fraud their losses tend to be higher those over eighty seemed to take the biggest hit per scam so everyone young operate she knows the threat they pose and she can tell you how to use that knowledge to make organizations like yourself a hard target get the inside spy school considering not giving a future healthcare providers my actual birthdate and someone hit me up on twitter Franklin thank you for pointing this out that if you do that then may not be protected against it and there is even a graphic user interface called Armitage for the mets point framework I see so it makes hacking very easy you know before dot com slash CIA to learn more about this exclusive webinar that's K. W. B. numeral four dot com slash C I the your claims may not be paid because that piece of P. I is used to identify you with the Insurance Company so if the insurance company gets different birthday of them Ron and you can distribute them as well so that other penetration testers can use it as well but just like any other tool it can be misused and frequently is misused still manages to be a menace menace. I don't like that term and a useful tool for penetration testers yeah well before we dig in here just a quicker they're gonna say this isn't the right Joe Kerrigan and they're not gonNA pay my claim and I have to give them the correct birthdate because I need to give the my employer my correct birthdate who then humans podcast Joe it's great to have you back could be back Dave before we dig into today's story you have a little bit of follow up some correction I last week I made the comment that I was nine which is Japanese for nothing can be done and what it does is it makes your exploit polymorphic so it's very difficult to see it when you when it's coming in but that's the intent of the tool was was it was designed by a guy who had you know was a network administrator and had to do all this other stuff along with have uh three or network so detection systems are less likely to find it and the exploit is more likely to be successful so When you hear the term script Kiddie these are generally people who are who are learning to use Meta split and running very simple attacks against other targets that into to my insurance company who then ask my doctor for it I C C shooting yourself in the foot Yup I don't do that okay sorry security of his network so we automated the process of testing the security network they built a tool to make his own job easier shared it with the community Yep and of course any tool can be used for good lexa comes pre bundled with a bunch of known exploits and if you discover an exploit or vulnerability then you can write your own exploits and enough randomness it imparts all of that randomness to the message and

Sri Lanka Johannesburg El Baghdadi McAfee extortion US Joe Kerrigan Joe Berg City Joe it Reuters Espy America Sea magazine partner Gan Dave administrator
South African Airline Comair Applies for Business Rescue

Newscast - Africa

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

South African Airline Comair Applies for Business Rescue

"You're listening to. The news are on Africa Business. Radio come on set on Tuesday that it has filed. It's fallen tree business rescue. After nationwide lockdown to the spread of the virus false airlines to suspend all flights comair with operates the British Airways Franchise in South Africa and on sponges. Airline line. Cool Lula also said it has applied to Johannesburg Stock Exchange for its shots being suspended with immediate effect and that was the news at this time on Africa Business Radio. You can continue to listen live online at. Www Africa business radio DOT com all via a mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Business South Africa Africa British Airways Franchise Cool Lula Johannesburg Stock Exchange
Shares in South Africa's Nedbank fall over 9% as it withdraws 2020 guidance

Newscast - Africa

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Shares in South Africa's Nedbank fall over 9% as it withdraws 2020 guidance

"You're listening to the news at this hour. On Africa Business Radio shares in South Africa. Linda Nedbank fell by over nine. Percents at markets opened on Wednesday a day after the land between its financial guidance for twenty twenty ankles some key targets on the review due to the Kobe nineteen pandemic the decline in the banks talk which was trading nine point six percent lower by seven seven in GMT compared to five point one percent fall in the Johannesburg Stock Exchange Banks Index. You can't continue to listen. Live online at. Www Dot Africa business radio DOT COM off. I mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Business Radio Johannesburg Stock Exchange Ba Dot Africa South Africa Linda Nedbank one percent six percent
Johannesburg Stock Exchange Offers Virus Crisis Relief

Newscast - Africa

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Johannesburg Stock Exchange Offers Virus Crisis Relief

"You're listening to the news. Others are on Africa business. Radio South Africa's Johannesburg Stock Exchange. Said it will offer temporary relief to companies in financial distress because of the virus crisis including fees for new list in an extended payment terms. Fresh business follows lockdown measures to slow the spread of the novel Corner Viruses lead to an increase in companies filing for business rescue a local form of Bankruptcy Protection Jesse Group to Leila for re set the Small Cup counters are among the most vulnerable in street markets. The discounts were we announcing for these markets segments are aimed at stimulating liquidity and supports in this fight so growth node economy. The JESS FOR SAID. It's grants distressed companies extended payment terms of between three and six months with no interest charged and offer a fifty percent fee reduction for trading clearing and settlement in all companies listed on the Jess E. X. and B. E. Board for the remainder of twenty twenty. That was the news at this time. In Africa Business Radio you can continue to listen live online at. Www Dot Africa business radio DOT COM or via a mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Dot Africa South Africa Johannesburg Stock Exchange Jess E. X. Jesse Group Leila B. E. Board fifty percent six months
South Africa Ups Weekly Debt Auctions By $109 Mln To Cover COVID-19 Stimulus

Newscast - Africa

01:07 min | 1 year ago

South Africa Ups Weekly Debt Auctions By $109 Mln To Cover COVID-19 Stimulus

"You're listening to the news Our Africa Business Radio South Africa will increase the amount of debt on sale at its weekly auction. Nearly two billion rand governor budget deficits set to increase sharply current virus stimulus package announced by President Obama. Fulsome and I'm Osman published on Friday on Johannesburg Stock Exchange. The National Treasury set it's would increase the amounts on offer weekly governments bond auctions by a combined one point nine three billion rand as plans to line in its budget. The Treasury set the amounts on offer at the fixed rate government bond auction will rise by one point five seven billion rand to six point one billion as of May nineteen while the weekly inflation linked bond auction amounts with increased by three hundred sixty million event so on point four billion rand from me fifteen and that was the news at this time Africa. Business Radio you can continue to this in life online at. Www Dot Africa business radio DOT COM or via amicable APP. Thank you for listening.

National Treasury Dot Africa South Africa Osman Africa Johannesburg Stock Exchange President Obama
The Nod hosts visit Johannesburg, South Africa; BBC Sounds resets ratings

podnews

03:26 min | 2 years ago

The Nod hosts visit Johannesburg, South Africa; BBC Sounds resets ratings

"From johannesburg south africa the latest from pulp you don't forget let media get the not black culture podcast brought to you by blackness his biggest fan getting the hosts of the north tower in south africa the university today was the host city culturally post meets in johannesburg who is a market overview from i own a dog fm an enterprise podcast which claims two point five million people download the podcast monthly then eric eddings and brittany lose hosts of gimblett media is the node with special guests we are some about their attitude to subscriptions and exclusives eric eddings said the subscription services offer podcast is the type of budget that they need to make great stories up front adding that he felt space but both business models most people don't know how much it costs to make something good added brittany lose they also took passionate podcasting must ucla says positive radio days africa the bbc sounds that has been upgraded to add carplay an android auto support we've also taken their opportunities says in email to reset a racing in the apple app store as today's bbc sounds experience is very different from the one people would have had when we launched a year ago that's according to james panella an old stuff email seen by paul news the racing fully out with just two point one starts before the reset it's now four point three so that was them pocus brunch club like book club but support costs published published it july listening list the theme is breaking the news and the play list includes four episodes about media companies and news consumers breaking old habits and old business models captivates gross focus podcast host currently peter has just announced captivate sites for podcasts website that quote looks like it was designed for this decade attitude and that that helps assemble the podcast is added noise reduction unimproved odio leveling to its service so this aims to help poke cost to spend less time on that audio more time creating great content if you'd like to add your favorite podcasts the google home routine so you could wake up to your favorite podcast all trigger riches you cook dinner we linked to instructions instructions today in the episode notes and on useless up in south africa and event for you post meets capetown is taking place on monday the boroughs up in album road where they afro quit team who nearly selected for google podcast creates just program wi are serious about pecan empire magazine the uk based movie magazine and by by a media meanwhile netflix is adding director's commentary using podcasts bespoke personalized audio advertising company millionaires million ounces announced partnerships with triton digital an ad form and we linked to some advice from the podcast host patriots support costas what are the best practices that rough translation is some of the finest journalism and reports

africa triton digital netflix pecan empire magazine africa google paul apple johannesburg director wi capetown peter james panella eric eddings million ounces
How To Fix It: Why South Africa needs a Dont Mess With Texas campaign

Don't Shoot The Messenger

20:58 min | 3 months ago

How To Fix It: Why South Africa needs a Dont Mess With Texas campaign

"This season of don't shoot. The messenger is brought to you. By ninety-one ninety-one is an authorized financial service provider. Quick note to our listeners. To to all the public holidays around. Easter our next episode will be released on the fifth of april. In the meantime would love you to catch up on any episodes. You may have missed from previous seasons. Says one about slots that i'm particularly fond of. Thanks as always for your support if you have driven one of the major urban highways lately particularly in johannesburg or pretoria. You've probably noticed litter piling up along the sides of the road. This is not a new problem but it's one becoming increasingly visible at least partly because south. Africa is simply running out of places to put its trash in two thousand and twenty our own environment minister barbara chrissy said that the way a country manages its waste is quote a fundamental indicator of the extent to which that society is functional. If that's the case south africa had better get its shit together. The good news is there's potentially hundreds of thousands of people ready to help welcome to don't shoot the messenger. The daily maverick podcast where we bring you the stories behind the stories in third season. We're looking at solutions to south africa's problems in this episode we're taking on the country's littering talking to an activist and an academic who help explain. Why an issue that might seem trivial or middle-class concern is actually anything but exploring one of the most successful anti littering campaigns in history and speaking to someone who helped design one of those simple but brilliant local products in this case giant vacuum cleaner for the beach. I'm your host. Rebecca davis in september twenty twenty. The city of johannesburg made a rather alarming announcement. Which kind of got lost among will be other. Twenty twenty madness city told its residents. We're running out of space for your rubbish officials estimate. The job has about four years of space left in atlanta cells. And then these sites will simply be. This might seem like a sort of apocalyptic scenario but it also has been entirely predictable as a country we produce a huge amount of rubbish and about fifty five million tons of general waste which i mean food and plastic and glass and paper and those kind of materials. We produce an even higher volume of hazardous waste by the way. But that's a problem for another day anyway. Somewhere between seventy and ninety percent of this crap just gets dumped into landfills as so often with south african issues. We don't have very precise figures in this case because we have a really strong and active plastics lobby which often chains recycling successes. Which seem overblown. South africa's own ministry of the environment said in a report last year that the country just really have a recycling culture in many places. We also don't really have reliable service delivery which means things which citizens should take for granted like pins being emptied or like bins. Even being available are actually not guaranteed by any means and what does adds up to particularly in our cities is that we're dirty and getting dirtier when we're talking about neutering. We need to take it away from the post which is still an important aspect who need to take it away from the personal and also look at it from a societal point of view apple and looking at things from a societal point of view is pretty much his job as an meritous professor of sociology at vits littering has been on rogers mind the last few years he wrote an opinion piece on the subject in twenty eighteen which he says incidentally is one of the pieces of writing his most often asked give comment on by the media might also. I've always disliked natasha. I have tended to make a habit of big novel. Love detriment trying to replace it in in whatever and it was particularly when ours living in how ten on now capetown which one reason another one hot sided in our walk on much less little in how tang which of course is the center of the country's economic activity and when i used to walk my dogs early in the morning down by the river you could see. Littering was all over the place. You've got all sorts of was coming down from alex and sandton and so on and it was just so terribly visible but at really jhad mind consciousness on the issue. I wanted to talk to roger about south africa's littering problem because he's got a particularly interesting take on it. It's his hypothesis. That littering by private citizens is just one manifestation of a wider problem which has been visible throughout south africa's modern history. I think those puzzling societal aspects. I think basically i see littering which is a light weight word in other words. I think when we think of littering we think of us throwing away packets we think of ourselves from the white comes in bottles and i think implied in the word lettering is it's callousness and it is us being privately selfish on our thank heart. The meaning of littering is that we are externalizing. Private rubbish onto the public arena. And that's why i say. Littering is a lightweight word. Because i think if we go back into south african history we see star. South african industrial development has been edited with industrial littering. The industry's waist being pulled out onto land into huge halls near mining unkowns in south of our waste water into rivers and so on rogers suggests that the callousness we show as citizens when we toss a camel to the road is mirrored by the carelessness with which our factories spew pollution into the air and our minds bleed poison into the air and also the carelessness with government treats the majority of citizens think looks. This goes throughout our history. It's not just local governments. Have jelling late display. A lack of a large majority of the population and i think this publicly displayed in the allocation of resources at local level. We know continuously the former life areas better off. They had harmless careful probably in many cases because local governments they are primary source of rights. Might want to offend that right class but it is a subject respite. Which means that the better off. Aaron's while petrov in terms of on nichols may not the polar areas on also well serviced much more subject to little unto industrial waste had to pour water and that has major consequences for i think people's morale people's health and so on the important point here is that although complaining about litter is sometimes seen as a profoundly middle-class hobby those who are disproportionately affected by the problems that africa are township residents. I spoke to in two zero vika from cape town's social justice coalition. Who says that as piles of rubbish build up they attract rats which bring disease and little children also get sick from playing in the why the reason that i think is because there's not enough pins because when people go to the mall there's always been around so don't toe staff on the floor at the mall. They always look for ten criticizing the been so in their areas. It's hard to fight been. That's what happens. Secondly will be lack of citizenship. You know sometimes people they saw basis order did so they thought maybe data so might pay if i'm probing Defense you know so daily topic. It's ordered dated or does ordered like things that how they end up lieutenant more so aren't enough bins to zella says the city doesn't empty. What bins they are frequently enough and perhaps most depressingly. It's really hard to get people excited about looking after their environment. If it just seems like there's no way that environment will ever get any better. Not zella says that on occasion. He and his fellow activists lead keen up campaigns but even those can feel dispiriting and a bit pointless sometimes see we use a doom clean up campaigns to areas showing people how important it is to make sure that you live in italy the base but they can cannot campaign states event that the people to make sure that they themselves and even then we'll stuggle sometimes to find beds of loves in other material to clean clean but then they wrap is we're going to call it and then end up tightening up you see fit like your wake just goes to waste because you've constantly lawrence coming to the happy so sometimes people just get tired of doing this things. has been spending particularly in a context where the government isn't holding up. Its side of the bargain. It's hard to get people to change behavior but it can be done when we're back look at one of the most successful anti littering campaigns of all time change is everywhere sometimes. It's good sometimes confusing so extraordinary that it turned is everyone and everything but whatever change comes next ninety-one will strive to do everything possible to make positive change for your investments and for the world we live in ninety-one investing for a world of change this season of don't shoot the messenger is brought to you by ninety one. Ninety one is an authorized financial service provider. The history of anti littering campaigns is worth touching on briefly hip because it illustrates an important point. Anti litter campaigns had their origins in the united states in the nineteen fifties with the keep america beautiful campaign which still exists today. Who funded this campaign. Coca cola and a bunch of other canned and bottled produces because in this way the focus was taken off the packaging and production of fast food and responsibility was placed onto individual litterbugs. That's worth remembering. Because as i mentioned towards the start of the episode plastic and glass manufacturers in south africa are often at the forefront of recycling initiatives or studies about litter and recycling. Because as long as we're talking about people's failure to recycle or to use rubbish bins. We not talking about whether we really need all that plastic and glass. I've been thinking about anti littering campaigns for the last two years in april nineteen the central city improvement district in cape town where i live rolled out posters which struck me as particularly lame and patronizing. They were attempting to mimic western cape slang. I think so. They bore slogans like h. My bra stop littering net. I just could not imagine anyone seeing that and suddenly being inspired to find a been around the same time though i haven't read about vastly more successful campaign. Take a listen to this. Each year we spend over twenty million dollars picking up trash along. Our texas highways messing with texas isn't just an insult to the lone star state. It's a crime you don't with. That was blues guitarist. Stevie ray vaughan voicing what is by now. A very famous slogan don't miss with texas. The campaign came about in one thousand nine hundred eighty six. The american state of texas had a huge litter problem on its hands and officials have identified. Who the major perpetrators were young men aged between sixteen and twenty four so they decided what they needed was a tough sounding slogan something that harnessed the pride of texans in this state together with a slight hint of belligerents. A sense of how dare outsiders come in unspoilt things for us. Don't mess with texas. Since then the phrase has become part of the dna of the state but more importantly within the next fourteen years litter dropping in texas was reduced by seventy two percent. But we don't have to look so far afield for all the anti litter innovation tash. I am from see the bigger picture. And i am one of the directors this tash crowds in two thousand eighteen. She helped off the organization. See the big picture. That's a with a group of friends who did free diving together. Dash says they founded this organization because of their growing horror at the amount of litter they were encountering on the beaches and in the water of the cape coast. We can arabia see how terrible is on the marine life and birds and also to wildlife in even a game reserves if you go onto the instance you search angles plastic. You'll see the being choked fisher being at or drowning in the water. But they've got a plastic bag over their hits because if some into it's not get fresh water circulating through gilt they drowning and they just don't understand what this is titles eating. It's you know they think plastic bags. A jellyfish was looks exactly the same. So as we contaminate the ocean and the waterways. It's not what it's in every breath because plastic never goes away it just gets smaller and smaller and smaller and smaller. And that's one of the terrible parts about it. See the bigger picture runs regular keen update on the cape beaches as well as other water systems. Like the black river canal. She says that after one of these days her husband christopher cross became disheartened. At how much work. It took too keen even relatively small areas having up to one hundred and fifty people at beach trying to pick up small amounts of waste like tiny little micro-plastics. It's not feasible to sit there with like your fingers trying to think of tiny little pieces in my capacity Like five millimeters in size lists. So he got frustrated and he was like. I need to figure out a different way to do a more way of doing this. What he came up with together with tash. The engineer father luigi fussier was essentially a giant vacuum. Tina that they've named the enviro buggy and it works on the beach exactly as an ordinary vacuum cleaner. Word sucking up the trash. It's so exciting because you can drive on the beach. Hoover up the plastic wastes leaving as little impact on the beach itself. While still having a maximum impact on how much you can pick up the micro-plastics in the five millimeters illness see. The bigger picture is currently raising funds to build a second more advanced version of the prototype with the hoping can be leased out to municipalities and communities in need of a good hoovering but as we've known for decades picking up litter is only half the problem the other half what to do with it once picked especially since as we said earlier. We're running out of places to store it. The answer is obviously recycling but the most recent figures available from their part of environmental affairs suggests that only five percent of south african households separate their waste. It's a good thing then that there are literally hundreds of thousands of people on our streets daily going about the business of recycling in ways that are often virtually unnoticed. They are south. Africa's waste pickers often stigmatized more often ignored but actually carrying out an absolutely indispensable service without them. South africa would essentially have no recycling industry. This is recycling yup become site in the evening reporting it to you have to separate and as good must be separated so that go to said it's according to these waste pickers filmed in. Johannesburg are doing the dirty job of recycling for the city and for the residents and are saving municipalities from already exceeding the small amount of landfill space available. They do so in a way that generates much needed and hard earned income for their households. They've long been promises from the city of janice burg to form integrate. These waste pickers into the city's waste management system but not much has been done. Perhaps the looming threat of a city with overflowing landfills will force overdue recognition of the waste pickers contribution as africa's urban populations continue to rocket upwards so to the waste production. It's very clear that we haven't got a grip on it. And that what. This problem amounts to is a health. Hasn't a tourism disincentive and an ecological time bomb. The good news is the south. Africans can turn even trash into innovation and entrepreneurial opportunity but that shouldn't blind us from putting pressure on supermarkets fast food chains and other manufacturers to do their bit to reduce the source of all. This junk don't shoot. The messenger is a podcast. Brought to you. By the daily maverick. This episode was produced by haji. Mohammad dodgy and written by rebecca davis editing. Like to rock shapiro. Sound makes by bernard qatar and additional support from katherine coulter. You can listen to. Don't shoot the messenger on the daily mavericks website apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. From all subscribe to the day mavericks newsletters and follow us on twitter and instagram. Have any questions or comments about the latest episode of. don't shoot the messenger. Why not post them on the comments section of apple podcasts. And we'll try and look into them for future episodes. You can also rate under view us. A podcast is only possible because of your engagement and we wanna know what you think.

zella barbara chrissy Rebecca davis johannesburg texas rogers pretoria cape town sandton petrov natasha South africa Africa atlanta nichols
South Africa's Sasol cuts production, sales target

Newscast - Africa

01:01 min | 1 year ago

South Africa's Sasol cuts production, sales target

"You're listening to the news at this hour. An African business radio South African petrochemicals giants Sassa Limited has said on Wednesday. The little caught. It's guidance wasn't fetig few production and liquid fuel cells for this financial. Yeah the decision was due to a three-week nationwide lockdown linked to current virus. Sas All is now expected to produce approximately between seven point three and seven point four million tons of Sinfield gains previously guided range of between seven point seven and so one point eight million tonnes in a statement the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. Sacele said it is also targets and sales of between fifty and fifty one million barrels of liquid Phil but he financial yet. Twenty twenty against fifty seven to sixty eight barrels previously. And that was the news that his time on Africa Business Radio you can continue to listen live online at stop you W. W. Dot Africa Business Radio DOT COM off. I mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Sassa Limited Johannesburg Stock Exchange W. W. Dot Africa Africa Phil Sacele fifty one million barrels eight million tonnes sixty eight barrels four million tons three-week
South African Activists Warn Energy Minister Over Nuclear Plan

Newscast - Africa

01:08 min | 1 year ago

South African Activists Warn Energy Minister Over Nuclear Plan

"You're listening to the news at this hour on Africa Business Radio. Stood in south, Africa the activists who blocked a massive nuclear power project on the former President Jacob Zuma have read into the energy minister to one him outs- procuring new nuclear capacity without proper consultation. The letter seen by Reuters which was sent to quite a montage. From F- alive Africa Johannesburg and the Southern African faith, Communities Environment Institute of their lawyers comes after energy officials said last month they planned to procure two thousand five hundred megawatts of new nuclear capacity by twenty twenty four. The activists said they would approach the court if the minister trying to procure nuclear power request information from nuclear vendors without following proper regulatory processes and seek an amputee from the public. and. That was denise time when Africa. Business Radio. You can continue to listen life. Online at www does Africa business read it? It's come all mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Africa Africa Johannesburg President Jacob Zuma Reuters Communities Environment Instit denise F twenty twenty two thousand five hundred mega
AT#670 - Africa Overland - Johannesburg to Victoria Falls

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

49:20 min | 1 year ago

AT#670 - Africa Overland - Johannesburg to Victoria Falls

"The bags bags on a roll and read. It's real fast board. How much traveler episode six hundred and seventy today the amateur traveler talks about lions and elephants and buffalo ronda flamingos salt flats and a great big waterfall as we take an overland trip from johannesburg south africa to victoria falls welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host chris christopherson and today we're gonna talk about the two thousand nineteen amateur traveler trip and overland trip in africa. Let's talk africa. I'd like to welcome to the show alex and eric jorissen <music> who've come to talk to us about the recent amateur traveler trip to africa alex and eric welcome to the show hey hey. I think these guys have never done this before. So i knew your little self conscious about this so we did a small select group of amateur traveler listeners this time to africa and we did a road trip from johannesburg south africa up to victoria falls in zimbabwe and alex eric were two of the six people on the trip counting we need it was a small but select group of people then this was your guys first time in africa as i recall yeah that's correct lie second time out of the country in general okay and the first time was to mexico or someplace i i left was i went to japan. Got okay you. You know you live in southern california and there's a country just like just an hour away read. That's so easy it's so instead had you guys got on a plane and flew a ridiculous number of hours to africa. We flew through london. I don't know where usefully through that was twenty hours or is there and i think at least as much back a little bit less well and i don't know if you've seen a map but does not exactly on the way so so now just see you know in case you hadn't picked up on there and then we put you into a vehicle and we drove overland and it's a very different experience. We've talked on this show before about doing a safari in africa like i did last december but this was a kind of different trip a lot of time in the van as it was what stands out for you. What was the highlight of the trip ru. You can pick a few different kinds of things that were highlights because there is social stuff that was going on seeing people living in the different different townships but i'm win mostly for the natural sites and everything else like that. I was actually struck by how diverse all of the terrain was. Yes you see a lot of animals and yes you see the planes and the images you associate with africa with the acacia picture trees in the big savannah but there were times driving through. I honestly saw huge pine forests huge mountains. The pint forest took me by surprise yeah. Definitely i mean it honestly felt like alaska with how grand hand how huge it was. The whole world self contained within this relatively small track that we were going on. I think that's one thing i immediately recall. When i think back to the trip besides a lot of the particular events that we were doing day to day we'll talk a little more about the pine forest because again that did take me by surprise of the first day we went from johannesburg to kruger national park and kruger national park was going to be that wildlife experienced and that was the big wildlife thing that we did with a two days we in kruger but on the way there we drove through among other things this very large kenyan that we went around and through and around the rim of at one point as well as this large pine forest and both of those were not. I feel like i the one who chose this trip so i should have known what was going to be in it but i chose it so long. Before we went that on the way there i was i think think s surprised as the rest of you by the route with no potato good excuse for that but we were in places like god's window in the three run devils and the blind river canyon that were some of the least african looking things in terms of what i expected. It really was not what you would get the impression of with dusty red africa high desert all those those things you would think of maybe from a first impression makes it seem different. It really felt like places been in other parts of the world south america erika or tropical kind of places more temperate spots well and then we were also driving past tours places that were <unk> advertising there fishing and coffeehouses and things and it wasn't to me what i expected definitely not more boutique not stuff than i would have expected for sure in some spots anyway. We'll and i think that first day sort of encapsulated for me some of the best and worst of this trip at the same time you're doing a lot of time in a vehicle and so it is gonna be a lot of time traveling so you're not flying into one location and then just exploring blurring that location but on the other hand then you're also getting to see i feel like i've got a better grip on what south africa is than i did at least before or the trip. I'm sure i still don't understand it but in terms of the wildlife in terms of the landscape driving across the country i think is really what we ended up doing and doubling back and going different routes is. I thought if you have the time because this will take time to do that dr i. I liked the slowness of the pace in some ways from that reason yeah. There's definitely a lot that you can take in passively. We were in the van at least good half of the a day most days. We weren't traveling around anywhere. I mean that first day we would stop at places like the burks luck potholes the things and get out and explore some of those things over lunch or take pictures at god's window and so there were stops but yeah. There's a lot of time in the van fortunately it. There's a good group that wasn't driving each other crazy in the van but for the most part on the trip. We were actually incredibly busy every day. Eh we would wake up at six. Get in the van until one major. Stop be there for anywhere from thirty. He minutes to a couple of hours and then at the end of the day. Find wherever risk stop is river our tents were. We're going to be set up in the wake back up at a crooked on every day right. It felt very busy to me. Eli's will in you mentioned something. That's useful alternate so we did an intrepid trip and this is a slightly different version of their trip because we're in a smaller vehicle because there were so few of us normally they'll do up to twenty four people pull in a large custom vehicle but when you say where you're tense would be set up where we would set up our tents so would we would get to the campsite we were sleeping in tents and we he would set them up our selves or with some help from the intrepid guys but we were pretty much on our own and helping each other do that so this is a camping experience. I think there was one night. We didn't set up tents because we were sleeping in some structures at a edgy funky cattle stations sort of thing. Oh oh yeah right right in the eco village show lodge thank you. That's a good way to say that which was an interesting thing to in terms of an experience because we're talking about a person who used to work in the government who retired and then now has set up this thing where he is helping the local farmers get get into the cattle business with a traditional african longhorn cow that can take care of itself can fight off the leopards and things like that and is more resistant disease and so one of the things i like about the intrepid trips as you do get these more less touristy moments like that where you're talking to somebody about the development of the local economy or then we went to the village for instance and and chatted with people there including one who is a recent college grad who's looking for work and i enjoyed those portions of the trooper. I feel like i'm not just seeing the zebras giraffes and the lions and those sorts of things yeah there was a lot got more personality to more of the spots that we went on this trip than you might get in a regular vacation package experience like the my only experience that i've ever had just anecdotally was with this other group gate one. Oh sure yeah bus trip. They have pretty decent vacation packages and you. Do you see quite a lot of stuff. They can sometimes be local but this was actually really getting into microcosm of very local project back door a very specific living situation that is not something that a vacation package group would necessarily take a bunch of people over to go see have that intimate experience is one way i guess you could say but you definitely get exposed to more with the locals are thinking about out with the eco lodge and when we got to go and talk to jonas the engineer student in that village and just asking them how they do do their day to day things and they were all really excited and happy to have people come out to see him because there's a lot of distance in between those little areas there's tens or hundreds of kilometers between them in the next town sometimes so it's it's cool now alex. We heard what eric's highlight was but we didn't hear what yours was. The salt pans was probably the most visually impressive. It's something that you feel feels like your ad planet earth and you're looking at a sea of flamingos miles long standing in a giant puddle pretty cool experience and then then he would look down seeing all the little crevices where the water has pretty recently receded well and you're talking about the and and i don't know that i can see this correctly muck godley godley salt pans in about swan so we did three different countries in this is trip which are south africa botswana and zimbabwe and on the towards the end of the trip sunday six. We're in one of the largest salt flats. That's in the world. I say one of the largest. I think the largest one is actually also in botswana it is right and adjacent to it is the size of switzerland but we are in a smaller smaller when here that had water in it and yet an ocean of flamingos. I think that's a good way of saying at one point and pointing out to joan as we were driving up. I said i think those are flamingos. Macos that looks like there's a line of pink and she wasn't seeing what i was saying. It we got closer and closer there. Were just more and more birds out there and of course going out there to watch the sunset. I was a very picturesque spot will also and in quite different because there was a number of different wildlife life. Is there something that we had seen before by this point we'd seen wildebeest and we had seen zebra. We hadn't seen ostriches yet. I think that was our first. Spotting of ostriches on this is trip but a very wide open space version very very different from for instance in south africa in the national park in kruger a a lot of the places. We're in kruger. Were really enclosed. Spaces not inside obviously but you couldn't see far wasn't that great broad savannah savannah experience that you often see on the national geographic channel but yeah this one was a very beautiful place although when you say with the most beautiful place i fuel you might be shortchanging victoria falls. That's just let's just get that right out there. I think you can make a case for either one. That was my indian wanting thing. That struck me. Also is the lead go to zimbabwe. Ned actually leaves seeing the fact that they no longer have a currency impacts their way of life in a way where you don't really think about hey what would happen if we just if we didn't have currency anymore right. That's not a thing that you think about until you into and you have the one hundred dollars nasek okay. I have to spend this wisely because this is all the money. I'm gonna get wall wall. I'm here and every menu has conversion tables for the u._s. Dollar for the euro you can pay with anything as long as it's not money. Money not ours yeah well. They're trying to reintroduce currency there but it was very odd because you could pay with butts wanna money with euros with dollars yeah very readily accessible but yeah and did you get the guys who approach to on the street and said would you like to buy a five billion dollar bill or five billion whatever the zimbabwe as a keepsake which is kind of all their currency turned into it was stunning to me when they were talking about was ninety five percent unemployment rate in in the area and yet somehow it manages to stay functional which is amazing to me and then while we were our shopping. We were in that market the last day of a trip. You guys were getting ready to go to the airport. After this and we're all picking up i'm great souvenirs because they have some terrific handiwork. They are all locally made wood working stone carving those sort of things but then even even when you're saying well. I don't have any more casual. How about your shoes. How about your t shirt because they have trouble getting durable goods in the country because the economy is so screwed up so at and was a very congenial discussion but they were serious that i'll give you a carving for your shoes so those of us who only brought one pair that was very practical but can't say i heard or saw anything referencing that you could barter like actual actual barter in zimbabwe anything online or anything so that definitely was a surprise and if you have anything old or even and the guys who were asking him sweatshirt oh. Do you have an extra shirt anything. You don't take back. We'll take it we'll trade. It will do anything to give you more. We're of the things that we have in our shop. If we think that there's a use for it and they definitely have lots of uses for it so if you have people that want to get in on that bartering sort sort of experience you can definitely do it. Your mom who was on the trip i think she was going into her purse and finding things like a little flashlight and things like that in bartering with them or i could could be mistaken about that but somebody was and i thought it was your mom that definitely happened. Nail clipper of yeah like japan earned her voice now in the background. I didn't know she was there. Okay excellent and then because this is africa and because we were talking about wildlife best best wildlife experience and liz. You're welcome to join us as well now that i know that you're in the room like to welcome to the show. This is this this is second time on amateur traveler because loose came with me to india and so she was on the show after we we're we're talking about a trip to india so best wildlife experience that we had the offense and the little babies throwing tantrums and laying down on the ground because they didn't want walk anymore and the younger ones tussling fighting just like little kids stu and everyone's really call her everybody around. I really really enjoyed seeing them interact with each other it with this her that we saw a good size heard i think you're thinking of the one in kruger where there were some juvenile's that were i think as young as a year old or less which i don't know if i've seen that young and elephant and some of the other encounters i'd had before so fascinating deigning to watch the trip t shirt which is making its way t- we'll have an elephant on it that we saw in kroger but not one of the little ones because i didn't get a picture of those i think for me it was probably when we were doing one of the night safari as we did the early morning and we did the night one and we saw the hyena cups free strain for sure behind his playing right by the road not at all frightened by us even though we've got spotlights shining on them and then either the mom summer the aunt or something other hyena which who was keeping an eye on them wasn't as thrilled with us being there keeping a little more distance from us that was i thought thought a pretty amazing experience and the fact that we saw leopard because that is something that i certainly wouldn't have promised you we would see either of those sort of things because is there more rare experiences yeah watching the leper preparing for hunting was pretty awesome to have we can do for very long but yeah all animal behavior instances. Were all really cool. I mean you brought up. The ones that i would pretty much have probably leave mentioned already. I actually kinda liked our opening into kruger. We saw some impala fighting a right to mail impala that were you're selling territory and females and stuff inches interesting thing to learn about two gallic. Oh it's mating season. I'm not going to eat for for two weeks by everybody who tends next to me right exactly. It's like the ultimate gauntlet but you're watching all those things you can see it in zoo zoo and you can imagine maybe what they might do. When you get to watch planet earth than you see them trying to break each other for good few minutes definitely set the tone for what to expect in the rest of the part for me. I think side from the other you mentioned already with the giant heard of the elephants in the dynamics. They are in a leopard in the hyenas data. We saw the lions before we saw them. We went through that herd of buffalo as well or we actually eh right through he was going to say we haven't mentioned the sorta like the elephant in the room. It's the zebra in the ted so alex a well. If experience we did not expect so the rest of us are off on a hike at moremi gorge where which the hike itself we have to mention this because because it starts with a normal hike get your walking stick. You're going through some streams. We see some some dossier. Which are these look like overgrown rodents that are supposed to be the closest. It's relative to an elephant which is still hard to picture. The guide is explaining the different plants. Were saying and things like that and then it's like okay now. Put down your sticks because from now on we're going to be grabbing onto the cables and going down the sides of these rocks and okay in ways that i'm sure no lawyer in the u._s. Would permit someone to to do an park and then we get to the end towards the waterfall and it's like okay now. We don't have anymore. Cables just hang onto the side of this mountain and the rocks so so we're having i. I thought very good experience and i'm thinking well. Alex is going to feel left out but what we were doing. Not you were back in the camp in what stroke so so i was just lounging in light ten pretty much and i heard some wrestling nearby them thinking okay well. That's i wonder whether this could be okay so i climbed onto my tents and then a few feet away from me. A zebra is just standing next to my tent hanging out as i'm looking at the zebra i- i- i- rustled by ten slightly and then he's trotted off but it was cool to have seen a couple away from me well and he was <unk> still hanging by the campaign we came back later because as we were having our campfire or whatever i know that there was the zebra i don't have any good pictures of it because it was nighttime by that the time but for the most interesting thing i thought about this is before we got here you know that she was not too excited about the whole camping intense sort of thing and that all worked out much better than she expected. The tents had cots were comfortable. The tents were larger than think wouldn't back when we had camped when we were. I married also the facilities every place we went. Were very clean cleaner than any national park. I've been to in the u._s. Somebody almost constantly cleaning them. Because you know people don't get paid as much you can afford to do that but it's very nice from all the facilities but i thought the most interesting thing is that when she was getting getting ready to come she would say well. You know this may probably be my only safari <laughter>. You know just just you know. This is probably the only time i'm going insofar and by the time we're at the end of the trip we were talking to our guide phillip or we were talking to goodman who is our driver and talking about out for instance. We did a one week portion of a two week trip. You can go back to johannesburg from victoria falls and see a whole different set of parks and things on the way back and she was saying well next time like homo who are done with my wife. It's like nick's time i would think about maybe doing 'cause i think phillip was suggesting could mix it up and stay in hotels some nights but he said when you do that you would miss that time around the campfire and the time with a group because everybody goes in their different directions and she was thinking he had been nice to have some of those nights. Every third night may be have a hotel. Stay where you could wash something out or or stay in a bad whatever but she wasn't saying she would even get rid of the camping. She would one go back and do this again and and to might do it a little differently but even somebody who is not a big camper. This was a memorable trip yeah definitely and there's not really so bad the ad after a couple of days once we actually understood how to do the whole tent assembly and disassembly. I mean it's better to have two people richer have two pairs of hands. Most everything came together pretty easily best fast. We got faster. It was not so in the in the first day it was a bit we are not as fast as philip goodman but we we got more proficient at it over time one thing you would tell people to bring trickle plugs. Yeah you guys had that nice nice device. So first of all. We should say that the plugs in south africa are a little different and in southern africa. I should say there the rounded plugs and their incompatible with plugs everywhere else in the world so my universal plug adapter for instance is not that universal. It'll it'll do asia to a europe it'll do u._k. It won't do southern africa and so you had the ones that were both plugs and then also had to usb and we made heavy use of those along with my u._s._b. Extender although that one didn't survive i think the surge that we had when we were the one eco lodge and their power went out out and then came back on again. I think it may have protected our devices but it it was friday. Process ten bush would've brought one that hung up in the temperate. Are you okay like pat had those the solar lantern sort of things that were very nice. I think any portable electronic doc device that you do wanna bring like if you have a battery bank solution that will always carry you through any infrastructure that you might miss it one side when you're going from from one place to the next because there's so much variability with what might be on offer depending on the campsite you go to or the police. You're gonna stay for few days. I was pretty much piggybacking on what anyone else had on hand. I wasn't really at all prepared for being able to charge my phone every day if i didn't have u._s._b. Outlet somewhere. I thought maybe u._s._p.'s would be more calm in i guess but you don't have the power adapter that will plug in electric wall of there's not a lot of solar or remote charging station capabilities at all not a lot of life so you have to be prepared to not really have wifi connection unless you bring it will and i was actually surprised we had more connectivity than i expected in more access to power than i expected because every camps that we had had power as long as you plug yeah and then a few of them had wifi and i think because we were on the t. mobile plan and we had access to cell phone connectivity in zimbabwe and in we also went to zambia for lunch just to get one more country entry the day that you guys took off to livingston and then also in south africa and all three of those countries we had access to cellphone. We did not have access in botswana which i knew because i've been there last year but that was actually one of the camps that had wifi so i was surprised how much connectivity i had i was expecting to have little or none i and and had more than i was anticipating part of his expectations and then one thing that you did outside of this trip that you were glad you've done so you guys for instance came a day early god of the museums museum in johannesburg the thing that's i i really liked about the z. How first of all the history is so recent and also it. It teaches you a lot about human nature and why everything happened to the way it is and it took me back on how upfront front the museum was about how racism impacted their lives for so long right and also how many people had to die in order to get any kind of rights they now have today adding onto that impression how much of a market made for understanding what the whole apartheid struggle was about when you open into that museum. We were there for about three hours. I think mm-hmm we had a limited amount of time though we thought that at our pace we were going to be able to see pretty much everything. Maybe have some time left over. We barely even got halfway through it. If a win it opens the museum is regular old historical museum. Oh this is where johannesburg started it was a gold mining town and you have all all of these kind of innocuous fats that actually built the whole context for the economic situation in motivation for developing the whole town in the kind of clientele that it brought an how in displaced in rearrange the native populations that were in those regions in how the groups then started to have political strife which also dovetailed with poor economic conditions for other groups than developed into to various ethnic groups that then tried to take on political supremacy and created that conflict there and then the slow steady boil up to the kind of viscerally horrifying racism and apartheid that you can see later on in that the museum in all of the media in all of the movies in all of the tv broadcasts and all of the music and all of the all of this rich information information and artifacts of that period of time really cement and makes prominent what that will struggle was like what alex was saying just how how much nelson mandela and his various supporters had to go through just to have basic political representation and to vote for their own self determination and how that was stymied by various economic interests at the time and deceive their perspectives side by side with one another was. You can't really describe private with words alone. You kinda have to be there. There is a exhibit with nelson mandela's hudson or his nephew or someone like that <hes> um just this circularly contained photo exhibit a. photos that he took during the height of the apartheid. Oh yes protests which is where most of the violence but these were all photo <unk> had and they were destroyed partially in storage rich and the ones that he decided to publish were enhanced in some respects for the ones that he pit in how they were damaged like there were certain stages with a student protests where he saw some of the negatives had deteriorated around students in focus your attention on certain certain politically relevant persons or people that were leading rebellions or protests at the time or enhancing the violence sense of the police against student protesters in the suppression of neighborhoods in townships really was unintended highlighting of what the whole story was really like. I'm not really much for keeping up with that kind of history in any intimate kind of way but this museum just totally lays it out built up from the elemental history of that whole city and then layering on you with more of the people's experiences and that was just even more enhanced when you actually get into johannesburg and you go to the townships and see where nelson mandela lived in. It's like a story book. Movie comes to life and you're watching it in walking through it. Almost students really really really cool for sure. Let's take a break here and here here from sponsor and that's my travel credit card dot com. I think it's clearly if you've been listening to amateur traveler that i love travel but i don't love paying for travel or at least i don't la pink extra for travel. That's why each day i helped pay for my travel just by buying my groceries my gas and my gadgets for a number of years now my wife. I fused travel credit cards for daily expenses. Then every year we reap the rewards by using the points we earn to pay for airline tickets and hotel rooms. The extra benefits along the way like airline credit cards that let us wave luggage fees hotel credit cards that gives us a free night a year travel cards. We use let us avoid foreign foreign transaction fees when we travel overseas which also saves us money. We pay these cards off every single month and that's the smart thing to do that way. Other people are paying for our travel instead of the other way round. If you don't know where to get started you can go to my travel credit card dot com and we've picked a small number of great travel credit cards that i personally recommend including the best starter card right now the card i reach four i is from chase but if i find better cards than we'll update my travel credit card dot com with our best picks so check it out and let me know where you go with your points. That's when we choose these trips. The the length is always controversial because some people don't have much time often. Some people have more time often so we try and choose a trip that sort sort of these seven to ten day range and then knowing that some people will add on extra time so you'd added on an extra day. Were there in johannesburg. We didn't do do anything in johannesburg but we added on three days did capetown including a trip to robben island which is a unesco world heritage site and that's the prison where air the apartheid demonstrators leaders of apartheid basically ended up being in jail for decades in many cases and ark our tour guide actually was one of the people who was jailed or one of our tour guides the one who took us through the prison and got a chance to see their cells and hear more of the details of that portion of the experience and i think it's useful when you're going to a place like this that has been through so much to not jesse the see the pretty pretty animals but also to learn the history and and that was a useful experience to and then we also went to keep down which is gorgeous end to the wine country and i've got at a write up on the website which talks about three days in cape town. You can read more there for those of us who are listening to that but quite useful site trip. If you're going to do this i would recommend if you have extra time. That is a useful place to go and one of the other things about that. Stop that. I think we saw on this trip. Is that when you're in country getting there is a little bit of a pain and takes a long time but when you're there it's very is a very affordable double place especially keep down especially capetown yeah surprisingly so in terms of you know staying nice places and in idiot decent places and and not paying all that much for it one thing that i thought was interesting is that the way that itinerary was in theory are days that we were seeing saying the wildlife were the two days in kruger and then the one day at the salt pans but as joan tells our friends the whole thing was a game drive because you'd be driving down the middle of some highway in zimbabwe especially after crossed in zimbabwe and now there are elephants. Oh look there's giraffes chiefs and you're just on a highway. I guess part of that. We were in the middle of parks in some of those things but you never quite knew what you would see and and then of course in zimbabwe there also were more was zimbabwe botswana now. I'm confusing more donkeys. Suddenly after we crossed the border is okay. That's the thing now <hes> everywhere along the road and interesting trip but i honestly can't exactly remember if it was in both zimbabwe botswana awesome. I'll have to go back and look at my photos and then i'll be able to tell which i find is true with a lot of the trip. There was a a lot to take in. If you had to say you're standing in the prettiest spot that we saw where would you be standing. And what would you be looking at. Obviously ron paul's was pretty much show. Stop even though it was in the beginning really do feel like you're in the clouds up in the sky looking down over the earth. That was pretty amazing. This is south africa's grand canyon ish kind of place except more green not quite as big okay okay. I was very struck by in the salt pans when we were going back to the campsite in seeing the sky and seeing being in contrast to the savannah against the trees it was the perfect almost pragmatic separation of all the colors in the sky entire sky was rabin reflected some kind of a clear crystal. It was absolutely clear during the twilight in you just saw these beautiful lack silhouettes trees coming up through high grasslands and i tried taking so many any pictures on my phone. This is one of those things that you see like high debt incredible four k. wallpapers that someone somewhere took so that you can see this incredible single moment for what happens here every day and that definitely was something i still remember. Even though i don't have an exactly good picture having some okay what's probably going to that. I remember off the top of my head and you actually just reminded me of a wildlife moment that i wasn't expecting thing and that was when we got back to that camp philip who is our guide great guide with saying that he took us out to see bush babies and the the bush babies you know the one of the world's smallest primates he basically walked up to. I feel like he had to walk. Maybe one or two or maybe three trees before he shone his flashlight up in their bush babies looking down at us. They were all over the place at their nocturnal so we weren't seeing them but he had no trouble at all finding bush babies for us to watch who were jumping from tree to tree or jumping from branch to branch. Maybe that's a treat may be an exaggeration on my memory their branch to branch for for sure these adorable little primates with the great big is that we're out and i'm sure all of you guys join us for that. We didn't walk komo than a hundred feet hundred meters excellent and then alex or liz prettiest spun so warning victoria falls after you walk the devils rainfall. That was the part where you got soaked. Everybody walked by that area. There is a a raised up section of rock that you can walk onto if you if you so choose and i walked on that looking on that. I really liked that few one because you're up above a little bit where you have been from. The four were walking through victoria falls. A lot of it is sectioned off where you have a bunch of is in you. Don't feel like you're on the edge of the falls as much coach but when you walk up on rocks i really liked that you because i don't think it's for everybody but it does feel like if you if you were stupid about aww you could actually fall to your best fortunately you didn't i pulled it off at the beginning of the falls away from everything and then at the end of the falls year. It's in a way that it's structured as to now. You're in the false. You remind me of an answer. The question of what you should bring because layers was the right answer i think for because i was wearing a raincoat. That was really glad. I almost didn't even bring it to the falls. I brought it with me on the trip and also in the morning some of this morning and evening game drives it was cold and it was by the middle of the day it was warm. I'm in a shirt sleeve weather but i was really glad that i had the the coat a the hat the sweatshirt basically you needed layer. I think is the correct answer to what to pack and liz prettiest spot. I still out of the trees especially at night. Who we you would see the big trees. The are unique to african. I took their call <unk> over baobab trees. Oh yeah neither outlined to sue just sitting up there on the plane especially when the sun was going down is all orange red in in different colors and it was just so expensive. I really liked that but i really liked everything. Let's seen the animals and i love victoria falls. I wish i could have had more time but time was really so much saimaa. I'll definitely go back to africa. I don't know where but somewhere and i would have to say the double. Rainbows at victoria falls was pretty darn special either that or just before eric's driving back from the sunset yet the at the sulphites the sun set itself. I thought was stunning was felt like a real african moment as you have. Flamingos flying crossed the horizon and and of course you've got your sundown. You've got your you know your beer or whatever your drink of choice is at that point was a very touristy moment because we were there with a number number of different tour groups at the same time but beautiful spa excellent <hes> the one question i usually ask on the show is one thing that makes you laugh and say a only in africa and if you added ma pony worms to your regular diet now since coming back plenty words yeah ah have raised by this isn't exactly of major thing when we were in zimbabwe a ton of these advertisements for blazing fast fiber internet in they have all of these super guzzi mascots that were incredibly badly photoshop than i loved all of it every single one the other be like this weird funding crocodile or a cheetah in a convertible with these horrible sunglasses wearing a tracksuit yeah. Will you extract suits in all these other local flavors of wes cooley says so only something you would ever see in africa in similar to that is going into a convenience in store in seeing some of the products that they sell. I took a bunch of pictures these hilarious goofy names for various products and some of them are super straightforward and then others are just. Why would you even call that is so lacking. I liked the way that our guide talked about chimps their the patriot in his voice. Tell the guidance right yeah yeah little. That sounds like an africa parole. I think when we were at the town in albany i think we're talking to the locals there and they were talking about of basically babboons coming in and stealing stuff ensues suddenly just had to watch out for like local hoodlums crafty lose one thing that makes me laugh. This is great. There's nobody there first first of all. It's a beautiful brand new airport. It's got restaurants and shops and i think three gates their international international airport and the same people that take the ticket go running through the machine. Oh and then they have a baggage rapper and you can put your bag on spinner in covers it with plastic wrap with saran wrap. If you want to but pretty typical in in africa have to prevent the theft of things from your bags yeah well and i don't know what if it happened when you were there but when we drove up there was an african group singing outside that's lovely committee having yeah. I guess that is fair. That is pretty africa. Only thing i was actually remembering at the gates or are they kind of looked like traditional housing how they spiraling so when you go through your international gates were wherever to get through the gate with is your airplane normally think of oh. Here's your little slide against this giant tanggula area of a bunch of different ways as two different gates but at the airport you go in to these spiral towers and when you look at them from the outside they honestly just look like traditional the housing round with around cullen group yeah they just have their own like independent little airplane house gate arrivals dollars yeah yeah exactly one of those oh this is different and very local well and i think the other experience that you just have to have a good sense of humor is crossing into zimbabwe. I think it was we crossed into the border. There and there's there's this long line of people and then you've got your fixtures. I don't know quite what happened there but we realized how the fix was was in. We had some some expediting there. I think that went along. It seemed okay. That's the way things work here. I remember burn the first time i was in africa. We were completely flummoxed by the nairobi airport and it was the opposite of the victoria falls to talk about it was it it was crowded and it was completely chaotic and if we hadn't basically used to fixing services of somebody i think we might still be there half our luggage which i ended up staying there anyway but sometimes africa is a little confusing. I think less so than i expected on this trip. One of the interesting tristan things about going cross country as we get off at two okay now. Go find yourself some lunch and you'd walk into a grocery store. Has this very familiar. There were portions of the things is where we're hours and hours from johannesburg little town and everything seemed very comfortable and very familiar and then you get other the days that were it seems a little different. I guess that is another thing so much game me there. You want him hala. We got him all delicious this crock amazing. We'd eat that any day of the week all the time. Only <unk> didn't try to ostrich and i've pat ostrich. It's it's okay were hog. I remember some people had tried. The word hawks and you're pretty good. That's pretty good excellent. Well my guess again have been alex and eric and surprise liz. Thank you for joining me in africa and when so many people wimped out and two for coming on the show oh and talking about the experience yeah thanks for having a follow up from the recent show that we did on national parks in washington d._c. Area from eric smith who was our guest and that is there is now a date for when the washington monument will reopen and that a september tapper nineteenth two thousand nineteen if you're listening to this show afterwards. It's already opened otherwise. Make your plans accordingly. I heard from elizabeth who's catching up on some older episodes of amateur travellers. She said i enjoyed your podcasts about fiji and vanuatu. I visited these island nations in in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine to eighty with my husband and eleven year old son during a circumnavigation on a thirty one foot sailboat and then she has a link for that ethel put in the show notes. I particularly loved learning that. In the early. Two thousands the local culture had largely survived in the outer islands of both countries in fiji she our son was carried off to the school by a band of friendly children. While we presented the required gift of cover route to the chief. We also spent time visiting the banks. This is where a local man interviewed us on a battery powered tape recorder. I wonder if you plan future podcast to include effects of climate change in fiji and the destruction caused by cyclone pam in vanuatu in two thousand fifteen. I'm sure that we will get back to talk about fiji and vanuatu. I i don't know when i have no particular plans right now. It might be after. I get to fiji for the first time as some of these shows. I'm definitely putting off until i get some place but remember if there's a place that you feel free to drop me an email to host amateur traveler dot com. Let's talk about whether it might make a good amateur traveler episode. I'm looking for things that were. You have been there within the last year and i'm also looking for something. That is a week long itinerary for north american traveler with that. We're going to bring this episode soda amateur traveler to a close. Don't forget my travel credit card dot com if you have any questions sending email to host immature traveler dot com if you want to join us on a trip the trip in two thousand twenty in september of two thousand twenty. The very first part of september will be to turkey. You can find more information about that at amateur traveler dot com slash trips and thanks so much for listening. Let's see what the cat said one jab just me alone go to.

africa alex eric zimbabwe victoria falls south africa johannesburg africa botswana kruger japan lions kruger fiji philip goodman california london alaska bush joan blind river canyon
Fleri: Health Insurance without Borders

InsurTech Business Series

54:09 min | 9 months ago

Fleri: Health Insurance without Borders

"Hi everyone, welcome to this episode of a podcast. I'm sure that you've had you know, fantastic weekends. You probably home, you know, and you've actually open Event Center or Nigeria or some sugar some of them have, you know, visited the move this event centers to have Betty celebration in a wedding parties and all of that for the good thing to be able to have you know, fiscal attendance and to be able to mix with people but of course as important, but it's also very important that those precautionary measures as two priests why we have been all of those, you know in German, but generally I trust that your weekend a good time was awesome as well. You know, do we have I had lots to do but this being good General. How's your weekend was was quite a jesting an Choi. You a boss boss so you for the children weekend because I went I went kayaking, you know, so and off ties and he's flexing and so yeah, it was it was it was a good experience. I mean, it was no means just threw myself out there and being and you know, putting myself on the edge. Yes, so that means you try something new. I mean not take that off my list. So his remaining bungee jumping and skydiving. So I'm looking for my goodness. I bought that was quite interesting and I mean like like you said a lot of place opened up and things are gradually, you know, getting back to normal just schools are opening up and and yeah, so, I mean, I'm sure you'll be coming. Boxing and your account with pasteurized, you know, yeah, but yeah, I thought with you but seriously particular of schedule of the gas that we are having we are speaking to today is is based in America, but it's actually from Ghana and when we have one conversation, I mean you mention God I love and I don't say that. I don't want to I don't have the fights. So not start world was like this is not the battery is not for fictitious are forgiven him. But yeah, so we're speaking with some bedroom is the founder of Larry was an interesting conversation and then we something that we definitely want to share with this with you suck and no would share that, you know after this short break stay tuned. Hi in Chetek business series. Thank you for the good work that you're doing your podcast always interesting thought-provoking and educational. I am in s and I'm following you from Johannesburg South Africa. I Sam Harvey. I'm good for me. Thank you very much for having me here the morning. I appreciate the invitation looking for it's a wonderful conversation with you. And and it's good to hang out again. Great. Great. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, how is it on the wrong side of the world? I'm in the midwest. I mean Ohio, the weather today is a bit gloomy are starting to get slightly cold, which is expected. But everything else is wage is okay. We're all coping with the effects of the pandemics are primarily working from home and not as much as usual. Okay, but how about Thursday? If you've been if we plug just normal just defining it's been great. Right? So in transitioning from Prime going out every day need to to the Arts and being home, it has its advantages and disadvantages. I find that I am working way more. So that's a negative thought I don't have as much as the boundaries but in terms of being able to be closer to the family that's paid off. I'm pretty well, especially with the little ones. So there's a lot of time that we're spending money. I mean the lines of employers that work-life balance, right? Yeah. Well, I mean you just you just have to try cuz I mean the work has to be done. Tell us a bit about yourself a history. That's an interesting one. My story is still being written. Okay one has already come off. I can give you a bit about that. So I'm Gillian Ghana jollof always win, you know, I grew up for the most part in in a cross born in a car lived between a client Emma where my family is up until I was about Seventeen, right? So I went to boarding school in Ghana former high school. And then I was fortunate enough to have a un scholarship that took me tomorrow code sometimes in 2008. So I spent about five years. In fact Morocco studying where I got very active with the community and also in technology I think back then we were all very fascinating. Hey by Google AdWords arm around 2008/2009 and was was part of the community that was helping small businesses. Learn how to use them. Add words to put themselves out there a little bit more. I also worked with a young group of volunteers that brought the second effort to next event tomorrow code which we had in my life. And that was really eye-opening to see how technology unite could be like different people, you know from different places, especially given the diversity of the student body there. I'm going to the very end latter part of my time there. I volunteered a year with German non-profit Community. Don't read International and with the focus on helping you can who were trying to get to Europe and had these thoughts on that. They're now that was my very first realization of the broader issue that immigration faces the the broader conversation off. What he really means to not have leaves on opportunity in your own country. I focus my thesis work on social entrepreneurship and how economies were were going off a result of that for me that that time was Muhammad yunus was was a great influencer in my life at that point in time and what the Grameen Bank meant to India and I truly felt that way, you know, we could have a bit of that in in Africa. I left went to Ghana in 2012 with a group of young men who also shared very similar Vision wage started a company called to heal the world which was my very first social Enterprise, you know experience, you know building a company in that regard went on from there started. My my first company kitchenette wage, which was a grocery delivery company that was with Way Beyond this time or way before his time. I didn't work out too. Well as we learn from our failures left at about six months and then started resulting firm wage. Top quarter in detail, which was focused on providing strategy Consulting and management advice to small businesses and startups both in West Africa and for businesses of styles that were focused on Iraq doing well after two related business this led to some really interesting collaborations really interesting client work. One of which I'm most proud to would be boating the ethical I work company in college that which is doing very well the work that we did there laid a lot of groundwork for what voting is now able to do both in Africa and and in North America, so that's that's a bit of a break down into you know, my early stages primarily on the continent before moving out currently. What do you think? I'm currently founder and CEO of them very if Larry is a health insurance Marketplace that allows immigrants living in the US and in the Dash birth to be able to compare em, khong Health insurance for their families back home. That's that's what I'm currently doing building a company with a team of really great people who have different experiences around their own immigrant stories where we're making life better for for immigrants and their loved ones back home. That's that's quite interesting. But I mean listen listen to your journey so far. I mean, there's no mention of insurance right nothing related to insurance. So I'm quite curious how the you know, how did you get additional space? How did very calm about that? Why why was that something that you thought that he this is a space that you wanted to go into especially at this moment insurance is not something that I ever thought of but there's always the context right when I was born. My dad was an insurance salesman and he was dead. Early at the State Insurance Company in Ghana in in the late eighties getting into the nineties. So I grew up with my dad doing that before he tries to cutting his own travel into our company. I never really thought much of that until very recently right after having experienced in that setting losses in my life over the last three years. I started to pay attention more to how in the US where I live we mitigate the same risks the primary wage and health care and providing for other forms of risk coverage and insurance is just the transfer of risk for a known outcome was something that's happened. You're going to get sick. You don't know but it's going to happen when that happens. You can either choose to carry that with yourself or to pass on that page. Which one entity to whom you pay a fixed amount to cover that with it's a very basic principle that is very well utilized in developing countries. The very underutilized back home and understanding my my desire to have a greater impact in health care access on the continent push need to have to learn more and understand insurance. So I am Roland, you know, just studying and become an accredited on license insurance just abuse and Brokers here in the US and that's kind of what drove my journey is determined. It was really around that's a problem that I'd like to solve and require me to have a better understanding of the particular field quality assurance. And that's what let me think that's quite interesting. So you mentioned what what's your phone number? And to to achieve it's a good thing. I mean being that we have seen publications of numbers as regards the flow of funds back to Africa, right? And the diaspora is is is quite huge contribution to you know, the the economy of African countries off. And I mean, I see how this click it into all of that but one thing that we have struggled with Shelly in this part of the world. These is that trust element, you know, in terms of insurance companies actually paying claims and be there for for their customers in this in this kind of model. I mean what I'm seeing is they have to trust the insurance companies right? Because they're talking about my mother here, right? I'm going to pay you a certain amount of money not to take in order to ensure that when my mother is dead. All she needs to do is get to the hospital and should be taken care of. She doesn't have to pay anything the convenience, right? You know, how have you plan to solve for that that element of trust like that is dead you manage your concerns from I mean your direct customers the the migrants and then, you know engage in those insurance companies who you are partnering with on the ground here in Africa wage. I think that's the case with me before we answer the question. I want to suck your family members in your home country. Okay, and also like understand the different hotels off. So much is admission was what that we have here. I understand that the molar actually see what is this the way people react to purchase of the show, but I think that's wrong answer. This question. They also have all of this product issues in the fact that young people are actually see how this works out. Okay, so really great questions, right? And and I and I kind of give you a background here trust for insurance companies is the primary currency that they took And one of my lecturers always mentioned that if if you don't know by believing and understanding that insurance companies are in the business of paying cleans everything else falls into place after that, right, which means that insurance companies are not in the business of denying claims insurance companies are not in the business of our deceiving customers insurance companies are not in the business of you know, falsifying or over selling or misrepresenting the benefits that they're giving right so which we start from that angle when Blue Cross Blue Shield which were really the page of the insurance industry in the United States started. One of the primary reasons was because people viewed hospitals as a place where they went to die off. Everything was based on security of Health Care until they started thinking about the fact that you know, if people had access to knowledge about wage in finding that a fairly simply without friction. We actually increase the likelihood that they live longer insurance companies here open with the same current, you know, trust in the only way you build that currency of trust is in your historic claim payment right when you ask an insurance company that what is your track record of paying claims. That is the number one basis on which you're going to make a decision for whether this insurance is worthy or not, It's the same thing that carries up costs whether we're focused on someone buying a policy for their family back home or someone buying a policy primarily for themselves to consume here wage. And we flaring is thinking about coming back to your question. We could have chosen to create a Marketplace that has every insurance company on the platform. But that would mean that we have very little leverage and very little control so built in the elemental trust. And so the wave Larry goes about it is intentionally engage the best insurers with the best track record in the countries where we are operating to have them on the platform first. And so when we started in Ghana wage goal was to identify what's going to be the best Partners to work with we spoke to several insurers not all of them are not platform, right? We had to establish. What would be the Playbook off for what makes a good insurance partner right and identify them which means that we're having discussions around the benefits the products that we're putting out the dog. How effective the products would be remediation factors Governors for any issues that come up to make sure that we're bringing the best service to the people who are behind this because in reality flurry is in selling health insurance. Selling peace of mind and Financial Security for immigrants in the diaspora off two months ago. My mom had a mild heart attack. I lived the very story. We're actually building fall from when she was taken to the hospital. So when my my sister called me to inform me to letting me know what was going on, the thing have made my mind does I feel that I felt that fear that I had is the same for the song millions of immigrants who live in the diaspora away from the people that they care about. How are we focused on them? Moving those things. How do we bring peace of mind in that process? So that's what's important for us do it to remember that choice is King and we're optimizing for trust by being selective and interest about who gets on the ferry platform as an insurance partner. I mean, I think is that bits that we still struggle with Australian this part of the world right understanding that the currency that we spend is trust still tell us, you know, the journey like the customer Journey how it works really just give us a picture of how it works all of them body exactly how very impacts people when you think about Flair you thinking about you know, the Nigerian or Lincoln in on the Kenyan, you know, ten slash in, you know, immigrant who lives in the US or in Australia, I'll tell you an interesting lie, you know who could also live in Nigeria for the person who's dead? Being outside the above the primary country with Beth that has dependents that rely on them. I dependents who you know, they support the beginning of a journey with Larry is I'm looking for a way to better care for those family members and and one of the biggest requests that they get all the time is hey, Jacob, my sick, you know, Mommy is not feeling well. Your husband is not doing okay this person got in an accident right off the headache that comes from them having to go find a Western Union or MoneyGram or downloading an app and trying to figure out what the exchange rate is going to be or even if they have shown that money budgeted if that that is the big one. So for for us it's about thinking of the future. If if you think of the people that you care about if you have someone depends on you, that's where your journey starts. So on our platform, right the the tech Choice makes all of this happened more seamlessly, but it's really you're coming on plants on Fleury to be able to identify one. I have this person that I would not be able to cover. I want them to have health care that they can access at any point in time with no hassle, right? And I want to wait to be able to do that. Not just like that a sustainably right? So you're not platform. You're giving us the information on who you want to cover. What country are they in? What is your name? Your genda phool No, get age. Do they have any known pre-existing conditions iPhone here? What kind of benefits would you like them to have once you told us all of these days Larry is going to turn off. You that the insurance companies that we work with? These are the policies in the right order that sent the need that you're looking for. So you have a choice right? It's not a one-size-fits-all you have choice, right and then find the best policy for what you want them to have whether you want them to be able to go to South Africa for care or you just want them to do have here in Nigeria. If you want them to be able to come to the u.s. To come for Care by that is going to be different factors that you're dealing with and we're going to show you you know with the different options are now you purchase a policy. It's as simple as attaching your your card or your bank account to facilitate that transaction. We also give you a choice of being able to pay a monthly quarterly semi-annually or annually right in making it as easy as possible the same way you get off. Health insurance for yourself to be able to get health insurance with his family member and once you do that, there's a whole lot of work that is going on in the background that will take care of I-4 making sure that the choice he gets underwritten. The policy contract is going to be delivered delivered to the doorstep of your family member. They're going to get their ID card along with the providers that they have in the network name chosen for them going at hotline number that they can call 24/7 to be able to let us know if there's anything that we need to deal with before the beneficiary in the country song is really one thing. We're making it stupid easy to just walk into a hospital or to a pharmacy. Once it in the service provider is just an insurance to be able to get back there. Take your card go to the hospital go get the care that you need so that in an emergency. Nobody has to be called they go off. Away, whether it's Ambulance Service Pharmacy, they need to buy how much sugar cause we want to make it easy for them and gives you that peace of mind knowing if it if it is 12 a.m. They don't have to call you and tell you that's all they they can call you and tell you in the next morning and let you know. Hey, follow me that only see that you bought mommy is she had to be taken to the hospital yesterday and it was all taken care of that is how we're measuring such tests on this platform. And that's basically what the journey looks like from the the best for an immigrant who comes on the platform to the end when the beneficiary receives your conscience, I using their policy, I think a lot a lot of money, you know, what time? Yeah, I usually check and see where we have to be out of pocket and although we get reimbursement for the end of the day. You would have actually punched clean of having to watch t or if you don't have any what we have and how exactly are you able to manage your money issue with some of the Israeli some of the exclusions that you might have some some things that might not be covered. So we do we do a very good job of explaining in your policy contract, you know, what is covered and what is not covered, right? And what is covered is simply, you know things that song. We we can mitigate for right if it's not covered. Then you're already aware from the beginning that there when it comes to these things and what's not covered is not much. We'll see, you know around pre-existing conditions that exist and if invent right we have different policies to be able to address that that way we eliminate those things changed is critical here right Critical Care might not be on some of the the lower and policies but it's Critical Care is important for a relative to have wage. Then we have a policy that provides critical care or provide critical care as a supplement that is being purchased by now. What do you also Town Saloon me was what happens in an emergency if they get sent to a hospital that is not in the network not is where it gets interesting right? I mentioned very early on that wage. Larry as a company is interested in owning The end-to-end Experience. What we're doing at least in Ghana is the fact that we're providing a certain level of provision right revolving fund that is meant to take care of these escalating situations such that our priority is to make sure that your relative gets the care they need at the time they need no matter what happens afterwards we go deal with the insurance company and that's the difference between jobs in the country that you were going to go deal with the insurance company yourself and it's 12 a.m. Wise 1 a.m. And you'd be rushed to the hospital. You're not going to be able to reach them. Right but flaring makes it different in that we are able to cover that and then take it up with the insurance company after if it's not an emergency. Then you have a choice right if you really want to use that provider because That's where you are, but it's not an emergency. Then you go ahead and do that. You're going to have to pay for that out-of-pocket and then there's a claim reinvestment process in our platform that helps you get rid of that. But when it deals with emergencies, we optimize to take care of the beneficiary first. The immigrants part is good extent is a good cell phone. I'd be something that would be peace of mind that definitely do want to to have right and being able to provide a kind of solution where their loved ones who get care package on the on the Side Drive is the minister has wow on the ground here in in Africa in in the countries where you are engaging now that it's you have limited control, right? So how do you manage that relationship insurance claims are being paid ensuring that even with the experiences of wage? Loved were all these people at the Care Center as Health Care Centers what it should be you know, so how do you manage all of that? So the the insurance package has been really great the the smart that way intentional with who are partners are and and just to get okay an overview call Pilot is happening in Iraq, right? So we're working with glycol Healthcare Premier Health Insurance. We're working with Nationwide Insurance. And for them it is as we took a really good relationship that allows us to be able to make sure that we're holding them accountable to their service providers on their Network, right the money comes from the insurance companies pay the claims. So it is in the providers best interest to provide the highest level of care. We also serve a the beneficiaries who go to the hospital wage. Make sure that the level of care that they receive are commensurate with the level of care that the insurers are promising the other part of how we manage that is the establishment of the confidence board. Right? We have a governance board that has two Representatives where every ensure that we work with. This is how we make sure that anything that comes up has adequate redress anything that comes up is being addressed properly. So that's how we're mitigating against these things. And as we expand as we acquire more customers, there's going to be an average to be able to attend to have on the market in this way or yeah from your engagements now with people already at the moment with insurance as an Alexa was a vision. So I think insurance has been around for a long time creative insurance is just starting and like fishing. You know, we are companies like well visits, you know realize that are doing some really interesting things in the market. We expect that to continue to grow and as we do more business with insurance on the continent, it's only going to get better ultimate vision is to improve access to Quality Health care for a billion people right choice. Then we realized that we can't just think to those who have relatives abroad. It's going to come down to how are we able to move the needle the needle for mom used to live on the African continent who have relatives abroad. How do we make sure that we're designing products that impact right? And that's something that we're going to see what we're bringing is unlocking a capital that has always just been seen for its size but never for each value, right? This is dead. To bring accountability and we see this here and I expect of you know, that remittance slow and the creativity then we're going to have more leverage think about it. If the money is Flowing from a relatives abroad doubt. It means that now hospitals are going to start recognizing that they're being judged based on their care that they're providing the money that as far as bringing back we're expecting that the hospitals are going to start making more investments in the healthcare provision in the number of doctors, right because as more cleaning are being paid than we're super changing the healthcare system to be able to solve some of the structural and systemic issues that primarily have not been able to solve because they were marketing and trying to sell to the same group of people who have a big challenge with affordability. What we've done is taking the equation of affordability from the local continent to the dash or And that we think is going to change a lot of how that value chain looks like like going to see how that plays out. We're very hopeful I think a lot more people are going to start unlocking more of that value in in the dashboard and I think that's a fantastic thing. But you guys are really sway includes one that actually found that Market address in stock market place. I read enough of this game. What kind as much as the people in front of the restaurant and lounge? I know that Talk to Larry. He's arguing with yourself of Netflix in the insurance Market by the job market. You're definitely correct. Right and there's a reason why Insurance generation in the continent and in most emerging economies are low, I that several factors from regulatory cultural Financial that that holds a lot of that back our primary focus like you mentioned is around the the immigrant right? How do we make life more bearable for the person who's left? Their their country home to find a life that allows them to better support their families and they're not at home. Right? And this means that if you look at that immigrant what what are they spending currently on wage? Funerals cost right in Ghana lot of places like honor so it is it is natural that we're going to be moving into the final rights and and the general policy space we're going to be moving I'm is gone permits into the life insurance base and really capitalizing and expanding on the gap insurance access type by diversifying and adding more products because it makes sense. They already spending thousands of dollars a year in being able to do these things off, you know at full cost. We're all going to die, right? We understand that how do you mitigate that and how do you make sure that when that happens you're better prepared going to take a crack debt of twenty thirty thousand dollars to pay for a funeral back home when it could have been mitigated with the life insurance policy on makes sense home. Immigrants to be able to have access to write, you know, you just want to connect that bridge and make it possible for them to live life slightly more dignified or more intense off and that's amazing. So if Larry now, what's what's the plan like in terms of investors Investments and Partnerships going forward with Larry is calling raising right? So where where is it? Not playing around we're continuously talking to investors in terms of product launch like we're in private beta so we started off policies just not publicly September 30th is going to be our soft lunch when we're going to open this up to do the public and start singing more of that customer position a rapidly building up, right? So that's that's where we are right now in terms of launching September 30th, and you can hear about us talk about as he has a dog. We're in that sense as we get the word out, but for now, we're we're in private beta working with fewer customers that that are coming in more intentional but making sure that we're we're working out the Kinks in this pipeline so that the experience can truly be scalable for for the immigrants and then Thursday is Sherry. Okay. Yeah that that's that's interesting. So I know that you joined a set of Studio. Can you tell us a bit about that? And also, we launched are you where are you launching? I know you're from Ghana. So we always started in Ghana. Yeah. So in terms of the event The Venture studio right rev one rev one Ohio is the is the insurance capital of the United States. We're lucky to be here and we have one has a lot of experience expertise and activities. Within the insurance based here. Also, they they do a very good job of supporting startups that are here in Columbus. And we also have some other support systems interested you is around the state they help with bringing a lot of expertise higher level thinking and strategy around what we're doing and then regards to the launch itself off our core business model is we work with local Insurance Partners in the countries. And so for that we're going to be launching that in Ghana, but like I mentioned before we're going to be going to Market also with that partnership with Cigna which allows us to be able to sell plans that give Global access across Africa. So someone you could buy a policy that area for a relative on the plan if that level of care that you're looking for much much higher than 2 million dollars in coverage in your arms are also slightly more and Thursday. Get done with the local Partners, but you have access to a whole lot more facilities like 1.73 million facilities around the world. But also like I mentioned that people who want their relatives to be able to come for care here or in the UK where they live right? So provision for this with these policies were also working with another partnership with any assurance that Africa that is going to provide us poor coverage and Africa that in also going to be coming out September 30th as we tighten up on on our agreement. So why we're launching our core product in Ghana, we're going to be in fifty-four countries in Africa starting September 30th, right July off my coverage for I used to have Partners or investors. Yes. Yes. So we have we have a partnership roadmap for what wage We were working along those time. I saw you start seeing other Acquisitions coming into the platform on a progressive basis. It was really important that you tighten up and down on going and going and then and other partners getting access to to relax. Okay? That's that's great. Well, he's been dead amazing talking about Larry and what you're doing is quite quite interesting and I like the way it ties very much into the thought sdg go off right providing good health care and well-being and I mean kudos to you guys. And so for people who are listening and you know, they want to reach out who want to propose Partnerships should be an investor wants to to come in and how how can some people reach out to you linked in or we're we're on Facebook. We're on Lincoln. We're on Twitter. We're on Instagram. Right. So flurry held for Instagram and Twitter, you know, you'll find that joints Larry on Facebook. And then on LinkedIn that will be flurries. You could also go to ww.w joint, And that's for anybody who is trying to buy a policy or wants to check us out walk through the process from the website. We're also available on website on WhatsApp. If you had tags via email just go into the website will give you access to all of our contacts, but I personally I'm primarily on LinkedIn it's about the only platform unable to manage myself. So we're we're very open very accessible on my my co-founders are also available on Thursday LinkedIn, you know, and and the team is small but but it's very Dynamic around the work that we're doing. I don't know about you following me. I mean, it's been an interesting conversation. Yeah, it has been dead. New on the mother of I think one of the first people who have officially have new markets life fighting for me and all of the public schools and all of the low technology used. I am excited about I speak very Comedy Club is open is going to be and I'll be happy or will be happy to actually be perfect. Thank you so much. Well, I appreciate it. It's been really great talking to you. I know we've had conversations before this and seeing what you're doing in the insurance based as well as leverage in this platform to let people understand you know, what is possible the primary problems for a for Africa the challenges in Africa remain pretty much the same and anybody's birthday. Make problems in this case one is going to be having an impact into has the opportunity to to build a successful business, right and focus on Healthcare and education. We focus on on Transportation Logistics and and we focus on financial accents right that other value pack include agriculture that that unlocks a lot of value for all parties involved. Right and at the end of the day, you know, the most important thing is we're building a company wage, um for immigrants by immigrants focused on you know, providing the kind of service that my grandmother is going to be proud of that. You're going to be part of right off every decision that we make comes from a place of you know, what is my mother going to feel like when she's using this product and and that doesn't happen often. I have one dog. Lot of different ideas lots of different companies. It's not often that you get to make something that is extremely personal extremely interesting to all intersect at the same time be a hopefully profitable business as well like grid. Yeah. So we look forward to further engagements and here just really just being a part of of the flourish of story. And yeah, we have to to have this conversation and definitely definitely is going to continue definitely wish you all the very best yourself off and it seemed absolutely I appreciate it. Thank you very much. Hi and welcome to the news update. My name is Uncle Louie the headlines Aaliyah's and Jubilee insurance and strategic partnership in East Africa. So genius rethinks customer engagements with AI chatbot. Nichrome sets to release it guidelines for industry players. now the details aliens and Jubilee insurance and just strategic partnership in East Africa leading Insurance Group aliens has just signed an agreement with East Africa's largest Insurance Group Jubilee Holdings Limited in order to explore new business opportunities in life. I've country Jubilee currently operates the partnership which covers General Insurance business is one according to the original CEO of aliens Africa that off faster growth by delivering innovative solutions and Superior Quality Service made possible by the combined expertise of both organizations. What's a genius rethinks customer engagement with AI chatbot digital Insurance platform Auto genius has announced that its customer has will now be able to buy a photo booth health insurance easily and faster via WhatsApp or telegram for the help of their new sports coat Alex off this according to the general manager. Adebola banjo is necessitated by their drive to offer Nigerians Innovative and flexible insurance plans, alongside month of Service delivery. Nikon sets to release it guidelines for industry players. The National Insurance Commission, which is regulator of the insurance industry in Nigeria has disclosed that guidelines for it in the industry would be released very soon wage. This is communist the commission's for insurance and a thermos announcer tonight compatible which has been in the works since 2014 as now been fixed home after journalists dinner in Ohio. The commissioner said it is no longer going to be historical reporting it is going to be reporting as at now. If you tap anybody in the commission he or she should be able to tell you the transactions in the markets in the last four days. That is the objective that is where we took into. And that states on the news updates the rest of the show continues with demola and flew me to stay tuned. Hi install Tech business series. Thank you for the good work that you are doing your podcast always interesting thought-provoking and educational. I am in s and I'm following you from Johannesburg South Africa. So guys, welcome back. I'm sure you enjoyed this interactive sessions with some it was I mean, it's good to know that there are a lot of different ways to buy insurance without having to step out of the borders or even buying away from the shores of Nigeria. I covering people within a particular taste like imagine if you have any able to buy insurance health insurance actually for someone you left behind if you ended Aspera, that's that's a good thing. It means that you you are not just you don't you don't feel that you talked abandoning your family you're able to keep stuff for them as much as you are able to touch on what it is. Should you out of your country of origin from the very first beginning so I think that's that's a good one wasn't doing is quite interesting and something that wage. I think that is quite key because I mean is well documented that you know the dashboard when does broad send money will you know for different reasons, you know various reasons and chief of those Regions Bank is religion, you know, my my co in send money, you know, five skills and money and slurry saying hey, let's help you save money less help you pack ensure that this log ones that you left behind in in in Africa. They're getting the best care possible. Give us that assignment that would help ensure that that is that is the case. That's what they are doing and they're helping give people in the diaspora the peace of mind and it's just imagine how insurance has been sold on boards, you know, see people, you know in in America and Thor parts of the world able to buy insurance for them more than their father back here in Africa in Ghana and Nigeria and South Africa, and this is here have access to birth. Of these Health centres within their country and even outside in and so it's it's just it's just amazing because it opens a lot of opportunities, you know for them and and wage. Yeah, it makes us see that a lot of things can come out of you. Just thinking about you know, how Insurance really can be taken to a new level and and that's what I see from from what they're doing it. I forgot is definitely for me the new playground when it comes to you know, Innovation around in technology and insurance and this is one thing that that they are doing that New Creation in market place where people come by insurance from from another four people in in an entirely different wage continent. So is this quite interesting and excited to see how how that grows know, I'd actually like the fact that they've been able to break down. Market bar area, you know and I like that you're penetrating this particular market. So you're seeing an opportunity somewhere. You know, I think a lot of people are actually being able to crack the parts clock hold for not for you to actually have adopted this motor into your business and you're running visits with you being able to cover image for the business. I mean insurance is it's a lot chances versatile you have different aspects of a chance, but you coming to sell to people in the gospel to COBRA people in your own country. That's an Africa. I think that's a very good one and it's interesting because you know, it gives you know, they usually assures you of the fact that you're able to hit us to your loved ones, but it gives you that peace of mind which is the actual purpose of insurance that wage. I'm gone and regardless I'm not going to pee out of my nose to want particular health issues because I don't play recovering this page something for me so that they just that piece of mind you have that let you know that okay. This is not an area have to bottom yourself about because I am covered for me again is I see as insurance for Africans by Africans right found us from God. And so yeah, they have that personal experience that the control from some of these risks. All these challenges are things that they have faced with them. So they can they are customers in in in in themselves, you know, so they know what the customer what what what people in Desperate facing the able to see that like hey is a prologue. Why not create a solution around that problem that can help people have that peace of mind like you said and so is this is quite interesting and you know, we are happy to to help and support them in any way that we can when they're ready to come into Nigeria insulin and happy to be a part of our conversation as well. Oh, let's let's not forget the congrats a list them. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, let me in some some regulations Simon Ting you guys are amazing and keep up the good work. Hey, we're show that you enjoyed this summer session and you are also clean and interested in following up with all of these conversations. So again, they are available on LinkedIn were available. You can also reach us via email address is also embedded in Arlington. And also we appreciate your time. We appreciate your support we also offer Sheetz the fact that you've sent in your reviews about how exactly to, you know be shipping the entire podcast. So, thank you. Thank you very much ma'am, and we hope to engage U one of these days, you know, just to have like a warm audience and perspective about insurance not just Specialists down the street. Just even here would we have to see about what you think about the insurance industry generally and how they should be able to use technology to unless something that's beats. Thank you once again for this. Thank you very much. I remain as a pleasure and see you stay safe.

Ghana Africa Larry Nigeria United States Ohio Africa Health Care LinkedIn Nationwide Insurance Johannesburg State Insurance Company South Africa
75 per cent of UK ad agencies plan to spend more money on podcasts

podnews

02:33 min | 2 years ago

75 per cent of UK ad agencies plan to spend more money on podcasts

"From radio days africa in johannesburg south africa the latest from pod news dot net seventy five percent of uk advertising agencies plan to spend more input constant over the next twelve months that's according to new research from banks digital audio is a whole including music services will see eighty five percent of agencies spending more guy rise is just step away from his role as host and editorial director of the ted radio hour we linked to the job advisement his replacement in pulp news today he looks back at seven years of hosting the show only npr website and he's also just been announced as a keynote speaker podcast movements in august mentioned yesterday but now it's more detailed eerie as is a new female founded podcast network they launched with full new shows this week willink with more information from are episode notes and on news today folks bus has announced an also leveling feature fritz customers in france y'all know a small rural county now has its own podcast journalism dot co dot uk reports on how they established it cost have announced a masterclass series for underrepresented groups in podcasting they called eight kloss see what they've done that and the first event is on the twenty second of july cbc podcasts currently sending us cryptic messages the latest one says one of a holocaust has a surprise for you expecting to learn a little more from this on july the ninth broadcast input costs are two worlds converging says only studios mitch secrets where data from across the world and the youngest s e oh plunking was a bad idea uphold cost until now because they deliberately block search engines from seeing you rss feeds and so you'd never get into google podcast dope after many reports this is now being fix inversion eleven point seven in focus today willing to frank tennis tales from no man's land a new podcast from the uk musician and they say the first time the uk office has released a podcast in conjunction with an album also news media insider podcast look inside the uk media industry and the conversation

editorial director kloss africa johannesburg africa uk npr france google seventy five percent eighty five percent twelve months twenty second seven years
District 9 (Directed by Neill Blomkamp)  A Bug's Life

Show Me the Meaning!

1:02:25 hr | 1 year ago

District 9 (Directed by Neill Blomkamp) A Bug's Life

"What i've everybody welcome to show me. The meaning wisecracks movie podcast jerry rejoined here with the show me the meaning crew. We got greg ryan sub film fans and we got austin yo. That was my best prawn language. Okay okay. I i <hes> prins and offensive problematic term. I'm going to have to okay okay. Okay allah the problem that you're going to lose your show yeah. You're gonna get us thrown off the platform anyway today. We're talking about district nine. The two thousand nine film directed by neil blom camp. Starring charlotte gnarled hoke hopely as always. We're gonna go around see what people thought about this the first time they watched him. What was it like revisiting this podcast. Let's start with greg. Oh shit it on a spot district nine first time i watched this slide two thousand nine two thousand and eight hundred man i watched it and i heard it was like a peter peter jackson film and i'm like oh lord rings dude all right. Let me check this out in <hes>. I'm like okay aliens slide some racial connotation type shit immigration immigration and south africa osha soleil i- phillies about it and <hes>. I dug it <hes> <hes> i liked the movie. I like the imagery i i'm always into lake <hes> alien type robot <hes> political type movies alien robot movies <hes> it was good. I mean it didn't like blow me away. I you know i understand no it. Didn't it didn't blow me. Well understand what the movie was trying to say. <hes> we got a lot of movies like this avatar and you know yeah. It's like a it's a ton of movies as good because you know him turning into alien so people can realize how it feels to be the outsider and you know just racism you know hating these people even though you took over for their land but you trying to deal with it and we got these colonies that we're gonna push people and i get it. You know <hes> doug had the movie was made but you know it's another one of these these flakes. I'm glad i hope you know i hope these movies keep coming out so people stop killing people <hes> but <hes> i'm a bucket so i'm here. I mean it's it's in two thousand nine. I thought it was good. I never thought it was like i liked avatar. More collective the statement. That's probably sending <hes> i just probably just because the visual and because the way advertisers jerked everybody off for like the six months before i came but i dug the movie i just you know i've seen this movie before that wow that's it. I'm sorry ryan. I feel like it's okay. It's okay all right ryan. What do you think well. I was blown away. I think this is one of the best movies ever made real. Yes yes. I would go as far as to say not hyperbole at all. It's fucking awesome movie. When it came out it was awesome and it still holds up. I mean it's a it's got everything going for it. It's gotta amazing script. It's got amazing special effects that were great for the time still hold up. It's like a hand held. Its hand and held with really practical butts c._i. Mixed in facts to which is a cool style that i liked with also. I love all the surveillance footage stuff sort of it. You know they really. I use that to great effect. <hes> i love what else do i love about this movie. I mean it's a body horror man on the run you know found footage movie kind of which was so cool at the time and it still holds up one thing that was different about this time watching watching it. Is that a oh and then also. It's like a fucked up star trek movie or story. Basically you know just what the sociopolitical aspect. The commentary would not but <hes> <hes>. I didn't have subtitles for the prawns when i watched this movie because when they sent me the not not joyce fall but but when they sent me the file there it wasn't subtitles and i thought that was crazy some house before that sucks. It doesn't actually take that very interesting watching it with the prawn language. I wouldn't know prom language. Would you know obviously charlton. Cock knows it and he's learned it but it was interesting this time watching without that and kind of the dissonance between we're just trying to figure out what i what they were doing and you kind of can figure out. You know pretty much what's going on. I think it was on hulu. I watched it on hulu which is okay interesting yeah so anyway. I just love everything about this movie. Shelter copy copley's incredible in it yeah <hes> what a good star and then the director who you know camp is the man but he hasn't made anything since then and i would say i hate them with passion. Jappie was cool but stupid stupid but it was a fun time but this is an amazing movie <music>. All fronts like it's fun to watch fun to think about you know even when the trailer dropped in you think they're talking. It's a refugee documentary and then it's like oh. Oh shit grandma aliens in a trailer came out. That was awesome time. You know you pump for the movie which i assume it was like peter jackson's axons credit to you know for marketing it well <hes> anyway. I just love everything about this movie. I have more say but we'll be talking. Well yeah austin. What do you think yeah. I was gonna say in conjunction in with the trailer. Do you guys remember. I don't know how many cities around the country were. <hes> were using this marketing campaign but at the bus stops they just had like the picture of kind of like like a little alien. It was like a minimalist alien just said like. I don't remember even what it said. It was like no prawns allowed or something weird. A member and i was like oh fuck is is that like i didn't want. I i thought i thought it was like some avant garde street artists trying to make a political statement and then when i found out that it was attached to a film and then it was attached to the trailer taylor like ryan was just talking about was kind of it almost seemed like it was going to be like cinema verite or some sort of like a documentary and it kind of switches it around on. You're like oh fuck look. This is actually produced by peter jackson then it was it was a really kind of brilliant way to amp up our expectations because that's obviously post lord of the rings and everything like that were peter. Jackson's name is just like god-like status right so i was really pumped for the film i saw it and i am in between ryan and greg. I would say that i would say that there are scifi films that are like canonized as the pinnacle right like two thousand one's in. I just told you i saw alien. Ah in theater recently like those are the films that are in the top tier right and they're on the mount rushmore. Let's say and i think this film is just one step below. Oh but nevertheless i think it's very very very very very good. I'm just trying to be shot to to not like over rhetorically imbue my words and say it's excellent but i'm almost almost tempted to say it's excellent. I think the acting is fantastic. I think the political commentary is clever as fuck. I think blonde camp did with a thirty million dollar budget to then one make a shitload load of money but also just the fact that he was able to make something that holds up in terms of how it looks the production design is amazing. <hes> i think the story craft is fantastic. I think designing principal in terms of the themes and the concepts really important and intriguing and i think that's the type that that's the mixture of film that i love to see especially because this is basically an independent product so for all those things. I really really really do enjoy the film. I just don't think it's as praiseworthy is ryan. Does how dare you well. It's definitely a huge standard to say one of the best movies of all time but i i'm broad net for me. I'm just saying that this is a masterpiece apiece is all. I really mean to say okay yeah. I love this movie. It's awesome. I loved it. The first time i saw in the theaters and i watched it and there's some parts that are just really powerful like the c. Charlotte oh copley who by the way sucks that he's not a superstar. He didn't have many chances to make it in america he he was i feel like he's in and stuff every once in a while and he surprises and he's great less than you do him off the top of my head just yeah he yeah but he pops up all the time i see him and stuff. You're kind of like oh shit. That's the dude from district ninety because forget his name but he's in stuff all the time well. Maybe he's just stained in my mind because he plays the bad guy in the american oldboy remake. Which is a costra fee yeah. He's in eighteen. He plays murdoch in the eighteen. You remember all he's in malefic. He's in <hes> <hes> chappie again he works with. Tom camp all the time <hes> he wasn't using hardcore henry heartsore henry okay. Maybe i'm wrong. I hope he keeps getting worse because he's awesome awesome in this movie and the scene where he begs christopher for protection once he's back in district nine as someone turning into a promise so powerful. This movie is awesome awesome. I don't wanna waste anymore time. Fawning over it 'cause ryan's already done that for all but before we get into recap. I want to remind everybody if you've been listening to the podcast asked recently you may have heard me talk about our medium partnerships so we're now partnered with medium which is a long form articles website so where uploading three articles a week go to medium dot com slash wisecracks subscribe to the publication share. Our stories would really mean a lot to us. We really want to make this partnership with medium workout. Alec who has been on this podcast has before been working really hard <hes> working with our other writers to make sure we're doing you know like basically three times as many scripts as we usually do so it's been hard work but we're really enjoying wing it and you guys can help us help us continue that partnership so and remember now the wisecracks there. It's getting hot down in medium. That's right all right guys. Let's go into a recap so in nineteen eighty to a spacecraft containing impoverished aliens which are which are pejoratively described as prawns appears hovering over johannesburg south africa so the south african government houses them a militarized settlement camp slash slum known as district nine fast forward to present the day we follow whikiss a worker add multi national united who is tasked with heading the effort to resettle the prins to another area instead of helping them repair their ship to get back home. Why because the government wants to harness the alien weapons which can only be used by prins weakest raids the housing of <unk> named christopher where he finds a mysterious series piece of any alien technology that sprays him with a black liquid victims help rapidly decays and when it becomes clear that he's gradually transforming into a prawn. He's he's taken into an inhumane prawn testing facility where the government scientists discover that he can now wield alien weapons before they can harness his organs for further research research vic escapes and takes refuge in district nine vikas tries to hide and christopher's house where he discovers that the object that sprayed him is the fueled the prins need to fly back home christopher promises to fix him if they can recover the fuel so they break into the government building and steal back the object with the fuel in hand vegas casse starts the ship and heads toward the mothership but it's shot down immediately by the government and vegas is kidnapped by a district nine crime lord christopher's son is able to remotely reactivate activate the mothership and save vegas using an alien maqsoud vikas helps christopher and his son to escape to the mothership christopher promises to come comeback for him and the rest of the prawns now living in district ten in three years. The final shot shows vegas now a full blown prawn creating a flower out of scrap for his wife and of movie. I guys before we move on. This podcast is brought to you by skill share so skill shares online learning community with thousands of amazing classes assist covering dozens of creative entrepreneurial skills. You can take classes in everything from photography and creative writing design productivity and more so whether you're returning into a longtime passion project or challenging yourself to get outside your comfort zone or simply something new skill share has the classes for you so i've taken a couple of classes on skill share. One that i really like is called the writers toolkit six steps to successful writing habit so this basically for people who get writer's block for people who <hes> have trouble getting getting stuff down on the page. This is a really great class. Some of the key things that took away from this class is one thing is making your own space so always change your environment if you can't make it to a coffee fi shop even something easy like a new window can actually help get your creative juices flowing i now because of this class right down all my first drafts of scripts on a notepad had it really helps to get stuff down. Also if you do find you have writer's block. I learned to read inspiring works and if something inspires you start writing so so that's all from this riders toolkit class so join the millions of students already learning on skill share today with a special offer just for our listeners to free months so skill shares offering show me the meaning listeners two free months of unlimited access to thousands of classes for free sign up go to skill share dot com slash wise crack again that skill share dot com slash wisecracked to get two free months for now and now back to the show. I know when i met writing at mcdonalds at some point have to go. I gotta go another mcdonald's based on the road. <hes> i've done some new <hes> atmosphere the other mcdonald's. You know just going to them. As long as you bring the same cup because then you can just refill fountain of cornell and they have mcdonald's did not sponsor this however really coletta mcdonalds oh yeah but when jacob and i were first starting wisecracked we worked out at mcdonalds a lot because they got cheap drinks free wifi and you know awesome. What gonna kick you out. That's so counter to the l._a. Dushi starbucks culture too right like if you go into any coffee bean or starbucks you just find writers from content creators and everyone is a producer in the coffee bean in l._a. Yeah so deterrent our guys. Let's start off talking about the documentary documentary style <hes> at first. I was really tightly sure how i felt about it. I wasn't really sure what it adds. <hes> there are those moments <hes> because when i watched it i was like oh you know he like he's looking at the camera and introducing us to various parts of his job and i guess that's kind of what it functions as but i also felt like that could have been achieved with. Maybe introducing like a rookie character that he's training but i on the other hand. I really like how it initially depicts. The prins these violent bottomfeeders kind of like how an episode cops that takes place in the inner city and then as the movie exits the documentary style and we go into the narrative style we start to empathize with the prins more so i the more i thought what about it the more i started liking it. I i think i it was a very bold choice to start for one. It's a bold choice to have such a weird in character for this film. You know you could have been just as he could have been just a straight guy like a tom cruise. Ask you know taking care of business person but he's a very strange idiosyncratic character. You know like he has these weird this weird voice and mannerisms and stuff and just the way he interacts with his wife and how he's kind of like kind of a worst away bodily but like also you know he's at <music> a position of responsibility you know so he's an interesting guy already and yeah just the fact that you're totally getting the the youtuber version of like like oh here. I'm gonna show you around my job. You know i'm blogging kind of like that's in this insane world that we're building and that's how they're building. The world is through this kind of <hes> first person point of view documentary which is a really awesome <hes> decision on your part of the office in turn learn and the way he i mean that i kind of like the first opening scene when he's either does not while they're just doing it in the background. It just had that feeling and dan him being kind of like a a loser type. Dude was right. <hes> just remind me of the office so much was office. Was that good in two thousand nine yeah now. I'm glad you brought that up honestly because that's kind of the one thing that to me make make this top level movie and why. I like it so much that it's hilarious. This movie is so funny to me <hes> and then just the insane violence people blowing up with blood blood splatter. That's my kind of gore. You know why it's hilarious in early but also yeah i really like bought brought up with the office because there's a very like when it comes to vicki's arcos a very banality of evil kind of thing because he's just closing his eyes to all the horrors of his job. I also like that. He's like this kind of meek social climber. He married his boss's daughter letter which gets him the promotion and she's high bill. O. sure worked but the father-in-law even says you know. Vacancy was never very strong but the point of the documentary thing is it almost emphasizes the point that he sees this as this fun youtube video kind of thing and he sees this perceived institutionalized benevolence which is just like this pleasant facade which we later learn is hiding pure barbarianism <unk> barbarism whatever the word is things going on there right. There's the sort of brechin distancing effect by breaking the fourth wall where you are immediately being addressed which which means that you are a part immediately of this story and so i think that they're supposed to then <hes> that that's supposed to inflict into type of empathic connection with whikiss in everything that he's doing so. I think that's why it's such a genius thing and then on top of that. You don't have like a typical leading man that is doing this because again. It's supposed to appeal l. to the every person that can watch this right. It's not someone who's brad pitt gorgeous. Not someone who's sylvester. Stallone ripped not someone who's tom cruise smarmy smarmy charming. Whatever the fuck is you know. It's <hes> it's somebody who we don't really know who's kind of just in every person who's a paper pusher and we're kind of brought into this person's story and it's kind of like fuck fuck man will. Let's let's kind of see how this relatively awkward not extraordinary dude is thrust into an extraordinary situation and that kind of plays it kind of pulls on us a little bit it forces us to do a little bit of work and that's that brek dean distancing thing it forces you to engage a little bit more into triggers your imagination and then it triggers your empathic involvement in the story. I i love that. I love that absolutely yeah austin. I have a question <hes> there's another element of this that kind of affected me in a way that i don't think he did did the first time but especially in the beginning and also towards the end of that juxtaposition of the various bureaucrats and academics juxtaposing that with the squalor that the prins live in and it kind of angered me and just made me think like what is this trying to say. Is it just about like the impotence of academia or of the bureaucracy actually affect any real change because that's how it affected acted me with this viewing interesting yeah i i don't know it very well could because there is a lot of ambition in academia right where we might often think that we're changing the world because of the books that were writing that ten people ever in their lives are gonna read by the way by my book <hes> and <hes> and stuff like that some yeah i mean it very well could be but another reason why i liked the inter cutting with the academic <hes> kind of documentary style narration and was that they it's a nice way of giving you plot information in an expert manner but in a way that doesn't <hes> it doesn't it doesn't like break the rules of storytelling right because it is kind of the cinema verite style and and so it kind of plays with genres a little bit and it allows as you to one be like oh. I'm watching a film. That's that distancing effect but then also i'm engaging with it and i'm getting information but i'm not annoyed that it's just too much plot exposition right eight. I think i like it to the more i thought about it the more it because initially i was like oh well bladerunner starts with maybe five lines of text heck's that explains so much that takes this movie like ten minutes to explain but i think the more we talk about it the more i think that it's time well spent definitely and i think it's trying to emulate like a history channel kind of explaining the refugee crisis could very well just about south africa and stuff which i think it is obviously supposed to be a one for one we might talk about. We will but <hes> but yeah like like you're talking about inner cutting. I love there's so many good examples samples of inner cutting. I have a couple here that the editing amazing and this is like when he finally when he finally is a fugitive as running from the the lab and then you're cutting cutting cutting that with the people talking like the talking heads you know who have who already know the events of the film that were watching so so basically yeah like you said you're getting information nation from the future lower watching the present quote unquote <hes> which is really cool frames that is this significant momentous events yeah this huge big event that everyone one knows about everyone's talking about and then another good example is just like when whenever the data's talking to his <hes> daughter just straight up lined or face saying like oh yeah no now he's gonna be fine and then while we're watching everything tortured. That's just a great juxtaposition. Yeah you get an abundance. You're getting to know about everyone's relationship and the scenes <hes> through the cutting. I love him. He said that it's like a history channel documentary. 'cause that's exactly it's it's like a history channel documentary but instead of going to the cheesy like fake acting that they do because they have such terrible budgets for reenactments. It's like a really high budget version of that right except within the context of a of a common social commentary so it's fictional but you know you watch you watch a history channel documentary on like the holocaust and it'll like go backwards to some actor playing hitler like doing his hand motions or whatever and doing whatever it is doing with his <hes> with his various military personnel and maybe like some jewish people in concentration camps and the footage is inevitable that good especially like war reenactments. It's they just don't have budgets. It's four whereas this is done in a way where like oh it's actually this is really seamless and <hes> it it kind of brings it to life brings the historical events to life a a whole lot more because of that i think the editing is the straight man in this though it breaks it up you know it breaks up the the hard content from district nine it breaks up the family <hes> the family beef with his father in law and his wife <hes> and breaks up with heat what he's going through <hes>. It needs it but it's it's. It's so much like the office has <hes> yeah. It's which is which is great yeah the one thing i really like about his arc. Is that that it's like he. This man who is a monster in order to become a man he has to become a monster in the sense like <hes> oh <music> waiting waiting room and seconds into the clip yeah because i mentioned and earlier the so when he starts transforming to a prawn he finds himself in the same position as the people he was previously oppressing so in one telling moment he steals a phone from a guy in the street out of desperation hearkening back to at the beginning when they in that documentary style exposition they talk they talk about how there were calls for resettlement due to the crime that the prins propagate and then he has to eat out of the trash can just like the prawns <hes> i it's just just i like this arc much more than the one in avatar we talk more about the similarities between avatar but he no longer has the privileged ethically sit on the sidelines he has to become a man of action and has to endanger himself to save christopher and his son and that's why it's all the more powerful that he's just kind of this meek the guy at the beginning maybe in the process we learn what it means to actually be a human so rather than the human being this scientifically biologically designated needed essence we think of the human as being an ideal that we are perpetually striving towards and so maybe none of us are ever actually human but we're always in the process of trying to become human what is human. It's the ideals that we sink that we that we seem to god self designate ourselves with but then maybe we don't actually live up to and so maybe he becomes more than human like or maybe just simply becomes that he's in the process of actually embodying the ideals that we already claim exists just within humanity and he has to become inhuman in order to truly become humane and i love that. I think that's fantastic yeah me too. You guys want to talk a little bit. I mean it's crazy that this movie avatar came out and both in two thousand nine hour is wild yeah having thought of that so this is way better overload. I i also think that i thought i also think this is way better so just to give everyone so both movies follow a man working for militarized organization that is seeking to extract a precious resource source from an alien species in case of avatar. It's invading the navy to get on obtaining them which is always whenever i say because it's such a on the nose name and and then in the case of district nine the government is trying to get the prin weapons and so both follow a man is he inhabits the body of the quote unquote other and he recognizes the humanity in them men revolts against his former bosses in both films and with this man being changed completely into this other but i liked this movie better for a couple of reasons nations one of which there isn't the kind of like hokey warship of the prins. Is this pure peaceful culture that is entirely connected to nature in a harmonious harmonious relationship. I know like for the most part the prins our justice shitty as humans and i like that because we don't need to build up these other cultures as pure and beautiful and faultless in order for us to want to help them. You know what i'm saying amen brother no i mean on apprenticeships other shittiest humans either they just like they shipped his breakdown and they left their. Maybe they don't have an opportunity to be as shitty as humans but they're not like aac either not like the novi are where they are an image for us to aspire to to live peacefully with the world <hes> the noble noble the savage which is which often sized by all kinds of political and social positions because it it <hes> it can equally lead to a type of tokenism or type of chauvinism and <hes> yeah. That's exactly what avatar does is it is it does it. Tokenism is the indigenous or the the the the non-settlers the non colonial settlers and rather than having a sort of much more nuanced take on how to understand understand the experience of the human in the formation of societies and things like that. I think both of them token is though why the positive definitely tokens this right okay and district and i don't think so just like we'll talk about the apartheid thing but <hes> that's what you're referring to this. Yeah i mean of course <hes> i mean that's the reason that set in south africa but i mean they're both that's why related to advertise like the same movie but in this time the aliens earliest come here and you know the humans goal you know to their space in in avatars. This is the same exact concept a movie out instead instead of somebody taking on the whole body. <hes> this guy gradually turns into the alien. I see what you're saying. Though like i've pretty much which yeah i agree because it's really just the tone in how they're dealing with these new aliens because here it's kind of like awards and all like the good and the bad and it's not so black and white whereas avatar yeah. It's basically we humans suck. We are coming to take their shit and goddamn it. They're like the perfect if we i also liked that. He doesn't need to fall in love with like a human estefan like the other doesn't doesn't have to be fuck -able for me to identify needs. We don't need zoe saldana. You know what i'm saying. I i can see a a monstrous prawn and still identify that hey this is a sentient sapient. Being that deserves dignity the bad to make a story that that draws our attention to the need to appreciate the non human world or the <hes> non white world or the non-colonial world those are obviously good impulses and good things to explore into develop ella but the issue is if you fetish is nature as being like this place of purity that is the site of i dunno board joie escaped from the city or if you think that somehow now <hes> the culture is like a degradation and corruption of the true natural human community then you're making some assumptions about what reality is you're making some assumptions is that navy don't actually hold and that maybe aren't even really adequate understanding the the the the the object that we're trying to study whether it'd be nature or the community that we're trying trying to understand and i think that's the problem avatar it just fetish is as nature too much and it's like fuck. Cities cities are evil and bad. <hes> technology is bad. Modernization is evil which i'm i'm okay with criticizing these things but it just doesn't really easy and cheap way to be like i would just need to get back to nature man which is just kind of. I don't know i think it's loaded with certain philosophical will presuppositions that i think are a little bit over-simplistic the marketing three day exactly exactly it's like technology is is corrupt but hey come see this and it is the more optimistic movie which i can then district and i can see. Would you know relate relate to audiences more at the end of the day. It's like hey. This is what you're saying. This is what we could be this utopia thing about it. That'd be awesome. Everyone's going yeah. That would be cool and this district district nine. It's like man people suck and just in a new settlement camp at the end. We don't even know if they get saved right. Yeah exactly i love the imbued ambiguity at the end of the movie with charlton copley's character and with what's going on with the prins like basically at the end who knows that the the the the struggled keeps going easy at the end of avatar. It's just easy. It's an easy it's pesos so that you can eat your little bit of candy and you can feel good about it yourself for being a nice like you know white liberal and maybe have some guilt and you see you like oh man. I gotta be better to lake indigenous people but that's okay. I'm still going to keep doing my thing. I'm not actually going to contest. The power. Structures whereas district nine to me is much more challenging. It's much more like no mother fuckers. This runs deep okay. You can't just like feel good about your white guilt and then go about your daily business. We got shit to do in work to do and that's why like district nine a little bit more politically. Socially you know yeah all right. Let's dive into the apartheid thing <hes> so pros of you that don't know apartheid was forced racial segregation in south africa from nineteen forty eight till the early nineties it was segregation housing public utilities marriage rights job opportunities there was even forced resettlement into into segregated neighborhoods which you know hearkens to the littoral district nine <hes> i found a really great paper by a woman helen capstein called the hysterics of district strychnine who she because i'm not an expert in apartheid she was able to pinpoint some specific allusions to various ideas ideas <hes> so one of which is early on in the film a bystander being interviewed the prawns suggests eliminating them with the selective virus <hes> and and this is a historical reference to a guy named voucher bass on apartheid's dr death who oversaw research into race specific biological weapons ends among other horrors also part when vegas is accused of having sexual relations with the prawn and so according to tap seeing this moment references this is south africa's history of taboos interracial mixing and sexual activity is actually codified under apartheid in the immorality act and prohibition of mixed marriages act which were frantically and punitively enforced. It also plays on the anxieties and stigmas about h._i._v. Aids epidemics in south africa and there's even a part in the movie where there's a poster that is pinned in the background that says infected don't risk it. They're all carriers risk hotline zero four no alien <hes> <hes> choose which kind of sums up society's fears about the biological and social boundaries being threatened also with like bates epidemic and stuff and and then that sign that you talked about that was part of the marketing austin. She says that the signs marking zones for humans only are obviously reminiscent. Is it yeah of apartheid era white persons only signs apparently they're similarly <hes> designed and <hes> yeah yeah i. I always thought this. I mean obviously the choice to have it. In south africa have forced resettlement part of it is obviously a big nod to apartheid always thought this was just really cool. The some some viewer let the comment. I thought was interesting. <hes> that i didn't know and it's it was an district nines an allegory for the forcible removal of people from district six in cape town. How the prawns were the non white <hes> will colored colored people. I don't know that they were south. They were they were into four different. Rachel clashes there was lack colored colored in indian and colored an indian people had different subgroups as well but you are actually classified within within one of those four and then maybe subgroups within those flow ignorance her into the apartheid <hes> district six equals district nine earls flipside well. The difference is it's actually it's the inverse of it because district six is where where people were removed moved from and they were settled into other camps <hes> so it was supposed to be a whites only camp <hes> so you kind of <hes> it's kind of like an inverse. I love it or a transformation of it but yeah they were. They were forcibly removed and resettled in the cape. Flats is what they're called and <hes> that was it's like this low lying land that was prone to flooding that was positioned in barely a very poor geographical region and then became basically like slaving in squalor like a slum is what it became over the years so and that's not the only the only instance that just happened to be the one <hes> i think in yep our particular region which is in the cape town area. Yeah people talk shit people like ooh. I hate talk about racism. Yeah i will say this. If people are interested <hes> i just finished <hes> sort of seminar we're here in reading group with a group of people we read a book by a south african scholar her name's jennifer robinson and she wrote a book called ordinary cities and and <hes> it's basically about trying to develop a post colonial theory for how it is that we understand the construction of cities now she's from durban south africa but she talks a bit about joe burg and it's it's for people who are interested in like urban geography or if you're interested in how cities are classified as a global global city or <hes> how spatial divisions are are constructed and things like that so she spends time a little bit of time doing some case studies on the history of <hes> johannesburg in particular so <hes> it's called ordinary cities by jennifer robinson and it just was fucking perfect happenstance that you that i watched this film after reading that book because so my mind was like lit up with she doesn't really go into <hes> some of the things that the film kind of is is intimating but really interesting book for people to try and it's super super super readable not like philosophy shit okay so for people that are like. I don't know about your recommendations dude. Check this shit out. It was actually really good. South africa's weird it man. I've never been a south africa. I've been i've been east africa. <hes> <hes> i'm i'm cool on south africa <hes> even like the africans i meet in america that that have lived that are from south africa. It's just a you know grown up in that man growing up in that shit and your your your family your a father's or your grandparents growing up with shit. She's nasty. It's like boston times twenty. It's disgusting <hes> yes. I'm my girlfriend actually has the opportunity to get a job in south africa and i'm like you might have to be going there by yourself. You can't can't deal with that like deep. That's some deep deep deep racism right there like people driving around like armored lake ford like if you need to have the glass at your ford truck armored because you're scared people are going to get some revenge on you and the shit that's gone. They're trying to give people back their land initiate. It's a bomb waiting to go off. There's attentions man. I had a couple of friends that that recently went <hes> a mixed group of people that went and they reported in quite different experiences surprise surprise but i i mean apartheid ends in the nineties so here we are you know twenty ish years later and in those divisions are still you know you don't just you don't just overturn hundreds of years because you know even though apartheid wasn't coda fide until till the late forty s it was already pre existent in certain rules under the dutch empire in the eighteenth <hes> in the eighteen hundreds and <hes> or in eighteenth century. I'm sorry and then when the british empire kind of takes over certain parts there was a battle between the dutch and the british empire but that that stuff doesn't go away when you have hundreds of years of like chauvinism chauvinism and racial sentiment and zine phobia and that stuff still exists in a lot of ways like in the social stratification from what i understand no doubt all right got to transition out of this talk about podcast is brought to you by my wall street so austin is laughing at the particular relevance of this but ryan you play the stock market. Don't you oh every day. Do you really know the market in koi. I invest i'm critical of economic regimes but i'm not trying. I just eat beans and rice for my fucking life. Yeah i mean i've always i think about investing but i i mean. I have a liberal arts education so i i don't really know i was never taught about any of this stuff <hes> so i have set up a thing with my wall street <hes> i don't. I know how to set up a portfolio. I didn't know what would get a good return. There are thousands of stocks to choose from <hes> but the cool thing about my wall street is they offer a shortlist of stocks that they're investors have spent countless hours researching <hes>. I was never coached on this stuff. So it's really nice to have that investing companion there for every step of the way setting up a broker and then you can start managing your own portfolio <hes> and with their app really easy you can invest and learn on the go so all our listeners can get access to the entire my wall street at for free and use it for thirty days instead of the normal seven days by going to my wall street dot com slash wisecracked back to download the app now and get access to their market beating stock picks and expert guidance after trial. You can continue for just nine a month. That's my wall street m. y. Why w. a. l. l. s. t. dot com slash wise crack so guys and as far as their motto goes from the wall all to the street to the my wall street dot com dot com. That's a good one single rice you gotta. They say never been hired. Raja ours anyone else want to bring up about this movie. You want to go to mailbag. We have a whole bunch of once upon a time in hollywood mailbag to get through since it took austin extra two weeks to see it. Oh yeah i'd like to just take another second to to just say how big of a shame it is that neil blonde camp. What's up not gonna go. Finish your thought for ya. I i was just gonna say that that he hasn't made a good movie since this and he <hes> infamously had i think an aliens reboot go under and maybe a robocop cop one go under i wanna say like he's had a couple of big projects that took years off of his creativity time that i'm sure you got paid well for but we don't get a movie at the end of it so basically we've only got chappie which we all agree is sub par the kids. The kids love chappie okay eh yeah and elysium which sucks fucking sucks him. I don't love it but i'm kind of into into it and i know with as subtle in awesome as political commentary is in this movie. That movie is just a sledgehammer it. It does seem like yeah but this is great though like you know they have that whole medical chair nobody dies in the league well originally it was supposed to be ninja from dan toward instead of matt damon and that would have been cool but then i say that but then he's bad in chappie like he's just not a good actor know who who would it have been originally supposed to be ninja from deanne toward the guy yeah interesting. I think that would have been interesting if he could pull it off at the time. I thought that the entered such performance art thing that oh he could do anything. I mean this whole performance. Our thing is so convincing but i don't know i don't really you know why feel differently after seeing chappie. They're bad in that movie all right. Do you wanna say something austin. Oh yeah so people might get mad if we just if we ignored like another kind of interesting element of the film but <hes> the idea that <hes> you know he has to become non human so that he can realize the ideals of of becoming humane or maybe of striving towards humanity in a better way <hes> but also the the thing that this film does it it couches this this racial we'll satire or commentary within the framework of species ism right and that's something that i think right now is really kind of important on the rise is concerned that people have like how do you how do you be a humanist and care about the world like particularly with the ecological crisis right like how do you care about the world but in a way that doesn't just concern itself with one species and i think one of the things that's interesting that this film does is it kinda. It kinda tries to say that there are deeper connections is that maybe even being human this ideal that we kind of think that we are is actually being post human right like like the alien and human human world can coexist so to speak <hes> and that it's important to strive for that kind of egalitarian rule. I think that's really powerful in this film you know yeah. I'll say i thought about something similar to that and i was like so when we see the prawns and they're getting abused. It's sad but i feel like it's sad because we can see the human like emotions is in there is but then i'm like all right well. It's conditional upon me recognizing a sense of humanity in there is and how much sympathy is there really for this other supers- well then that means that we have to figure out how to how to attune ourselves to those empathic connections outside of just the ways that we you typically are accustomed to like. We obviously like you know this. You're a dog lover to the hilt like if you see dogs getting put in pain you connect with them. You read sadness in there is is you read sadness and a whimper and you experience joy in their joy when they're running around. Can we do the same thing with fish. I just saw fucking viral video of an octopus trying to escape out of a fish fish market and i got really sad. I was like oh my god. That's fucking octopus trying to escape. A fish market is like a dog trying to escape from someone. That's trying to eat a dog or something like that. You know take us a dog. Hey man in east asia. They eat some dogs so i don't know but you know austin. If lettuce screamed while you eight you would never have a abilty again. Probably haven't we gotta synthetically create all of our consumptive material all right <hes> mailbag yeah. Let's do it all right so <hes> we're gonna do some voicemails hit us up at two one three five three four eight eight zero seven or two one elf hut. Oh seven we got a couple of voicemails. These are the ones that aren't too long ready. Let's see what you got wise crackers. We got dalton up talking about in the mood for love we gotta do hey wisecracked dalton from here calling in response to the in the mood for love him so for the first time at the last year and there's like immediately became one of my favorite romance movies ever alongside movies like lost in translation in the before trilogy yeah but you brought up a great point podcast on a ticking time element added a whole nother layer of the film and looking back those other two movies lost in translation and the mainly before sunrise before sunset <hes> they use that to and while hollywood romance movies use that same device device to have the leading lady about the flyway on a plane and never be seen again but then the guy rushed to the airport sweeps off the feet of the last one. I it's just it's bullshit. Get ending these movies <hes> that end with <hes>. I'll fuck like our time but finished up. We can't keep this connection going because i'll probably never see you against those leaves the easy way bigger and more profound impact on me aside from the fact that they're just directed active beautifully. I think idea of a love story ending either ambiguous this guy or or anti-climatic instead of winter climax typically do just overall better film than more people can't connect to even if they don't want to anyway those are just my thoughts <hes> love the show and i appreciate you guys always making me wanna go back to we watch movies and appreciate them away or just discovering movies much less piece be great message. He's a lover too. You can tell district nine kind of had that like we were talking about. It's very that last shot of him peel making the the metal flower is very bittersweet. You know like yeah well. He mentioned lost in translation and i believe sofia coppola when she won the oscar for best original screenplay aleisha actually thanked one car why because <hes> because the movie is lost loop on it's based on for long classy that she thanked active she totally cite your sources when you steal their material right. Let's do another one. Let's go jason with once upon all the time right. Hey show me the meaning crew <hes> my name's jason and i had a question for you all about once upon a time in hollywood now i just saw the movie movie last night and <hes> one of the the small things that i i remember that is kinda sticking with me that i wanted to get your opinion on on the scene in which rectal is sitting on the western set with the little girl actor and both reading their books now the little girl is reading a book about walt disney me and she proclaims walt disney to be a genius and a visionary and then asks rick what book he's reading and he's reading a western about a character mr who is undergoing a very similar arc the brick himself in this movie and so i was wondering and then the little girl then says well that sounds like an amazing story so i was wondering what is quentin tarantino saying if anything about possibly the studio system today about how walt disney movies are are has taken over kind of every corner of the box office especially this summer the <hes> with lion king and the latin and <hes> spiderman and i'm wondering as tarantino saying that maybe both his smaller character driven movie and the big studio movies can co exist in a world and there's an audience for both of them and they can both be appreciated and they're not mutually exclusive or maybe he kind of patting himself on the back and putting himself alongside the visionary status of walt disney <hes>. That's just one of the takeaways i had and i'm curious. <hes> <hes> what you guys think love. The show can't wait to hear by dude good cash jason jason goody good voicemail but i i think you're wrong. I think that this is all he was saying with. That was <hes> humming. Okay yeah this reference in walt disney. I love him okay. I got to put but this reference this cowboy books cool. I is cool and other people might have school. What other cool stuff do i like. What's on my bookshelf. Oh yeah i'm gonna put that in the thing you know. People might think that that's cool. That's my opinion hater ryan. I'ma tarintino lover hard love because right now a slump the biggest slump of his career man he's just masturbating on celluloid and then calling it art. I don't know i love a little bit masturbation onto some celluloid because i thought it's fantastic right me too fucking loved it bro and i'd fucking love it or just like what was that movie and i think that this voicemail is absolutely tarantino because what happens is her attention. She puts the book down and she gets invested than in rick dalton's book and into rick dalton himself and then she becomes <hes> like a fan of him in the fucking cried when she said that some of the best acting that's the best acting i've ever seen and that look in dalton's face. You're just like oh my god so i would say that tarantino actually trying to vindicate his own approach against the kind of monopolizing studio radio system of disney by the way shout. We have a bad ass video that i hope to do the research on <hes> precisely on this on platform capitalism on otherwise crack channels so if you haven't seen it check that one out yeah. I'd like to think that there's relevancy here. The one thing i would say is that he does tell this girl that if you don't understand what it's like to be washed up you're going to experience it karoo which i don't think it's really gonna apply to disney because his i i mean i don't know i believe that so long as there are movies there's going to be disney probably for the foreseeable able future there yeah the but i have sixty percent of the market but i love the idea of did the fresh face new girl obsessed with disney who owns the box office now <hes> contrasted with the old guard western guy which used to dominate the box office back in the day great shit <hes> <hes> all all right <hes>. Let's go into the mailbag so hit us up movies at wisecracked dot c._o. Dot com dot c._o. Did you did you guys see lion king. Did you know a latin no i've i've skipped saw though i just want to have that i can catch up on on all these remakes and shit like that. That's the only reason because i don't have an excuse you know and then i'll get to you. Don't need an excuse kids movies by myself. It's time time so then. I'm forced into it. You know all right so this is from thomas. We've got a lot of emails like this. I wanted to discuss it's the charlie manson subplot to the movie i agree with ryan at the audience should be familiar with manson and his cult to fully experienced that catharsis from the ultra violence at the end though the movie was clear that the family is a violent cult it portrayed female cultists as happy-go-lucky twenty-somethings which is sure to confuse unfamiliar audience with the ending splatters gratuitous gratuitous blood. This isn't the problem right now however because i think that manson and his cult are still in the collective consciousness of most adults in america some movie goers in the audio auditorium even cheered it as cliff bashed in the face of one of the manson cultist and rick burn the other one alive. It'll be interesting to revisit the film and five years from now and get a reaction from much younger audience since members. We got a ton of emails of people saying that i didn't know about the manson murders. Actually i felt very vindicated yeah. They didn't know about the manson murders that didn't know who sharon tate was a- and they said that they because if you do know then you're watching the movie from this perspective of oh the specter of charles manson something bad's going to happened. We all know what's going to happen but if you don't know then you're just like oh cool. We're hanging out with some bro yeah home. You sure ways that this contracts like one you have to know whom manson you have to know a little bit about the family and you have to know a little bit about the tate murders but then too. I think another layers if you're from l. a. or few lived a long time in l._a. Then that will also kind of add another layer of connection and then the third is is if you're involved in the industry in any way and i think if you if you have all three of those than this film has so much more meaning to you because you go into this understanding how that event has affected hollywood you would <hes> how people understand that <hes> i grew up with my friends. We used to go to abandoned like chicken coops ranches and shit like that around southern california that were supposedly places where the family used to like <hes> squat so like for me. The manson story looms quite heavily so that's why it had such an impact on me seeing the film you know <hes>. We got another one from jimmy. He says <hes> in your show me the meaning once upon a time in hollywood you brought up the question of what it's like to see the movie without knowledge of the tate murders and i can definitely definitely answer me and a couple of friends saw that movie was getting great reviews so we decided to head over to the theater to watch it and we had no idea what it was about other than having something to do with hollywood and it's crime. It's it's a fun. Maybe you should be saying that. Many of us are z. and never really knew of the history of the tape murders for the first hour me and my friends kept trying to figure out the plot or the story line or some action that was pushing the story afford it felt as though there was only the initial push with rick and his producer and then nothing after that i grasped the symbolism in the commentary of the film industry but i did not realize that there was a looming coming threat of the tate family being murdered when it came time to beat up demand since we're all very surprised to see them get murdered to us. It was comical how badly they were beaten up. It made no sense insist to why they were so brutally beaten out of nowhere. I understood the manson's were devout on killing but it surprised me how hyper violent it was two characters that meant nothing to me and for rick to use the flame thrower our on the man's tonight in the pool just made us all question the point of the movie <hes> from our perspective rick hates hippies but for him to kill someone that was so bloodied and beaten that just fell in his pool. It felt over the top for no reason when we were discussing. This person say we're here. She is from <hes>. I don't think that because you you got it got it and when i saw this i saw this in sydney and i actually had a conversation with some audience members who said the exact same thing they were young dudes like either young young millennials or like zimmer's and they were like is there's no reason there's no justification for that violence at the end data and i said do you know who charles manson was. Do you know who sharon tate was. Are you familiar with the tate murders. They had no no clue so i explained it to them and they said oh that sucks because they didn't get it. You know you think tarantino knew that like he not the scene one scenes to set up who that is and i guess you could you could argue you. Don't need the scene and people obviously love this movie so they're like you know who obviously know everything about the murders but i think just for the majority of your young audience. That doesn't know shit. We clear they're getting emails sales in a hardcore bubble to him he tarantino -actly tarantino hasn't met anyone in ten years. All of sharon tate's filmography. That's so cool for like you know i. I think if tarantino knew what he was doing and that he knew other people have different views of of this. I think that's cool because now those kids know for sure who manson is <hes> especially if this is a discovery channel expose <music> worse. They're going to learn exactly what didn't happen all right. We're gonna do two more from chase. You guys talked about how a lot of you've the many scenes in the movie felt superfluous and i have to strongly disagree. I left the movie feeling like it had almost edgar radiant feel to it and that it seemed like it used the concept except chekhov's gun less like a simple tool and more more of a plot outline nearly every scene in the movie had some hand in setting up domino for the end sequence the dog the flame aim for the acid cigarette cliffs familiarity with the family the pool and how rick tends to float back. They're blasting music through headphones when he gets hammered cliffs potential oh psychopathic tendencies and also his aptitude for hand to hand combat. Every aspect of the fight is carefully constructed through the lens of the movie. Nothing in the scene came out of nowhere aside from the fact that deviates from what happened in reality a reality which is never explicitly told to us by the movie. It's a pre existing notion brought into the feeder by the viewer and subconsciously stoked by the true crime style l. narration that kicks in after the time jump this also possibly a reason why the goals the manson family are never explored it makes it so the twist isn't unfair. If you thought sharon sharon tate was going to be murdered in the movie you brought that with you to the theater from chase. I agree one hundred percent with that. People were talking about what the point of the bruce lee scene. It's precisely like he said you want to know that cliff has <hes> some sort of skills with hand to hand combat and i think there are some other reasons that kind of time as well <hes> kind of introducing a fresh new <unk> character that can sort of deconstruct if you will a mythological character that creates some sort of attachment to the new character. Which is the cliff character <hes>. I think they're that's exactly exactly right. Everything had a purpose and it does tie together. It's just that it's done in a kind of scattershot since in so it doesn't it doesn't it doesn't seem to be the as <hes> streamlines but i think all does culminate. There's the payoff comes at the end not every pay off. There are a couple of payoffs sharon tate. Learning martial arts with bruce. Lee thought maybe maybe because i actually had an inkling of ending before i saw the film i thought maybe that she would somehow be involved in some asking of the the hippies which i thought would have been a really nice is touch actually to give her a little bit of like revenge <hes> so to speak like revisionist revenge but but most of it is most of the setups are paid off at the very end and they do kind of tightly come together three hours later i mostly agree but the violence is so over the top op which i love but it breaks the fourth wall to the point where okay this is. Just you know were basking in this revisionist history this fantasy to see to the point where even if it wasn't established that brad pitt's character was a bad ass could use hand to hand combat everything we would still break ourselves out of it and see okay. This is the quote unquote money shot of the movie which we can break all of the existing logic and just revel in the fact that we're changing history and were correcting history history so that these horrible murderers get their due but it's also important because he smokes the acid cigarette so you're like he's playing with expectation. That's what this film is. It's playing with expectations nations. It's dangling a carrot. It's taking things away from you and so you think okay cliff is a bad ass. He's potentially a psychopath who may have murdered his wife. He's also a war hero. He has all these scars but then he smokes the cigarette and then you're like oh fuck man now. He's incapacitated now. He's going to die and so then tarantino kind of plays with that too. You're thinking oh he. If he were sober auber he would fuck these people up and he's got a bad ass dog who eats food. That's called like good food. I mean dogs or whatever it is so that element you know so. There's all these things he's constantly constantly just playing with expectation. This is for me. This is actually his most like psychological film in the sense that he's trying to actually affect the audiences thoughts and expectations stations and the mythologies that we bring to the to the theater and that's why i thought the foam so amazing yeah ours. We're gonna go ahead and wrap it up <hes> so we will be taking a two week break this podcast. I'm going on vacation so we'll see you guys in three weeks. Freedom going to sequoia and then goes through northern california. It's <hes> california orange trees with some trees. Oh nice yeah yeah a great time. Dude thanks appreciate him. I work we find you as an social media ryan a uh-huh make shorts every week on ryan shorts on youtube and facebook and instagram. That's my main place. Check me out <hes> check out. My website man greg comedy dot com. I gotta lot of shows. I check my art website. Greg edwards dot com greg the grouch on twitter. Yeah greg's arts fucking awesome too seriously. Go check it out by his stuff. You can hit me up on twitter austin underscored hayden or in the u._s. Underscore h. a. y. Checkout medium dot com slash wise this crack and we'll see you next time goodbye from y'all hattiesburg south that breath.

greg ryan south africa austin prins christopher africa peter jackson government vegas peter peter jackson johannesburg america Tom walt disney neil blom jerry charlotte doug hollywood
Third Friday of April 2021 Show Intro

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

06:44 min | 2 months ago

Third Friday of April 2021 Show Intro

"The tablet please the cab away kennedy roy. Rutgers it smith he'll work. Beer battered onion rings american cheese and spicy barbecue sauce. Kaiser born dig wrong. Shortish uber eats available at participating restaurants. Hey it's comedians nikki. glaser. I can't wait for you to listen to my new. Show the nikki. glaser podcasts. From the big money players network and iheartradio with my best friend and roommate andrew collin. He's hilarious and no we are not no cooking i am. Radio is wonderful podcast. You can always find the nikki. Glaser podcast on iheartradio app. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Oh god jimmy we are here. It is opponent is more time. You know what. I was just thinking i said man. How cool is it to be able to say good morning. How cool is it to be able to just count show self in the number of people who are alive and well. I'm one of them. How about you. Let's get it on. Steve harvey morning show invites you to live in the day and make it and make to date a great date. Steve harvey morning show surely straw. Happy friday steve to call food. What is happening. see never mad on a friday. What's up through junior off. Put me in the number of good morning nephew. Thomas class bourbon. Hey oh you had to classic Magic city class sir. Alabama classes interested gay. So you're still in the motherland still in the motherland johannesburg. We start filming today. Took a track of time own demand southfield today to after right. Can i tell you so much. Jetlag is real. Don't you think. Because men i left from la. So i love family funeral. I went straight to dubai fifteen hours and then here to dust. Eight hours From dubai to jobs eight hours it's real jet lag is real right right now. I really don't know what's going on with my at this morning. You're like night. But i'm sleepiest hail but i can't be causes morning. Give people light on the worst. Did you sleep on the plane at all. Like a down eight. Eat nothing on the play That was and that was it. I resident sleep sleep at a watch two movies. I watched ben affleck's movie our turku bank robbery note names of all right. We'll think about it coming up at thirty two minutes after the hour. Ask the aloe chief. Legal officer steve harvey in the building. Right after i got a burst of energy. You're listening to morning show. Oh hey you. It's nicole lapin new york times. Bestselling author the only financial expert. You don't need a dictionary to understand and now the host of the new iheart radio daily. Podcast money rehab. So here's the deal. I'm going to rehab your wallet so that you can get your financial life together once and for all trust me. I know money. Talk can be scary. And that's why my episodes are just ten ish minutes. No frills just to bite sized tips and tricks so you waste time because is money and here at money rehab. You're not just a listener you to come on the show. Ask me your burning money questions. And i'll answer them. Nothing is off limits. Listened money rehab on the iheartradio app or wherever you got your top. The time for your intervention is now so let's make some change from the dan. Patrick podcast network. Iheartradio joy wrote entertainment workhouse media and sugar. Twenty-three comes a new podcast westwood. hi i'm jerry. West longtime basketball player longtime executive. Very proud of my association with the los angeles lakers for numerous years. Now with the los angeles clippers working for steve bomber to hopes to chains landscape of basketball in los angeles. This is the story of basketball in. La in a rivalry thirty five years in the making. This is not about. The clippers rooting the lakers from their pedestal. That will never happen. But for seven straight years. The clippers had the best team in los angeles. Listen to westwood on the iheartradio app on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast series. Premieres april twentieth.

Steve harvey glaser kennedy roy andrew collin nikki Glaser Rutgers turku bank dubai Kaiser nicole lapin southfield jimmy smith johannesburg ben affleck Alabama steve Thomas la
Is Africa Prepared for the Coronavirus?

WSJ What's News

12:52 min | 1 year ago

Is Africa Prepared for the Coronavirus?

"It's happening wherever cupcakes. Are being frosted songs are being recorded and engines are being tuned. Adp is designing a better way to work with industry leading. Hr talent time benefits and payroll more companies rely on ADP than any other HR partner from small business to global enterprise. See how ADP can help you. And your people achieve what you're working for him at designed. Adp DOT COM ADP always designing for people. The Corona virus pandemic has started hitting developing nations. We'll talk more about the challenges of fighting the virus in Africa. We're about to see the corona virus through a completely different Lens completely different type of challenge where it comes into regions where the healthcare systems are GonNa really struggle to respond. It's Wednesday march twenty fifth. I'm an refer totally for the Wall Street Journal. Here's what's News Congress is poised to vote on a two trillion dollar stimulus package after key lawmakers and the trump administration reached a deal overnight. Us markets cheered the news. The Dow climbed nearly five hundred points up two point four percent for the day. That's a day after the Blue Chip Index had its best day in eighty seven years and it was the Dow's first back to back gains since February with more. Here's Wall Street Journal. Markets REPORTER ECONOMY. Otani MARKETS. Have been on absolute roller coaster. Ride the last couple of weeks and we can't even attribute all of the swings that we've been seeing to the news so while investors do say that they are encouraged by the fact that lawmakers are getting closer to voting on the giant who trillion dollar stimulus bill to help the economy. They say that that's not necessarily the whole reason why the market is moving the way it is just in general the last couple of weeks we've seen some of the biggest up and down days in years in the stock market and investors say. That's very common. When there's a lot of uncertainty and when traders are are really sort of moving off of the latest headlines and try to figure out how bad of a hit the economy's going to take because of pandemic so it's very possible that will continue seeing big move spoke to the upside and the downside in the coming days and I think the fact that we are getting a stimulus package while encouraging isn't necessarily a sign that the markets are about to return to more calm face that's Wall Street Journal. Markets reporter a Kanatani. The number of corona virus cases worldwide has now passed four hundred fifty thousand people and more than twenty thousand have died. The death toll in Spain has passed that of China and the number of infections in Italy is nearing the total in China. The number of deaths in Italy surpassed those in China last week. In India. All non essential businesses and government offices are being closed. It's the world's biggest stay at home order affecting one point. Three billion people coming up. We'll look at how the pandemic has started hitting Africa and whether the continent is prepared. It's happening wherever cupcakes. Are being frosted songs are being recorded and engines are being tuned. Adp is designing a better way to work with industry leading. Hr talent time benefits and payroll more companies rely on ADP than any other HR partner from small business to global enterprise. See how ADP can help you and your people achieve what you're working for him at designed at ADP DOT com eighty always designing for people across the world. Developing nations are beginning to reckon with corona virus but many of them are tackling it without the institution's and medical access of more developed countries. That's creating daunting challenges. As they work to fight the spread of the disease joining me now from Johannesburg South Africa is Wall Street Journal. Africa Bureau chief. Joe Parkinson Joe. Let's talk about some of those areas where we are just starting says he spikes in the number of corona virus cases. South Africa has just announced a twenty one. Day Lockdown and the virus has now been reported in more than forty countries across the continent. What can you tell us about the particular challenges in combatting the pandemic across Africa? Well South Africa is where I'm calling from right now from Johannesburg and Johannesburg is the epicenter of this outbreak. The announced just today that the number of cases have risen above seven hundred. And that's a sixfold increase in a week and although South Africa is now the country that's recorded the most confirmed cases of the virus. It's indicative of a trend across the continent and that is for the last three months people in the developing world in Africa especially have been watching nervously. But you know with with the hope I suppose that they would be spared the worst of this virus until now the numbers of Boll not out. Unfortunately in the last week we seem to be going into a slightly different phase where the virus is spreading very fast and in number of countries. We have more than a dozen countries in Africa. We have domestic transmission and it seems like now parts of the world that were the least prepared to take on this virus with healthcare systems. As you mentioned there were already overwhelmed now about to face the biggest challenge that most people can remember you already mentioned and we talked about seeing hospitals in developed nations including Italy and the United States becoming overwhelmed by the number of corona virus cases in developing nations. As you point out they are oftentimes just beginning to address this epidemic with structures and institutions. That are already overwhelmed. That's right I mean there's a there's a statistic in the story that I think is incredibly striking and that is in Italy where we've seen one of the world's most developed most sophisticated highly funded public healthcare care systems being completely overwhelmed. They have forty one doctors for every ten thousand patients. The continental average across Africa is to doctors for every ten thousand patients just to put into perspective. The it's very uneven and we should be aware of generalizing too much about the whole continent because countries like South Africa have responded very very quickly and they have quite developed healthcare system but there's other countries where really is already overwhelmed as you say in South Sudan which has been at war for five years this twenty four `isolation beds for the whole country. That's thirteen million people in Malawi. Seventeen million population only twenty five isolation beds. It's quite hard to even get your head around those figures really when you're looking at the way that the West is responding to this pandemic kind of resources whether it's fiscal or what's happening with the expansion of healthcare and redeploying healthcare workers. You know the tools that we're seeing deployed in the West which is struggling to combat. The pandemic do not exist across much of the developing world. So this is again why I think just this week as the numbers seem to be growing. Exponentially more policymakers more presidents and prime ministers from the West as well of course from the developing world or a calling for emergency aid. Joe We actually spoke to a humanitarian aid worker in Uganda. Her name is Jesse Maranello. Here's what she had to say about what she's seeing on the ground there so I live very near Soweto slum which I'm in Kampala and those people are stacked on top of one another there is no there's no ability to have social distancing and then the water people barely have enough money to buy enough water for their daily needs on a good day and a. Lotta people aren't having so They are taking precautions. One thing that Uganda has been doing. Well I think is there are washing stations. I got the markets. And they're being really vigilant as you're walking through maybe a market space that you're washing your hands. They don't allow you entrance until you wash your hands. Of course that's only your hands. That's not what comes out of your mouth or anything But the this country the majority of this country is they're not necessarily in the slums but they are in situations where water and soap. That simple thing might be an issue from the start but also large families living in small spaces is true for most most families So yeah there's a stacking effect happening here. That concerns me a lot. This speaks to some of those precautions. We're hearing about here in the West what we consider maybe commonsense like washing your hands with soap and water. The reality is not. Everyone has the access or ability to do that. That's absolutely right. And over the past twenty years. During period of economic globalization Africa has urbanized rapidly and sixty percent of the African population now lives in cities and sixty percent of those urban populations live in informal settlements in townships or slum areas. Some of which have very poor sanitation. Many people live without plumbing. Water is a very important commodity. That costs money. And you know the idea that you can wash your hands every few hours that you'll be in a place where you can do that that you'll be in a place where you have access to hand sanitizer let alone whether you're in a place whether you get where you get access to quality healthcare and ventilators in the kind of instruments and infrastructure the that we're talking about now in the developed world it's a very different context and so there are mitigating factors. You know there are. Africa has a very very young population. The average agent Africa is just twenty and we know that young people responding much better to the virus. We don't know but there's some evidence to suggest that hotter climates might be more hostile for the virus which of course for a lot of the countries across Africa may work in favor. Maybe a mitigating factor. But then there's also the fact that people with weaknesses people with immuno-deficient diseases particularly exposed Africa as you know has been through healthcare crises. Recently that could play into that not least HIV AIDS. A big part of the response in the West has been based on health officials guidance and media reports about how the pandemic has spread when we talk to Jesse that was one of the major differences. She mentioned for Uganda. People are taking very seriously but I don't know that they don't have access to the news to international news. They don't have money for data for watching videos and news clips on facebook or wherever so The instructions given by the Ghanaian government are just very basic to wash your hands. If you're sick don't gone to public to avoid public transportation very very very basic. Joe What do you think about that you? Under is one of the African countries that until recently was proudly saying that it managed to avoid any cases of the corona virus. The government instituted quite quickly. Travel bans on some of the countries that had the most confirmed cases schools and universities were closed and there were other restrictions imposed by the president. Yoweri Museveni has been power for more than thirty years but there were a lot of people inside the country who were skeptical about the numbers dubious. The amount of people being tested seem to be incredibly low. That conversation seems to have gone to the mainstream now with the most recognizable opposition politician in the country. A former rapper. Bobby wine releasing a song today called the corona virus alert a hip hop song where he talks about all the steps that Ugandan should take to try and protect themselves against the virus in questions implicitly. Whether the government's doing enough to protect that population that was our Africa Bureau. Chief Joe Parkinson speaking to us from Johannesburg South Africa. Joe Thank you so much. Thank you and finally we want to know the questions you have about the Koran Virus Pandemic. Call us at three one five nine nine two eight two nine eight and leave us a voicemail with your question that phone numbers also in our show description as we continue to cover the pandemic will be bringing on our reporters and experts to answer as many of your questions as we can. And that's what's news for this Wednesday afternoon. We'll be back tomorrow morning and in the afternoon if you like our show please rate and review US wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Anne Marie for Tolley for the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

Africa South Africa Adp Wall Street Journal Africa Joe Parkinson Joe West Africa Bureau Uganda Johannesburg Italy ADP REPORTER partner United States South Africa ADP DOT Jesse Maranello
Harmony Plans to Issue $200 Mln Worth of Shares for Anglogold Deal

Newscast - Africa

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Harmony Plans to Issue $200 Mln Worth of Shares for Anglogold Deal

"You're listening to the news. Our Africa Business Radio Harmony Gold Mining Company. Ltd said its plans to raise up to two hundred million dollars. A share issue to fund pots of its perch. As of Anglogold Ashanti's last remaining assets. In South Africa found gold said in February it would sell its assets includes in putting mine. The world's deepest gold mine for about three hundred million dollars to hominy turning it into the country's largest gold producer harmony said the fundraise would allow companies have benefit from balance-sheet flexibility and optionally given the current uncertainty caused by ninety and pandemic shares. And how many Phil six percents to six point five nine run by one thirteen and seven Jim. After the company said it was seeking authority to issue the ordinary shares for cash while shares and other gold mine is listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. Were up around three percent and that was the news at this time and business radio. You can't continue listen life online at. Www Dot Africa business radio dot COM OFFER ARABLE APP. Thank you for listening.

Gold Mining Company Dot Africa Anglogold Ashanti Africa South Africa Johannesburg Stock Exchange producer Phil Jim three hundred million dollars two hundred million dollars three percent
NLU Podcast, Episode 284: Erik van Rooyen

No Laying Up

54:38 min | 1 year ago

NLU Podcast, Episode 284: Erik van Rooyen

"Beater right club today. Yes that's better than most about. It is better than most fatter than most. I'm not exaggerating when I say I want you to tell me absolutely everything. You can't about golf club that CHAPULTEPEC because I love watching this golf course I promise. There's not one detail I went to get by about playing it. Used COMING OFF A T. Three finish I just want you to kind of walk us through some of the considerations that go into play in that course because they talk about the altitude of course on the broadcast. It's not a direct translation of like. Oh now my eight iron goes this far because of all the different heights and stuff so right. What kind of adjustments do you make before this tournament? It's interesting because usually so I grew up. Bob Played logoff in Johannesburg South Africa and the difference is about ten percents so when a plan Janice Burke I play straight meters and it works great. Is that your stock yardage? Won't you play here play yards so say my nine goes one hundred and fifty eight hundred fifty five meters in Johannesburg. It goes one hundred fifty five yards here interesting so it's pretty close. But then we get to Japan Deepak. And it's like okay bowls going even further than Giannis books on the Tuesday. We hit every club in the bag. Just write it down straight. How is it going and track men track man and that's it? He had all the numbers in each Irish book. And I was like okay. How far is it nine? Ongo again or the eight on well about one hundred and eighty seven. Here's a. But then if you are if you're hitting a ninety five percent nine iron. Is it a direct? Does that really change how much it's going to fly compared to a regular golf course like? What are those kind of adjust? I try to not over. Think it too in the fate happened on even back on Sunday. A sixteen I was in between it was either a full wedge but the braves is a little into us. I think it was a hundred and fifty one of the pen and sixteen in a massive slow behind it. You can use a slip if you want and so we decided on taking a little nine and I was like okay but I've got a little bit of this. How am I doing that again? So it okay. But I think if you've gone over think it is going to get quite complicated yet but it's interesting. I don't feel like we see a golf course on tour where we see more guys get more mystified on the distance. The balls go right. I mean we're watching your shot into seven on Sunday. I think it was Sunday right. Excellent we watched guys go long on that day we tell people hitting the tree and everything like that but it just seems like it's a golf course that makes you guys at. Maybe not you finished tied for third. Maybe not may be the guy to ask about this but makes people uncomfortable. A little bit does does especially. If you're not in use it you know and it's funny I think when you get to sort of the mid irons seven six eight nine. It almost takes a little bit more because at ball gets up a little bit and we spoke about We do WanNa hit the high one just account for that little bit extra orage. Because it's GonNa go that extra bit further. You just had to get comfortable with it. We see every almost every year this tournament. Guys that hit it really far succeed. And if you adjust for altitude the courses equivalent of like sixty four hundred yards doesn't play. That long doesn't play that long. But why why would long drivers succeed there? I don't know it's a good question. I just think it's a golf 'cause again at its it's similar to courses in. Johannesburg and I grew up on us. I was very even lossiemouth system applied comfortable then. I think it's a golf course. It looks really tight but take whole four for example. Huge dog laughed. If you're going to hit drave got left because it's fairly simple punch out to the green and every holes Kinda got aside like that You know eight for example you have to miss it right dog right up the hill. If you left screwed you gotTa Punch out so you know which sites here driver wherever you want to. You're going to have a chance at least punch out to the green or get it around the green somewhere seeking up and down for par. But if you're going to play conservatively and you then mess here in trouble so I think part of the reason why we love watching so much is it feels a lot like the experiment of if if the the best players in the world are GONNA play. What of course that kind of looks like our local Munich overgrown yeah and just kind of weird bunkers around the green but guys seem to love playing and obviously you've had success or whatever. What is it about that makes it so fun to play? I think it's GonNa mix of everything you've got the short hauls you've got one which is really exciting. You know Gaza him to on on the green three woods and yet dot abounds right there to the left if you miss it too exciting long-hauls like eight really good par threes seven. It's going to be one of the baseball threes we play. Oh yeah I mean after you? Great show say tree. You wouldn't have been settled. I hit the tree. Freakin covers like off of the It's a tricky one. It's got a lot of everything it gives you know Sunday. There's a lot of pens. We can use some slopes and get a close with a whole lot of exciting stuff. What's IT I mean? So Co again. We're talking about of course the you're playing plays very differently than the rest of the courses you've been in pressure situations before and but now you're playing golf course that has this weird altitude factor In a high pressure situation Sunday did that feel any different than the other high pressure situations. You've been in on Sundays now. Pretty similar of you know if I think back in Sweden last year I was more nervous on Sunday in Europe and then I was This this this last week on Saturday I was actually the drain. Hundred was all over the place and then Sunday was quite calm. Funny Enough I shot four under this adds. There's all one hundred Sunday so I think I did. Okay and do you do anything differently? At altitude you set out when you start out the week. Are You hydrating better? I believe you've had. He got hit with food poisoning. The Eagles screwed bring that on himself. Are you what do you do with food wise? Like how do you make sure you don't get hit with what hits a lot of people in Mexico You know we went to a nice restaurant in the hotel tippin. Yawkey good Japanese food. He says it was shrimp. That we all eat the shrimp. I think he went back and add something different afterwards but yeah he was out. Thursday he was went back to the Italian sleep the whole day so actually at my trainer on the bag and heated. Okay Club the club me. Bad Club on AIDS or sixteen holes. He gave you a bad club. Is it three would drive? And he's like Nana hit. The driver and I hit it laughed. I wasn't supposed to go gave him the guy but we did okay in the end. It's all good well. This is perfect timing because we tease you before. We going to do our Calloway ad for you. We're GONNA make you add Lib it but the one thing I was adjusted to ask about was the maverick three would you? Yeah what's your feedback on that? I loved it the minute I got up behind. A bowl think it sits really good. It's kind of like a classic three would for me and I'm kind of an old school guy like I don't have any persimmon clubs but I'd love to have some one day. I love a good Blade Iron. So that looks like just a classic looking through it. I like it. One of our guys is claiming that the jaws wedges mart should be illegal. They should be illegal because the grooves are so good on them and they're literally wanted me to ask you about whether what you think of the grooves on the switches. I spoke to You. Think he should have been disqualified for using illegal. I don't think so spokes Rodrick Cleveland about and he's not working for callaway at the Genesis obviously got so much knowledge and they've actually got little miniature groups in between the actual cruise. You know I didn't know that you do get a lot of spin on them. It was context as that. That was the frightening part for me. Was sometimes I would get crazy. Good Spin but what are you? That concludes the AD portion of this much of a tinker with equipment. I mean how often will you do you consider? Where do you fall in the spectrum? I guess when I probably prefer not to change obviously I think like any golf perfect. We all love getting. You couldn't love seeing the latest stuff but if something works for me I'm GONNA I'm GonNa keep it in the bag. Don't really like to change unless I see significant improvement. Yeah what. What is the feedback on the joggers? Somehow I knew this was go. Of course I can't believe I made this is Ed's is really all over the ballpark to be honest people. It's so polarized what people get so worked up about it. I'm very okay. It doesn't bother me. People either love it or absolutely hates that have gone some meshes instagram. So on lady in Lee Massachusetts says surely got enough money to go buy some property tie for the conference and then I get guys at say absolutely love it wake and I get it. So it's no middle ground extra comfortable like what is really cockney appeal of the convenient at the same time you know. I think I think they look good. Yes it's different and people probably done like that too much but what in Golf? No Way people love. The sport is so good at the time so I think I don't know I don't mind the fact that it's a little extending are just a little bit but then again I'm not a huge fan of those loudmouthed pants. That are all these different kinds of colors. Were those the two options you were. But I think I think it's. It's it's a little different it at the same time. So neat and clean well. I honestly do think it's underrated. Part of the highest levels of pro golf. That you have to wear pants eighty-five in hot is new. And it's truly not comfortable to play golf in that paints have come to. I know that sounds stupid to save. It could even looking at some of the. We're with Brad Faxon. They're looking at some of the old cotton shirts. Right Hands Right. Yeah the idea of wearing pants and eighty five degree heat. I know that there's a lot that comes with a minor thing to deal with a right but it is like when you're playing poorly in your pants and your hot Yeah new European they. They made a rule now. If it gets above a certain temperature they allow you to wish awards but I mean just make it across the board. I mean why not yes. I'm not quite sure I can only go back to something you said earlier and not feeling super nervous on Sunday. A couple of things one. I'm curious how how how to how it different from Scandinavia like you're talking about and then three like there's a lot on the line for you personally stars like where you're GonNa be playing how much you can walk up all that kind of stuff. It's a lot of questions I think about all those things. I just any other little four foot writer. That you've got going is going into the week or going into Sunday. What what are those things that are on on your mind? Music like special temporary membership and that kind of for how I it's it's in the back you mind. I'M GONNA TRY THAT. I'm trying to get my PJ to card But I mean. I've been doing this for quite a while. Now. And if that's going to be at the forefront of your mind going on Sunday you're definitely not going to be ready to go win major tournaments. You've got kind of put it in the Freezer. You know until you're done so it's not easy. Obviously wing then golf tournament was forefront of my mind throughout the whole day but if God just go do your job as well as he can so what. Walk us through kind of that that we were talking about trying to get your car right. So let's catch people up that people that are not as familiar with your career to this point and I want to go in on the Sunshine. Tour. I WanNa talk about the challenge tour. I want to talk about some of the fun stories. I'm sure you have from that. But give us soda. Stadium gives us kind of some of the The the the basis of Or your career to date up until kind of your rise here in the last couple years. Little background sure. Yeah obviously you know into Minnesota four years Obvious you tell from accent loved it absolutely loved and we pause there. How did you? How did you end up in got recruited by them and to other schools decided quite late in high school that I wanted to come to the US but obviously it's a really good option if you WANNA get a degree in also play golf? Which my dad was like. Look get something behind your name and I was like okay. Well this is the best place to do it. So what was your degree marketing? So pretty simple to be honest. So have it yeah? Long story short ended up gaining Minnesota had Minnesota the winter winds may of. Oh nine already committed. Nah Okay. I went and visited. Kennesaw state Liberty and Minnesota and opt for the coldest place. I wonder if they're going to try to trick you into signing before you actually got it right and so I called it actually. They told me it was much shorter than what it actually is. So connor the exact words of of the coach at the time but he made it sound like two months of snow. And then we'll be okay and what's more like half the during the summer. That might be the best place on her. I know it's great so Minnesota for four years absolutely loved it then went back plates trying to send pro three years out. There finally won my first tournament. The eye of Africa. Pj and decided all. It's trying to make the move. Try and go to Europe Most my car q-school but finished thirtieth and the next twenty five guys are so get their challenge. The status and I knew that I wasn't going to have enough enough money to sort of back myself the whole year so I had to go out and play well and luckily I did that. So what's it like? Is it more nerve-racking to play? When you don't have the money to support yourself or more nerve wracking to play for one point seven million or whatever that is and Yeah it's it's it's two different situations and position to be in. You know you want both quite badly but when you know okay I've got five more events left and then I've got to go back home. It's kind of lots of fire underneath. You was that the OPF the backup option and going back home. It wasn't like I. I'm going to round up some funding to kind of get around the challenge tour. It's no I'm going home. Is that what it came down to five events? No not a lot of stories like that. Their marketing books. Yes exactly get back to the but the market. Yeah the marketing job search google it. Yeah ended up playing okay and my effect she got on the bag. Which helped caddies are quite expensive. When you're playing China's story you can also obviously grab a little pushcart endearing. But she got on the bag and ended up winning in China in that year. So how's the how's the rate structure work for your wife? When she's on the day she sitting over here she can she can fill in. If you're lying is is p-a-k hundred percent of earnings. So you mentioned kind of going badly potentially going back to the sunshine tour but take before you went to Europe. What what's the sunshine tour like? I don't think we've ever delve into the Santorum as podcast. I mean I know it's it's in South Africa but I on what's the competition level like. Where is where is? How would you describe it? It's really strong competition wise. Everybody wants to pretty much play somewhere else. So they're all really working hard during the right stuff I encouraged a lot of mile teammates to comeback. Stay with me. Alex Mom bag. At the moment he came out freer plates trying to earn Is the money as good as it is here or like places like the where Jansher No? It's not but it's not that common tour. It's just to a used kind of as a stepping stone to then move on. What was great at the time that we had something like five or six cuss sanctioned veins with Europe and that was really intriguing to me. 'cause you get to play against some of the better players and gain that experience and that's what I did. What so you're you've talked about. You made no secret that you want a PGA tour card You are you are in the process of basically trying to get special. Temporary are you. Are you taking up? Sponsor's exemptions to do this. How close are you touch the if you needed a solo second or better in Mexico to get it right then but they almost made it sound like that was really I mean? Obviously I kind of knew if I did the math but I didn't know where exactly it's finished several star so have you been applying for sponsor's exemptions here. You're in handed this week in Honda this week. Base office sponsors. The sponsors invite so I got the invite a couple of weeks ago as on was going to play and then I've got a few coming up based off of top fifty rankings. Do you still use your sponsor's invite because you've got top ten last week. Does that get you into? I'm not quite sure Mitchell. Mitchell doesn't shaking his head. It's already burned if you all the. Wgc's don't get you in. Gotcha that's interesting okay. Should have played Puerto Rico within the game right Human GonNa one Puerto Rico. Not made six hundred thousand dollars. I don't know I think he did. Okay so you have the Puerto Rico Kirsch. Though that's true the have you heard about the Puerto Rico? Has got to be something to do with female or something. It's one of them but no one has ever won the Puerto Rico Open and ever won a tournament after the kidding except for Michael Bradley. Who warned go to? Puerto Rico opened again. It could have been a huge mistake. Would be praying for a victory exactly so now you get your top fifty in the world is the first time you've been fifty hours before I was ended lost. You got the GUSTA invite from that and dropped just back out a few weeks ago and now you're in the players and to play his about. Yeah so you you don't sound like you're doing a lot of math to figure out how many points you need to get to get this kind of where. I'm at gamma comes down to play golf and just play. Goffman started this year I was really wrapped around world ranking and what have to do to move up. Oh what did I do to get there in the first place? I was just play golf. And do my thing and Y- rankings and stuff will take care of itself. Yeah on that note I. I've asked question a lot on this podcast and I either. Don't ask it well. I don't get a lot of good answers to I. It's it's almost asking for you to brag on yourself a little bit which is hard for people to do but at a certain point you had to accept the fact that you are one of the top fifty best players in the world. And that's I'm sure when you're playing the sunshine tour that's very hard to accept and maybe you consider yourself at a very different level now than you were then but win. Did you like. When was the revealing moment for you if like owner or I am I am that good? I don't know that's a good question. Probably end of the year end of last year and twenty nine teams. He finished tied for eighth at PJ championship well. I don't know think it's always look obviously mission to brag on newstalk so yes. I'm pretty good right now. So I'm going to run away from the fact that I know I'm decent but at the same time it's a like back to my career that's far this. He's been these little boxes. I wanted to take and things that I wanted to achieve getting my first win on the sunshine tour and I did that and I felt great for X. amount of time and then it was like whoa. What's the next thing and so it's if there's always this next goal that I want to achieve this next thing I want to push and try and region. I'm not shooting myself down in the process. But that hungers always say so. Do I believe myself and do? I know that I'm really good. Yeah but at the same time. I'm not waking up tomorrow and thinking are not going to go practice today. 'cause I got this in my ask it is. That's more of a question of telling yourself that and I don't mean telling the world that it's like when would you tell you feel comfortable with yourself being like? Hey I am this good of a play every day. That's that's a good good answer and I think that's also if you look at the base in the world. They think they wouldn't be where they are so every day. All right. We're GONNA say quick break here. Let you guys know as I'm sure you're aware if you've been listening to the podcast last couple of weeks and following us on our youtube channel that episode five of Torah Saas presented by our partner. Original Penguin is live on our youtube. Channel Tron has gone all in his entire stack of money for the season against Dj Pie at Wilmington municipal course also we have some news on the original Penguin Front. The guys have over. There have been thrilled with the partnership so foreign feedback. They've gotten from all of you. Guys that They're also going to give all you know you. Fans a thirty percent discount on their first order so all you gotta do go to original Penguin dot com slash. En El you thirty. They're going to send you an email gift code to use on original PENGUIN DOT COM. A one time thirty percent use. I'm about to place a very large order with these guys with some of the hoodies that they have. You'll see us wearing the stuff all throughout the season but the wild stuff and the conservative stuff so always remember to be original goto original penguin dot com slash. Thirty for thirty percent off your order and we still got like five more episodes of all the sick outfits. They gave us for this past season. So thanking them for their incredible partnership. Let's get back to our interview with Eric. Van Roy in and make sure swing by our Youtube Channel Nc latest episode of tourist sauce. I want to unpack that a little bit. What you just said because zone. I'm starting to learn more about mental side of golf in that I feel like a lot of amador's hold themselves back. Based on like if you are uncomfortably. Klay uncomfortably. Well if you're if you're a two handicap in your four under par inherently in your mind. You are already fallen back. You know that you are out over your skis. You're playing above your level very experience. You just realize way out but how how I guess what is your journey through. Professional golf been like from a mental side in terms of kind of balancing that comfort level. Of where you should be because I I hear a lot of guys say like hey if I'm thinking about the cut line going into the week I'm hovering around the cut line. Come Friday if I'm thinking about the top ten. I'm near the top ten if I'm thinking about winning. I'm probably winning. You know what I mean like your Games Gonna. Adjust to where you're at mentally so I'm just. I'm curious to hear pick guys brains on how they approach the mental side game. Yeah I started working with a sports psychologist in South Africa. What's it into Twenty fifteen? I think it was played the straddling PGA Shot like I dunno like fourteen fifteen and finished thirtieth or something label won the event And I made like a thirteen on the one hall and which is broken. Then yeah just. Let's pause they're saying it. Can you tell us about you? Know par four water rights but you can call us at carry. If you just little afterward there was bonkers left out of bounds left Latte I must have hit on the water a bunch of times and then finally got on the ferry missed the green chipped at three-putted whatever added up to really Went back home and I'm not wearing to be in my mind uncomfortable and soldered at addressing those things since and so But you made a really good point guys at that. Think okay. I just really want to make the cut this week. But you know you're probably going to be right there on Friday often in China. Make the cuts and So yeah that's a really good point. Guys that are the best in the world. They they don't think that way Was there a point when you got into the European tour of the PGA tour events? You've played where you looked around at players maybe differently than you do. Now right having played in a few of these events and competed with them and beaten a lot of these players. Do you look around the range and think any differently than you did. When you first got to that yeah absolutely you get there and it's all new and here's Tiger Woods the guy that I've been watching on TV my whole life Guy With admired. You know all these achievements. I'm here he is an. I'VE GOTTA go compete against him. So you're you're outcasted change. I'm not here to look and look at it. And he's pretty swing I'm here to try and kick his ASS And it goes for those guys But that said that also doesn't happen overnight. It doesn't happen immediately. So I've played a few of these events and you get used to it and you get comfortable and before you know it. Adam SCOTT COMES UP JEANNIE SAYS DUDE. Go in it tomorrow. I'm rooting for you. And that's pretty cool moment it at the same time. I'm competing in Sam and next week. I'M GONNA have to do the same thing and trying to beat him as well. So which event was that? Sorry The Sunday that was Sunday. There was Saturday night. He's rooting for you. Maybe because he's he's in the Fedex Cup standings out there maybe thinking that personal right well. Wh- what brought you? How long have you been Jupiter? Now I mean since August of Loss Dan. So you this is. Where were you before that where you moving from inside Africa? We still got an apartment in China's Berg and we're kind of traveling back and forth to Europe from. They just wanted to home. So yeah the reason I'm asking is you don't have that as yet. You know. This is what you're going for but you said that I'm setting up shop and Jupiter is a good place what what makes I guess. What's the appeal for you to come to hear that? So many tour pros obviously live here. But what's the appeal for you with my life being American? It's time for us to buy a house somewhere you know. We talked about starting a family and we were going to move back to Americans we K- WE WANNA be. We're looking at Phoenix. Alex lives out in Scottsdale. He's got a house there and we're thinking there while a little far travelling to Europe from Phoenix. All the time so carol it's east coast somewhere and this is just it's ideal little golfing heaven down here. Where do you play down here? They're slobs yeah. You get some good games with guys out there. What's years to do that? I haven't been here for such a long time. You know I got back from south. Africa woman was off to Saudi. And before that I was here like October law so I haven't been here for too long even though we've had the house for a bit what can you tell us about. Saudi the events in Saudi Arabia. We haven't really talked to anyone on the PODCASTS. That has played the event. What it's like once you arrive to the moment you leave. But what can you tell us about that event? It's different certainly. I'm sure it's the way people felt. When when they first went to Dubai. There was nothing out there just as golf course in the middle of no and that's the same way in Saudi Dubai. I don't know if you've been there. It's a sweet city really cool golf courses and I duNno. Saudi sounds like they want to really develop it and turn it into something similar so obviously the cultures are completely different. There's difference of opinions about that but from pure golfing perspective. I'm intrigued to see where it's GonNa go in the next ten to twenty years. Do you get a sense from talking to any other players and it's kind of like what we've talked about on the podcast. It's more of what we've kind of see and not an issue with is a lot of the top American players that don't really play the European tour taking money from the from Saudi Arabia to go play that event. I view that very differently than players in the European tour cycle. You've traveled everywhere. A lot of different places is there any can you talked about what your thought process and planning processes for how you would go to events. Are there any considerations around some of the controversy around Saudi Arabia? That you do think about absolutely. It's in the back of my mind. I've got my view and things and other people have their opinions. But it's such a tough one because at the end of the day almond entertainer right. If people didn't enjoy watching golf I wouldn't have a job. So guy like Phil easing entertainer and sorry to say but he's also back in his career so he's trying to get as much out of this is e possibly can so does it mean. He agrees with some of the political things that happened. Saudi probably probably doesn't would be my guess but he's still selling his product and he's doing really well so good for him. That's all we're going to try to get away with Mitchell staring. No we gotTA. We're all good. It is an interesting and that's kind of what we kind of what I was saying. There again is. It's just for people that are making a living on the on the European tour. It's a very different conversation. I think men huge appearance fee cash Grad. But can you. I want to hear kind of about open ended. What's the most interesting place? He traveled on the challenge tour. Interesting I don't. We love guys about Kazakhstan. Look according to. Isn't that Borat thing? Neuro experts asked him. I was GONNA say that's about the only place I've ever heard about Donald Borat so that was my only sort of point capture that that's not the same at all. It's it's really pretty quite different than the Denver Traded Eastern Europe Eastern countries. I've been have been like stunning in. Its everything's really affordable and the people are really nice so I've never been to Kazakhstan. People really friendly really weird things that they love horse to eat horse like steaks so rose and I were by the Italian dinner tonight and I didn't have the the horse but There are these you know local Kazakhstan people. Haven't you know alcohol and having a party and after they start chatting to us come to our house will have some more steak and I was like. That sounds great. Let Yeah obviously. There is a little odd but on all those beautiful country. Yeah I love the just kind of how European tour in challenge to where how much you got to grow up and because yeah inexperienced going to some of these places. It's not you're in a bit of a bubble going and playing golf in these places but you're also getting quite a bit of culture shock and a lot of places to Another reason why I think guys need to go out and play the frontiers. There's so many guys here. That are good enough to play professionally. But they don't actually go out and part of it is learn how to be uncomfortable. It wasn't easy gun. Leaving South Africa to go player to European countries. Different colleges go to Kazakhstan. Go to China. You GotTA learn how to travel where to stakes using what to eat what not to eat a name to be honest. Sometimes you plan some Shitty golf courses while you still plan feel living and you still trying to get Europe into a card so suck it up and go make the ten foot bumpy part that you've got you know that's part of getting here to you. You kind of lead there with what eating what to eat and what not to eat so where. What have you eaten that you would not eat again? Oh I'm pretty safe either. To be honest Um we were in China plan. The Volvo China lost at a Chinese team added Minnesotan. He lives in what is it. Chen took us out to the Chinese market and they had stinky tofu which it sounds great. It looks like sort of melted tar and these chunks of it and he bought this sort of I could have it and I was eating it and it smells horrendous and Alex by but I you know happily declined so yeah. We saw some rough stuff. What's I mean what's it like when you go to some random place like this and say for instance like you missed the cut like in you play poorly and you're really far from home? Yeah what's take me there because that's side of golf that no normal person ever see you know what I mean? If if you're lucky you can get a flat out otherwise hotel and slide out. Are you going back to South Africa or are you just onto? The next stop is in as in China. I'm just probably probably next. Stop get there a couple of days early. Hopefully they allow you to practice. Otherwise you find a place nearby. There was a point on challenge tour. I did eight weeks in a row. So going back to South Africa con afford it and you know jetlag and all that stuff so yeah next. Stop probably the best option. What is golf in South Africa like you were you were born in near Cape Town near Joe? Burke is that right or I'm born in Cape Town partly in Pretoria which is near Johannesburg and then small town George called Oeser and Sir Good luck with that Yeah about forty minutes from Georgia Fan. Cords I used to drive there three times a week here in Highschool practiser golfs. I think changing a lot until Africa. There's you'd efforts. Being made to develop new players going to poor areas and and get the kids involved At the moment it's still very much an expensive sport which it's all around the world But for some reason we've always got plays coming through. It was going to say that doesn't get as especially with the competitor. Like what I was asking about the competitiveness of the sunshine tour. Yeah I would imagine for a can't be enormous Gulf population non small compared to a place. Like this yeah and so the amount of competitive players that come out. That's why I just wonder I would imagine seeing Gary Player and Ernie els come through that that almost everyone competing in golf growing up in South Africa understands that there is a very clear path to success within. It is that what helps like those kind of that kind of inspiration. Is that drive a lot of the competitive spirit of the South African player. Really I think so. You know with being small country. We're all you know very patriotic and small country. How many people live in South Africa? Sixty in fifty five million okay. So it's not like the small European country but there's a really small golfing population so we all look up to people like Gary Ernie Trevor Louis Shawl and we all see the road that they take but at the same time it it pumps you up because I can do it too. Is Ernie like the biggest inspiration for people from your generation as Those are the guys I keep forgetting. God It is amazing What can what can you tell about? What is like the President's Cup mean to somebody like from South Africa? Is it a? Is it a bigger deal than probably like American Street? The practices yeah absolutely grew up. Like especially with going there. When you were younger I went and watched really. Yeah I was. There wasn't there on Sunday when they had the playoff. But it's a massive deal. I spoke to her about it in Saudi. I missed the cotton he was there was this today and he got done with these round and we had a bit of a chat and I spoke about the presence. He knows that I was kind of that. I didn't make the team. But it's a big deal for us and we really want to win. Think we were all myself included pretty bleak that they didn't win in Australia but I think that's part of the hurdle that they've got to get over it. Such a big deal for them that maybe that's why they stumble but and I think until the international teams winning I think on you then. Will it be a bigger deal for the Americans? Were you lobbying? Pretty hard for a spot from calicoes. I sent him a text. What's it look like? What what did you say is just like pick me pick? This is why I think I need to be in the team I think I'll you know. Make a big difference. I've been playing really well. Paid me and he gave me a call the next day and as I look. I'm really sorry. We're GONNA go with this guy and this guy and then at the Nedbank a week or so later came and we had a chat about it so it was. It was great. Yeah no ill-feeling absolutely not And at the same hand I'm playing for pick you know it's like if I did my job earlier in the air I would have been in the team so it's Kinda up to me to play the best golf. So do you like in particular playing fast firm golf courses? I'M GONNA say no because last week wasn't firm and for a pretty firm. A little bit not played. I played my migraines. It's firm underneath the trees in the rough on ten when you just missed the green from the bunker and it goes fifty yards away from again so I imagine that as in like what kind of playing conditions did you grow playing like like CHAPULTEPEC. Very someone are never played golf my life until the Dunhill links of two thousand sixteen. I think fell in love with it. So what was your reaction fast? That's so cool man. It's so awesome. Seem to love competing on links golf courses but a lot of them love playing. That is that I love competes competing in any scenario. It's some guys don't like that some of the bounces and they think it's unfair said won't go play a different sport but I agree with you. Listen to explain that to me some of these things. Some of these guys bitch about those funny what? So what about bethpage that in the early parts of that week? Your your eyes lighting up. Are you saying this is a great setup for me or was your success there? A surprise to you in any way or and it wasn't a surprise. I feel like I always expect myself to do okay or to do well but first time around. I was like Whoa. I mean some of those par-fours like tain for example you know first. Tee shot out there playing practice. Randomest the fairway on the right hand side and do you end up with the gap wedge here. And he's still got a hundred twenty yards the whole so's it wasn't timid dating right off the bat and then you know when you go around with again. It's like okay. Hit it here. It's going to be okay. Hit here so you figure your way around. Yeah how would you for people? That aren't familiar. Maybe didn't watch this past weekend. How would you describe your gain like? Are you a a ball striker? Are you a bomber? Are you to put the lights out? How would you describe your own game? I think it's changed over the last couple of years. I think I've always been a good ball striker I think the part that was lacking was my putting. Think it's improved tremendously. It's it's part of the reason why I'm out here. Someone asked me last week. What's my favorite clubs said dry powder. That's absolute truth. Am I bomber? No I hit it further than most but I'm not a DJ or Brooks Rory. But I think Bowles ranking's always been Good Ponta my guy. I think I'm GONNA steal this one from Facts and Brad. Faxon asked me this question. Earlier he made me grade each of my games driving. Approach chipping and putting. I've never had to do that. It was a great thought exercise. That is what grade. Would you give your driving a through? F At the moment be plus. Okay yeah what about simply because I think I can hit more famous. Okay Your Approach Game. Your iron play a day. Yeah and then you're chipping and you're putting a plus all right. That is always. We're always people so funny people ask me. What do you work on on everything? It's my jihad but there's always room for improvement. Who Do you work with on your swing? Coach Doug in Johannesburg Been working with him since August of Twenty. Twenty eight thousand. Is that like a visa? Mostly through video is it. No he comes in he comes out. He was at the Genesis I wasn't supposed to play genesis and you got a late invite so we were going to have the week off here. There's Club in work and stuff and ended up having to make things about it but he comes out often. He's back at the players so yeah I'll send them videos when I'm practicing here at home and we'll chat about stuff but I mean we work in everything together. Is there any temptation just kind of going back to? Whether it's sunshine tour days to now. Is there any temptation to overdose on the technology aspects of things? Now that do you have a lot of stuff thrown at you. Try this try this. Let's see these numbers across the track man on new clubs kind of all of it. I mean now that you've got every resource your disposal go down the range and see all the different things using you can get so caught up you can get lost down that rabbit hole of while. I'm doing this because I'm trying to get Beta is actually helping you bud like do you really need to know what your speaker weird number from track man? Is that number really going to help you? Knowing that if you're looking at it yes I help you this too with South Africa I was I was there for a decently extended period of time and I was like I wonder where I could jump a flight somewhere and go check out something else. In the area I really realized how isolated South Africa felt from the rest of the world. Did you sense that when you do sense that and having been around the world and you get more of a sense of that having yeah having been around the world now when you love like Oh okay. We're center of the universe. Meanwhile you're breaking away down so yeah absolutely. It's really hard to get to. That was a random South Africa. Getting rid ask also is having played a few more. Pga Tour events compare and contrast the playing style of the PGA tour. The at least events you've played to the European tour and is if you see a difference in the skills that are required see here. I see a lot of guys trying really hard to hit it really far as opposed to Europe way. I'm not saying guys here on trying to do that. But you have to be kind of skillful. I don't think the causes are as long in Europe. However you facing a course that maybe isn't as well manicured you facing the elements a little bit more paps. So it's a little bit. Different guys are always focusing on how far can hit it. Maybe a little bit of a different you see that being rewarded on golf courses more on the PGA tour. I think I think so. It's obviously a huge talking point these days as well with how far the balls flying. I'm like I'm not trying to hit it further but I think also think there's a right win a wrong way to go about that at the end of the day. Golf is still a game where it's going to be skillful right and being creative and having all different kinds of shots. I think that's more important than just being able to hit three sixty well. That was the first time it revere this year. Yes yeah what was so? That's kind of the you're always here in the broadcaster from players. Gosh it's such a great golf course put into perspective why what makes it. It's one of my favorites absolutely because festival. What I love about it. It's old okay which means we don't have to build courses eight thousand yards for too difficult. The Green Complex is probably one of the best in the world the way it's designed the Greens on small. But they're slopes on them and when they get firm that makes the landing areas really tiny They can talk pens. You've got a combination of long hauls Short holes with really tricky Greens His almost no rough out there. What eleven under par one right and I think that's what guys love it because it doesn't have to be eight thousand with firm. Greens for it to be difficult. I think you build a tricky little golf course that's got rough and firm Greens. It's going to be a test. Where do you? How plugged in. Are you on the? Usda recent distance report. That came out. I haven't even read it. The what about any any kind of insight as to as a tour player what you think of any potential limiting on distance or where you stand on. How far boggles these days? I think if they want to do it should have done it. Ten years ago I think is a hitting it further for more than just one reason. Take a guy like Bryson for example he just got frigging Jack in a short space of time and he's hitting it a lot further so everybody's working out. Maybe an answer is working out in a small dude. We're doing and that's part of the reason you now seeing kids like Matthew Wolff. Who's an just an athlete? They might have gone down and play baseball thirty years ago. These guys are playing golf and they grew up playing the equipment. That's available to them so I think it's kind of silly to slip the game. I think that's the best argument against any kind of adjustment is the toothpaste is out of the tube. It's gone too far. It's gone too far and you know the game doesn't change the game. You still trying to shoot as low as he possibly. Can you still trying to win the golf sentiment take Rivera for example eleven under one? That wasn't a guy that hits absolute bombs all the time and has logged everywhere. And it's not that topic hoarse anyway so I think it's stupid. That's very fair. One thing that by the time this goes up my already the the whole thing might already be dead but somebody like in your position. Recently into the top fifty in the world this Premier Golf League. Have you given any consideration as anybody talk to you? Have you looked at it from afar and thought it's dumb? Thought it's great. What do you where do you stand? I've had one guy told me about it a just some reporter from Europe asked me what I think about it at the time. I didn't know much about it at all then spoke to earn about it and got his opinion on it. I don't really. It's really interesting one because I think the most difficult part is if you are playing and then let's say you have three or four weeks in a row and the team manager captains whatever's okay dude. We're going to bring in with someone else do you go. We're GONNA play however at the same hand I think. Any kind of competition in any industry is healthy. So has the European tour provided. I'm close enough as European tour providing feedback for players as to that question the PGA Tour. Said you are playing our tour. Or you're playing that toward there's no crossover. Has there been conversations with the European Torres to like you know any kind of overlap or anything looking around the room for an answer here. I don't believe European tour has come out with with a strict sort of ban if you're going to play the PGA will actually be interested to see what they say. I think maybe perhaps there are also waiting to see what's going to happen because that makes more sense for some kind of overlap there in my opinion than I mean the the Europe the with the current structure of the European tour in and like an opportunity like that. I think they're I don't know that I I'm asking because I don't think they're positioned should or would be as harsh as the PGA tours because that you ask the most important question there where you're GonNa go play. And I would. I don't know if this lease happened or not but I would have a hard time seeing the European tour be like no. You can't come play on tour at all if you'd done this so at the end of the day. I just love playing Golfer living and I'm sure there's going to be somewhere to play so the P. Gel sounds like a really cool idea. Do I think they've got a lot of hurdles overcome. Yeah I think they do so. Let's see what happens when you're coming down the stretch like the most recent week in Mexico and you get to a point where you've kind of realize that you're not GonNa win the Golf Tournament do does your mind turn to cash at any point but there was a moment where I was like okay. Shit I can't win this anymore. That really sucks. But it's still my job in the system my career and I do have a lot to play for. So let's go finish this out strong. You know so. Never goes the cash. When did that stop you? Take where did it with? It's never like that. I've been when you had five events left challenge toward. You're going home. You're thinking about what position I've gotTA finish. I'm not like hey baby. Here's another five guys. I've never functioned that way. It's never really motivated me to be honest so the successful players all say that you know some some guys. I remember polly's and you're saying like I wouldn't get that nervous going for a win but if it's between fourth and Fifth Place. I'd be more nervous because I'm choking for the cash. It's it's just a different different I would imagine a different thing. You're striving for absolutely Always had the amount of points on the Fedex Cup list in mind which translates to money in the end. But I certainly didn't play it for the money. What is the coolest your favorite or the coolest golf course? You've ever played. Wow first impressions. Of course it sends me was. Carnoustie was my first open. Championship was crazy was went there three or four weeks before the tournament to go prep and play and it was lush. Green rough was like knee height. I thought it was going to be like the time pull Ari one. And then I get to the event and it's gray and fairways concrete on hitting line literally three hundred yards so also backed the wall maybe Ballata. So we're going to say. Yeah so what I loved was bullshit. It's changed overnight and then again come back to how much I just enjoy. Llings golf It's so different. So Yeah Carnoustie what is? What's what's the anticipation like for your first Masters Pompton really. I don't know what I'm what I'm most excited for that. First he shot Thursday or playing. Amen Corner for the first time I was there in. Oh nine watching Monday Monday. Practice Round so. I've been there but I'm just yeah everything driving down Elaine. Look obviously a lot of. It's so hyped with his because of what it is but I'm just really excited. Joggers and masters what what's six hundred your favorite Masters Memory Curious as someone who both from South Africa and also grew up in the tiger generation. Yeah I didn't I. I was too young. I never played playing offers aid so in Tiger when I was seven Didn't really play in so he wanted ninety seven. Didn't really play back then but I remember watching film. Make that Putt to win. He's I won the reason I remember that Andrews because he beat Ernie wasn't your favorite of that Shawls wins gotta be my favorite They almost break down in tears when he won. I don't know why just because it was so cool for me again fellow-countrymen I was sitting in my now in-laws little then that they've got having a ham sandwich with my father norm in winning. Just so who's the guy that you would see problems? We let you go here soon. But who's a guy you would see on your pairing? You're paired with this guy and you get the most excited to go play with the most like hall cool. What a great pairing this week Tiger Tiger I was kind of England for like. Who are some of your buddies that you would like really enjoy with the most done for tally? Yeah we're good. We're good friends That'd be cool. I don't know goodness me. That's a tough one was. That was easy one. The next one is the tough one. Who would you get paired with that? You wouldn't want to play. Love wait until the end to make people after three three more questions about Saudi before they get your lab worthy tried. Then I say that for the end then I shut it off and then you tell me who the guy and then can go. Tell everyone. That's so I think we're good here. We're GonNa let you get out get out. We're going to get out of your house. I guess I should say but Thanks for letting US come down so congrats and all the success and looks hopefully got lock up the absolute thank you. So much cheers guys club club today better than most about in better than most expecting thing.

golfing Europe South Africa China Johannesburg Greens Mexico Alex Kazakhstan Africa baseball Africa braves Brad Faxon Mitchell Bob Puerto Rico Janice Burke Donald Borat Minnesota
Devorah Kur - DKWellness - Asking 'what now?' instead of 'why me?'

The Only Way Is Up

50:06 min | 1 year ago

Devorah Kur - DKWellness - Asking 'what now?' instead of 'why me?'

"I welcome to the all new ways. Podcast I'm Rebecca Passion each week. I'll be introducing you to amazing women who have moved to Israel from all over the world. They have started businesses nonprofits blogs wellness clinics. And so much more. I want to share with you. These inspirational stories of career changes surviving family. Life dating advice and personal development each episode will focus on a different subject matter to help you realize that ever had some hardships after emigrating but they have managed to overcome them to be successful and make positive changes to their lives. Whatever your life goes on they can become possible. Herren Israel Devora may Dalia Aliyah from Johannesburg South Africa. Eight years ago while she was in South Africa she ran a busy reflexologist practice from home. And she was also studying lager therapy when she made aliyah she ought to start her reflexologist From scratch unsubtle in her family to his ready. Life Harris has story welcome today to the only way is up and today we have Devora Kerr who is originally from South Africa. And she is with us today. Welcome thanks for Bacon. Hi Hi everyone so a little bit of background I as I said you are from South Africa so from Japan from Johannesburg. How long ago did you make Julia? And why did you make Aliyah? So am I made eight years ago just off doctrine forty and I think the seeds of any our planted in me when I was fifteen and a kind with a school program to Israel for three months and I went to Zionist Jewish day school. So obviously living in Israel in cool value and I always wanted to come explain why I just feel the connection to the people to the land to the religion. Lack of real are coming so I wanted to come for many years and M. My husband wasn't so keen to come. We had a beautiful and wonderful laugh in South Africa. Lots of friends Jewish community was said very strong and we were very happy and So it was increased security reasons that we were leaving South Africa address Mokanda Fan. Who's a chance everyone in the family to let Marjorie which was which was very very challenging? M I think even the time when we came we we have four daughters and m because of the their age. The age is between order. They mocked two years apart and because of the the school system he initially by grudge. Starting right we require integration. We will come to the children teenagers when we made the decision seconds now bat and even have that fell into place Was incredible. My husband had left his job and he was looking for a new job and I had a brother lived already in Rana and Tim. Listen you've been in a tense job for a long time. Just take a break. Go visit my brother and just got just have a break before you start finding something. So he came and meantime brothers sitting up to me to his friends and to my husband. He always told me that. To 'em living in Israel was knocked on his right. Aw that's what he used to say and it was just so hard for me. We had an agreement between the two of us. If I ever died he would remain neutral. That was the agreement and after two when he came to visit my brother. He makes me to say China and he could really seem self living here by died three he could raise himself living here and by four he was not really prepared to consider it and he sold some work pertain. Show he so that he could be socially happy them. In Rana Day was a lot of English. We already had family. Yeah and we had many friends from community beckoned Mizraki in Johannesburg who had already culture and so we knew a lot of people so that already was quite encouraging and then he came back and he'd say And the edges off. My children at the time were Matt Daughters. Were Seventeen fifteen thirteen contain and the seventeen year old. If we didn't leave then they are named in the fifteen-euro wouldn't have made the school system. So the seventeen year old we actually left behind in Johannesburg with my sister and she stayed with my sister and she completed her family in Europe has school in Southern Africa. And we came here with the fifteen year old thirteen rotate neurons. While how long after your husband came back. Did you make plans to make in two months? We were yeah I knew once he's right or had changed. I thought I'm not lose that momentum and I think that is also something about me am go with my heart to end so the details out lighter which was quite challenging because schools and culture and language and also things were challenging for the children when we came. It was incredibly incredibly hard. Did you move straight to Ranana? Yeah we move strikes in Anaheim at the time mom was also living in. Ranana and another brother was also living in yet beaming so we came to family and the head. Consta- used before. So am I leave behind? Massa Stan mccranie in South Africa in mccranie used to live with me periods. Well so that was so severely hard to To to leave behind and back to 'em was a big decision and like I said I was forty years old at the time and it wasn't masters Biegel big decision close at age thirty. I had a career change. Total career change son and this was something big for me as well. Yeah how was it settling with the kids? How did they settle into school and find that place hair towards to just nothing shoot of traumatic and for me? The second landed was lack not in those movies. They show that I'm thinking of Show Rich Red Squirrel thing opens the doors and fans acorn and the fact that music playing accurate arrived in haven. That's how I felt when I touched down in the ground. Theralac felt complete at just found. Black you know we left a beautiful materialistic laugh behind. Nfl black ahead exchange that for something that I couldn't put into woods of maintenance so on the one hand in this magnificent place but on the other hand match Children Suffering Salads. Really trying to help they meant was aim with the pain and they struggle going to was incredibly challenging. One thing. That was really good for me. And everybody benefited from and like I said I had changed compares when I was thirty into a healing proficient as a reflexologist and was studying nugget therapy. Which is the teachings of Dr Viktor? Frankl and his signature book is man's search for meaning. So what I used to find in South Africa was people would come to me with illnesses or infertility and say why can't they have a baby? A wider that to be sick and couldn't help and wanted to help people with their questions and they suffering and so into study lager therapy and the teacher at the University. Was this old. Afrikaner woman who had been Dr Frankel student it while the mice incredible and gift to be studying under this person lacks secondhand. You know I came rushing than Kanyosha and then so that what it felt like to learn with this with the teacher and off that completed the first course we'd did the the first level we decided to come to Israel a wind up to WHO and she's an Afrikaner woman and essay to her. Listen I'm I'm not condemn us to continue with the coast. Unfortunately I'm going to live overseas. So she said to me. Oh that's nice. Will you going to Suss it? I'm going to Israel so she said to me that's marvelous divorce. I live in Modine savvy. What says she saved. Ama- Jewish are converted because of Dr Franco and I live in the in the university me to teach the coast translator so she sees a minute. You land in Israel. You can join my private English english-speaking luggage therapy group in in and that was exactly what happened so I arrived here. I was taking macho man. Used to go once a week. Once every two weeks to 'em who group and it was even better than studying through the university course because it was really an intimate small group and it was incredible and as I was building my skills because the beautiful thing about logo therapy is it. It helps you ask different questions instead of asking me you start to ask. Watt now and while much children when really sufferings socially that was suffering with an the social paw the missing from hard that was struggling with the language that was struggling with the culture that was struggling with the lack of discipline end. Just some with just they were in agony. My children so I was able to be a support dame on the level of work. Now you know we have come in and we're GONNA do a base to see what we can do. So I found that that coast we even although it was a coast for me. It really was something which helped me save my family which which was just incredible and etching. Hebrews vape beautiful because the would lamma is why women also Lamma we stay like a victim but when we offer would Lima which is the same word but just save differently than we often wok wok now and that was something I managed to instill in my children and now eight years and even the eldest daughter thank God joined us had three children come through the army already and now if you asked any of them would you ever go back. The onset is technically not and oftentimes applegate phone calls from children to say thank you for bringing. It's just the hardest thing that ever did. But the based resolve. That could've had and I think I think what was really good with that. I kick myself strong. And fifthly our to be. Yes I knew I was GonNa make it work and I just was strong support for children and staffing thanked also helped as well. Yeah I'm sure. Did you have any idea what it would be like before you move to? Nah I don't know I just I just did not think past. The fact of my husband said yes. Let's garden. I gave to live in Israel. I just didn't think I didn't think practically I didn't think about my work I didn't think about anything at just followed my soul. That was united so we knew them schools. They could go to renew. They had cousins. Ya We knew regatta place was English. We need a community even way we would slept riding. We already knew the rabbi and we knew that socially we would be okay. We knew socially the kids would eventually be kind. We just didn't think about like Aruna a lot more bigger questions and with we just came so I don't know how hard it would be and the first time I went to the shots I wanted to make. My children allows us to make in South Africa us to make them a delicious and a Baton Act Pastor Sosa creamy the souls and winton apple ingredients and I came home and was pouring the milk and it was this thick smoke. That has a funny smell. And it was like Whoa. This is weird and it turned out to be review on at was an batum. Oke so m you have to learn all your products and you have no context. You have nothing you know an extra lesson teacher. No you need mattresses. You need a car you need to you need electricians you need someone to hang your paintings on the wall you just know nobody so you your whole list of and you'll foundation and what what you good at what you familiarity is just taken away from you and in the one incredible thing was. I whole lives. We lived at at least a six hour. Drive away from the sea and now we have a fifteen minute drive away from the sea so that was just the most incredible incredible benefit classes welfare. Labs the see. We wait on day trips. We heard it was snowing. My kids had never seen snow. We went after the hormone for the day. And we used to go on lots. We do lots of hacks hacks than we went to the see and we went to Mitzpe. Ramon we did. We made all of that and we start in Jerusalem we wing to Berry picking and all sorts of things which started creating new memories maintains fact also new memories which and which I wanted because I wanted the kids to keep laughing. Israel was important for me while it rejects was so hard I want to To start making you may marines and the place. Yeah for sure. What do you think was your biggest challenge? And how did you overcome it? A and say they were they were they were to three the first one. M. I didn't really focus on myself. I knew I was just so happy to be that at an even focus mind needs at all and kind of like after the first six months one day. I was just walking and thought to myself. I've lost my whole practice. Matt identity as a therapist and as a he land and someone who helps people. No one knows me is that actually. You can't bring your practice with you when you you make. You can't bring your plans with you sir. That was very hard for me was when I meet New People I would be. Thinking is a potential client is a potential friend. What is this and how meeting people so I think for me on a personal level. That was that was an quite haunt about losing man losing my career and I had to re both from scratch. That was that was challenging and the second thing was a much Integration that was just David starting to watch them suffering. That really suffered and they were teenagers. You not a hard time anyway. And they suffered the really really suffered. The language as suffered with a language lies suffered with just feeling stupid. You know children who had done well before when things were easy now. They will after stupid clocks. Couldn't understand anything that went making eight and I and when we hit relax foul six months. Will we have made one family who had made Alex three or four years before was similar? Age Children to our kids and we were acting Kids said you know the they children safe to match over. Something will happen. On one of the hockey it will just click for you and you'll be fine so as every hiring started writing around the ATHOL. Maybe this kind be paid that maybe this will be better and after six months was your Matsumoto's and our children. Our teenage children were clinging to ask them walking around with us on your mind. Smoot was just you know just disparately exiting for them and for for for me that the social aspect took so long and so we did whatever we could to get think to toews and extra lessons end the extra support and the schools were quite good and but it was very very hard very hard. Ill the school meetings were in Hebrew. And of course my Hebrew was also not actor scratch so had been produced is cool but I never learned conversation. Hebrews so I did do Pan Straightaway. Which our drake into anybody to do panel soon as your data because essentially laugh starts settling here. You'RE NOT GONNA make Tomfool plan so I think that was good a win for six to nine months adult pen and then after that. I do the medical open so at least amid a liberal. We can do my reflect solidly treatments in Hebrew and my lecturing. My counseling are not at a level that I can do in Hebrew but I am trying to incredible the terms and then now the challenge that we head was officer. And after I you. My husband's brother in South Africa was diagnosed with cancer and this was absolutely devastating for my husband and his brother evaded. They were very close and full year in hall. Who almost two years. My husband went backwards and forwards. Very often to be with him and am. I really wanted him to be able to have that time. Because it was approved my family here now and look have tune. These Predator part would be hard for me so he traveled the often it because of that he was unsettled. My husband was unsettled here from work perspective and That was also quite quite challenging then. My brother-in-law passed away which was very very sad and that was so that was that was very haunt as a family that was on because we had also thought will be out up and running in on our feet and working and earning and doing Beta. We thought it would be soon. But you can't. You can't nod so that was challenging. And then while I was building up mock practice added anything to earn money on the side. I actually even worked at night. Tom with twin babies. I would look off the twins at Tom Weather slipped. I would arrive at ten PM and stay till six. Am and at just like. I thought I will do anything to make this work. And I'll do anything to be able to provide for my children and so you not never thought I would do something like that but I I think in Israel do anything to make it work so I do think. Yfu Full couple of years at today while I was building up my my practice. What do you love about Israel? They so much energy alive that that when you go on a hack. 'cause I laughed hacking and there isn't a forest or a trail. Anyway you stake which is just night. Chan. They always monuments telling a story of battles that went on hand the history behind us in the soldiers who killed God forbid in these forests and there is such a strong name Orion and cavalry to and respect to those who have lost a laugh and in this country so I love that. I'm constantly walking in history. I absolutely love that. I love that You know we used to gone hunting Sunday. Forget we always used to sleep with us. All the could've eggs with the cushion meet at the Kosher Food and going on holiday. Allow that you just get in the car new guys. You're going to a super bowl game guide to bike day. Everything is everywhere and it's just so easy to be cautioned Jewish and laugh vet that Part of the festivities. It's not like Christmas. Was the big thing you know. I love that I'm part of the country part of the land and and Some of the things. I left the the spirituality of the place. It's just something in the aged just indescribable. It's true though a little bit about how did you get into reflexologist? How did you start that? I'm what made you want to start? Yeah so am. I had a very an thriving career in interior design incorporating tear designed for years and Then my father got sick. When I was twenty six he was stopped. Monster Kenza and not become a test with the role of the patient. How how we can make ourselves well. And the more I read the more soul that. Not Everything is reliant. On doctors in the elected we can do to be active participants in unhealing journey and After he died I wanted to explore it more and then eventually couldn't lack not listen to that in a voice that was cooling me into a healing career side. I picked reflects allergy and I have not stopped studying sensations. How is the thirty at the time? So if I said the last eighteen years I have seen studying so studying. So what what happened in the beginning was that patients would say to me why. I have a baby. Or why do I have to be sick? And like just your reflexologist allergy for you. Let me just make a woman's right to leave me a wig the side effects of your cancer treatments and but the why questions were reading hard for me. I wanted to help people you use. What was in laugh and when I started studying the luggage therapy it just helped me to take two different level. Helping people see now that this is a new lab. The are options. You don't have to just be Hendra. Laugh over two doctors you can be an active participant and it's make you strong from this late. See how you can grow because this is in your life now so I'll have to be like a Mugabe lacquer to accompany people junie said support them to being well and Sense and even what is beautiful at this country? As well which is just phenomenal is they? They want to integrate. They want you to 'em loon Hebrew. They help you. They want you to do well and even if you listen now that in your first tenures misread had he will pay four apps killing you and to a new degree or a new education. And just this pasta I used. Those benefits are willing to study 'em Semitic experience which is emotional. I I for trauma so now. I'm working with Ed as well and I will go with made to imagery everything to able to help people help themselves. And it's such a give life I think I had. I know someone who went to live in America She just Iraqi you know. Find your job find on integrate yourself to get money your bank account. Welcome you know. It's a magnificent and caring process of they invite as they welcome. Say they want us to succeed? And even Mattie which which. I used a lot in. The beginning is an open as to how William an added. Facebook courses added marketing courses at a time management causes all free of charge and found the to be analysis. A prisoner mental. All of this was provided for me to to help me succeed which really was a huge thing so I got into 'em reflex sergey in the kind of the same way like I got into come into Lebanon just decided. Yeah that sounds good. I'm doing it and And thank God. They've all been good decisions. And and actually it was through the hardship and difficulty of number one. Losing my father number two working with people going through the une hardships and they learning the skills to help them with US hardships. That could use that for myself and my family as well very successfully and to be able to help them and my kids actually tease me all the time. Because I'm always looking for meaning every way I'm always and we'll we'll watch a movie in our case he what's going on Jack how he won people down with mum country. Just watch the does everything have to be bad. Meaning does everything has have to have lager therapy and behind it and for me. I'm always looking for meaning like I believe we've come here to contribute something and to serve and to to make something of allies and so I'm always looking for from meaning and always even what struggles that we gave them earn or with my children or was Mac clients that I work with. It's about can see this as a stepping stone instead of a stumbling block and have can we find the tools and the strength within Youtube Apple to rise to the casual to deal with. What's going on because inequity Doesn't become a something that's GonNa make. You visited itchy comes to shows strength to even you head and that is something that allowed and another thing. I've I've started doing Ken. Israel I did a very very small scale in south. Africa started with them. Teaching of the healing energy of an each Jewish man and I used to teach women's classes at 'em row shortage time and yet they became dean at wiki program which I teach Montan to women and so he knew that I could even become a teach again. You know that an a huge privilege to to teach people. And how did you build your practice? Have very very slowly and through speaking to people through marketing through doing free treatments through 'em Advertising Facebook Latte very slowly tap people our meat end. Jim was gate bidder. Act A promoting yourself. You know not be shy because I'm more like a behind the scenes kind person once I know you. I'm happy to talk. Like United Gate will indeed yesterday but really unplanned shot so to lack lack I will put one woman with a digestive disorder and I helped her. She was only needed surgery. And through. Reflexologist imagery manage to help it to prevent the surgery. Says telling another friend of managed? Said I didn't know you do that so as need to start speaking about what I do. And then I started drafting articles and I think the biggest thing for me was Lakers game. Free lectures. We ever occurred so to all the name We saw an IMO and see I and an tell fade in order. These prices are I've been to every city in Israel and I've spoken it and through that than often people come to the often and become clients or patients so so that has been a that that has been how I have grown from that word of mouth and so and now they have taken more of a turn and more working with the the mind using a monster. How Paseo with the mental imagery for healing and the Semitic experience the emotional first aid. And I'm finding now it's kind of like a new partner before it was more reflexologist now. I'm moving more into the cancelling. Well so it's just an grinding business. Not Not easy when you know is Didn't start off as a businesswoman. Lack win out win to study reflexologist. We had to do two hundred hours of different people so ahead. People who kind Hussein became a practice and the difference as well but when I got Tampa at one knows me. I'm not practicing anymore. I'm very skilled at what I do. And where the people so? It was a big challenge and from bedside. What advice to give to someone who wants to go into the he'll angled reflexologist or just endeavour wants to work for themselves as a service person. What advice would you give to? Someone who's just made allow wants to change careers and so I think number one UCONN shine. You've got to speak about what you do write about what you do. Iraq photons of Israel arrived articles day. Anyway let me add as recently wrote an article for the Jerusalem. Post magazine which I'm very excited to the and hopefully I'm going to be having a monthly article with them so I think you've gotta get Athey you've gotta get there because people there are so many people who do what you do but there's any one of you who does it the way you do it ninety why people are going to hear violence if you speak a battle to Edu Ratu Bamut you lecture about it and for me. I think that was how the best way to grow by my client. Base was Getting out there and speaking about these things and actually another thing which which was fg -nificant for me in this country is a I think from from the time I turned forty and I had a real transition into having night Shah and so Israel of conduct APP for me of really escaping tonight to find myself and something else that often dot for me was. I used to always made a tight. In South Africa. I HAD DETENTION COURSES. But what was beautiful. Here is the have This is a an organization that belong monopoly to but they ran these silent retreats way you go. And there is a connection to 'em to you had to Judaism and meditation and just the most magnificent combination end gem often God and you go. You're handing your find your hand in older equipment. You catch yourself from the world and you just I'm you'd recommit yourself in. Virtual label found that that has been nurturing for me. I'm I'm very good at knowing and this is what I act at help. Women do is done white till you depleted. If you're not focused you can't force anyone else out so it's not women always said to be authentic selfish if I just took a walk on the beach adventures. Just wait for mass onto that. Took an all costs selfish about children too often? Dinner to cook end only million things as woman that we have to do. But the truth of the methods. If you do not for yourself up you can't give to others so I'm very good at filling myself up and it's actually my my meditation. Detention Teacher EMDENI Kerlin. And he says that M that. It's not selfish when you do these things. It's actually called self full. You are filling yourself up and down so I think another another thing that I do Walk the talk and I live my life. The WAY ACTRA encourage others to as well and at early in the morning in insomnia aca very early before it even gets hot guy. Six thirty seven o'clock truck ago to the beach. I go for a long walk acid on a rock on the hill clips in Herzliya Looking the see I made a tight and at prey on the beach onto yoga on the beach. Swim in the sea and I come home. Eighteen a drug. That are Use The beauty of working working for myself is are called into my day. Neutering AND PASTA. I know will make me work. Bid At be motivated more driven to help others. Because I'm feeling so you know so well myself so think it be barn looking at being in the healing field. That got to know that you have to take care of yourself as well and I think. I'm lucky that children are just h where they're not as needy mean. My baby finished school last year. And so at Am privileged of my last. Now we unlock my first priority. Which is such a gift. I'm yeah yeah. What is your definition of? Success is my definition of success. I feel that if you can go to beat at the end of every day and this is what I teach in in my class at Montana as well. That is a gift. An are you using it. Well and dim-sum definition of success is not wealth might definition is wealth of different CON Have used to tom well and had you have you served. The people around you who've come to sue. Have you contributed to the world around you? In a way that is gonNA leave this place in a Beta plaques that you found that for me that is an success. Who's we kind of Black Tortellini? Changed our last night. We live that kind of loss of materialism and success they But here we've talked to the lack swap debt for for something deep That according to put into words something magnificent in in having done that I feel. Our children are more real. Our relationships are more real. 'cause it's not stuff that makes things real. Oh Heck you successful at connection anger relationships and not whiting for? I wish I would've like adorn live my lack with regret. I tell people all the time. How special bow to me. And how much math is. Because they're in it. I'm not shy to to complement and help. People end both people and give them the tools to help themselves Need to become needy on me. You have it in you to be the success that you need to be done. I think that is success. When you're using the gift of life that you have been given to a full service. I think that is success. What are you most grateful for so match Matt Never Lands? Ma Is my mom. Beautiful has been end. Mom Wonderful children engine. I'm also grateful for the struggles and the challenges that I've had because they have made me into the person nine tonight. So I'm grateful. Growth Sam grateful for deepening relationships all the time and for learning new skills lack. I feel like I'm forty drag now and I'm just at the moment the start but I'm a knowing Nia lewd everything. I've come to learn sir. I'm grateful for the opportunity to be healthy to be able to guide of these things. All of these new and these new techniques of helping people help themselves and not in south on a deeper level and Young to to use imagery and to battle to help heal ourselves and I think it's big gripe. Full the tools and skills that I'm learning to help myself my family and people around me if you learn about yourself thousands moving here and wow I think Laughing South Africa especially in the the older doctors community that we used to live in. Was the box uterus. The suit way you left to search to Lang did certain things and when you got I got into. Israel was that they honor rules. You do what what works and Wealth. Something one of the things that have opened up beautifully for me was finding a community where that embraces women holding on dancing with the Toronto will within Halachic parameters are even learned to 'em Line from the mega lab for Mikey Latte stare. And that was a beautiful thing that they might not have been exposed to before and one of the things I think through journey of growing and developing and learning myself. I think the greatest thing I have is that we done on people that Tim everybody has to find the on pause and the Prophet you. Choose for yourself The profit or children will choose for they've cells and everybody has the opportunity and it's task to nurture those around us to to become vamping to become not to become who we were laughing to be. That has been my greatest learning. I think in the last three to four years I think since have been exposed to working with imagery and county Patou healing on an even deeper level on a city level on a mental level. Amusing imagery amd M emotional. I think these are on concepts. Have come to in which which have finally enough as started doing that. Mom relationships with children depend and I feel it. Is the hugest privilege math to just to be Amanda a flock? 'em Up numbing like everyone. Is I think the biggest lesson. Italy's unconditional love because people can do things that you wouldn't have chosen or you didn't want and you're not so happy about and Can you still shop last anyway? Because they and they journey. They can't to what you did because that would be or laugh. And we can't impose ourselves on other people so I think this has been huge learning for me which I think living in Israel and these opportunities have opened apple. Meet taking me out of the box of half things will in. South Africa people here that judge to. He's not covered this metro the sleep knowing really case. I think Able to go a lot more spiritual as a person and really respect myself in the process. Age does around. It's true so for the two final questions. I'm sure you often thought in the times of the hardships and the challenges about maybe returning back to South Africa or maybe you did but I was wondering if you ever feel that way and also have you ever wondered what life would have been like if you'd never made Aaliyah and how you power life would have continued okay so when we left South Africa we saw. We saw that. Because we saw everything and we moved and Buzz in-and-out it's my husband. We decided like we're not going back like financially just wouldn't been viable and to 'em. I remember ago contacting me. Who had been at school at? She met any other similar. Tom As me she will be six months and she said to me on the fun. How long have you given it an before you decide? You'll go back or not and I said to her. We didn't even give it one day because none option guy big and I think that was part of our Mansi because I think if you come here with one foot out the door he went. When could it's hard? I'm telling you with haunt I used to work at night with babies other people's babies actual crying at home with the struggles. It's hard in the beginning. It's hard and if you jeanette with one foot at the door you might not be able to make sign of US was neighboring option. We can and we're GONNA make it a success and that was our family motto and I'm telling you the times we wanna much to begs even and it was haunt the ass really hard but when you are strong with your decision this is what we want. And we're GONNA make a draft and we've taken this Johnson we're buzzing our forties. When became you know that's really scary? Time to 'em to comment to start a gain and to use up WANNA savings Says very scary and better think foster was no option of guy back and thank God. We didn't have to make that decision. And one of the things that I learned with my teacher and Dr J. Jail Epstein who? I studied a main to imagery with in in New York and studied on with it yet through Israel which is also an incredible. And is that you. There's no such thing as future talk because when you ask what if questions what what what is the point event I know when I go back to South Africa and see my friends from before the last other love and nothing has changed just this and this and this and this and more of that than see 'em how privileged. I am that I've been able to grow out of that and Groti Pad Deepak. Most virtual room meaningful. It's not about the staff at Bat. The relationships so am for me. It's not about. Oh so what would have been more holidays and more entertainment and more more clouds and mortuary acts. That's not what I was looking for enough. And that is something that we have a M- maybe sacrificed on. But it's actually not what's important in that said the what if game Because it's almost like I don't know it's kind of black Latino fine. It's quite dangerous because was really good inside Africa but if I you know I did not want much to go to university. They and I'm worried about the country From a safety perspective from a political perspective an interesting thank God we not stay united. We made the move was really hard became with teenagers But it's done and thank God bless ass level based thing we invited. My daughter was right now. She was a magic off for program am school children who came from South Africa on Banak and so while she never got to do with the she's doing it yet after she is now she's in her twenties. She's finished the army She she was imagine cafo program and she just kept calling me saying you know. Thank God onto like these kids because my life is so much deeper and more more meaning than just the staff you have in the drugs you way around You know they think they something you've given us battering to is Ron. Thank you you know. Like who would have thought she was the one who to beg for the final question. Build a city from scratch. What would be the first thing you put in the city the first lawyer pass and the people you'd bring with you well for me because I leaving a thirty year and I would have more forests and to escape to forests and so I think Mu Green marine size is is really good and then I think important who would bring with just real people am people who are on the spiritual journeys and to 'em people came at the environment. I think this is a family has transitioned into recycling. We've gone green than we try. Not Use foil dishes disposables. We've really UNITECH next to one of my daughters has been very influential in the family because green. And you're not people who on this planet Elect to be around people who done throw letter on the ground care for the Environment Day. That and I'm not sure about the law. Okay well this is your time for everyone to find you. Telephone everyone your social media. Lanes website anywhere. Anything you WANNA eleven anx Rebecca so my website is www dot de que wellness dot co Dot L. and decays my initials double worker and I'm on facebook. Md K. wellbeing on facebook and Youtube. Channel people can just search my name and Lincoln. They can find me. They divorced at is D. E. V. O. R. A. H. and Soon Kirk K. You are sons as the pledge and that's been really exciting speaking in and even as a task feel such a privilege to live in this country end and honestly I can say when asked in Riley flag flying high at still feel the privilege accompanied Levian accompanied. This happened in my laugh lack. I still feel some excited. ages in sorry. Emma Hook that they were always stay strong That feeling and being able to help people on the journeys to get through the struggles difficulties in the challenges for me. That's a real pretty China to do it. Well I'm sure you will thank you so much map pleasure. Thank you for listening to the only ways up podcast and thank you again to my guest today. I would love to hear from you my listeners. What inspired you from this episode. What did you like? And what would you like to hear more about? You can tweet us at only way is up part. You can comment on of the post on instagram. Page only weighs up podcast or you can send us an email to only weighs up podcast. Go Dot Com. Your feedback is really important. Please if you haven't done so already. And it should only take a minute rate review and subscribe on Apple podcasts. This will help to continue. The success can bring you more content if you'd love the episode today. Why Not Sheraton instagram stories? You can take picture tag. A friend and we can increase the amount of listeners. Thank you again remember. The only way is up.

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